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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: How Trump will affect climate change  (Read 7685 times)
Erno86
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #45 on: Dec 10th, 2016, 1:36pm »

Having Trump in the White House...is like a fox guarding the henhouse.
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #46 on: Dec 10th, 2016, 3:34pm »

on Dec 10th, 2016, 3:18pm, MrGort wrote:
Yeah yeah yeah I will just judge us to pizza do the one with me didn't


Say whathuh

Sometimes I have to ask myself "what's the point".
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #47 on: Dec 11th, 2016, 09:52am »

NASA: "Crack Advances Across Antarctic Ice Shelf"


Sept 8, 2016

http://www.earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=88708

http://www.disclose.tv/news/edgar_cayces_prediction_unfolding_enormous_130km_crack_spreading_across_antarctica/136946
« Last Edit: Dec 11th, 2016, 10:11am by Erno86 » User IP Logged

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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #48 on: Dec 12th, 2016, 10:53am »

Ice loss spreads up Antarctic glaciers

By Jonathan Amos BBC Science Correspondent, San Francisco
12 December 2016

The scale and pace of change now taking place in West Antarctica is captured in a new, long-term satellite record.

Scientists have combined nearly a quarter of a century of observations to show how the region's great glaciers are losing height by up to 7m per year.

The satellite data also traces the way this thinning behaviour has spread up the length of the ice streams.

The glaciers concerned all terminate in the Amundsen Sea and are significant contributors to global ocean rise.

Their names are Pine Island, Thwaites, Pope, Smith, and Kohler.

Right now, they are dumping some 120 to 140 billion tonnes of ice a year into the ocean, which is sufficient to push up global waters by between 0.34mm and 0.40mm per annum - more than 10% of the total worldwide trend.

The glaciers' reduction in height is likely the result of the warm seawater recorded around Antarctica in recent decades.

This attacks the underside of the ice streams at the point where they cease to push out along bedrock and begin to float. Eroding this "grounding line" back towards the land makes the glaciers move faster.

"As the glaciers accelerate, they have to take ever more ice from the interior to compensate for the speed-up. This means they thin; they lose height, which we can detect from space," explained Dr Hannes Konrad from the UK's Centre for Polar Observation and Monitoring (CPOM).

"And if there is no increase in snow and ice in the interior then this thinning will just migrate further and further upstream," the Leeds University researcher told BBC News.

Dr Konrad is presenting his team's work here at the Fall Meeting of American Geophysical Union (AGU) - the world's largest annual gathering of Earth scientists.

His study has also just been accepted for publication in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

It seamlessly ties together for the first time the altimetry observations from five different satellites operated by the European and American space agencies from 1992 to the present day.

What is interesting in the data is the individual responses of the glaciers to the melting assault.

They all show thinning over the period, but the behaviours are far from uniform.

Pine Island Glacier (PIG), which currently contributes more to sea level rise than any other ice stream on the planet, thins fairly steadily and relentlessly.

The lowering of its surface is already in play by the start of the satellite measurements, and now spreads back from its grounding line, along its main trunk for hundreds of km inland.

At maximum, the glacier is losing 5m in height every year and the thinning spreads inland at up to 15km per year at times.

Thwaites, on the other hand, started dropping its elevation later than the PIG and did so in two broad periods. Its delayed and episodic response means thinning on Thwaites has not spread so far inland.

Pope, Smith, and Kohler very likely began thinning earlier even than the PIG and show the sharpest height loss - up to 7m per year at the grounding line. But this behaviour is much slower to spread back along the glaciers' trunks.

"They are much smaller than the PIG or Thwaites. They have small catchments and flow along short, narrow troughs in the bedrock. So they have a very limited area where the thinning can spread into," explained Dr Konrad.

The study's results will be used to calibrate models that try to forecast the behaviour of the Amundsen Sea region in a warming world, and the consequences this will have for future sea-level rise.

It has been argued that this part of Antarctica may already be in an unstoppable retreat which would see its glaciers all collapse in coming centuries.

But co-author Prof Andrew Shepherd said there remains a good deal of uncertainty in the projections.

"It's clear from this study that the response of these glaciers to environmental change has not been uniform," he told BBC News.

"Thinning stopped and started on Thwaites, and it spread at different rates down each of glaciers.

"We have to treat these glaciers as individuals - not as a unit - if we want to make better projections of future sea-level rise."

Prof David Vaughan from the British Antarctic Survey was not involved in the study, but commended its insight - "the first time anyone's properly tracked these changes and how they propagate inland".

Scientists needed now to fully explain the different behaviours, he added.

Much research effort has already been focused on Pine Island, and Thwaites is about to get similar treatment with big UK-US field campaigns planned for the Antarctic seasons of 2019-20 and 2020-21.

"Of all these glaciers that are retreating, Pine Island has accelerated the most and is currently the furthest out of balance, but ultimately it is Thwaites in the long term, in the hundred-year timescale, that is seen as being the big concern. Because of its geometry, because the middle of its central basin just gets deeper and deeper - once you kick off its retreat, there maybe nothing to stop it."

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38256932


Oh, but "Global Warming" is a myth, right?!! rolleyes



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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #49 on: Dec 12th, 2016, 12:47pm »

NASA Study: Mass Gains of Antarctic Ice Sheet Greater than Losses


https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/nasa-study-mass-gains-of-antarctic-ice-sheet-greater-than-losses


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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #50 on: Dec 12th, 2016, 2:53pm »

Time will tell. grin
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #51 on: Dec 12th, 2016, 4:40pm »

Trump Team Asking For Energy Department Staff Who Worked On Climate Change."

No doubt...we have a political witch hunt on our hands.


http://www.abcnews.go.com/Politics/trump-team-energy-department-staff-worked-climate-change/story?id=44100049
« Last Edit: Dec 12th, 2016, 4:52pm by Erno86 » User IP Logged

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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #52 on: Dec 14th, 2016, 12:10am »

They can't make up their minds!!

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/628524/Climate-change-shock-Burning-fossil-fuels-COOLs-planet-says-NASA

Climate change shock: Burning fossil fuels 'COOLS planet', says NASA

BURNING fossil fuels and cutting down trees causes global COOLING, a shock new NASA study has found.

By JON AUSTIN
13:07, Mon, Dec 21, 2015 | UPDATED: 17:00, Mon, Dec 21, 2015

Major theories about what causes temperatures to rise have been thrown into doubt after NASA found the Earth has cooled in areas of heavy industrialisation where more trees have been lost and more fossil fuel burning takes place.

Environmentalists have long argued the burning of fossil fuels in power stations and for other uses is responsible for global warming and predicted temperature increases because of the high levels of carbon dioxide produced - which causes the global greenhouse effect.

While the findings did not dispute the effects of carbon dioxide on global warming, they found aerosols - also given off by burning fossil fuels - actually cool the local environment, at least temporarily.

The research was carried out to see if current climate change models for calculating future temperatures were taking into account all factors and were accurate.

A NASA spokesman said: "To quantify climate change, researchers need to know the Transient Climate Response (TCR) and Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity (ECS) of Earth.

"Both values are projected global mean surface temperature changes in response to doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations but on different timescales.

"TCR is characteristic of short-term predictions, up to a century out, while ECS looks centuries further into the future, when the entire climate system has reached equilibrium and temperatures have stabilised."

The spokesman said it was "well known" that aerosols such as those emitted in volcanic eruptions and power stations, act to cool Earth, at least temporarily, by reflecting solar radiation away from the planet.

He added: "In a similar fashion, land use changes such as deforestation in northern latitudes result in bare land that increases reflected sunlight."

Kate Marvel, a climatologist at GISS and the paper’s lead author, said the results showed the "complexity" of estimating future global temperatures.

She said: “Take sulfate aerosols, which are created from burning fossil fuels and contribute to atmospheric cooling.

“They are more or less confined to the northern hemisphere, where most of us live and emit pollution.
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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #53 on: Dec 14th, 2016, 10:51am »

Hundreds of Scientists Rally to Protect Climate Science

By Tia Ghose, Senior Writer
December 13, 2016

SAN FRANCISCO – For a few hours at least, throngs of scientists stepped out from behind their PowerPoint slides about sea ice extent and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels to make a more political statement.

The scientists, who were attending the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union, rallied here in downtown San Francisco on Tuesday (Dec. 13) to support climate science and to reject government meddling with scientific facts.

"I know you're here because you understand just how essential science and evidence are to our democracy," Peter Frumhoff, the science and policy director for the Union of Concerned Scientists, told the crowd of more than 200 geologists, climate scientists and Earth scientists. "THE SCIENCE AND EVIDENCE THAT WE ALL GET IS AT RISK OF BEING DEEPLY INTERFERED WITH BY THIS INCOMING ADMINISTRATION."

Concrete steps
The rally, called Stand Up for Science, was organized by 350BayArea.org, climatetruth.org and other activist organizations that support policies to limit carbon emissions. A few hundred geologists, climate scientists and Earth scientists donned lab coats, chanted slogans and carried signs with messages like "Go science!" and "Ice has no agenda, it just melts."

On Sunday (Dec. 11), President-elect Donald Trump claimed that "nobody knows if climate change is real." (OVERWHELMING SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE SHOWS THAT THE CLIMATE IS CHANGING AND THAT HUMANS ARE CAUSING IT, THOUGH THERE IS SOME UNCERTAINTY ABOUT HOW TO BEST TACKLE THE PROBLEM.) And last week, a letter from Trump's transition team to the U.S. Department of Energy asked for the individual names of scientists who were involved in climate research.

At the rally, Frumhoff said that he had been fielding calls from spooked scientists in federal agencies.

"They are deeply discouraged about their own well-being, about their own ability to do their science," Frumhoff said. "Many of the federal scientists I've talked to have talked about polishing up their resumes, looing for ways to duck and cover."

While that is an understandable response, it was important for scientists to stand up for their work and hold politicians accountable for misusing or ignoring the science, he said.

For instance, THE UNION OF CONCERNED SCIENTISTS HAS ALREADY SENT A LETTER TO THE INCOMING ADMINISTRATION, SIGNED BY 3,000 SCIENTISTS, URGING THE PRESIDENT TO RESPECT SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE.

THEY ARE ALSO SETTING UP AN ANONYMOUS PORTAL THROUGH WHICH FEDERAL SCIENTISTS WORKING IN GOVERNMENT AGENCIES CAN ANONYMOUSLY REPORT EFFORTS TO DISTRIBUTE MISINFORMATION, HE SAID.


Uphill battle
For a few of the scientists Live Science spoke with, attending a political or protest rally was a decidedly unusual event. However, the current political environment made it seem important to attend, said Dan Jaffe, a geologist at the University of Washington.

In particular, Jaffe said that he was concerned about several of the political appointeestapped by Trump, such as Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson as secretary of state or Scott Pruitt, a vocal foe of climate science, as head of the Environmental Protection Agency. Those nominations provided strong indications that the incoming Trump administration does not respect the scientific process, Jaffe said.

"IF YOU DON'T USE SCIENCE TO MAKE DECISIONS, THEN IT'S ALL POLITICS," Jaffe told Live Science. [Science is]"the only way we can make objective decisions."

Hege-Beate Fredriksen, a statistician at the University of Tromsøin Norway, was driven to attend because "Trump does not acknowledge that climate change is man-made," she told Live Science. "Also, PEOPLE DON'T BELIEVE IN SCIENCE IN GENERAL, FACTS DO NOT MATTER ANYMORE. IT'S VERY SCARY."

James Kubicki, who is chair of geological sciences and environmental sciences at the University of Texas at El Paso, thought that things had reached a tipping point with the new political situation.

"I think for a long time a lot of our science — especially in geosciences — has been under attack. I felt it was time to really do something about that," Kubicki told Live Science. "It's critical at this point."

The AGU's annual meeting, which convenes an average of 26,000 scientists every year, is one of the largest scientific conferences in the world.

http://www.livescience.com/57201-agu-scientists-rally-to-protect-science.html

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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #54 on: Dec 14th, 2016, 10:56am »


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syU1rRCp7E8&feature=em-uploademail




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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #55 on: Dec 14th, 2016, 4:33pm »

"Department of Energy Reportedly Refuses To Give Trump Names Of Employees Working On Climate Change"



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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #56 on: Dec 14th, 2016, 7:47pm »

Mysterious 'Crater' in Antarctica Has Ominous Cause

By Stephanie Pappas, Live Science Contributor
December 14, 2016

A "crater" in Antarctica once thought to be the work of a meteorite impact is actually the result of ice melt, new research finds.

The hole, which is in the Roi Baudouin ice shelf in East Antarctica, is a collapsed lake — a cavity formed when a lake of meltwater drained — with a "moulin," a nearly vertical drainage passage through the ice, beneath it, researchers found on a field trip to the area in January 2016.

"That was a huge surprise," Stef Lhermitte, an earth science researcher at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands and at the University of Leuven in Belgium, said in a statement. "Moulins typically are observed on Greenland. And we definitely never see them on an ice shelf."

Surprising melt
Combining their fieldwork with satellite data and climate modeling, the researchers found that East Antarctica is more vulnerable to melt than was previously realized. Warm winds to the region blow away the snow cover, which darkens the surface of the ice, the team reported Dec. 12 in the journal Nature Climate Change. Darker surfaces absorb more heat from the sun than lighter surfaces, so they are more prone to melt. These floating ice sheets don't contribute much to sea level rise ¬— as they're already in the ocean — but they provide an important backstop against the flowing of land-based ice from continental Antarctica into the ocean.

East Antarctica has been a mysterious place when it comes to climate change. The region has been gaining ice due to increases in snow accumulation, according to 2015 research. Global warming can increase snowfall by boosting the amount of moisture in the air (warm air holds more moisture than cold).

The Roi Baudouin crater was more mysterious still. It's existed on satellite images going back to at least 1989, researchers said, but was first noted widely in January 2015. Scientists initially reported it to be a meteorite crater, perhaps the result of a space rock that exploded over Antarctica in 2004. But scientists quickly questioned whether the 2-mile-wide (3 kilometers) circle was really from a meteorite. Many suspected it was the result of melting ice.

Jan Lenaerts, a climate researcher at Utrecht University in the Netherlands and at the University of Leuven, was one of the meteorite skeptics.

"My response was: 'In that area? Then it's definitely not a meteorite; it's proof of strong melting,'" he said in a statement.

Vulnerable ice
The new study confirms that hunch. During their fieldwork on the southernmost continent, researchers also discovered many other meltwater lakes beneath the surface of the Roi Baudouin ice sheet.

"The amount of meltwater differs immensely from year to year, but it clearly increases during warm years," Lhermitte said.

Earlier research had shown that West Antarctica is very sensitive to climate change, Lenaerts said in the statement.

"Our research now suggests that the much larger East Antarctica ice sheet is also very vulnerable," Lenaerts said.

http://www.livescience.com/57204-mysterious-crater-in-antarctica-explained.html?utm_source=ls-newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20161214-ls

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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #57 on: Dec 15th, 2016, 10:56am »

[size=2]on Dec 14th, 2016, 10:51am, Swamprat wrote:
Hundreds of Scientists Rally to Protect Climate Science

By Tia Ghose, Senior Writer
December 13, 2016






“The idea that 97% of scientists hold a consensus view on human-caused global warming/climate change has become part of the climate change mythology, reaching the highest echelons of science such as NASA, and the highest political office – that of President Barack Obama.”

“Friends of Science have reviewed climate science literature for over a decade. We agree with the Dutch government’s position on the inadequacy of climate change analysis conducted by the IPCC : “We believe that limiting the scope of the IPCC to human-induced climate change is undesirable, especially because natural climate change is a crucial part of the total understanding of the climate system, including human-induced climate change.” Friends of Science hold the position, based on the scientific evidence, that the sun is the main driver of climate change. Not you. Not CO2. As this report shows, there’s no 97% consensus on global warming in these surveys. Not even close. They’re fooling you.”


https://friendsofscience.org/assets/documents/97_Consensus_Myth.pdf



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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #58 on: Dec 15th, 2016, 11:54am »

Friends of Science

Founded 2002
Founder Douglas Leahey
Type Climate change skepticism
Focus Canadian public policy
Location Calgary, Alberta
Key people Madhav Khandekar, Chris de Freitas, Tim Patterson, Sallie Baliunas
Slogan Providing insight into Climate Change
Website www.friendsofscience.org


Friends of Science (FoS) is a Canadian non-profit advocacy organization based in Calgary, Alberta. The organization takes a position that humans are largely not responsible for the currently observed global warming, CONTRARY TO THE ESTABLISHED SCIENTIFIC POSITION ON THE SUBJECT. Rather, they propose that "the Sun is the main direct and indirect driver of climate change," not human activity. They argued against the Kyoto Protocol. The society was founded in 2002 and launched its website in October of that year. THEY ARE CONSIDERED BY MANY TO PROMOTE CLIMATE CHANGE DENIAL. THEY ARE LARGELY FUNDED BY THE FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY.
shocked angry

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friends_of_Science



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xx Re: How Trump will affect climate change
« Reply #59 on: Dec 15th, 2016, 3:01pm »

If we in the US had been stupid enough to follow through with the Kyoto Accords when Oblamo took office, our economy would be worse than Argentina's is now.
You wouldn't be getting your pensions, SS and your bank account would be nonexistent! There would be nothing to live on except what you can beg or steal!

That is a fact everyone on the Changers side refuses to consider!

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