Board Logo
« The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jun 22nd, 2017, 8:36pm


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 21 22 23 24 25  ...  61 Notify Send Topic Print
 sticky  Author  Topic: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones  (Read 101593 times)
Aggie
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #330 on: Jun 29th, 2011, 4:28pm »

These are for you Lev, Variants of Lev 2 thought you would like them. Thank you for that crystal display. Loved it.
User Image
User Image
User Image
User Image
User Image
User Image

« Last Edit: Jun 29th, 2011, 4:49pm by Aggie » User IP Logged

Carlito
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #331 on: Jul 18th, 2011, 01:37am »

Pleasure Domes Myths and Lore revisited by El Systema Configurado
The race for habitable caves
First the a brief preface.
In my opinion what followed after the Drone, merits worthiness in this most sacred and hallowed thread of the Drone. Not merely the visual art, but the literary pool from which the story, even in its second incarnation draws from.
"Titan. Its name comes from Xanadu, the legendary palace described in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem Kubla Khan.
The feature was first identified in 1994 by astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope at infrared wavelengths, and has recently been imaged in more detail by the Cassini space probe. Xanadu is about the size of Australia. Preliminary observations indicate that Xanadu is a plateau-like region of highly reflective water ice, contrasting somewhat with the darker lower regions. These in turn seem to contrast quite sharply with the very dark maria, which were once believed to be seas of liquid hydrocarbons, but are now thought to be plains.

Scientists are also investigating the boundary between Xanadu and Shangri-la, a dark region to the west. The shape of the boundary suggests that the dark material embays the bright terrain.

Radar images taken by Cassini have revealed dunes, hills, rivers and valleys present on Xanadu. The features are likely carved in ice, rather than solid ground, by liquid methane or ethane.
Teds Dialectic


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kubla_Khan

Now Coleridge is a an entirely different matter..I find it intriguing that a drug addction such as by an opiate can induce a state that helped produce one of the monumental works in the English language.
Kubla Khan[1] is a poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, completed in 1797 and published in Christabel, Kubla Khan, and the Pains of Sleep in 1816. According to Coleridge's Preface to Kubla Khan, the poem was composed one night after he experienced an opium influenced dream after reading a work describing the Tartar king Kublai Khan. Upon waking, he set about writing lines of poetry that came to him from the dream until he was interrupted by a person from Porlock. The poem could not be completed according to its original 200-300 line plan as the interruption caused him to forget the lines. Although the specific details of Coleridge's Preface are debatable, he most likely composed Kubla Khan during autumn 1797 but left unpublished and kept for private readings until 1816 when, on the prompting by George Gordon Byron, it was made available to the public.

The poem is different in style and form from other poems composed by Coleridge. Kubla Khan is subtitled a "fragment", but it lacks aspects of Coleridge's other fragmentary poems. Instead, its incomplete nature represents aspects of the creative process through its form and message. Its language is highly stylised with a strong emphasis on sound devices that change between the poem's original two stanzas. The first stanza of the poem describes Khan's pleasure dome built alongside a sacred river fed by a powerful fountain. The second stanza of the poem is the narrator's response to the power and effects of an Abyssinian maid's song, which enraptures him but leaves him unable to act on her inspiration unless he could hear her once again. Together, they form a comparison of creative power that does not work with nature and creative power that is harmonious with nature.

Modern critics, with some exceptions, view Kubla Khan as one of Coleridge's three great poems, with The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Christabel. Some critics argue that it is unique in English poetry or one of the greatest English poems, but others claim that its power is overestimated. This is not the case with Coleridge's contemporaries, who mostly denounced the poem upon publication or questioned Coleridge's statements about its origin, but Kubla Khan was originally published because many of Coleridge's associates felt that it, when read by Coleridge aloud, was wonderful. It was not until years later that critics began to openly admire the poem.

The poem begins with a description of Khan's Xanadu, near the river Alph which passes through caverns before reaching a dark or dead sea. Although the land is one of man-made "pleasure", there is a natural, "sacred" river that runs past it. The lines describing the river have a markedly different rhythm from the rest of the passage:[28]

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree :
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea. (lines 1-5)


The land is constructed as a paradisical garden, but like Eden after Man's fall, Xanadu is isolated by walls. The finite property of the constructed walls of Xanadu are contrasted with the infinite properties of the natural caves through which the river runs.

So twice five miles of fertile ground
With walls and towers were girdled round:
And here were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfolding sunny spots of greenery. (lines 6-11)

The poem expands on the gothic hints of the first stanza as the narrator explores the dark chasm in the midst of Xanadu's gardens, and describes the surrounding area as both "savage" and "holy". Yarlott interprets this chasm as symbolic of the poet struggling with decadence that ignores nature.[51] It may also represent the dark side of the soul, the dehumanizing effect of power and dominion.

But oh! that deep romantic chasm which slanted
Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover!
A savage place! as holy and enchanted
As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted

By woman wailing for her demon-lover! (lines 12-16)

From the dark chasm a fountain violently erupts, then forms the meandering river Alph, which runs to the sea described in the first stanza. Fountains are often symbolic of the inception of life, and in this case may represent forceful creativity.[52] Since this fountain ends in death, it may also simply represent the life span of a human, from violent birth to a sinking end.

And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething,
As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing,
A mighty fountain momently was forced:
Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst
Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail,
Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher's flail:
And 'mid these dancing rocks at once and ever
It flung up momently the sacred river.
Five miles meandering with a mazy motion
Through wood and dale the sacred river ran,
Then reached the caverns measureless to man,
And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean: (lines 17-28)

Kubla Khan hears voices of the dead, and refers to a vague "war" that appears to be unreferenced elsewhere in the poem. Yarlott argues that the war represents the penalty for seeking pleasure, or simply the confrontation of the present by the past:[53]

And 'mid this tumult Kubla heard from far
Ancestral voices prophesying war! (lines 29-30)


Though the exterior of Xanadu is presented in images of darkness, and in context of the dead sea, we are reminded of the "miracle" and "pleasure" of Kubla Khan's creation. The vision of the sites, including the dome, the cavern, and the fountain, are similar to an apocalyptic vision. Together, the natural and man-made structures form a miracle of nature as they represent the mixing of opposites together, the essence of creativity:[54]

The shadow of the dome of pleasure
Floated midway on the waves;
Where was heard the mingled measure
From the fountain and the caves.
It was a miracle of rare device,
A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice! (lines 31-36)

The narrator turns prophetic, referring to a vision of an unidentified "Abyssinian maid" who sings of "Mount Abora". Harold Bloom suggests that this passage reveals the narrator's desire to rival Khan's ability to create with his own.[55] The woman may also refer to Mnemosyne, the Greek personification of memory and mother of the muses, referring directly to Coleridge's claimed struggle to compose this poem from memory of a dream.

A damsel with a dulcimer
In a vision once I saw:
It was an Abyssinian maid,
And on her dulcimer she played,
Singing of Mount Abora.
Could I revive within me
Her symphony and song,
To such a deep delight 'twould win me,
That with music loud and long,
I would build that dome in air,
That sunny dome! those caves of ice! (lines 37-47)

The subsequent passage refers to unnamed witnesses who may also hear this, and thereby share in the narrator's vision of a replicated, ethereal, Xanadu. Harold Bloom suggests that the power of the poetic imagination, stronger than nature or art, fills the narrator and grants him the ability to share this vision with others through his poetry. The narrator would thereby be elevated to an awesome, almost mythical status, as one who has experienced an Edenic paradise available only to those who have similarly mastered these creative powers:[56]

And all who heard should see them there,
And all should cry, Beware! Beware!
His flashing eyes, his floating hair!
Weave a circle round him thrice,
And close your eyes with holy dread,
For he on honey-dew hath fed,
And drunk the milk of Paradise. (lines 48-54) "

L


A bright note we leave on...but perhaps I can cover Osirio , another of Coleridges works later and nore telling about us and our assunptions.What does this have to do with the Drone? My Dear, It Doesnt ! It's about us. [i]To be continued[/i
« Last Edit: Jul 18th, 2011, 02:25am by Carlito » User IP Logged

Carlito
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #332 on: Jul 20th, 2011, 6:01pm »

LeviathanS Art
There was as in Levs and Isaacs narratives an inherent duality if speaking to more than one audience.which one audience can see him lying and another he was speaking the truth from a different perspective. Several of his works, not posted here, had towers with the mosque tops, prior to us going into the Turkish and subsequently Grecian and Sumerian deity matters. At one time. he had the drones along an Egyptian type edifice..which he removed.
User Image
User Image

It was not to hide anything I believe. But rather to seed for a brief period our minds... Or as in Shamalymans psycho thrillers release a red or black baloon would precede a death. Both IA and Lev approached the mind from two different aspects. IA from a Coleridge transcendental knowing, and Lev from an HP Lovecraft perspective, where a knowing an ancient God , or Elder God like Cthulu would guarantee certain death. The very author.. mentioned ..Again..like the Ferryman crossing us thru the fabled river Styx.
Both are like us navigators, ferrymen, occupy the role of death and the Life in death ofColerdidge. I have no doubt these artists are working together, as they do in alliances. Let me make it clear its not religion they are pushing, just the boundary of imagination. One can't go wrong using such well known classics, celebrated by rock groups such as Iron Maiden, and well covered in wiki. Lev had mentioned the ntartic more than once, and it is an area that intirgued both writers.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rime_of_the_Ancient_Mariner

http://highwaycyclinggroup.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/unknown-1.jpeg?w=470&h=339


The poem may have been inspired by James Cook's second voyage of exploration (17721775) of the South Seas and the Pacific Ocean; Coleridge's tutor, William Wales, was the astronomer on Cook's flagship and had a strong relationship with Cook. On this second voyage Cook crossed three times into the Antarctic Circle to determine whether the fabled great southern continent existed.[1] Critics have also opined that the poem may have been inspired by the voyage of Thomas James into the Arctic. "Some critics think that Coleridge drew upon James's account of hardship and lamentation in writing The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.[2]
In Biographia Literaria XIV, Coleridge writes:

The thought suggested itself (to which of us I do not recollect) that a series of poems might be composed of two sorts. In the one, incidents and agents were to be, in part at least, supernatural, and the excellence aimed at was to consist in the interesting of the affections by the dramatic truth of such emotions, as would naturally accompany such situations, supposing them real. And real in this sense they have been to every human being who, from whatever source of delusion, has at any time believed himself under supernatural agency. For the second class, subjects were to be chosen from ordinary life[b]...In this idea originated the plan of the 'Lyrical Ballads'; in which it was agreed, that my endeavours should be directed to persons and characters supernatural, or at least Romantic; yet so as to transfer from our inward nature a human interest and a semblance of truth sufficient to procure for these shadows of imagination that willing suspension of disbelief for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith. ... With this view I wrote the 'Ancient Mariner'. [/b]
The structure of the poem, according to McGann, is influenced by Coleridge's interest in higher criticism, and its function "was to illustrate a significant continuity of meaning between cultural phenomena that seemed as diverse as pagan superstitions, Catholic theology, Aristotelian science, and contemporary philological theory, to name only a few of the work's ostentatiously present materials."[8]

In his 1946-47 essay "The Mariner and the Albatross", George Whalley suggests that the Ancient Mariner is an autobiographical portrait of Coleridge himself, comparing the Mariner's loneliness with Coleridge's own feelings of loneliness expressed in his letters and journals.[9]


Lovecraft had a lifelong interest in Antarctic exploration. "Lovecraft had been fascinated with the Antarctic continent since he was at least 12 years old, when he had written several small treatises on early Antarctic explorers," biographer S. T. Joshi wrote.[4] At about the age of 9, inspired by W. Clark Russell's 1887 book The Frozen Pirate, Lovecraft had written "several yarns" set in Antarctica.[5]

By the 1920s, S. T. Joshi notes in The Annotated Lovecraft that Antarctica was "one of the last unexplored regions of the earth, where large stretches of territory had never seen the tread of human feet. Contemporary maps of the continent show a number of provocative blanks, and Lovecraft could exercise his imagination in filling them in...with little fear of immediate contradiction."[6]

The first expedition of Richard Evelyn Byrd took place in 1928-1930, the period just before the novella was written, and Lovecraft mentioned the explorer repeatedly in his letters, remarking at one point on "geologists of the Byrd expedition having found many fossils indicating a tropical past".[7] In fact, Miskatonic University's expedition was modelled after that of Byrd.[8]

In Lovecraft: A Look Behind the Cthulhu Mythos Lin Carter suggests - with Joshi noting the suggestion as "facile" - that one inspiration for At the Mountains of Madness was Lovecraft's own hypersensitivity to cold, as evidenced by an incident where the writer "collapsed in the street and was carried unconscious into a drug store" because the temperature dropped from 60 degrees to 30 degrees Fahrenheit (15 degrees to -1 degree Celsius). "The loathing and horror that extreme cold evoked in him was carried over into his writing," Carter wrote, "and the pages of Madness convey the blighting, blasting, stifling sensation caused by sub-zero temperatures in a way that even Poe could not suggest."[9]

Practicing occultist and co-author of The Necronomicon Files John William Gonce III asserts that Lovecraft "never divorced magic from his fiction; he simply married it to science." Gonce says Lovecraft continued to use occult plot devices in his stories until the end of his life.[17]

The story has also inadvertently popularized the concept of ancient astronauts, as well as Antarctica's place in the "ancient astronaut mythology".[1User Image
http://www.rlyeh.nl/
Hmm..Beware the Green Monster ...

If we do some more in depth there is an entire universe we can trasverse
^ "Deities & Demigods, Legends & Lore". The Acaeum. http://www.acaeum.com/ddindexes/setpages/deities.html. Retrieved 2010-05-10.0
[/b]Eventually, we are left again on the shores like the mariner, are we enlightened? or do we wear an albatross around our necks forever., Prometheus bound even, Certanly nothing will ever seem the same as before, whether an event is real, imagined, or dreamed.






« Last Edit: Jul 21st, 2011, 12:05am by Carlito » User IP Logged

Carlito
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #333 on: Jul 21st, 2011, 12:42am »

This one for my friend the wild horse.

User IP Logged

Carlito
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #334 on: Jul 22nd, 2011, 10:38pm »

Nahh old friend. I doubt Lev would allow himself to be known, any more than the Angels and Lot did in the Old testament , or even us want to. which is why we wear the masks we do. He just happens to require a tad more personal space than the average person.
When I found the references to historical artifacts in the LAP, and the other curiosities, it became a find, seek, and compare. Lev himself said it was a game at Reality uncovered... That has not changed for me. I overlook the annoyances he caused at time, and look at all the elements he put before us. The Cthulu mythos, well entrenched in horror fiction, is certainly well embedded, and in the historical record of occult..let me call it Ultist ..fiction. (pun intended).
I once read a short fictional piece about 4 decades ago.. of a race of beings that came to our world to seek help. They were apparently more advanced. What attracted them to us iwas our capacty to think out the box..requisite for survival.. unlike their world, that had genetically filtered crazy people out.. .we allowed ours more or less to exist as a part of our genetic pool. That craziness, mental illness gave us a more creative edge, then they had. Been a while..but that always stuck in my mind.
A fiction can be put to good use..it's understood to be a fiction, yet people act on it to honor the excellence, and even as a therapy.
I lift this link in the last post to demonstrate.

User Image

Great isn't it?..see the http://www.wolfandwater.org/ and what it does. say..I wonder if they can do one like that for the Drone on BB..hehe.why not? a Pic of it would fit perfectly on that map.
I enjoyed Tommis presentation, or analogy to Pi, though not related directly, it was in my minds eye..metaphorical allusion to the Mariner, and helped setup the contrast to Cthulu. Two vehicles we have then to learning and discovery.
Now, the DT, and LMH, are definitely in my opinion the collective genesis of the the Drones demise., to become immersed as a cultural phenomenon like Cthulu or the Ancient Mariner. That should be a signal, for both movie makers and game developers and authors, to avoid using these people as vehicles for insertion into the paranormal or ufolological landscape.
I don't know about the rascalion Bunnywrench, as I never followed him. The journey to Borneo was not wasted, for my use in other matters.
So in summary, if I helped in understanding Lev a bit, good, if not, at least he can read that some of us really cared for him and had a genuine interest in his work and his vision, and their use in pointing the way to answers..
As for AW it must continue to wear the albatross around its neck from here on end. It will find eventually, the cost outweighs the benefit of maintaining a lie, anymore than a bling necklace stirs the soul.
They cannot match the masters Coleridge and HPL and what they gave us. Certainly Lev was instrumental and more effective in giving me a glimpse into his world..and theirs.He really was a "gatekeeper".

« Last Edit: Jul 23rd, 2011, 12:06am by Carlito » User IP Logged

blackwater
Full Member
ImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM


Posts: 104
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #335 on: Jul 22nd, 2011, 11:28pm »

User Image

b l a c k w a t e r
User IP Logged

let 'em call ya anything but late for a meal time.
Carlito
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #336 on: Jul 22nd, 2011, 11:42pm »

nice Blackwater!
I have some pixthat, one can imagine this creature fit that reddish tinge
User Image
User Image
User Image
User Image

If requested will remove they are levs when he posted here.
IA IA!! grin




« Last Edit: Jul 23rd, 2011, 6:53pm by Carlito » User IP Logged

Carlito
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #337 on: Jul 24th, 2011, 02:07am »

User Image
before attempting to decipher a passage in secret writing they should invoke the names of angels . .
Umberto Eco
User IP Logged

blackwater
Full Member
ImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM


Posts: 104
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #338 on: Jul 24th, 2011, 05:27am »

Thanks Carlito grin

I'm learning to use a program called zBrush in my spare time.

User IP Logged

let 'em call ya anything but late for a meal time.
Carlito
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #339 on: Jul 24th, 2011, 12:54pm »

Z-brush stellar sculpting program. You did that canvas with that? It reminded me more of the rpg art and covers on the old Amazing and A Galaxy mags. You know, I tried years ago and could not get past the interface, it was so complex. A Maya or Bryce student could easily i am sure. Maybe its a rite of passage or something they have rigged up to pass the interfaces in these tools, an then be called an artist. For all intense and purposes that was an alien panel board . But even some of the byproducts I managed to produce , made fantastic eye candy with that liquid metal effect. Levs has that same liquid metal look, I am sure you picked up on that immediately.
Good for you! grin
User Image
I always loved hidden stuff in this game..as much as some had putting putting them there.





here is one done on zbrush from an old foto
User Image
Lev did this geneology like plaque with the LAP
User Image

User Image
In the midst of the net I came across this called 1 Portal.
which then reminded me of this passage

Porta Ludovica, where reality is contained in a "magic space;" a place only tenuously connected to other related spatial points, denying unilateral thought, confirming a universe of uncertainty -- even, at times, unsure of its own existence. With only the slightest slant in the direction of postmodernism, it becomes a small analog of Avalon, of Shangri-La, of the Goblin Market, Arcadia and Wonderland -- in fact, to any one of a hundred mythical places with which we share a secret coexistence, a portal to a world just at the edge of our reason. And with a small but knowing nod to Net culture, perhaps to even that "consensual hallucination" of Cyberspace itself.

I must say, Rod Serling could not not have said it better himself.

Suddenly I hear a haunting voice , like a sirens , you remember.. those mythical voices that have caused many a mariner and their crew to go mad and jump into the murky waters to certain death. It cried, o no no seniore ..go to Ultissis..Ultissis is the place! come we are here!.
Scratch | Project | New anthro!
http://www.scratch.mit.edu/projects/Bella8647/1306889 - Cached
Bio:She was born on the planet Ultisis,a far away planet.The hedgehogs that inhabit the planet are a race of ultimate hedgehogs. ...
I covered my ears like Ulysses of old, sailed merrily, yet cautiously past it.
Yes Bunny the funky rabbit turned siren, would fit in just fine right with Hedgehogs..go Bunny go..

User Image
Lev called it Leviathan Surfaces, I shall call this one, Free Willy
Indeed swim free and unfettered and untethered as the imagination should.




« Last Edit: Aug 18th, 2011, 7:53pm by Carlito » User IP Logged

blackwater
Full Member
ImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM


Posts: 104
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #340 on: Aug 5th, 2011, 04:04am »

Sys you should give zBrush another chance, once you get passed the interface it's really fun to sculpt and play around with, but I would recommend using a tablet pen over a mouse. It's my first 3D program so I've been downloading all the tutorials and guides I can find. If you want some .PDF's or videos just let me know.
cool
User IP Logged

let 'em call ya anything but late for a meal time.
Carlito
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #341 on: Aug 6th, 2011, 10:38am »

User Image


User Image
Goodbye said the Fox, and now here is my
secret:
It is only with the heart that one can
see rightly,what is essential is invisible to the eye

From the Little Prince

Thank you..The Real Reader
« Last Edit: Aug 6th, 2011, 11:46am by Carlito » User IP Logged

blackwater
Full Member
ImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM


Posts: 104
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #342 on: Aug 6th, 2011, 4:43pm »

User Image
User IP Logged

let 'em call ya anything but late for a meal time.
Carlito
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #343 on: Aug 6th, 2011, 8:24pm »

Your rose is your rose even if their a thousand copies of it..it is unique as that girls is hers and you are special to it as well, as one captures a moment or it captures you...Did you ever read the little prince?
It's the second most printed book next to the Bible, that is quite an accomplishment, It was suggested to me a while back by Reader along with other childrens and thinkers books...I have been grateful ever since.....I certainly wasn't trying to make you or your work..the Aardman, as KLat alludes to in his cracklin expressions.. out. I just happened to notice neat curvatures on the surface and played with hues that is all. I was surprised to see a Vector symbol we have come to know. With the ships light beams, it reminded me of spacecraft making cropcircles and that's why I left it as that. IA, Atto, and several others termed caret a transport device, They were correct in whatever manner anyone looks at it, imo.
I have no doubt all was inspiring for you as well as the rest of us.


Say,I just saw Planet of The Apes..I give it a thumbs up..
Yes When I clear out this HD I will give you a yell. I'm looking at some tablets on Ebay now.
Thank you too
Say on the light portal there were 2 versions. They are from Levs old gallery. About 2 days ago I made out one word that spelled Shinoe,

User Image
which is a Japanese name.
By Serendipity, it also the name of a famous woman who wrote down some of the things she saw during or post Hiroshima and was censored heavily by the Allies occupying the city afterwards.. The notes made it out eventually. The Anniversary just passed, Aug 6 1945..66th Anniv.
Interesting..Of course..but that could be just my imagination.. It could be a reference to Shinoe Dj.. as we had many musicians, and artists mentioned and participating..,but they all seemed to ay homage or tribute to something, rather than just sign their name.but given the historical things embedded thruout..I believe its the former, or at the least for a different project.
I like how he works with that glass and embedding and polarization of light. Oh I had to flip the picture., so one can imagine flipping , wrting, flipping again, or inversion.
Tedious work to say the least.
« Last Edit: Aug 7th, 2011, 04:14am by Carlito » User IP Logged

Carlito
Guest
xx Re: The Art and Aesthetics of Les Drones
« Reply #344 on: Aug 7th, 2011, 9:34pm »

Nightshift at the Droneworks
by Katterfelto

User Image

« Last Edit: Aug 7th, 2011, 10:13pm by Carlito » User IP Logged

Pages: 1 ... 21 22 23 24 25  ...  61 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls