Board Logo
« How Trump will affect climate change »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jun 25th, 2017, 10:38am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 9 10 11  Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: How Trump will affect climate change  (Read 4940 times)
dave54
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1208
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #150 on: Apr 29th, 2017, 9:06pm »

on Apr 29th, 2017, 12:31pm, Erno86 wrote:


I deny Bill Nye exists!

I deny existence exists!
User IP Logged

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This post is 100% gluten free and made with recycled electrons.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Cliff-67
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1676
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #151 on: Apr 29th, 2017, 10:37pm »


When they can predict an accurate forecast two weeks from now maybe then I'll start taking what they are saying more seriously.....








User IP Logged

TRILLIONS AND TRILLIONS.........................................>>>OO

GUSTATUS SIMILIS PULLUS
SuzyQ
Senior Member
ImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM


Posts: 487
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #152 on: Apr 29th, 2017, 11:37pm »


If people are really concerned, start taking individual steps of their own to help the environment.

Solar / wind power - Less energy consumption
plant a tree
recycle - less chemicals, plastics, etc.
Quit polluting / dispose of properly
Less ( joy riding ) emissions

For starters. kiss




User IP Logged

INT21
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 2965
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #153 on: Apr 30th, 2017, 06:51am »

...For starters..

Then you can move on to sabotaging coal fired power stations etc.

One step at a time.

HAL
INT21
User IP Logged

Isn't it midnight, on the other side of the world.
Do you remember
the face of a pretty girl ?
SuzyQ
Senior Member
ImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM


Posts: 487
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #154 on: Apr 30th, 2017, 8:21pm »

on Apr 30th, 2017, 06:51am, INT21 wrote:
...For starters..

Then you can move on to sabotaging coal fired power stations etc.

One step at a time.

HAL
INT21


That sounds sort've extreme


rolleyes
« Last Edit: Apr 30th, 2017, 10:02pm by SuzyQ » User IP Logged

Erno86
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 2581
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #155 on: May 1st, 2017, 2:17pm »

on Apr 30th, 2017, 06:51am, INT21 wrote:
...For starters..

Then you can move on to sabotaging coal fired power stations etc.

One step at a time.

HAL
INT21


You don't need to sabotage, either by computer hacking, government EPA regulations, tactical OP's, or just plain old investment firms, backing out of financial investments for coal.

I can't find last week's NYT's quote,but If I find it, I'll quote a piece. They said something like: that 2/3's {223 out of 254 coal fired power plants in the United States are scheduled to be phased out by 2022.

« Last Edit: May 1st, 2017, 2:19pm by Erno86 » User IP Logged

"It would be unsatisfactory, in my opinion, if a world without matter were possible."

Albert Einstein
INT21
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 2965
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #156 on: May 1st, 2017, 4:14pm »

Erno,

That comment was intended to be tongue in cheek.

But I do see what you mean.

However there are a couple of problems.

Trump needs to keep the miners on side for at least another four years. So he may force the continuation of stations that were listed for closure.

As for the EPA, They are removing things from their website that show any pollution.

And look who is in charge of it. A climate change denier.

It's already stitched up, my friend. Too late.

HAL
INT21
User IP Logged

Isn't it midnight, on the other side of the world.
Do you remember
the face of a pretty girl ?
Cliff-67
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1676
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #157 on: May 1st, 2017, 4:28pm »

I will admit that I am concerned about future generations to come and the mess we are leaving them.


I'm sitting here with two of my grandkids now...





« Last Edit: May 1st, 2017, 4:45pm by Cliff-67 » User IP Logged

TRILLIONS AND TRILLIONS.........................................>>>OO

GUSTATUS SIMILIS PULLUS
dave54
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1208
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #158 on: May 2nd, 2017, 11:10am »

What are proposing as a solution? The meaningless and toothless Paris Accords?
User IP Logged

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This post is 100% gluten free and made with recycled electrons.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Erno86
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 2581
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #159 on: May 5th, 2017, 11:52am »

"The Worst Man for Earth"



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7msRhXgKXk
« Last Edit: May 5th, 2017, 11:58am by Erno86 » User IP Logged

"It would be unsatisfactory, in my opinion, if a world without matter were possible."

Albert Einstein
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 3849
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #160 on: Jun 3rd, 2017, 09:55am »

Article is two years old, but.......?

Is this the right assessment, or is he a Donald supporter?



Updated NASA Data: Global Warming Not Causing Any Polar Ice Retreat

James Taylor, Contributor, President of the Spark of Freedom Foundation.
May 19, 2015

Note: Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

Updated data from NASA satellite instruments reveal the Earth’s polar ice caps have not receded at all since the satellite instruments began measuring the ice caps in 1979. Since the end of 2012, moreover, total polar ice extent has largely remained above the post-1979 average. The updated data contradict one of the most frequently asserted global warming claims – that global warming is causing the polar ice caps to recede.

The timing of the 1979 NASA satellite instrument launch could not have been better for global warming alarmists. The late 1970s marked the end of a 30-year cooling trend. As a result, the polar ice caps were quite likely more extensive than they had been since at least the 1920s. Nevertheless, this abnormally extensive 1979 polar ice extent would appear to be the “normal” baseline when comparing post-1979 polar ice extent.

Updated NASA satellite data show the polar ice caps remained at approximately their 1979 extent until the middle of the last decade. Beginning in 2005, however, polar ice modestly receded for several years. By 2012, polar sea ice had receded by approximately 10 percent from 1979 measurements. (Total polar ice area – factoring in both sea and land ice – had receded by much less than 10 percent, but alarmists focused on the sea ice loss as “proof” of a global warming crisis.)

A 10-percent decline in polar sea ice is not very remarkable, especially considering the 1979 baseline was abnormally high anyway. Regardless, global warming activists and a compliant news media frequently and vociferously claimed the modest polar ice cap retreat was a sign of impending catastrophe. Al Gore even predicted the Arctic ice cap could completely disappear by 2014.

In late 2012, however, polar ice dramatically rebounded and quickly surpassed the post-1979 average. Ever since, the polar ice caps have been at a greater average extent than the post-1979 mean.

Now, in May 2015, the updated NASA data show polar sea ice is approximately 5 percent above the post-1979 average.

During the modest decline in 2005 through 2012, the media presented a daily barrage of melting ice cap stories. Since the ice caps rebounded – and then some – how have the media reported the issue?

Full Bio: President of the Spark of Freedom Foundation; I write about energy and environment issues, frequently focusing on global warming. I have presented environmental analysis on CNN, CNN Headline News, CBS Evening News, MSNBC, Fox News Channel, and several national radio programs. My environmental analysis has been published in virtually every major newspaper in the United States. I studied atmospheric science and majored in government at Dartmouth College. I obtained my Juris Doctorate from Syracuse University.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamestaylor/2015/05/19/updated-nasa-data-polar-ice-not-receding-after-all/#10bd02428921

User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
Erno86
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 2581
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #161 on: Jun 4th, 2017, 2:15pm »



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=monhjZzx4nw




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDB8kWHyWOY
« Last Edit: Jun 4th, 2017, 2:18pm by Erno86 » User IP Logged

"It would be unsatisfactory, in my opinion, if a world without matter were possible."

Albert Einstein
Erno86
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 2581
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #162 on: Jun 4th, 2017, 2:20pm »




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhDftmd9Lzk


« Last Edit: Jun 4th, 2017, 2:30pm by Erno86 » User IP Logged

"It would be unsatisfactory, in my opinion, if a world without matter were possible."

Albert Einstein
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 3849
xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #163 on: Jun 14th, 2017, 6:11pm »

Let Trump claim a better deal on climate

If we can stomach it, a ‘renegotiation’ of the Paris Agreement could help us all

Elliot Diringer.
14 June 2017

It was perhaps inevitable that Donald Trump would stand on the White House lawn to proclaim that the United States was quitting the Paris Agreement, our best hope ever for tackling climate change. It’s also plausible that the United States will not actually withdraw.

Like so many others, I was distressed at the images and words coming from the Rose Garden earlier this month. Having attended the 1992 Earth Summit where the global climate effort was born, spent years helping negotiators navigate their way to the 2015 Paris Agreement, and rallied companies to support the United States staying in, I could hardly bear to watch.

Trump was spurning fellow world leaders, the chief executives of many of the world’s largest companies, and a strong majority of Americans — for no evident reason other than to gratify his voting base, or simply to prove that he could.

The ensuing global outrage won’t quickly subside. Nor, let us hope, will the groundswell of renewed climate commitment. Country after country has reaffirmed its support for Paris, and a spontaneous ‘We Are Still In’ campaign by US cities, states and companies offers hope that the United States can still get close to its Paris goal. The message from many is clear: forget Trump, we’ll do it without him.

It is better, I think, not to count him out yet.

Trump did not declare a clean break from the global climate effort. The United States remains a party to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the treaty underlying the Paris Agreement. (It also did when president George W. Bush rejected the 1997 Kyoto Protocol; had the United States not stayed then, Paris would probably never have emerged.) And the earliest the country can technically depart the Paris Agreement is 4 November 2020.

In the meantime, Trump says he is willing to rework the deal. That opening, if properly navigated, could produce another dramatic proclamation, this one keeping the United States in.

To be clear, the basic terms of Paris are not open for renegotiation. Other countries regard them as a sensible balancing of national interests against an urgent common threat. And they are weary of accommoda¬ting the vagaries of US climate politics. After all, this agreement, like the Kyoto Protocol, was designed largely to US specifications.

But there is a way to preserve the core agreement and still allow the president to declare that he’s secured a better deal.

A fundamental feature of the Paris Agreement is that countries’ individual contributions are “nationally determined”. Although the accord discourages parties from weakening their goals, it doesn’t forbid them from doing so. If President Trump doesn’t like former president Barack Obama’s target of shrinking greenhouse-gas emissions to 26–28% below 2005 levels in 2025, he’s free to change it.

Although many are loath to encourage a move so clearly contravening the spirit of the Paris Agreement, some of the countries most vulnerable to climate change openly acknowledge the option. Thoriq Ibrahim, environment and energy minister for the Maldives and chair of the Alliance of Small Island States, said, “If the US wishes to change its contribution, that would be unfortunate but is its prerogative”.

Why would the Maldives or anyone else be open to a weaker US target? For the same reasons so many of us worked so furiously to persuade Trump to stay in. For now, his announcement may have a galvanizing effect. But over time, the formal exit of the world’s largest economy risks corroding global ambition.

Today’s strong momentum to decarbonize can be only a start. We need a wholesale transformation of energy and transportation systems over the coming decades to even approach the Paris goal of keeping warming below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels. Countries will make their best efforts only if they’re confident that others, especially major competitors, will too. That’s how Paris works: by strengthening confidence that everyone’s doing their part.

If the United States walks away, other countries will remain, but they’re likely to be less ambitious in meeting their initial targets, and in the next ones they’re due to set in 2020. Staying in, on the other hand, would also encourage US action by forcing a national conversation every five years around climate goals and measures. Better, on the whole, for the United States to be in than out.

How would this benefit Trump? The president has shown that he’s motivated more by the ‘deal’ than its substance, and that his extreme opening positions are just that. In the international realm alone, he’s retreated from his threat to quit the North American Free Trade Agreement, his promise to move the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, his currency-manipulation charges against China, and his dismissal of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization as obsolete. With his Rose Garden speech, Trump checked one box and drew another. He fulfilled his campaign pledge to leave Paris, and he told Americans he’s now going for a better deal. Coming back with a reduced target could be enticing precisely because it would allow him to claim another win.

The forces within the administration that goaded him to withdraw would no doubt persist. But the greater obstacle may be our own visceral aversion to the idea of letting Trump ‘get his way’. Our choice, in the end, may be between indulging a prideful charade or letting the United States leave. I, for one, hope we manage to keep Paris whole.

http://www.nature.com/news/let-trump-claim-a-better-deal-on-climate-1.22146?WT.ec_id=NEWSDAILY-20170614

User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
Pages: 1 ... 9 10 11  Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls