Board Logo
« Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jul 29th, 2014, 11:59pm


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 2 3  Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear  (Read 828 times)
figneutron
Full Member
ImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

The Great Way is not difficult for those who do not pick or choose.


PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 162
xx Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Thread started on: May 25th, 2011, 02:18am »

Public indifference to the prospect of Disclosure is based on profound and universal unconscious fear of annihilation or subjugation by an advanced alien race. This is indicated by the recurring commercial success of films and videos with plots ending in victory over superior alien invaders foiled by an unobvious vulnerablity and human heroics. The resort to trite ridicule by mass media, this functioning as a cultural defense such as in mentions of little green men, is further evidence supporting this hypothesis. The mass resistance to Disclosure, therefore, cannot be overestimated. If it ever accepts the truth, humanity most likely will be dragged to it kicking and screaming upon confrontation with spectacular alien-orchestrated events. Of course, having nothing to gain and everything to lose, the ruling elite will continue to fight Disclosure with all the means at its disposal including assassination. Still, for a few good reasons Disclosure is inevitable in the next twenty-five years, an opinion offered by Richard Dolan and his collaborator in After Disclosure. There is an urgent critical need for serious research upon which to formulate a feasible plan facilitating the ensuing revolution. Against all odds, I persist to hope for a miracle.
« Last Edit: May 25th, 2011, 03:17am by figneutron » User IP Logged

bonehead
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

"All descriptions of reality are temporary hypotheses."


PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1455
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #1 on: May 25th, 2011, 11:58am »

on May 25th, 2011, 02:18am, figneutron wrote:
Public indifference to the prospect of Disclosure is based on profound and universal unconscious fear of annihilation or subjugation by an advanced alien race.


Fig,

The UFO taboo is a case of cognitive dissonance that I have been wrestling with for some time now. While I don't fully disagree with your assessment I think the case of cultural denial of UFOs stems from something more fundamental and subliminal in the human psyche: unconscious feelings of unworthiness.

To explain this position, I would compare it to the past example of the Copernican revolution. The powers that be had a strong negative reaction to Copernicus' and Galileo's assertions that the universe did not revolve around us, but rather that the earth revolved around the sun. This was seen as a loss of metaphysical 'status' and it was strongly resisted until the preponderance of evidence finally made such denial no longer tenable.

Why the resistance?

Religion was the primary cultural authority of Copernicus' time. The power of the church hinged on the fundamental idea that man, in his natural state, was an unworthy and "sinful" creature whose only hope for worthiness was through the agency and intercession of the church. This cultural anxiety was further leveraged by patristic social structures that encouraged "toughness" and assertiveness as desirable qualities. Children raised in such an environment were not allowed to be carefree children but were punished, often physically, for any behavior which the parents deemed "embarrassing" to themselves.

Thus children became responsible for the insecurities of their parents. The self esteem of children is undermined practically from the beginning of their lives. To build adult self-esteem on such a shaky foundation requires a good deal of denial and transference. Thus the psyche of a child is damaged and split by cultural conditioning practically from the word go.

So, why then would anybody feel "threatened" by objects on the sky which, for the most part, do not display any actual physical threat? It can be compared to being fearful of an unidentified car driving by your house. In other words, the fear is mostly unjustified.

Yet, even those who accept the reality of UFOs have a hard time accepting the reality of beings who might be associated with them. This is demonstrated by the early denial of the contactees and sightings of aliens associated with UFOs. This UFOlogical taboo remained strong well into the 1960s. UFOlogists of earlier days had no problem with the idea that alien spaceships were in our skies, but could not accept reports of alien beings.

Why?

Even today, a rapt UFO believer like Kevin Randle cannot accept the idea of alien abduction, where people actually have face to face relationships with alien beings. He offers half-baked reasons why they cannot be true: explanations that are in many ways more difficult to accept than the simple idea that people are simply reporting their experiences.

Why? Why deny any suggestion that might put men in direct contact with the beings that he believes "pilot" UFO spaceships? What is the big deal? If he can have alien spaceships, then why can he not also have the aliens associated with them? (Well, unless they are dead and strewn across the desert landscape.....)

I would suggest that it is because he cannot control them. Is it fear of annihilation, or fear of being inferior? I think it is both of those things.


on May 25th, 2011, 02:18am, figneutron wrote:
This is indicated by the recurring commercial success of films and videos with plots ending in victory over superior alien invaders foiled by an unobvious vulnerablity and human heroics. The resort to trite ridicule by mass media, this functioning as a cultural defense such as in mentions of little green men, is further evidence supporting this hypothesis. The mass resistance to Disclosure, therefore, cannot be overestimated. If it ever accepts the truth, humanity most likely will be dragged to it kicking and screaming upon confrontation with spectacular alien-orchestrated events. Of course, having nothing to gain and everything to lose, the ruling elite will continue to fight Disclosure with all the means at its disposal including assassination. Still, for a few good reasons Disclosure is inevitable in the next twenty-five years, an opinion offered by Richard Dolan and his collaborator in After Disclosure. There is an urgent critical need for serious research upon which to formulate a feasible plan facilitating the ensuing revolution. Against all odds, I persist to hope for a miracle.


I think the popularity of saucer invasion flicks is more an expression of those patriarchal domination fantasies that are part and parcel of our social conditioning. Alien invasion movies are only the science fiction versions of equally popular war and action-hero movies. These all stem from the same patristic cultural fantasies of superiority and dominance through violence and oppression. Why else would otherwise presumably mentally "healthy" individuals get a "feel good" ego boost from movie fantasies that hinge on violence, dominance and sociopathic mayhem against demonized "others"?

We are a culture of insecure bullies. We puff up our sagging self-esteem with fantasies of macho dominance and violent repression. It is not fear of annihilation that creates this sociopathic tendency, but a fundamental lack of self-esteem. We punish our children because we do not want them to embarrass us - because we wrongly believe there is something fundamentally "wrong" with them. But, of course, it is the adults who actually have something "wrong" with them.

That is the disease of our culture. Until "post modern" man comes to grips with the psychic damage wrought by culturally conditioned inferiority complexes, we will never be able to rationally deal with real-live aliens in our midst.

I don't know whether Dolan is right about disclosure or not. But I do hope that disclosure comes before I cast off this mortal coil..... wink

Fig, thanks for bringing up a provocative subject!!

Bonehead
« Last Edit: May 27th, 2011, 10:40am by bonehead » User IP Logged

"The most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible."
ALBERT EINSTEIN
Raf
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1368
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #2 on: May 26th, 2011, 12:43pm »


National Geographic Channel...just last night aired a re-run.."When Aliens Attack" or some such nonsense. I had missed it the first time, but decided to check it out last night.

National Geographic...I'm sorely disappointed. This crap from the magazines I marveled over as a youngster.

How the mighty have fallen.

Raf
User IP Logged

The boldness of asking deep questions may require unforeseen flexibility if we are to accept the answers. ~ Brian Greene
techy030
Guest
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #3 on: May 27th, 2011, 1:16pm »

on May 25th, 2011, 02:18am, figneutron wrote:
Public indifference to the prospect of Disclosure is based on profound and universal unconscious fear of annihilation or subjugation by an advanced alien race. This is indicated by the recurring commercial success of films and videos with plots ending in victory over superior alien invaders foiled by an unobvious vulnerablity and human heroics. The resort to trite ridicule by mass media, this functioning as a cultural defense such as in mentions of little green men, is further evidence supporting this hypothesis. The mass resistance to Disclosure, therefore, cannot be overestimated. If it ever accepts the truth, humanity most likely will be dragged to it kicking and screaming upon confrontation with spectacular alien-orchestrated events. Of course, having nothing to gain and everything to lose, the ruling elite will continue to fight Disclosure with all the means at its disposal including assassination. Still, for a few good reasons Disclosure is inevitable in the next twenty-five years, an opinion offered by Richard Dolan and his collaborator in After Disclosure. There is an urgent critical need for serious research upon which to formulate a feasible plan facilitating the ensuing revolution. Against all odds, I persist to hope for a miracle.


Well no matter how you try to shake a stick at it ETI Disclosure will change things. So it's a real ugly situation at this point with increased fear mongering and acts of desperation by a status quo losing its grip.
User IP Logged

drwu23
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 3638
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #4 on: May 27th, 2011, 2:30pm »

Public indifference..? Fear of 'aliens'..?
I simply don't see this at all in the general public. As an example I am the only person in my extended family and friends who is even interested in the topic of ufos and aliens. People simply are not interested since most think it's nonsense. One can attribute this to various causes like media indifference and ridicule but imho it's not about some pyschological fear of annihilation or subjugation and imo that's simply extreme over analysis.
As far as films people like action and adventure and sci-fi films (and horror) offer that type of release. It's' no more complicated than that imo.
And what mass resistance to 'disclosure' are we talking about. What massess? Where? Again 99% of the population wouldn't even know what that means regarding alien disclosure. Again it's a non issue with most people.
User IP Logged

LoneGunMan
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

Sgt. Major of the Deadly,Evil, Reptilian Hunters of America


PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 2463
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #5 on: May 27th, 2011, 4:33pm »

Drwu,
I tend to agree with your premise. Sometimes even mentioning that you heard about some sighting of an unidentified craft get's little more than a raised eyebrow from MOST people. Either that or a look of scorn because you must be a fool!

Lone
User IP Logged

De Opresso Libre! I Have Been many Men, In Many Times, I Shall Be Again!
\"The real destroyer of the liberties of the people is he who spreads among them bounties, donations and benefits.\"
Plutarch
Call me a coward Lev? Anytime, Anywhere I'll meet you face to face and lets see who is what!!!
masker33
Guest
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #6 on: May 28th, 2011, 08:25am »

Maybe the powers that be know that there are no aliens. They might concede that something, they can not understand, is here and has been for a very, very long time.
L E V I A T H A N 9
User IP Logged

bonehead
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

"All descriptions of reality are temporary hypotheses."


PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1455
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #7 on: May 28th, 2011, 09:48am »

on May 27th, 2011, 2:30pm, drwu23 wrote:
Public indifference..? Fear of 'aliens'..?
People simply are not interested since most think it's nonsense. One can attribute this to various causes like media indifference and ridicule but imho it's not about some pyschological fear of annihilation or subjugation and imo that's simply extreme over analysis.


drwu23,

I can't speak for figneutron, but the "UFO taboo" I talk about is exactly what you are describing here.

You said, "most think it's nonsense". Why? There is no "scientific evidence" that UFOs are "nonsense". Nor can there be, if we approach the question with reason. But reason is not the usual response: denial is. You also mention "media indifference and ridicule". Where did that come from? These reactionary responses to the mere mention of UFOs suggest that there is something psychological askew in regards to our culture's relationship with the question of UFOs.

These common examples of cultural reactionary-ism and denial are an indication of a psychological disconnect or schism. Even you, a person who claims that nobody cares, have clearly delineated the symptoms of a cultural taboo.

If nobody "cares" then why the denial? huh

Bonehead
User IP Logged

"The most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible."
ALBERT EINSTEIN
masker33
Guest
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #8 on: May 28th, 2011, 12:33pm »

Quote:
These common examples of cultural reactionary-ism and denial are an indication of a psychological disconnect or schism. Even you, a person who claims that nobody cares, have clearly delineated the symptoms of a cultural taboo.


NICE.
L E V I A T H A N 9
User IP Logged

drwu23
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 3638
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #9 on: May 28th, 2011, 1:57pm »

on May 28th, 2011, 09:48am, bonehead wrote:
drwu23,

I can't speak for figneutron, but the "UFO taboo" I talk about is exactly what you are describing here.

You said, "most think it's nonsense". Why? There is no "scientific evidence" that UFOs are "nonsense". Nor can there be, if we approach the question with reason. But reason is not the usual response: denial is. You also mention "media indifference and ridicule". Where did that come from? These reactionary responses to the mere mention of UFOs suggest that there is something psychological askew in regards to our culture's relationship with the question of UFOs.

These common examples of cultural reactionary-ism and denial are an indication of a psychological disconnect or schism. Even you, a person who claims that nobody cares, have clearly delineated the symptoms of a cultural taboo.

If nobody "cares" then why the denial? huh

Bonehead


Again I think you are over analyzing and creating your own belief in a denial scenario. There doesn't need to be any scientific evidence that ufos are nonsense since there is none to support them being space aliens as far as the general public is concerned. It's that simple imo.
There is nothing psychologically askew here.

IMO this all falls into the same area as ghosts and fairies, demons, etc in that people aren't exactly afraid of them per se since most think it's not likely any of it is real. One can attribute this view to modern science and it's dismissal of the paranormal in general ,but I simply don't see any deep hidden psychological fear of aliens here or any 'reactionary' positions. Nor do I see a 'cultural taboo' since people talk about ufos and films are made. If there were a true cultural taboo there would be little no talk about ufos, no ufo community, nor any films/tv shows publically made.

IMo it's far more likely that this is due to public indifference created by dismissal of the phenom as legitimate by both mainstream science and the media.
This is more related to paradigm shifts in knowledge and understanding as William James once pointed out.

"First, you know, a new theory is attacked as absurd; then it is admitted to be true, but obvious and insignificant; finally it is seen to be so important that its adversaries claim that they themselves discovered it. "
Lecture VI, Pragmatism's Conception of Truth

grin
User IP Logged

techy030
Guest
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #10 on: May 28th, 2011, 4:48pm »

on May 28th, 2011, 1:57pm, drwu23 wrote:
Again I think you are over analyzing and creating your own belief in a denial scenario. There doesn't need to be any scientific evidence that ufos are nonsense since there is none to support them being space aliens as far as the general public is concerned. It's that simple imo.
There is nothing psychologically askew here.


There is physical trace evidence, cover-up evidence, and plenty of indicators just using your common sense that the UFO phenomenon is ET in origin.

See: http://nawewtech.angelfire.com/et_indicators.html

But you need to ask yourself if there is nothing to ET then why make a big stink over it and try and convince people other wise? Could it be denial?

Like it or not "fear" plays a big role in our defense-laden war mongering system that seems to always need an excuse for foreign conflict. I would say aliens would be no exception to that rule. See Ronald Reagan's speech:

User IP Logged

Kattradamus
Guest
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #11 on: May 28th, 2011, 5:18pm »

Believe a politician, even Ronbo? I guess if they say what one wants to hear - why not. rolleyes
User IP Logged

masker33
Guest
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #12 on: May 28th, 2011, 9:35pm »

Mundane, congrats on being promoted in the ranks. I did not think you had it in you.
L E V I A T H A N 9
User IP Logged

techy030
Guest
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #13 on: Jun 1st, 2011, 11:31am »

on May 28th, 2011, 5:18pm, Katt LE wrote:
Believe a politician, even Ronbo? I guess if they say what one wants to hear - why not. rolleyes


Leo Strauss was the first wasn't he?

"Strauss thinks that a political order can be stable only if it is united by an external threat,'' Drury wrote in her book. ''Following Machiavelli, he maintains that if no external threat exists, then one has to be manufactured. Had he lived to see the collapse of the Soviet Union, he would have been deeply troubled because the collapse of the 'evil empire' poses a threat to America's inner stability.''
Source: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article3284.htm
User IP Logged

drwu23
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 3638
xx Re: Disclosure and the Social Psychology of Fear
« Reply #14 on: Jun 2nd, 2011, 12:34pm »

on May 28th, 2011, 4:48pm, techy030 wrote:
There is physical trace evidence, cover-up evidence, and plenty of indicators just using your common sense that the UFO phenomenon is ET in origin.

See: http://nawewtech.angelfire.com/et_indicators.html

But you need to ask yourself if there is nothing to ET then why make a big stink over it and try and convince people other wise? Could it be denial?

Like it or not "fear" plays a big role in our defense-laden war mongering system that seems to always need an excuse for foreign conflict. I would say aliens would be no exception to that rule. See Ronald Reagan's speech:



There isn't one piece of actual objective evidence that conclusively points to ET.....not one. Please share that piece of evidence that proves ET.
Common sense tells us that the ufo phenom has many aspects to it and that ET is only one possibility.
And who specifically is presenting this 'big stink' and denial?
Of course fear is involved in war and other human aggression etc, but to make a blanket statement that fear is the reason for what some perceive as this general denial of space aliens is only supposition imo.
As far as Reagan was concerned imo his remarks were just a general example and nothing specific and again those who believe in ET have taken this as if it actually means something concrete since they have a vested interest in believing in space aliens.

Having said that I do believe that the ufo phenom is a legitimate phenom but that it is by no means clear it only represents interactions from alleged ET. There is a very good possibility it might be even more profound in origin than simple space travelers and probably has been with mankind from the very beginning of human consciousness on earth. It may have to do with our very place in being and our interaction with reality itself on levels we do not understand.
User IP Logged

Pages: 1 2 3  Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls