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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abduction  (Read 53485 times)
jjflash
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #60 on: Jul 11th, 2013, 12:46pm »

on Jul 10th, 2013, 3:32pm, Mythos wrote:
Anyone recall seeing that commercial that says "If you read it on the internet - then it MUST be true?'

http://www.ufotrail.blogspot.com/2013/07/motivated-reasoning-and-research-of.html

Well once again we have a Blogger bad mouthing David Jacobs and expressing his OPINON about what he considers scientific methods and ethics in UFO research.

Well if it is on the internet, it must be the truth right?


Mythos, are you suggesting there was something untrue in the post you linked? If so, would you please clarify exactly what you perceive that might be? Please be specific.
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #61 on: Jul 11th, 2013, 12:50pm »

My intention was to critically explore research of alleged alien abduction. That included focusing upon researchers and organizations that claim to be conducting scientific investigation, yet clearly are not, as defined by both dictionaries and the scientific method.

An inherent problem to such circumstances is that researchers and organizations that misrepresent the scientific merit of their products and services, in doing so, exploit uninformed and uneducated individuals. Consequences include accepting misleading and unsubstantiated conclusions that were formed under false and misrepresented circumstances in the first place.
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #62 on: Jul 11th, 2013, 3:12pm »

on Jul 11th, 2013, 12:46pm, jjflash wrote:
Mythos, are you suggesting there was something untrue in the post you linked? If so, would you please clarify exactly what you perceive that might be? Please be specific.


To be very specific, your blog is neither true nor untrue, it is your opinions...!

The same way that the writers you attack, are voicing their opinions (in their books).

Of course you have the right to put down and attempt to discredit anyone you want and that is one of the main problems with the UFO culture...

I have nothing against you as a person, you seem well connected and well spoken, but I refuse to sit by and allow attacks on researchers that I respect (especially when they are not here to defend themselves).

I would love to hear about any actual UFO research you have done, including speaking with contactees..
« Last Edit: Jul 11th, 2013, 3:14pm by Mythos » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #63 on: Jul 11th, 2013, 6:16pm »

on Jul 11th, 2013, 3:12pm, Mythos wrote:
To be very specific, your blog is neither true nor untrue, it is your opinions...!

The same way that the writers you attack, are voicing their opinions (in their books).


I disagree on several counts. For example, when individuals publish their work in books and present their perspectives at events such as a symposium, they should fully expect their findings and methodology to be discussed and reviewed.

I am not attacking anyone, but offering reasonable reviews and perspectives on the relevant related issues. I invite consideration that I scrutinize and criticize the actions of a person, not the person. Public figures expect such scrutiny.

Also, I am particularly attempting here to address the false representation of scientific research. It is relevant that not only do such researchers as Jacobs and Greer commit such false claims, but members of the UFO community often make excuses for the behavior. That should be considered important to people sincerely interested in actuality from any number of points of view.
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #64 on: Jul 23rd, 2013, 9:21pm »



"Although some claim human-alien genetic hybrids are among us now and pose a threat to humankind, the details of construction of these entities are vague. Examining two simple cases of gene transmission dynamics suggest hybrids face some inherent challenges."
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #65 on: Aug 7th, 2013, 9:05pm »

Gary Hart on the Carpenter Affair

The UFO Trail

August 7, 2013

Long time UFO investigator Gary Hart commented tonight at The UFO Trail on the infamous Carpenter Affair. The series of events involved the betrayal of some 140 individuals who sought the support and services of John Carpenter and the Mutual UFO Network during the 1990's. The 140, including Leah Haley, underwent regressive hypnosis facilitated by Carpenter, a former MUFON director of abduction research. It was later learned Carpenter received some $14,000 in funding from Robert Bigelow in exchange for ongoing activities and providing him and his associates, which included Colonel John Alexander, with the case files of the 140. This was done entirely without the knowledge or consent of the 140 individuals. Much more about the Carpenter Affair can be read in the previous posts on the Leah Haley case, including The Leah Haley Case: John Carpenter, where Mr. Hart left the following comments:

Jack, as one of the principle reporters of the Carpenter Affair I found your posts quite interesting, especially in regards to what Mr. Carpenter had to say about everything. Perhaps I can clear up some few points that Mr. Carpenter chooses to repeatedly ignore or twist to a brighter point of view:

1) Mr. Carpenter originally wrote the section on handling abductee cases in the then current edition of the MUFON Field Investigator's Manual where he includes a sample form for the abductee to be presented with and sign if they wish to give a researcher permission to use their case material publicly. Mr. Carpenter, in a private communication, admitted that he had never had any of the abductees he worked with sign this or any other form of consent to sell or otherwise distribute their hypnosis files and that no researcher he knew followed his own suggested procedure.

Some files such as Leah Haley's would have been instantly identifiable even if Carpenter sold them without providing Mr. Bigelow with the identity of the person associated with each file. As I found out and was provided evidence of, Mr. Carpenter provided Mr. Bigelow with a name/case key list and even though every abductee I spoke with said that Carpenter promised he WOULD revisit them for their explicit permission to release any of their file materials if necessary yet he never did.

2) I brought the Carpenter case to public attention only after many of the abductees asked me to do so understanding that at that time he planned to write a book about them and was ALREADY selling a video for his personal profit that showed clips from some of their private hypnosis sessions with his professional credentials prominently listed on the videotape's cover.

3) Carpenter claimed, in a legal statement through his lawyer, that he did his hypnosis sessions as an amateur and thus could not be held to professional ethical standards - a point also made to me directly by then head of MUFON Walt Andrus. In fact, several of Carpenter's cases were referrals from other medical doctors. LCSW, by the way, is a professional designation - MO state Licensed Clinical Social Worker. MSW says that he has a masters in social work. All abductees I spoke with were shown only Carpenter's professional business card with these important licensing initials, not MUFON's more ordinary Investigator's ID card so he was promoting himself as a true health care professional.

4) Carpenter got to a point in the mid 90's where he double billed abductees: he asked them for personal payment for their hypnosis sessions and billed their insurance and there is proof of this.

5) Finally, as a result of my filing a complaint against Carpenter's professional license because of his unethical handling of abductee cases, he was put on 5 years probation by the State of Missouri and there is online proof of this also so the state did agree with the case we collectively presented to their investigative board.

MUFON still throws out the "we want to stop the backbiting and infighting in Ufology" line as if there never has been a legitimate legal issue with how MUFON board members and representatives (as John was as their then Director of Abduction Research). This was the case MUFON still would like to forget. This is the case that caused MUFON's Board in 2001 to vote and throw out the "member" designation so that from then on persons affiliated with MUFON would be "subscribers" only and have no voting rights as to how the organization does business.

Just to set things straight,

Gary Hart
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #66 on: Aug 8th, 2013, 12:36am »

While I am the first to admit that I know absolutely nothing of Gary Hart or the Carpenter Affair, I wanted to add a few comments.

While it is a shame that 140 (supposed) Abductees were victimized in this manner, it should not take away from the fact that 140 people claimed they were abducted and it would be interesting to hear/see/read their accounts..

As for #4 "Double Billing", every insurance I have ever had - had partial or co-payments by the patient, as I said, I don't know about this case, but unless the Insurance is paying 100% then doctors (or wanna-be doctors in this case) are allowed to bill the patient directly for what is not covered by the insurance.

If he was in fact Double-Billing, that is; charging the Insurance Company as well as the Patient BOTH 100% of his fees, I would assume that would be breaking some type of law and then he could (and should) be arrested..

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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #67 on: Aug 10th, 2013, 2:13pm »

My personal UFO interests took a turn in recent years to the manners that experiencers frequently seem at risk of mistreatment and exploitation by the UFO community. It appears a given that whatever truly interesting phenomena might actually lie at the heart of ufology, it is often misrepresented and exploited for use by many people with many agendas. Such people include at least some of the self-described investigators who employ hypnosis as a primary investigative tool. My interests in such subject matter led me to the Carpenter Affair.

I subsequently invested resources in conducting research and interviewing certain individuals, among other activities. I concluded that the Carpenter Affair was indeed a significant series of events for a variety of reasons. A great deal about it and its players may be found on my blog, The UFO Trail, and particularly within the posts related to the Leah Haley case.

I choose to invest my resources in such projects because I think properly educating the UFO community about what has taken place will assist it in learning how to abstain from repeating its mistakes. I think that would be helpful to the experiencers, helpful in reducing their risk of exploitation and helpful in increasing the accuracy of information circulated.
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #68 on: Aug 10th, 2013, 5:29pm »

There is nothing wrong with challenging one another's opinions and claims. In the hard sciences, that is done all the time. My son is a professor of physics who is conducting research in condensed matter. He has frequently said that most physics conventions/symposiums are chock full of arguments, confrontations, and challenges. (And THESE folks even have data backing them up!)

That being said, I find Billy Cox's latest blog entry very interesting. It is actually a slightly tongue-in-cheek comparison of ufology to some of the recent conversations regarding legalizing marijuana. However, he makes a valid point.

Swamp


We've had enough of Nixon

By Billy Cox, Herald-Tribune
Friday, August 9, 2013

Does anyone else see the parallels between the emerging momentum on marijuana and the cognitive dissonance on UFOs? Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s condemnation of Uncle Sam’s marijuana policy yesterday really brings it into focus. Finally — finally — somebody is applying science to ignorance. And it sure as hell isn’t coming from the people we elect as leaders.

Forty years after Richard Nixon proclaimed his “war on drugs,” with marijuana as Public Enemy No. 1, the catastrophic results are crushing us, economically and ethically. According to a recent FBI report, police made a marijuana arrest in this country once every 42 seconds in 2011. Today, we lead the entire world in inmate populations, at a cost that could fund NASA’s budget more than three times over. De Void waited in vain during the 2012 election cycle for this malignant policy blight to gain some traction during the primary and general-election debates. Nothing doing, of course, not with the fait accompli of Washington-insider hacks like Bob Schieffer and George Stephanopolous sticking to stale talking points and ignoring the 800-pound gorilla.

In 2006, two years before Barack Obama’s “hope and change” campaign, the Senator admitted “I inhaled frequently — that was the point,” so one couldn’t be blamed for thinking the future prez was serious about dismantling the business-as-usual crap. Among other things, Gupta was on Obama’s short list for Surgeon General during the first administration. But, like everyone who assumes residency in the White House, Obama went on to revert to type, and his AG started cracking down on medical marijuana dispensaries.

Then a funny thing happened nine months ago, when taxpayers in Oregon and Colorado said screw the federal laws and voted to legalize pot altogether. And on Thursday at CNN, Gupta did something he never could’ve accomplished in the White House. He admitted that “we have been terribly and systematically misled for nearly 70 years in the United States” about marijuana. This is huge.

Gupta will share more details of his research Sunday night at 8 p.m. with a CNN special called “Weed,” which will presumably address the fallacies of pot's Schedule I classification which have created monstrous numbers of fake criminals. What really grabbed De Void’s attention was how the Emmy-winning neurosurgeon revisited the roots of that error in 1970, when Assistant Secretary of Health Roger Egeberg advised categorizing pot with heroin.

As Gupta points out, Egeberg advocated branding weed with felony status “until the completion of studies now underway to resolve the issue” when, in fact, Nixon’s spear carrier was already sitting on 20 years worth of research indicating pot was less addictive than tobacco and had none of the harsh and potentially lethal withdrawal properties associated with other drugs like alcohol. “I calculated about 6 percent of the current U.S. marijuana studies investigate the benefits of marijuana,” Gupta added. “The rest are designed to investigate harm. That imbalance paints a highly distorted picture.”

Washington will likely remain tone-deaf to the growing body of research exonerating pot from the “Reefer Madness” clown show, but science, common sense, and public opinion are rapidly outflanking those calcified Beltway suits. They’ll be the last to join an intelligent conversation on a policy that remains, at best, inhumane.

Similarly, our official discourse on UFOs remains logjammed by another Nixon-era decree, when the U.S. Air Force and its analogue technology closed the books on further study of bizarre phenomena that continue to ply our skies. The long sad history of that doomed and tortured “study,” known as Project Blue Book, is thoroughly detailed in Michael Swords’ and Robert Powell’s UFOs and Government: A Historical Inquiry.

Gupta was surprised to learn about legitimate studies itemizing the medicinal uses of marijuana. Likewise, scientific scrutiny of UFOs continues, in the private sector, and abroad and, as with pot, growing evidence demands a formal re-evaluation of the issue. But the contemporary cultural environment for UFOs is about where pot was 20 years ago, when Bill Clinton could admit only that he’d tried it “a time or two” but never inhaled and didn’t like it.

Which made no sense whatsoever. Which made Obama look refreshing. At least for awhile.

One would hope Sanjay Gupta’s reporting will be the beginning of the end of our cruel and insanely disconnected laws on marijuana. There are well-placed and impeccably credentialed scientists who’ve done their homework on UFOs as well. We need them to step up, too.

We can document the extent of the damage our marijuana policies have inflicted upon this country. Calculating the cost of four decades of institutional denial surrounding the enduring mystery of UFOs may be impossible. But like marijuana, wishing it away isn’t working. Confronting it honestly, with a bit of integrity, could pay off in ways we haven't begun to imagine.

http://devoid.blogs.heraldtribune.com/13924/weve-had-enough-of-nixon/
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #69 on: Sep 6th, 2013, 3:15pm »

You're Getting Sleepy... and Misled: Regression Hypnosis in Ufology

The UFO Trail

September 6, 2013

Regression hypnosis has long been used during investigation of alleged alien abduction. Some have made up their minds that the activity provides reasonable evidence. For them, there is no amount of expert opinion or scientific research contradicting their belief that can motivate sincere review of the circumstances. Even the words of warning from former hypnosis subjects, lengthily explaining firsthand how its ill effects and misuses can be harmful, fail to inspire objective evaluation of the use of hypnosis as a mythical truth serum.

Much has been learned of memory functions, potential dangers of regression hypnosis and related issues since researchers first began hypnotizing self-described experiencers in hopes of uncovering hidden memories. However, many investigators continue subscribing to the now decades old concepts while the professional research community has long since updated its understandings. If you are sincerely interested in reviewing facts surrounding regression hypnosis, including taking into consideration some opinions of qualified experts and documentation of relevant circumstances, please continue reading.

British UFO Research Association

The fact of the matter is the professional research community has never established hypnosis as an effective investigative tool or a reliable memory retrieval technique. The American Psychotherapy and Medical Hypnosis Association released statements clarifying its members should not inaccurately represent the stance of the American Medical Association on such matters.

"The American Medical Association (AMA) is concerned that many individuals using hypnosis may be making the inaccurate statement that hypnosis is approved by the AMA as a legitimate therapy for medical or psychological purposes," the APMHA explained. "The AMA has a current position that this statement is inaccurate."

The AMA clearly does not recognize or define hypnosis as approved for use for medical or psychological purposes. That would of course include subjecting traumatized individuals to the exploration of the possibility they are regularly abused by perpetrators from other planets, to say the least.

It should be further understood that significant portions of the UFO community itself came to accept and agree with policies as established by the AMA. The British UFO Research Association (BUFORA) enacted a moratorium in 1988 on the use of hypnosis, and the policy continues to remain in place.

Full article:

http://ufotrail.blogspot.com/2013/09/youre-getting-sleepy-and-misled.html
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #70 on: Sep 16th, 2013, 12:58pm »

Dear JJflash,be careful what you wish for,we had all best be careful,hypnosis is the only thing we have left.True it should be in the hands of both a willing hypnotist and one with the right frame of mind.Imagine going to a hypnotist thats never heard of alien abductions or worse having heard of alien abduction and come to the conclusion that its all just nonsense. So he resorts to what hes been taught.We had the right man in John Mack.
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #71 on: Sep 17th, 2013, 11:00am »

The vast majority of abduction cases rest solely on the testimony of the victim or experiencer as you will.
The closest we have to confirmation is the few cases where there was more than one abducted and more than one is willing to discuss what happened.
Digging deeper into the mind of a single wittness will get nothing usable. The best you will get is more of a story you already know. If the story is a physical event you will get those memories that a person has from any traumatic event be it a car crash or a mugging. You will get a few more flashes of details that stood out.
If the story is a hoax or a mental illusion you may get more details as the mind has a chance to fill in the blanks, but if the subject wants to hold back they can, and that will leave you with nothing more.
In the Hill Case both displayed symptoms we now identify as PTSD following their experience. This shared physical result supports a shared experience. A mental illusion may effect the victim but not an other. This case is a classic example of a strong case for a physical event.
This is one of a very few cases where the hypnotist entered the case with few preconcieved goals and the testimony of both subjects fit together almost perfectly.
However very few cases since were handled the same way as hypnotizing people to look for hidden memories of various things became a cottage industry shortly thereafter.
To spend researchers time and money on cases that have no supporting evidence of any kind is a waste.
Hypnosis to recover memories is a scientificly proven failure. It should be abandoned except for those few cases like the Hills where other extraordinary proof exists that the subjects did have a traumatic experience, and the subjects truly WANT to know what happened. And then a team of researchers should watch and monitor every step to insure against contamination of the sessions and to guard against possible damage to the subjects mental health.
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #72 on: Sep 17th, 2013, 12:33pm »

HEY SKIZICKS,

EXCELLENT POST TEMPERED WITH KEEN INSIGHTS...
I GUESS THE PROTOCOL TO CHOOSE/ASSESS THOSE OF THE HILL'S EXPERIENCE SHOULD BE NECESSITATED...IMHO...

SHALOM...ZETAR
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #73 on: Sep 17th, 2013, 10:08pm »

Agreed, Z. That was a great post from the old man. He still has it. grin

Flat
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xx Re: Critical Analysis of Research of Alien Abducti
« Reply #74 on: Sep 21st, 2013, 1:06pm »

on Jul 9th, 2013, 6:10pm, jjflash wrote:
Motivated Reasoning and Research of Alleged Alien Abduction

The UFO Trail

July 9, 2013

Science and political journalist Chris Mooney wrote an article, The Science of Why We Don't Believe Science. It was published in the May/June 2011 issue of Mother Jones.

Mr. Mooney explored a 1950's era case study undertaken by renowned Stanford psychologist Leon Festinger. The study focused upon the activities of the Seekers, a Chicago-based group whose members were convinced they were interacting with aliens...


More related, relevant and, in my opinion, interesting material:


Scientists’ depressing new discovery about the brain

Forget the dream that education, scientific evidence or reason can help people make good decisions

September 17, 2013

Salon

This article originally appeared on Alternet.

Yale law school professor Dan Kahan’s new research paper is called “Motivated Numeracy and Enlightened Self-Government,” but for me a better title is the headline on science writer Chris Mooney’s piece about it in Grist: “Science Confirms: Politics Wrecks Your Ability to Do Math.”

Kahan conducted some ingenious experiments about the impact of political passion on people’s ability to think clearly. His conclusion, in Mooney’s words: partisanship “can even undermine our very basic reasoning skills…. [People] who are otherwise very good at math may totally flunk a problem that they would otherwise probably be able to solve, simply because giving the right answer goes against their political beliefs.”

In other words, say goodnight to the dream that education, journalism, scientific evidence, media literacy or reason can provide the tools and information that people need in order to make good decisions. It turns out that in the public realm, a lack of information isn’t the real problem. The hurdle is how our minds work, no matter how smart we think we are. We want to believe we’re rational, but reason turns out to be the ex post facto way we rationalize what our emotions already want to believe.

For years my go-to source for downer studies of how our hard-wiring makes democracy hopeless has been Brendan Nyhan, an assistant professor of government at Dartmouth.

Nyan and his collaborators have been running experiments trying to answer this terrifying question about American voters: Do facts matter?

The answer, basically, is no. When people are misinformed, giving them facts to correct those errors only makes them cling to their beliefs more tenaciously.

Here’s some of what Nyhan found:

- People who thought WMDs were found in Iraq believed that misinformation even more strongly when they were shown a news story correcting it.

- People who thought George W. Bush banned all stem cell research kept thinking he did that even after they were shown an article saying that only some federally funded stem cell work was stopped.

- People who said the economy was the most important issue to them, and who disapproved of Obama’s economic record, were shown a graph of nonfarm employment over the prior year – a rising line, adding about a million jobs. They were asked whether the number of people with jobs had gone up, down or stayed about the same. Many, looking straight at the graph, said down.

- But if, before they were shown the graph, they were asked to write a few sentences about an experience that made them feel good about themselves, a significant number of them changed their minds about the economy. If you spend a few minutes affirming your self-worth, you’re more likely to say that the number of jobs increased.

In Kahan’s experiment, some people were asked to interpret a table of numbers about whether a skin cream reduced rashes, and some people were asked to interpret a different table – containing the same numbers – about whether a law banning private citizens from carrying concealed handguns reduced crime. Kahan found that when the numbers in the table conflicted with people’s positions on gun control, they couldn’t do the math right, though they could when the subject was skin cream. The bleakest finding was that the more advanced that people’s math skills were, the more likely it was that their political views, whether liberal or conservative, made them less able to solve the math problem.

I hate what this implies – not only about gun control, but also about other contentious issues, like climate change. I’m not completely ready to give up on the idea that disputes over facts can be resolved by evidence, but you have to admit that things aren’t looking so good for a reason. I keep hoping that one more photo of an iceberg the size of Manhattan calving off of Greenland, one more stretch of record-breaking heat and drought and fires, one more graph of how atmospheric carbon dioxide has risen in the past century, will do the trick. But what these studies of how our minds work suggest is that the political judgments we’ve already made are impervious to facts that contradict us.

Maybe climate change denial isn’t the right term; it implies a psychological disorder. Denial is business-as-usual for our brains. More and better facts don’t turn low-information voters into well-equipped citizens. It just makes them more committed to their misperceptions. In the entire history of the universe, no Fox News viewers ever changed their minds because some new data upended their thinking. When there’s a conflict between partisan beliefs and plain evidence, it’s the beliefs that win. The power of emotion over reason isn’t a bug in our human operating systems, it’s a feature.
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