Board Logo
« UFO in the news »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Sep 19th, 2017, 12:16pm


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8  ...  10 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: UFO in the news  (Read 8160 times)
Reasoner
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1014
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #75 on: Jul 10th, 2012, 5:34pm »

So this guy is interviewed by the Huffington Post. It's mentioned that he has several books out. So I'm guessing... not new news. This guy also has financial stake in this story. Dubious? Sensationalist? Fact checking about to commence?
User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
icepick
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 5931
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #76 on: Jul 17th, 2012, 8:06pm »

Hey Reasoner. I'm sure you realize by now that this guy has a thread going in the hoax section?
User IP Logged

Reasoner
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1014
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #77 on: Aug 1st, 2012, 6:03pm »

Is it just me? Or is the casebook forum starting to buzz? This is just an aside, and nothing yet in the MSM about ETH, UFO, et. al.

Maybe it's just me, posting here and there, getting excited for MUFON announcement to amaze me straight out of my socks... or roll my eyes.

It's probably that my back is slowly healing, and I'm not feeling quite as gimpy as last week. Sudden burst of energy, clicking of the heels, talking a bit like a manic busybody.
User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
icepick
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 5931
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #78 on: Aug 6th, 2012, 05:34am »

That's just the narcotics at work Reasoner. grin

Actually, I have thought myself that Casebook shifted a gear after we added that hoax section. It's as if suddenly even the believers are obsessed with resolving the more ridiculous reports. I feared a flame war, but the actual results seems to be everybody's IQ jumping a couple of numbers higher. Pretty cool eh?

Tim
User IP Logged

Reasoner
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1014
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #79 on: Sep 13th, 2012, 7:53pm »

Hey all. I find it ironic that that last post on this thread was from Tim a little over a month ago, agreeing that the discourse seemed to flowing better, and more provocative ideas were under discussion.

Then? Something happened. Or rather, nothing of import happened. Interest seems to have flagged. Or maybe it's just my interest that has waned.

So, as not to worry anyone by simply disappearing altogether, I'm just announcing I'm taking a break. Maybe it's the current political rhetoric in the air because of impending U.S. elections, but I'm getting a bit tired of parsing information and trying to fact check every article and tidbit, or scrutinizing evidentiary details.

Nothing's going on! I'm not seeing any kind of big news in Ufology and/or in the media, and I don't want to argue YouTube clips anymore. Nor have to explain my soft sarcasm explicitly to people who don't get it, as it ruins the joke and effect.

So, I'll see you in a couple of months. Feel free to post in this particular thread if you see mainstream news being reported on UFOs (that's what I started this for).

Of course, I'll definitely be back sooner if, say, Obama's holographic facade drops and we see his true reptilian overlord face, but those high tech alien generators tend not to be very glitchy, so the likelihood is I'll see you in the early months of 2013 to join in the mocking chorus of those who believed the world would get smacked in 2012.

Be well. Be good to each other. Make a point to listen, and always re-examine your own beliefs. And as always, keep watching the skies smiley
User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
icepick
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 5931
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #80 on: Sep 13th, 2012, 10:09pm »

Ah, sound advice as always Reasoner. I believe the main problem to be the fact that there's been some screwy developments on the political/military front that's going who knows where. If we find a real politician between now and then, we'll chain them here, okay? All imposters/jokers will be dealt with in the usual fashion, unless we're fortunate enough to acquire a pack of very hungry wild dogs.

Tim
User IP Logged

Reasoner
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1014
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #81 on: Oct 4th, 2012, 12:43pm »

just popping in for a moment to splash this into the thread.

'Cincinnati Lights' UFO Mystery Solved; It's Skydivers, Not UFOs
Huffington Post | By David Moye
Posted: 10/03/2012 4:43 pm EDT Updated: 10/03/2012 4:43 pm EDT

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/03/cincinnati-lights-ufo-mystery_n_1936994.html



For a few days, Ohio's UFO community was fascinated by a mysterious phenomenon colloquially as "the Cincinnati Lights" -- a group of bizarre bulbs shining in the skies over the city on Sept. 28.

Interest was especially high because the sighting was familiar to the 1997 "Phoenix Lights" and the 2010 "El Paso Lights," but it turns out that the source of the illumination wasn't extraterrestrial at all, according to NBC News.

The man who posted the original "Cincinnati Lights" video on YouTube, who calls himself "Galuyasdi" said that what some people thought were UFOs were actually skydivers doing a pyrotechnics jump at the La Salle High School homecoming.


There are links in the article for more information, plus a helpful montage of non-ET explanations of UFOs. I wasn't aware of how prevalent google streetview lens flares are being mistaken for UFOs.

One thing I do find interesting is this isn't the first UFO spotted over a sporting event explained to be a night time skydiver team. Looking at the video, I can accept the explanation. I just wonder how night time sky diving can be at all entertaining for onlookers, other than mistaking them for flying saucers.
« Last Edit: Oct 4th, 2012, 12:46pm by Reasoner » User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
PowerKnight
Metallic Silver Flying Saucers Exist...I Should Know I Once Experienced A Close Encounter Of The First Kind!
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

Silver Spaceships Of Sublime Beauty!


PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1705
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #82 on: Oct 4th, 2012, 2:49pm »

Lawwalk just threaded two videos of this in another sub-forum, night time skydiving isn`t that a little dangerous!!! PowerKnight wink
« Last Edit: Oct 4th, 2012, 2:49pm by PowerKnight » User IP Logged

PowerKnight`s Perchance To Dream...

Joust With Thee
For I The PowerKnight Hath Taken
Escaped From The Castle
A Damsel Distressed Unto Thee
The PowerKnight Legacy

...Composed From The Poetic Pen Of PowerKnight.
Reasoner
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1014
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #83 on: Nov 20th, 2012, 11:49am »

I have been remiss to update this. I know I said I was leaving for a bit, but the "big" news recently with multiple stories was the UFOs spotted in Denver, and a news crew filming them.

I rolled my eyes when I read the story and looked at the video. This is everything that's wrong with how the media reports on UFOs. One camera is not enough. If you catch these things, why not a follow up with more serious acumen? Nope. Use the sole video, run the story. Why? Call me cynical, but I believe that the reporter knows the truth. It's just bugs. But the reporter knows that people will eat up a story about UFOs and just runs with this. I think this is purposeful deception at worst, willful ignorance at best.

This immediately reminded me of DrDil's insights into the Chilean Air Force UFO flap, and his painstaking look at the apparent culprit.

THAT made me go and google Leslie Kean and see what others may have thought of that. I instead found Kean had written an entire article just about the bugs theory to debunk it. She used faux objectivity and rigor in her argument. She never directly addressed the flight of one of the UFOs in the foreground, and she never addressed the problems of close, small objects distorting when captured on video. She wanted entomologists to identify video distortions as to what kind of insects they are. Named and world renowned entomologists! See what connections get you? She failed to convince me, having seen the argument she was trying to debunk... but she doesn't offer the direct refutation for you to inspect, only mentions it. So had you not seen DrDil's inspection, you might probably be swayed by Kean.

It was Kean's obvious duplicity that had me so incensed that when I saw Hastings on the forums and his casual dismissal of criticism, I just had to write back.

There are definitely things unknown out there! We need objective people out there helping to discover what they are, not people unwilling to change their mind on a particular event for fear of undermining their name and book sales.

Stories like the UFO over Denver are further harming the study of UFOs. Sure they generate a surge of interest, but when an obvious real world explanation is easily at hand, it just turns more "normal folks" away. And probably a few enthusiasts, I'm sure.

Some of the die hard rail against science and scientists as being close-minded, unwilling to see what's there. And I would agree that scientists are people, with biases and feelings, not robots pure in logic. But science is merely a tool for understanding (when used properly). A good scientist will form a hypothesis, try to induce through experimentation instances to confirm his hypothesis, and then make sure to test hard and poke holes in his argument, ensure that his (or her, ladies, sorry) results aren't flawed, that they solidly hold water.

Posting a video of a single incidence... that's well and fine for us amateurs who likely don't have good equipment, the time, or the opportunity to witness an event like a UFO ever again. But reporters who have the opportunity to revisit an incident with excellent equipment... they should be shamed for the shoddy way they handled the subject.

Addendum: did not properly capitalize DrDil. Remedied the mistake
« Last Edit: Nov 20th, 2012, 2:52pm by Reasoner » User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
HAL9000
Guest
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #84 on: Nov 20th, 2012, 2:08pm »

Reasoner,

The Denver Post never replied to my Email regarding this matter.

HAL
User IP Logged

Reasoner
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1014
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #85 on: Dec 6th, 2012, 6:35pm »

I noted today that most people have cool, funny, pithy quotes associated to their names, and so I set out to find one for myself. I wanted to quote my namesake, and knowing that he was a dry wit but sometimes nastily sarcastic, I thought I'd find something quite apropos.

I found this one. Unfortunately, it runs a little counter to my own beliefs, and is a bit too antagonistic - but it did give me a choking chortle, so I'm just putting it here for your amusement.

I guess it DOES belong here as one tiny datum of evidence on how the media portrays belief in UFOs, so here you go. Harry Reasoner.

"When 25 percent of the population believe the President should be impeached and 51 percent of the population believe in UFOs, you may or may not need a new President, but you definitely need a new population."
(from http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/h/harryreaso305138.html#M7a5RKbe5kgwhQIF.99)
« Last Edit: Dec 6th, 2012, 6:35pm by Reasoner » User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
Reasoner
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1014
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #86 on: Jan 14th, 2013, 5:53pm »

The case of the weather balloon.

That UFO exploding over California? Looks like a weather balloon
Updated: Fri, 04 Jan 2013 19:16:03 GMT | By Alan Boyle

http://news.ca.msn.com/top-stories/that-ufo-exploding-over-california-looks-like-a-weather-balloon

A smartphone video that shows a bright orb exploding in the sky sparked a UFO mystery in Sacramento, Calif., but it looks as if the mystery has been solved: It was a weather balloon.

That may sound like the quintessential cover story from the flying-saucer conspiracy, but in this case, the explanation makes perfect sense.

The video was shot through the eyepiece of a telescope by Elijah Prychodzko around 5 p.m. on Dec. 20, and aired by Sacramento's CBS13 television station on New Year's Eve. The first video clip shows the orb in the sky with a smaller object swinging around it. Prychodzko calling his nephew over to take a look, and then turned back to shoot another video clip.

"Oh my God, it just blew up!" Prychodzko can be heard saying. The video showed a haze of fragments floating in the air.

In its account of the Sacramento UFO incident, The Huffington Post said "nobody has come forward to officially explain the event." On the Above Top Secret forum, however, the discussion quickly turned to weather balloons. The most telling message was this one, attributed to the National Weather Service's Upper Air Observations Program:

"...It is very likely a weather balloon that burst. The small dot 'orbiting' the balloon was the radiosonde that was attached below it with about 70 to 100 feet of string.

"The weather balloon was likely released by the National Weather Service (NWS) upper air station in Oakland, California, at about 3:00 p.m. local time.

"Here is a video of a NWS weather balloon burst taken by a NWS meteorologist through a telescope: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lG3zr0yaJw"

George Cline, observation program officer for the National Weather Service's office in Sacramento, confirmed that the Oakland station releases its balloons at around 3 p.m. and 3 a.m. PT and that the flights last about an hour and a half. He noted that the timing for Prychodzko's reported sighting fits the afternoon timeline.

"That would put it right around the time for a balloon burst," Cline told NBC News.


here is the link that didn't copy from the original, not the known weather balloon:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ycPDg2vVLtA

It makes sense... it's a round orb, a real world explanation, a coinciding time frame of a balloon released nearby (atmospherically, that is), and the explosion would be an hour and a half to two hours in. But... the colors. Is it that the phone clip was so slow-motioned that there was distortion? It looks orange-y and stuff. What's in those things to explode? Maybe we need some weather balloon 101 to dispel the myths and tell us the real world science behind these.

If I were the guy taking the video, I'd be pretty flabbergasted too smiley
« Last Edit: Jan 14th, 2013, 5:54pm by Reasoner » User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
Reasoner
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1014
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #87 on: Jan 14th, 2013, 8:29pm »

I need to follow up on this video. It's got Nick Pope and others on CNN talking about UFO government news releases, with a montage of some incredible looking UFOs. Some I've already seen, and have been "explained", but others are crazy looking!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FWjtZ7nmr0

The problem is, I gotta find the source. Here's good old "it'sgottabetrue" youtube. Also, the date of upload is like January of last year. So, this is probably nothing. I want to dissect it for each of its bits. Watch all the legs wriggle tongue
User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
Reasoner
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1014
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #88 on: Jan 16th, 2013, 4:40pm »

This is a follow-up to my earlier article with video that was a possible exploding weather balloon. This is from an eHow article.

Read more: Why Do Weather Balloons Expand at High Altitudes?
By Noelle Carver, eHow Contributor

http://www.ehow.com/about_6400424_do-balloons-expand-high-altitudes_.html

Even though weather balloons look floppy, small and strange from the outset--like weak floating bubbles--when they reach altitudes of over 100,000 feet (30,000 meters) the balloons are taut, strong and sometimes as big as a house. Starting with the invention of the hot air balloon in the 18th century, balloon flights have made it possible to carry objects high into the sky.

In 1785, the English physician John Jeffries--who often receives credit as the first person to use hot air balloons for scientific purposes--attached a thermometer, barometer and hygrometer (an instrument that measures relative humidity) to a hot air balloon. The balloon reached a soaring height of 9,000 ft (2,700 m) and measured atmospheric data. As of 2010, modern weather balloons reach heights of over 100,000 feet and use helium or hydrogen instead of hot air to rise.

Filling & Rising
To launch a weather balloon, meteorologists fill the balloon with either helium or hydrogen, the lightest and most abundant elements in the universe. However, the scientists do not fill the balloon all the way to capacity: when the balloon starts to rise, the balloon casing (or envelope) looks floppy, not taut like a blown-up balloon or hot air balloon.

Scientists do not fill the balloon to capacity for strategic reasons: as a balloon rises into the atmosphere, the pressure around the balloon decreases. The pressure decreases because air gets thinner in higher atmosphere. As the pressure decreases, a balloon fills tight, to its full capacity, to make up for the loss of outside pressure.

Atmospheric Considerations
According to Donald Yee, Ph. D from the San Francisco Estuary Institute, at ground level atmospheric pressure is much stronger than it is high up in the thinner atmosphere. If the balloon were completely filled from the start, as the pressure outside the balloon dropped, the balloon would attempt to expand to equalize the pressure, but instead it would pop.

How Weather Balloons Work
Meteorologists and scientists use weather balloons to make meteorological measurements in high altitudes. Scientists attach an instrument called a radiosonde to the base of the helium filled balloon. The radiosonde---which measures temperature, humidity and air pressure---transmits meteorological measurements to ground stations through radio transmitters.

Volume
As a weather balloon rises into high altitudes, where air pressure decreases, the helium or hydrogen pressure inside the balloon increases and expands the balloon. This way the balloon and the radiosonde can rise at a consistent pace high into the atmosphere. Balloons zoom upwards at around 1,000 feet per minute.

Rising Effects
According to Wendell Bechtold, Meteorologist Forecaster for the National Weather Service in St. Louis Missouri, the balloon ascends to an altitude of around 100,000 feet, enough to see the earth's blue rounded edge from space. By that height, the balloon---depending on the size of the envelope or balloon material---is stretched as wide as a car or house.

When the balloon can no longer stretch outward, and therefore rise further, the balloon ruptures. The gas inside escapes and the radiosonde instrument and busted balloon fall back down to earth. A parachute attached to the instrument prevents damage; however, the balloon cannot be used again.

Retrieval
Before attaching the radiosonde to a balloon, meteorologists insert a small bag inside the radiosonde. Inside the bag is a card telling whoever finds the fallen balloon and instrument what it is and its scientific purpose. That person should mail the radiosonde back to a reconditioning center where scientists read the data, repair any damages and reuse the radiosonde for a future flight.


If these balloons are designed to reach around 100,000 feet above the ground, and rise at an average rate of 1000 feet a minute, then you can see the time that a balloon would be aloft from point of launch would be approximately 100 minutes, which is nearly 2 hours. This was alluded to when the meteorologist made the remarks of the expected burst time.

It would also appear that all normal (not sky hook) weather balloons are expected to burst. It seems they have to... to keep rising they eventually hit their maximum expansion limits. But I wonder, wouldn't a balloon eventually stop rising, as the lack of pressure in the upper parts of the atmosphere would be lighter than what's inside the balloon? Probably not enough that the burst wouldn't happen.

The question I have in relation to the earlier video is, as I've seen other videos of balloons exploding on the ground and in the higher altitudes, what made the color explosion that was in the particular recorder's video? It was orange-ish. In the other videos, at low levels, the gas expelled cannot be seen, and higher up, it appears whitish (probably as precipitate is immediately formed with the released gas). Was it the distortion from this guy's camera itself? Were there effects added? I mean, it looks like a more fiery explosion, but in this day and age, it's hard to trust the source to be untouched.
« Last Edit: Jan 16th, 2013, 4:46pm by Reasoner » User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
Reasoner
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1014
xx Re: UFO in the news
« Reply #89 on: Jan 17th, 2013, 3:28pm »

I went back and looked at my earlier CNN video. It was recorded around mid May of 2008. I got that from reading the news scroll on the bottom. I also was able to make out some of the various sightings that were split-screened next to interviews.

- There was a White Sands, NM 1996 (shows glowing object that skips once off ground then disintegrates on second ground strike).

- Beijing, China 1995 (shows glowing, slow moving object)

- Stuttgart, Germany 1993 (glowing object, very similar to Beijing ufo)

- Mexican Air Force video from 2004 (likely oil platform burn-off flares)

- Morro Caritas, Brazil 1992 (hovering object with what looks like landing gear or legs)

- Chant, Switzerland, 1996 (multiple lights)

- Fort Wayne, Indiana 2004 (something reentering atmosphere seemingly on fire)

ALSO, an interview with Charles Halt about his dealings with his superiors after the Rendlesham sighting

After that, there's a myriad of black and white undocumented photos. I had to stop at one point, thinking they were using a blurred drone photo, but not sure. Anyways, looks like they decided to grab some striking and famous vids to use as a priming backdrop for the casual viewer.

In my quick research into these things, I did note that the three at the top of my list all looked strikingly similar, although the exploding one moved quite differently. Terrestrial explanations for these are such...

1) the first one is a failed missile-type object and we only see its burning tail, not the object itself (because of the quality of the video). Likely a failed air force test.

2) the second and third, it was posited on one forum, were actually blimps used for a global advertising campaign (used the technology where they show images on the sides). I think the problem with that is the dates of the images.

Anyways. I just wanted to review the vid I was posting.
User IP Logged

no more evil. bury the hatchet. there's enough bad out there, we need more good
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 6 7 8  ...  10 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 19,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls