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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: How Trump will affect climate change  (Read 5885 times)
Erno86
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #120 on: Jan 25th, 2017, 3:29pm »

on Jan 24th, 2017, 5:28pm, INT21 wrote:
Am I correct in saying that the guy who is to tun the EPA was in favour of shutting it down ?

As for the rejuvenated coal industry.

A number of years ago Sweden was suffering badly from deforestation due to acid rain. The acid rain was caused by UK coal fired power stations emitting Sulphur into the atmosphere.

The cost of fitting 'scrubbers' into the exhaust stack is horrendous.

As the wind isn't too choosy where it blows the pollution (Canada ?) I wonder if this has been taken into consideration.

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Hal - It was former Texas governor Rick Perry --- Trump's pick for Energy Secretary for DOE--- He once vowed to kill the Department of Energy.

http://www.politico.com/story/2016/12/trump-picks-perry-for-energy-secretary-232565
« Last Edit: Jan 25th, 2017, 3:38pm by Erno86 » User IP Logged

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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #121 on: Jan 29th, 2017, 9:07pm »

Oh, U. S. of A. what has happened to you?!

Nordic countries are bringing about an energy transition worth copying

Date: January 27, 2017
Source: University of Sussex

What can we learn from the Nordic low-carbon energy transition given the new US leadership vacuum on climate change? A new study by Professor Benjamin Sovacool at the University of Sussex offers some important lessons.


The Trump administration's "First energy plan" criticises the "burdensome" regulations on the energy industry and aims to eliminate "harmful and unnecessary policies such as the Climate Action Plan" which was introduced by President Barack Obama. It has also deleted all mentions of climate change and global warming from the White House website.

Given the American leadership vacuum on energy and climate change, national and local planners looking to bring about energy transitions will need to look elsewhere. Five Nordic countries -- Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden -- could hold answers for how to make the transition to a more energy efficient society generating energy through renewables. About 83% of electricity generation in Nordic countries is low-carbon, of which 63% comes entirely from renewable sources. The Nordic countries are also facilitating other low-carbon transitions across other sectors including heat, buildings, industry, and transport.

A new study outlines broad lessons for how this transition could be replicated elsewhere.

The energy transition pays for itself (if you factor in the costs of air pollution)

The total estimated cost of the Nordic energy transition is roughly $357 billion more than business as usual, which comes to a total of less than 1 percent of cumulative GDP between now and 2050. Almost all of these costs will be offset by fuel savings. Even the external costs associated with the health impacts of air pollution alone in the Nordic countries (about $9 to $14 billion annually) are roughly equal to the additional investment needed to achieve a carbon neutral scenario.

Trade and interconnection with other countries are key for reaching energy targets

Trade and interconnection with Europe are instrumental to the Nordic countries reaching their carbon and energy targets. Nordic electricity trade must expand considerably -- underscoring the need for paralleled, coordinated grid development and interconnections with Great Britain, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia. "It's as much a regional governance or European challenge as it is a national priority for individual Nordic states," says Sovacool, a Professor of Energy Policy at the University of Sussex's Science Policy Research Unit and Director of the Centre on Innovation and Energy Demand.

Cities and municipalities take the lead


Cities and municipalities, or 'subnational actors' have taken the lead as key actors driving electricity and heat, energy efficiency, transport and the industry sectors to decarbonise, especially given that urbanization rates across the Nordic region are expected to occur at double the rate of previous decades. It is cities that will need to invest in new buildings, sponsor retrofits, erect electric vehicle charging infrastructure, and optimize heat networks.

Energy transitions take generations

Even for the Nordic countries, which are relatively wealthy, small, and committed, the transition will take at least three to four more decades. Its success rests upon a number of compelling technological contingencies or breakthroughs, each of which will take time. A few such breakthroughs include a continued phase out of nuclear power; a rapid ramping up of onshore and offshore wind energy; a spectacular diffusion of electric vehicles; a massive increase in bioenergy production; and the commercialization of industrial scale carbon capture and storage. On top of this, households and consumers must learn to adopt better energy management systems and industrial planners must come to install newer cement kilns, electric arc furnaces, and feedstock switching for chemicals, petrochemicals, and paper and pulping.

Transitions are contingent on other factors, contested and potentially unjust


For all of its promise, the Nordic transition is contingent upon and unique to its own sociotechnical environment. All the Nordic countries are endowed with plentiful fossil fuels that they can export to generate revenue that they funnel back into domestic decarbonisation process, coupled with a history of strong energy and climate planning and high fuel and electricity prices.

While the Nordic low-carbon transition has generally been successful and has benefited most within its society, the paper also identifies losers in the transition, including those set to lose their jobs as fossil fuels are displaced. Other potential obstacles to be overcome are a lack of understanding among some citizens about energy and climate topics, and the outsourcing of embodied carbon emissions overseas.

Read Contestation, contingency, and justice in the Nordic low-carbon energy transition.
________________________________________
Story Source:
Materials provided by University of Sussex. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
________________________________________
Journal Reference:
1. Benjamin K. Sovacool. Contestation, contingency, and justice in the Nordic low-carbon energy transition. Energy Policy, 2017; 102: 569 DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2016.12.045

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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #122 on: Jan 31st, 2017, 4:39pm »

Hmmmm, seems good old Dr. Mann got a dose of warranted criticism of his scientific abilities...again! This fellow is doing more to further the proof that he and his 'theory' of Climate Change is full of Bat Guano!

http://www.steynonline.com/7690/a-serial-transgressor-of-scientific-norms

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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #123 on: Feb 4th, 2017, 10:50am »

The skiing industry believes it, even if Trump doesn't.....

A future for skiing in a warmer world

Date: February 1, 2017
Source: SINTEF

As the world struggles to make progress to limit climate change, researchers are finding ways to adapt to warmer winter temperatures -- by developing environmentally friendly ways of producing artificial snow.

Chances are if you know anything about Norway, you know it's a place where skiing was born.

Norse mythology describes gods and goddesses hunting on skis, and 4000-year-old petroglyphs from northern Norway include some of the earliest known drawings of people on skis. One of the most recognizable Norwegian paintings worldwide depicts two skiers in 1206 fleeing to safety with the country's two-year-old prince, Håkon Håkonsson.

Over the centuries, skiing in Norway has evolved from a practical mode of winter transport to a sport that is deeply ingrained in Norwegian culture. Norwegians themselves like to say they enter the world uniquely prepared for their northern home -- because they are "born with skis on their feet."

But warmer weather due to climate change has made for less-than-stellar ski conditions in Norway and across Europe. Advances in snowmaking, where water is "seeded" with a protein from a bacterium that allows snow to be made at temperatures right around freezing, simply aren't enough to keep up with the changing climate.

In response, a team of Norwegian researchers has been awarded a NOK 2.3 million grant from the Norwegian Ministry of Culture to develop a new approach to snowmaking -- one that would allow snow to be made in an energy-efficient way, even at warmer temperatures. The project has been named, appropriately enough, "Snow for the Future."

Putting heat pumps to work

Traditional snowmaking makes up for a lack of snow by spraying water into cold air, and letting physics do the rest. But if temperatures are above freezing, this simply won't work, for obvious reasons.

Researchers at SINTEF, Scandinavia's largest independent research institute, and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have worked extensively with a type of technology called a heat pump. They think that heat pumps could be key to producing snow in an environmentally friendly way, even at higher temperatures. Your refrigerator and freezer are examples of appliances that use heat pumps to regulate temperatures.

"One of the main aims of the project will be to find out how we can produce snow regardless of the outdoor temperature, and to develop energy-efficient ways of doing it," says Petter Nekså, an energy research scientist at SINTEF.

Nekså thinks that one feasible approach is to develop heat pumps where the cold side can be used to produce snow, while the warm side is used for heating.

"If the air outside is cold, traditional snow cannons work very well. But these are temperature dependent," says Nekså. "At higher temperatures, you need a refrigeration plant to make snow. The advantage is that the process is independent of air temperatures."

What can make the process energy efficient is heating a building with the heat generated by the heat pump as it cools water to be made into snow, Nekså says.

"In this way, we can heat indoor facilities while also making artificial snow for ski slopes outside -- virtually cost free," he says.

Using heat and cold from heat pump technology
The approach involves adapting current heat pump technology, says Jacob Stang, one of Nekså's colleagues at SINTEF.

"A traditional snow production facility that makes snow at zero degrees outdoors has no 'hot side'," Stang says. "That means we need a heat pump that has the properties of a refrigeration plant. We have to adapt components, such as an evaporator and condenser, to get them to work together."

Storage and use

The project will be conducted in collaboration with the city of Trondheim, where SINTEF and NTNU are based, and the Norwegian Ski Federation (NSF).

The researchers are also hoping to develop better ways of storing snow, which is an approach many ski areas use as a hedge against warmer temperatures. Currently, many ski area use sawdust to store artificial snow that can be spread on slopes and trails when the weather doesn't deliver the white stuff on its own. While this is a proven approach, over time the sawdust loses its insulating properties and has to be replaced.

The project will also identify new ways of making sure that ski areas get as much benefit as they can out of manufactured snow. The researchers will look at everything from the design and drainage of ski runs, to protection from sun and rain, salting and snow preparation.

Technology transfer from the fisheries industry
Researchers will conduct lab experiments, use computer models and simulations, create prototypes and undertake field tests.

"Norway has a long tradition and expertise in this field," says Trygve M. Eikevik, a professor in NTNU's Department of Energy and Process Engineering. "The fishery sector produces around 300 thousand tonnes of ice each year for fish export. This is enough to cover an 8-metre-wide, 150-kilometre-long ski trail with a layer of ice that is 0.5 metres thick. It is more than possible to manufacture snow for skiing."

The NSF hopes the project will increase the chances that Norway will be able to host World Championships in skiing in the future, but officials are most concerned about maintaining skiing as a pastime in Norway. Communities across the country promote skiing by maintaining easily accessible, lighted and groomed ski trails and encouraging ski clubs. This strong system recruits young people to skiing, which has led to Norway's prominence in both alpine and cross-country ski competitions. It also helps keep people healthy, by encouraging them to get outside to exercise in the winter.

"The challenges posed by climate change represent perhaps the greatest threat to ski sports. This is why we're very pleased that this project is taking off," says Marit Gjerland, who is a ski run consultant for the NSF. "Good results from the project will mean a lot for the future of ski sports."

She says the technology could also expand the popularity of skiing, by making snow available in places where it previously wasn't.

"Just like we have artificial football pitches, we could also create future snow parks," she says.

Research centre for snow technology

One of the aims of the project is to establish a snow technology research centre based in Trondheim, where both Norwegian and international projects could be carried out.

"We envisage the development of more efficient refrigeration plants and snow production concepts, facilities designed for combined snow and heat production, and a total concept that integrates data models with meteorological data," says Eikevik.

"We hope this will help promote innovation and business development related to future snow production facilities," he says.
________________________________________
Story Source:
Materials provided by SINTEF. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
________________________________________
Cite This Page:
SINTEF. "A future for skiing in a warmer world." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 February 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170201093251.htm>.

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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #124 on: Feb 4th, 2017, 10:53am »

And then there is this:

1880--2016 The Earth is getting HOTTER!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVmpDk4rEI0


But WAIT! There's MORE! What's THIS?!

cool

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEKe1UPpQTI
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #125 on: Feb 7th, 2017, 9:22pm »

I said it before -

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/02/07/federal-scientist-cooked-climate-change-books-ahead-obama-presentation-whistle-blower-charges.html
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #126 on: Feb 8th, 2017, 2:18pm »

Whew! A good thing POTUS has determined global warming is fake! Otherwise, "The Grid" would be coming after us for Big Money!



Electricity costs: A new way they'll surge in a warming world


Date: February 7, 2017
Source: University of Michigan

Climate change is likely to increase U.S. electricity costs over the next century by billions of dollars more than economists previously forecast, according to a new study involving a University of Michigan researcher.

The study shows how higher temperatures will raise not just the average annual electricity demand, but more importantly, the peak demand. And to avoid brownouts and absorb these surges, utilities will need to spend between $70 billion and $180 billion in grid upgrades -- power plants and futuristic energy storage systems for which ratepayers would ultimately foot the bill.

"If you look at your own bill across the year, you'll probably see that your usage is highest in the summer, when you're running the air conditioning," said Catherine Hausman, assistant professor at U-M's Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy.

"Climate change researchers know that when we look out over the next 100 years, things will get warmer and, on a per-person basis, use of air conditioning will rise. The question we asked was 'On the hottest day of the year, when people are maxing out on that, can the grid handle it?' We build the grid for the hottest hour of the year."

Hausman and colleagues urge electric grid planners to keep their calculations in mind as they draft 20-year procurement plans. They also have a message for policymakers.

"This means that climate change adaptation is going to be more expensive than we thought. And so mitigation efforts become more valuable -- more worthwhile -- because they can prevent these costs," said Hausman, who is co-author of the study that appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "Our findings should inform the cost-benefit calculations of climate change policy."

The need varies by region. The researchers examined separately each of 166 load-balancing authorities. These are regions that regulators use when they're examining the grid's reliability.

To generate their cost figures, the researchers calculated the mathematical relationship between air temperature and electricity in each region. Then they plugged that into simulations that took into account climate models and two different carbon emissions scenarios identified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

One scenario represents "business as usual," under which carbon emissions would continue to increase. The other is a scenario under which we stabilize emissions. Under both scenarios, if the nation were to experience temperatures like the ones predicted 100 years from now with today's infrastructure, the grid would be overtaxed.

Under the stabilization scenario, demand on an average day would climb 3 percent, and on a peak day, 7 percent. They calculate a 152 percent change in the number of days experiencing the 95th percentile or above of demand. Absorbing this would require an investment of $70 billion.

Under business-as-usual, demand on a peak usage day would spike by 18 percent, and the number of days in the 95th percentile or above would go up by 395 percent. Preparing for this would cost $180 billion.

What exactly would that money pay for? Electricity storage technologies such as grid-scale batteries could work, but they're still in the research phase. Advances in batteries or the use of electric vehicles for storage could smooth the peaks.

The study also nods to "time varying pricing," which gives customers incentives to reduce their use at peak times. Solar power and wind power could help a bit, but not enough without better energy storage options. The sun and wind aren't always on at peak demand times. Given the current state of technology, if the projected climate of 2117 were to occur tomorrow, Hausman said we'd need to build more fossil fuel plants to jump in on the highest demand days.

The researchers caution that this isn't a "prediction" for several reasons. Yes, increasing temperatures may spur greater adoption of air conditioners, and as a result, greater temperature impacts, but they could also hasten development of more efficient air conditioners.

"We're not trying to say this is the future scenario," Hausman said. "We're saying, 'If the future climate were here now, what would need to happen to the grid to adapt to that warmer world?'"
________________________________________
Story Source:
Materials provided by University of Michigan. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
________________________________________
Journal Reference:
1. Maximilian Auffhammer, Patrick Baylis, Catherine H. Hausman. Climate change is projected to have severe impacts on the frequency and intensity of peak electricity demand across the United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017; 201613193 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1613193114

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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #127 on: Feb 8th, 2017, 4:23pm »

on Feb 8th, 2017, 2:18pm, Swamprat wrote:
Whew! A good thing POTUS has determined global warming is fake! Otherwise, "The Grid" would be coming after us for Big Money!



Electricity costs: A new way they'll surge in a warming world


Date: February 7, 2017
Source: University of Michigan

Climate change is likely to increase U.S. electricity costs ________________________________________
Story Source:
Materials provided by University of Michigan. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
________________________________________
Journal Reference:
1. Maximilian Auffhammer, Patrick Baylis, Catherine H. Hausman. Climate change is projected to have severe impacts on the frequency and intensity of peak electricity demand across the United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017; 201613193 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1613193114




I’ve said this before in a previous post which I can’t seem to find. However, arguably the issue (climate change/global warming) is certainly polarizing it seems. There are believers and nonbelievers it’s almost like a cult.

I’ve explained before why the liberal agenda seeks to promote global warming and climate change and won’t go into that again here. However the issue related to electrical power merits some discussion again.

In summary (my opinion) the United States does not have an energy crisis. I will however, propose that rather, it has an energy management crisis. Obama did nothing in this regard and if anything exacerbated the situation.

There are many sources of energy (electrical power) available to the United States.

Nuclear submarines are decommissioned because it costs more to upgrade the technology then to build a new submarine. While from a strategic point of view the submarine may be obsolete, it’s nuclear capabilities are not. I could just imagine how costly it is to decommission a nuclear submarine under current environmental regulations.

As an alternative, these submarines which still harbor safe nuclear reactors and generate electricity, can be used to produce electricity in the various coastal cities.

If it is not feasible to put one of these submarines (devoid of armament of course) in a harbor it could be stationed offshore as a floating electrical generating plant.

Not only would this save the cost of decommissioning and environmental cleanup but the generated electricity should be nominal with costs only for operation and maintenance of the now converted submarine.






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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #128 on: Feb 8th, 2017, 4:33pm »

"No Data Manipulation in 2015 Climate Study, Researchers Say"

http://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/07/science/2015-climate-study-data.html?ref=todayspaper
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #129 on: Feb 8th, 2017, 4:44pm »

on Feb 8th, 2017, 4:33pm, Erno86 wrote:
"No Data Manipulation in 2015 Climate Study, Researchers Say"

http://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/07/science/2015-climate-study-data.html?ref=todayspaper


Of course they are going to deny it. Even though Obama is gone their credibility is still at stake.
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #130 on: Mar 4th, 2017, 3:11pm »

"Trump looking to cut climate science agency's budget: report"

http://www.thehill.com/homenews/administration/322346-trump-administration-pursues-cuts-to-climate-science-agency-report


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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #131 on: Mar 5th, 2017, 2:37pm »

"Washington ---- The White House is fiercely divided over President Trump's campaign promise to 'cancel' the Paris agreement, the 2015 accord that binds nearly every country to curb global warming, with more moderate voices maintaining that ha should stick with the agreement despite his campaign pledge.

Stephen K. Bannon, Mr. Trump's senior adviser, is pressing the president to officially pull the United States from the landmark accord, according to energy and government officials with knowledge of the debate. But, they say, he is clashing with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and the president's daughter Ivanka Trump, who fear the move could have broad and damaging diplomatic ramifications."

quote: "Divide at the White House Over the Paris Climate Agreement --- Worries of diplomatic fallout amid calls for an exit." --- By Coral Davenport - NYT's - Friday, March 3, 2017
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #132 on: Mar 5th, 2017, 3:04pm »

"Australia Heat Tied to Climate Shift"

"Southeastern Australia has suffered through a series of brutal heat waves over the past two months, with temperatures reaching a scorching 113 degrees Fahrenheit in some parts of the state of New South Wales.

'It was nothing short of awful,' said Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick, of the Climate Change Research Center at the University of New South Wales, in Sidney. 'In Australia, we're used to a little bit of heat. But this was at another level.'

Her analysis, conducted with a loose-knit group of researchers called World Weather Attribution, was made public on Thursday. Their conclusion was that climate change made maximum temperatures like those seen in January and February at least 10 times more likely than a century ago, before significant greenhouse gas emissions from human activity started warming the planet.

Looked at another way, that means that the kind of soaring temperatures expected to occur in New South Wales once every 500 years on average now may occur once every 50 years. What is more, the researchers found that if climate change continued unabated, such maximum temperatures may occur on average every five years.

quote: By Henry Fountain - NYT's - Friday, March 3, 2017
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #133 on: Mar 5th, 2017, 5:33pm »

The Paris Agreement is a non issue.

Each country is allowed to set their own targets, and compliance is voluntary. There is no enforcement provision in the agreement.

Even if the the global target was met, it will still result in a 3 degree rise, double the target of 1.5 degrees.

We may as well stay in it, and say we are a global good citizen and all that rot. Then ignore the targets like most other countries will do anyway. The whole thing is a farce.
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #134 on: Mar 10th, 2017, 3:23pm »

EPA chief, Scott Pruitt...joins list of environmental terrorists on Trump's team!!

"Trump's EPA chief just contradicted decades of science --- Scott Pruitt doesn't agree that CO2 is a major contributor to global warming."

http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2017/03/pruitt-co2-global-warming
« Last Edit: Mar 11th, 2017, 09:28am by Erno86 » User IP Logged

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