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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 112442 times)
GhostofEd
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« Reply #10065 on: Feb 14th, 2014, 7:11pm »

Bizarre Beauty Contests

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To me, beauty contests are pretty strange things to begin with: something about women being paraded on stage to have their bodies evaluated like cattle at an agricultural fair rubs up against every feminist impulse in me. That is not to say they are not interesting spectacles. Whether we like it or not, images of all humans are constantly measured against often unstated cultural and personal standards of beauty; these types of pageants seem to be a real-life attempt to articulate and apply contemporary definitions of beauty.

http://ridiculouslyinteresting.com/2012/12/27/unusual-retro-beauty-contests/

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« Reply #10066 on: Feb 14th, 2014, 7:25pm »

Side by Side Illusion

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« Reply #10067 on: Feb 14th, 2014, 9:01pm »

"Side by side"----Good one Ghost!!
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« Reply #10068 on: Feb 15th, 2014, 03:32am »

I remember the scandal The Arab sting they accepted to take the money too..


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/15/business/media/wnet-to-return-3-5-million-grant-for-pension-series.html?_r=1

WNET to Return $3.5 Million Grant for Pension Series

ouch!

In a joint statement from PBS and WNET, PBS said it stood by WNET’s reporting in the series but “in order to eliminate any perception on the part of the public, our viewers and donors that the foundation’s interests influenced the editorial integrity of the reporting for this program,” WNET would return the gift.

Leila Walsh, a spokeswoman for the foundation, said by email that it “never sought, nor did we receive, any editorial control or access to the programming.” She added that the foundation remained “committed to educating the public about our nation’s severe pension problems and solutions that protect workers and their retirement security.”

The foundation was the sole sponsor of the series, although WNET had been soliciting other sponsors. Some of the reports had already been broadcast on “PBS NewsHour Weekend” and locally, and radio and television documentaries and an extensive website were planned.

PBS’s “perception test” guidelines prohibit accepting funding for public affairs programs if “there exists a clear and direct connection” between the interests of a proposed funder and the program’s subject matter, even if the funder has no editorial control.

Stephen Segaller, WNET’s vice president for programming, said in the statement, “We made a mistake, pure and simple.”

On Thursday, before the statement came out, he said in a telephone interview that WNET believed the funding did not violate PBS’s “perception” rule, because the foundation’s goals of encouraging public discussion were separate from Mr. and Mrs. Arnold’s desire for reform.

By telephone Friday, he said WNET officials reversed course after discussions with PBS “about both the facts and the optics. We all take very, very seriously any suggestion that there’s a perception problem about the integrity of our work or the sources of our funding, and we came to the conclusion that it’s better to err on the side of caution.”

He added that the grant had been solicited with “absolute conviction” that the foundation was an acceptable funder.

Late Friday, the PBS ombudsman, Michael Getler, weighed in, saying Mr. Sirota’s article shined a light on “what seems to me to be ethical compromises in funding arrangements and la
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« Reply #10069 on: Feb 15th, 2014, 09:54am »

Thanks Swamprat cheesy

Good morning all grin

Crystal



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« Reply #10070 on: Feb 15th, 2014, 10:03am »

CBS Boston

Keefer Madness On The Adam Jones Show: Rick Dyer, Bigfoot Hunter

February 15, 2014 6:25 AM

Rich Keefe interviews Rick Dyer, the man who caught Bigfoot, on the latest edition of Keefer Madness.

Like Bigfoot himself, Dyer was very hard to track down, and once he was finally on the line, the connection wasn’t great.

Talk about mystery and wonderment.

Dyer says he found a Bigfoot in 2008 which was already dead. But then, in a twist, the Bigfoot was stolen from him.

Later, he saw a Bigfoot dragging a deer across a road, an indication of the beastly power of the Bigfoot.

Dyer explains how he baited the Bigfoot and then caught him.

Listen to the whole interview. It’s a once-in-a-lifetime type of chat.

interview after the jump at the bottom of the page:
http://boston.cbslocal.com/2014/02/15/the-adam-jones-show-keefer-madness-5/

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« Reply #10071 on: Feb 15th, 2014, 10:07am »

Defense News

New US Border Policy Could Be Boon For Defense Firms

Feb. 14, 2014 - 03:45AM
By JOHN T. BENNETT

WASHINGTON — Immigration reform legislation could provide an unexpected boost for defense firms, and one senior senator says pro-Republican business leaders’ political heft is needed to persuade House leaders to move a bill.

The Senate, last year, passed a sweeping immigration-reform measure that proposes $38 billion for new American-made weapon systems. But House Republicans, who control the lower chamber’s agenda, are skeptical not only about spending that much — but also about a slew of other immigration issues.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., and GOP leaders say the chamber will tackle immigration reform piece by piece, rather than the soup-to-nuts approach employed by the Senate.

House Republican leaders recently released the party’s “standards for immigration reform,” a one-page white paper with six categories. The first covers “border security and interior enforcement,” which the document declares “must come first.”

But the section contains almost no specifics on how the party prefers to secure America’s borders and makes no mention of the party’s stance on the Senate’s proposed weapons purchases. It appears more interested in taking shots at President Barack Obama — and his predecessors.

“Faced with a consistent pattern of administrations of both parties only selectively enforcing our nation’s immigration laws, we must enact reform that ensures that a president cannot unilaterally stop immigration reform,” states the GOP white paper, released Jan. 28.

Still, the GOP standards were seen as a step toward actual House legislation by immigration-reform stakeholders.

“The draft Standards for Immigration Reform being debated by the House Republicans today marks important progress in ensuring immigration reform is a priority this year,” US Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Thomas Donohue said in a statement two days later. “This is a very encouraging sign that House lawmakers are serious about fixing our broken immigration system.”

But on Feb. 6, House Speaker Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, seemed to pour cold water on any notion the House would act on a comprehensive bill that might bring new business to defense contractors.

“There’s widespread doubt about whether this administration can be trusted to enforce our laws,” Boehner told reporters Feb. 6. “And it’s going to be difficult to move any immigration legislation until that changes.”

That left reform advocates, such as Senate Armed Services Committee member Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., searching for new momentum. He told Defense News on Feb. 11 he is frustrated by House Republicans’ resistance.

For their part, many important House Republicans — so long the defense sector’s closest allies on Capitol Hill — have ranged from cryptic to mum about spending nearly $40 billion on helicopters, drones, vehicles and other hardware to help secure America’s southern border.

In a statement on his website that lists his 10 biggest gripes with the Senate bill, Goodlatte never directly addresses the proposed hardware buys that would be a boon for Sikorsky, Bell Helicopter, surveillance drone makers and other firms feeling the squeeze from sequestration and declining military spending worldwide.

Asked where Goodlatte stands on the proposed hardware buys, a Goodlatte aide wrote in an email: “See point No. 3.”

That section is titled “Lack of Border Security,” and strikes a critical tone.

“While the Senate bill throws billions of dollars at the border, there is no mechanism in the bill to ensure it actually secures our porous borders,” Goodlatte writes in language consistent with the House GOP caucus’ anti-spending mantra.

The Judiciary Committee chairman also bashes the Senate measure’s “so-called ‘border surge,’ ” saying it is flawed because the 38,400 new Border Patrol agents it calls for “do not have to be deployed before 2021, which is well after unlawful immigrants receive legal status.”

What’s more, the Senate bill would allow the Department of Homeland Security to use some of the new agents to pare wait times in airports — “not to enforce immigration law, apprehend illegal immigrants, seize illegal contraband, or improve national security,” Goodlatte contends. “This is hardly a border surge.”

A long list of other House conservatives have made similar comments. And they are being pushed by powerful conservative groups such as Heritage Action, the political arm of the Heritage Foundation think tank.

“Any immigration measure would provide a vehicle for the House to commence conference negotiations with the Senate — a legislative move that the political class would undoubtedly exploit to pressure the House into accepting some form of amnesty in advance of the November elections,” Heritage Action wrote Jan. 16 on its popular blog. “Moreover, many of these piecemeal proposals are flawed in their own right.”

The blog post featured a clear “call to action” for conservatives to mount an all-out assault to kill any immigration measures from ever being crafted, much less enacted.

“Sentinels are encouraged to petition their members of Congress to attend their annual retreat on January 29th and vocally oppose any plan to unveil and pass piecemeal immigration bills during this Congress,” Heritage Action wrote.

Boehner last week allowed a clean measure that raised the nation’s borrowing limit to pass with mostly Democratic votes. But Boehner has made clear he won’t use that approach with any immigration-reform measure.

So what, if anything, might move the House Republican caucus and leadership toward acting on even limited immigration reform that might — though less so than the Senate bill — be good news for US defense firms?

McCain told Defense News last week “it’s time for all of those interests that are the base of the Republican Party to push back.”

“I’ve talked to a lot of business leaders about it,” McCain said. “And, trust me, they’re not happy with the situation in the House.”

To that end, the leading defense and aerospace lobbying group, the Aerospace Industries Association, declined to comment for this story. An AIA spokesman said immigration is not a high-priority issue for the association.

Former BAE Systems Inc. CEO Linda Hudson, during a visit to India in November, endorsed US immigration reform. But her endorsement aimed at amending the way Washington hands out visas for high-skilled workers such as engineers, which defense firms desperately need.

But the country’s leading business lobby shop, the US Chamber, will be fighting opposite groups such as Heritage Action.

The chamber is for “common sense immigration reform that strengthens border security, expands the number of visas for high- and lesser-skilled workers, makes improvements to the federal employment verification system, and provides an earned lawful status for the undocumented with no future bar to citizenship,” according to a statement on its website.

In recent months and years, chamber leaders have testified before Congress with a message of an “economic imperative for enacting immigration reform.”

“Immigration reform is an essential element of economic growth, and it will create American jobs. It will add talent, innovation, investment and dynamism to our economy,” the chamber’s Donohue said. “The time is now.”


http://www.defensenews.com/article/20140214/DEFREG02/302140028/New-US-Border-Policy-Could-Boon-Defense-Firms

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« Reply #10072 on: Feb 16th, 2014, 03:29am »

http://www.wnd.com/2014/02/feds-want-to-track-your-dna-like-a-license-plate/


The federal government doesn’t just want the ability to track down your car; it wants to be able to track down your body as well.

Just as details are emerging about a controversial, nationwide vehicle-surveillance database, WND has learned the federal government is planning an even more invasive spy program using “physiological signatures” to track down individuals.

The goal of this research is to detect – as well as analyze and categorize – unique traits the government can exploit to “identify, locate and track specific individuals or groups of people.”

According to the program’s statement of objectives, “The scope of human-centered [intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, or ISR] research spans the complete range of human performance starting at the individual molecular, cellular, genomic level.”

Documents WND located through routine database research reveal the ability to follow people by detecting “certain characteristics of operational interest” is designed for U.S. military and intelligence-gathering superiority.

It remains unknown when such capabilities might transition to the realm of domestic counterterrorism or law enforcement operations; however, the feds – through the Air Force Research Lab, or AFRL – are recruiting private-sector assistance in order to make this “biosignature” spying a reality.

Existing ISR systems are “ideal for identifying and tracking entities such as aircraft and vehicles, but are less capable of identifying and tracking the human,” the lab says in a planning document known as a Broad Agency Announcement, or BAA.

The Human-Centered ISR Leveraged Science & Technology Program will seek to develop, with outside help, technologies that the government can use “to identify, locate and track humans of interest within the operational environment,” according to solicitation No. BAA-HPW-RHX-2014-0001.

Research specific to fusing and analyzing sensor data has undergone consistent growth, but such efforts have been “system-centric” and fail to “adequately address the human element.”

This new research scheme seeks to strengthen the ability of intelligence analysts by placing the human component at the forefront of their efforts.

AFRL’s research could have implications for a variety of domains, such as air, space and cyberspace, it says. The program’s outcome also will broadly apply to other U.S. Department of Defense organizations and the intelligence community.

A second component of the AFRL initiative is the Human Trust and Interaction Program, which will conduct research into human-to-human and human-to-machine interactions.

This program segment entails several sub-areas, including Trust and Suspicion, which will focus on “the recognition of suspicious activities in the cyberspace realm.”

This segment will examine open-source data such as social media. It also will continue to leverage “more traditional intelligence sources.”

AFRL says it anticipates awarding three or four initial contracts for the overall initiative, which has an estimated program value of about $50 million.

The goal of this and other AFLR programs typically start out as largely theoretical, similar to the approach taken by the more widely known Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, which created ARPANET, the defense-system predecessor to the Internet.

The Department of Homeland Security, on the other hand, merely has to solicit bids from industry for a National License Plate Recognition, or NLPR, database system.

While DHS is soliciting this service specifically for Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, functions, the breadth of this NLPR service encompasses the gathering of transportation-movement data from major metropolitan areas nationwide.

This database, which would be fed with information gleaned from multiple sources, would “track vehicle license plate numbers that pass through cameras or are voluntarily entered into the system,” according to the program solicitation.

The vehicle tracking-data then would be “uploaded to share with law enforcement.”

The database will be compatible with smart phone technology, enabling law enforcement offices to download thousands of listings – as well as close-up photos – of vehicle license plates.

Once DHS secures this service, the contractor must retain and make available data from previous months, as well as update the system with “new and unique” data monthly.

DHS anticipates awarding a one-year contr


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« Reply #10073 on: Feb 16th, 2014, 09:53am »

on Feb 16th, 2014, 03:29am, Harry Lime wrote:
http://www.wnd.com/2014/02/feds-want-to-track-your-dna-like-a-license-plate/


The federal government doesn’t just want the ability to track down your car; it wants to be able to track down your body as well.

Just as details are emerging about a controversial, nationwide vehicle-surveillance database, WND has learned the federal government is planning an even more invasive spy program using “physiological signatures” to track down individuals.

The goal of this research is to detect – as well as analyze and categorize – unique traits the government can exploit to “identify, locate and track specific individuals or groups of people.”

According to the program’s statement of objectives, “The scope of human-centered [intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, or ISR] research spans the complete range of human performance starting at the individual molecular, cellular, genomic level.”

Documents WND located through routine database research reveal the ability to follow people by detecting “certain characteristics of operational interest” is designed for U.S. military and intelligence-gathering superiority.

It remains unknown when such capabilities might transition to the realm of domestic counterterrorism or law enforcement operations; however, the feds – through the Air Force Research Lab, or AFRL – are recruiting private-sector assistance in order to make this “biosignature” spying a reality....



Great, now they will be able to track you then drone you...........


Crystal


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« Reply #10074 on: Feb 16th, 2014, 09:59am »

New York Times

Spying by N.S.A. Ally Entangled U.S. Law Firm

By JAMES RISEN and LAURA POITRAS
FEB. 15, 2014

The list of those caught up in the global surveillance net cast by the National Security Agency and its overseas partners, from social media users to foreign heads of state, now includes another entry: American lawyers.

A top-secret document, obtained by the former N.S.A. contractor Edward J. Snowden, shows that an American law firm was monitored while representing a foreign government in trade disputes with the United States. The disclosure offers a rare glimpse of a specific instance in which Americans were ensnared by the eavesdroppers, and is of particular interest because lawyers in the United States with clients overseas have expressed growing concern that their confidential communications could be compromised by such surveillance.

The government of Indonesia had retained the law firm for help in trade talks, according to the February 2013 document. It reports that the N.S.A.’s Australian counterpart, the Australian Signals Directorate, notified the agency that it was conducting surveillance of the talks, including communications between Indonesian officials and the American law firm, and offered to share the information.

The Australians told officials at an N.S.A. liaison office in Canberra, Australia, that “information covered by attorney-client privilege may be included” in the intelligence gathering, according to the document, a monthly bulletin from the Canberra office. The law firm was not identified, but Mayer Brown, a Chicago-based firm with a global practice, was then advising the Indonesian government on trade issues.

On behalf of the Australians, the liaison officials asked the N.S.A. general counsel’s office for guidance about the spying. The bulletin notes only that the counsel’s office “provided clear guidance” and that the Australian agency “has been able to continue to cover the talks, providing highly useful intelligence for interested US customers.”

The N.S.A. declined to answer questions about the reported surveillance, including whether information involving the American law firm was shared with United States trade officials or negotiators.

Duane Layton, a Mayer Brown lawyer involved in the trade talks, said he did not have any evidence that he or his firm had been under scrutiny by Australian or American intelligence agencies. “I always wonder if someone is listening, because you would have to be an idiot not to wonder in this day and age,” he said in an interview. “But I’ve never really thought I was being spied on.”

A Rising Concern for Lawyers

Most attorney-client conversations do not get special protections under American law from N.S.A. eavesdropping. Amid growing concerns about surveillance and hacking, the American Bar Association in 2012 revised its ethics rules to explicitly require lawyers to “make reasonable efforts” to protect confidential information from unauthorized disclosure to outsiders.

Last year, the Supreme Court, in a 5-to-4 decision, rebuffed a legal challenge to a 2008 law allowing warrantless wiretapping that was brought in part by lawyers with foreign clients they believed were likely targets of N.S.A. monitoring. The lawyers contended that the law raised risks that required them to take costly measures, like traveling overseas to meet clients, to protect sensitive communications. But the Supreme Court dismissed their fears as “speculative.”

The N.S.A. is prohibited from targeting Americans, including businesses, law firms and other organizations based in the United States, for surveillance without warrants, and intelligence officials have repeatedly said the N.S.A. does not use the spy services of its partners in the so-called Five Eyes alliance — Australia, Britain, Canada and New Zealand — to skirt the law.

Still, the N.S.A. can intercept the communications of Americans if they are in contact with a foreign intelligence target abroad, such as Indonesian officials. The N.S.A. is then required to follow so-called minimization rules to protect their privacy, such as deleting the identity of Americans or information that is not deemed necessary to understand or assess the foreign intelligence, before sharing it with other agencies.

An N.S.A. spokeswoman said the agency’s Office of the General Counsel was consulted when issues of potential attorney-client privilege arose and could recommend steps to protect such information.

“Such steps could include requesting that collection or reporting by a foreign partner be limited, that intelligence reports be written so as to limit the inclusion of privileged material and to exclude U.S. identities, and that dissemination of such reports be limited and subject to appropriate warnings or restrictions on their use,” said Vanee M. Vines, the spokeswoman.

The Australian government declined to comment about the surveillance. In a statement, the Australian Defense Force public affairs office said that in gathering information to support Australia’s national interests, its intelligence agencies adhered strictly to their legal obligations, including when they engaged with foreign counterparts.Several newly disclosed documents provide details of the cooperation between the United States and Australia, which share facilities and highly sensitive intelligence, including efforts to break encryption and collect phone call data in Indonesia. Both nations have trade and security interests in Indonesia, where Islamic terrorist groups that threaten the West have bases.

The 2013 N.S.A. bulletin did not identify which trade case was being monitored by Australian intelligence, but Indonesia has been embroiled in several disputes with the United States in recent years. One involves clove cigarettes, an Indonesian export. The Indonesian government has protested to the World Trade Organization a United States ban on their sale, arguing that similar menthol cigarettes have not been subject to the same restrictions under American antismoking laws. The trade organization, ruling that the United States prohibition violated international trade laws, referred the case to arbitration to determine potential remedies for Indonesia.

Another dispute involved Indonesia’s exports of shrimp, which the United States claimed were being sold at below-market prices.

The Indonesian government retained Mayer Brown to help in the cases concerning cigarettes and shrimp, said Ni Made Ayu Marthini, attaché for trade and industry at the Indonesian Embassy in Washington. She said no American law firm had been formally retained yet to help in a third case, involving horticultural and animal products.

Mr. Layton, a lawyer in the Washington office of Mayer Brown, said that since 2010 he had led a team from the firm in the clove cigarette dispute. He said Matthew McConkey, another lawyer in the firm’s Washington office, had taken the lead on the shrimp issue until the United States dropped its claims in August. Both cases were underway a year ago when the Australians reported that their surveillance included an American law firm.

Mr. Layton said that if his emails and calls with Indonesian officials had been monitored, the spies would have been bored. “None of this stuff is very sexy,” he said. “It’s just run of the mill.”

more after the jump:
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/16/us/eavesdropping-ensnared-american-law-firm.html?hp&_r=1

Crystal

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« Reply #10075 on: Feb 16th, 2014, 10:13am »

Associated Press

Federal guidance on pot business leaves banks wary

By GENE JOHNSON
— Feb. 15, 2014 1:22 AM EST

SEATTLE (AP) — For marijuana dispensaries around the country, the days of doing business in cash — driving around with bill-stuffed envelopes to pay the rent, or showing up at a state revenue office with $20,000 in paper bags for the tax man — can't end soon enough.

It's not clear that the Obama administration's new guidance on pot-related banking is going to end them.

The Justice and Treasury Departments on Friday issued banks a road map for doing business with marijuana firms. The security-wary pot industry, including recreational shops in Colorado and medical marijuana operators elsewhere, welcomed the long-awaited news, but banking industry groups made clear that the administration's tone didn't make them feel much easier about taking pot money.

The banks were hoping the announcement would relieve them of the threat of prosecution should they open accounts for marijuana businesses, Don Childears, president of the Colorado Bankers Association, said in a written statement. It doesn't.

"After a series of red lights, we expected this guidance to be a yellow one," Childears said. "At best, this amounts to 'serve these customers at your own risk' and it emphasizes all of the risks. This light is red."

Some dispensaries have managed to open accounts, sometimes by being less than forthcoming about their business, but for the most part banking has long been a headache for the cannabis industry. Because marijuana remains illegal under federal law, banks haven't been able to accept pot business without risking prosecution for money laundering or racketeering.

But 20 states now have medical marijuana laws on the books; two, Washington and Colorado, have legalized marijuana sales to adults; and Alaska voters this summer will consider a similar recreational pot law.

With the industry emerging from the underground, states want to track marijuana sales and collect taxes. It's a lot easier to do that when the businesses have bank accounts.

It's easier on the businesses, as well. For Seattle's Conscious Care Cooperative, a medical marijuana dispensary with three branches and 11,000 members, the guidance "definitely looks exciting," said Trek Hollnagel, a business consultant there.

The dispensary started operating on a cash basis after bouncing from bank to bank. Hollnagel said Conscious Care was always up front with banks about their business, and some, including Bank of America, would let them open accounts — only to freeze or close them later on.

"From one day to the next they changed their policies," Hollnagel said. "If all your funds are frozen for two weeks it makes it difficult to run a business. You write a rent check on a Monday, get a call from the bank Tuesday saying the account's frozen, then a call from your landlord on Wednesday saying the check bounced."

Instead, Hollnagel or others at the dispensary wound up driving around with $10,000 in a bank envelope to pay their bills. And when they showed up at the state Department of Revenue to pay their taxes, it would take half an hour for an agent to count the money, Hollnagel said.

"Hopefully with these changes we'll be able to go back to being a real business," he said.

Maybe, maybe not.

Under the guidance, banks must review state license applications for marijuana customers, request information about the business, develop an understanding of the types of products to be sold and monitor publicly available sources for any negative information about the business.

The guidance provided the banks with more than 20 "red flags" that may indicate a violation of state law. Among them: if a business receives substantially more revenue than its local competitors, deposits more cash than is in line with the amount of marijuana-related revenue it is reporting for federal and state tax purposes, or experiences a surge in activity by third parties offering goods or services such as equipment suppliers or shipping services.

If a marijuana-related business is seen engaging in international or interstate activity, such as the receipt of cash deposits from locations outside the state, that's problematic, too.

The banks need to file "suspicious activity reports" on their pot customers — designated either "marijuana limited," for those believed to be complying with the federal government's law-enforcement priorities, such as keeping pot away from children; "marijuana priority," for those the banks have questions about; or "marijuana termination," for those believed to be engaging in criminal activity.

"They'll have to have a real awareness of the activities of their customers," said Denny Eliason, a lobbyist for the Washington Bankers Association.

The American Bankers Association said banks will only be comfortable serving marijuana businesses if federal prohibitions on the drug are changed in law.

U.S. Rep. Denny Heck, D-Wash., wrote on Twitter that the announcement makes it "significantly safer to regulate and operate the voter-approved legitimate marijuana market in our state," but agreed the only way to truly solve the problem is to change federal law. He and Colorado Democratic Rep. Ed Perlmutter have introduced a bill that would allow banks and credit unions to work with marijuana businesses.

"We're constantly facing the threat that banks will shut us down," said Todd Mitchem of OpenVape, a Denver company that sells electronic devices to consume marijuana. "It makes it very difficult to do business."

___

Associated Press writers Pete Yost in Washington, D.C., and Kristen Wyatt in Denver contributed to this report.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/federal-guidance-pot-business-leaves-banks-wary

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« Reply #10076 on: Feb 16th, 2014, 10:25am »




Please be an angel




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« Reply #10077 on: Feb 16th, 2014, 12:48pm »

HMMM...YA THINK THAT BROAD REACH OF DOMESTIC TERRORISM TYPIFIED BY IMPULSIVE "NON~APPLICATIVE"/"AVOINDANCE" OF THE CONSTITUTION WILL SHRED THE SANCTITY OF ATTORNEY/CLINT PRIVILEGE...rolleyes

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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10078 on: Feb 16th, 2014, 1:00pm »

ZETAR,

They just reported one ! You know that there are hundreds of cases they have violated. It's just part of the control of all business that they can profit from!

Liberty as we know it is gone until some other tech can be leveraged to stop anyone but those involved in the cases protected from eaves dropping!

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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10079 on: Feb 16th, 2014, 1:30pm »

LONE,

ONE MUST "SPECULATE" AS THAT IS MERELY WHAT WE DO @CASEBOOK..IN OUR "AMATEUR" WAY~ALONG WITH OUR {D.J.~"BOBBIN" FROM LEEDS ENGLAND~J.D. THAT MASTER OF DITCH DIGGIN~SIR JOE~HEY JOE...WHERE YA GOIN WITH THAT SHOVEL IN YOUR HAND~O.K.ENOUGH HENDRIX~BUT YA ARE THINKIN OF THAT SONG rolleyes}...LONE...CONSIDER A NEFARIOUS PLAN TO IMPORT FOREIGN NATIONALS TRAINED IN MIDDLE EASTERN ENVIRONMENTS...POSSIBLY FOREIGN VETERANS OF SAME TO BE A SLEEPER "BROWN SHIRT" BRIGADE FOR AN/THOSE UNSCRUPULOUS~PTB~...NAAHHHH...SURELY NOT rolleyes

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« Last Edit: Feb 16th, 2014, 2:30pm by ZETAR » User IP Logged

GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2
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