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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 15748 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10125 on: Feb 21st, 2014, 6:43pm »

GHOST,

YA MEAN IT'S A SLOW DAY @CASEBOOK grin...WELL THEN LET'S KICKIT UP A NOTCH...

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WELL...I DID SEE THAT THE "F.C.C" ELECTED TO NOT SEND >>>GUBMINT MONITORS<<< INTO NEWS STATIONS/NEWSPAPERS AND HAS FOR THE MOMENT SHELVED BEING THE "GUBMINT EDITOR" FOR ALL THINGS NEWSWORTHY...MAYBE THAT {FIRST AMENDMENT} MIGHT HAVE BIT THEM IN THE ASSESTS IF "SCOTUS" HAD TO RULE...REALLY ~ DODGE CITY D.C....THEY MIGHT NEED TO GET OUT OF THE "BELTWAY" MORE OFTEN AND HASTEN THE CHANTS OF>>>WE KNOW BEST<<<...HMMM...FATHER KNOWS BEST...BUT I DON'T NEED "ANUDDER DADDY"...GOD REST MY FATHER'S SOUL WHOM PRACTICED "LAW" 50 PLUS YEARS cool

THINK IT WAS AN AQUEOUS SLAP IN THE FACE...

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10126 on: Feb 21st, 2014, 10:17pm »

Freedom Of Press Win!!..FCC Backs Down News Room Monitoring
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/02/21/fcc-backs-off-newsroom-survey-plan/

The Federal Communications Commission announced Friday that it was putting on hold a controversial study of American newsrooms, after complaints from Republican lawmakers and media groups that the project was too intrusive.

FCC spokeswoman Shannon Gilson said Chairman Tom Wheeler agreed with critics that some of the study's proposed questions for reporters and news directors "overstepped the bounds of what is required."

The agency announced that a proposed pilot study in South Carolina will now be shelved, at least until a "new study design" is finalized. But the agency made clear that this and any future studies will not involve interviews with "media owners, news directors or reporters."

Commissioner Ajit Pai, who was one of the staunchest critics of the proposal, heralded the decision Friday as an acknowledgement that government-backed researchers would not be dispatched into newsrooms, as feared.

"This study would have thrust the federal government into newsrooms across the country, somewhere it just doesn't belong," he said in a statement. "The Commission has now recognized that no study by the federal government, now or in the future, should involve asking questions to media owners, news directors, or reporters about their practices. This is an important victory for the First Amendment."

He added: "And it would not have been possible without the American people making their voices heard. I will remain vigilant that any future initiatives not infringe on our constitutional freedoms."

The Radio and Television News Directors Association took a more cautious view of the announcement.

"RTDNA views this as an important admission by the FCC that questions regarding editorial policies and practices are off-limits to the government," Director Mike Cavender said in a statement. "We are eager to see the revised study to insure there aren't topics or questions that could be construed as a 'back door' attempt to gather the same type of information."

Amid the controversy, Wheeler had already told lawmakers the commission had "no intention" of regulating reporters' speech. He also directed that the controversial questions be removed from the survey entirely.

The initial proposal for the study called for looking into issues like "perceived station bias" and "perceived responsiveness to underserved populations." The proposed questions for the interviews with members of the media raised alarm bells, including questions about "news philosophy" and how much community input goes into story selection and whether reporters ever had "a story with critical information" rejected by management.

Gilson said Friday that, "Any subsequent market studies conducted by the FCC, if determined necessary, will not seek participation from or include questions for media owners, news directors or reporters."

However, she added: "Any suggestion that the FCC intends to regulate the speech of news media or plans to put monitors in America's newsrooms is false. The FCC looks forward to fulfilling its obligation to Congress to report on barriers to entry into the communications marketplace, and is currently revising its proposed study to achieve that goal."

The contract for the study had gone to Maryland-based firm Social Solutions International, whose background largely focuses on public health and not media. Republican lawmakers first complained about the potential course of the study in December. Pai raised additional concerns in a Wall Street Journal column earlier this month.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10127 on: Feb 22nd, 2014, 09:08am »

IT'S THE WEEKEND~ grin grin grin grin grin grin grin

HAPPY SATURDAY CRYSTAL AND KREW cool

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10128 on: Feb 22nd, 2014, 10:28am »

GOOD MORNING WONDERFUL Z AND ALL YOU WONDERFUL CASEBOOKERS grin

I WAS VERY HAPPY TO HEAR ABOUT THE FCC BACKDOWN, FOR NOW. UNTIL THEY THINK OF ANOTHER WAY TO SLINK BACK IN.

IT'S TRYING TO SNOW THIS MORNING.

CRYSTAL


IT IS SNOWING grin


« Last Edit: Feb 22nd, 2014, 10:38am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10129 on: Feb 22nd, 2014, 10:33am »

Wired

This look back at a dune that NASA's Curiosity Mars rover drove across was taken by the rover's Mast Camera (Mastcam) during the 538th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars (Feb. 9, 2004). The rover had driven over the dune three days earlier. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 9 feet (2.7 meters). The dune is about 3 feet (1 meter) tall in the middle of its span across an opening called "Dingo Gap." This view is looking eastward.

The image has been white balanced to show what the Martian surface materials would look like if under the light of Earth's sky. A version with raw color, as recorded by the camera under Martian lighting conditions, is available as Figure 1.


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http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2014/02/wired-space-photo-of-the-day-feb-2014#slide-id-553271:full

Crystal


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10130 on: Feb 22nd, 2014, 10:37am »

Guardian

UAW demands labour board review Volkswagen plant vote

Auto union blames ‘firestorm of interference’ for no vote that denies labour representation at Tennessee VW plant.

by Dominic Rushe in New York
Friday 21 February 2014 17.04 EST

Union officials filed an appeal on Friday against a vote that denied labour representation at a Tennessee Volkswagen plant, blaming a “firestorm of interference” for the no vote.

The United Auto Workers (UAW) narrowly lost a vote last week to represent workers at VW’s Chattanooga plant, the German car company’s only factory in the US and one of the company’s few in the world without a works council.

The vote was seen as a major blow for the UAW and union representation in southern manufacturing states. It came after months of intense lobbying against the UAW from rightwing pressure groups and Republican politicians.

“A firestorm of interference from politicians and special interest groups threatening the economic future of the plant occurred just before and during three days of voting,” the UAW said in a statement.

The UAW said its objections – filed with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) – detail a “coordinated and widely publicized coercive campaign conducted by politicians and outside organizations to deprive Volkswagen workers of their federally protected right to join a union.”

During the campaign Republican senator Bob Corker, a staunch opponent of unionisation, claimed VW would award the factory another model if the union was rejected. The comments prompted President Obama to accuse opponents of the UAW of being “more concerned about German shareholders than American workers.”

Corker’s comments also led to a clash with Volkswagen, which has remained neutral on the vote. “There is no connection between our Chattanooga employees’ decision about whether to be represented by a union and the decision about where to build a new product for the US market,” Volkswagen said in a statement.

The campaign against the UAW was also backed by a year-long campaign by Americans for Tax Reform, the lobby group run by Grover Norquist.

In its objection the UAW calls Corker’s conduct “shameful and undertaken with utter disregard for the rights of the citizens of Tennessee and surrounding states that work at Volkswagen.”

“It’s an outrage that politically motivated third parties threatened the economic future of this facility and the opportunity for workers to create a successful operating model that that would grow jobs in Tennessee,” said UAW president Bob King.

“It is extraordinary interference in the private decision of workers to have a US senator, a governor and leaders of the state legislature threaten the company with the denial of economic incentives and workers with a loss of product. We’re committed to standing with the Volkswagen workers to ensure that their right to have a fair vote without coercion and interference is protected.”

A yes vote for union representation at the Volkswagen plant would have led to the establishment of a works council that would have been the first such model of labour-management relations in the United States. German Volkswagen labour representatives have since threatened to try to block new investments in the southern US if workers there are not unionized.

If the NLRB determines there are grounds to set aside the election results, it can call for a new election to be held.


http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/21/uaw-labour-board-volkswagen-tennessee

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10131 on: Feb 22nd, 2014, 10:46am »

on Feb 22nd, 2014, 10:28am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
GOOD MORNING WONDERFUL Z AND ALL YOU WONDERFUL CASEBOOKERS grin

I WAS VERY HAPPY TO HEAR ABOUT THE FCC BACKDOWN, FOR NOW. UNTIL THEY THINK OF ANOTHER WAY TO SLINK BACK IN.

IT'S TRYING TO SNOW THIS MORNING.

CRYSTAL


IT IS SNOWING grin




Crystal,
I have volunteered to be the monitor here at CaseBook for the nominal sum of 6 figures! I'm sure I will hear enthusiastically from DHS very soon on my appointment!!

Lone grin grin
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« Reply #10132 on: Feb 22nd, 2014, 11:00am »

LONE,

WELL...IT'S ALMOST LIKE THEY'RE PRINTING MONEY OUT OF THIN AIR THESE DAYS...SIX FIGURES IS LIKE A DROP OF WATER IN A SPOON~THEY MIGHT SEND THAT IN THE MAILBOX...

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HAD TO POST THIS~IT'S FUNNY~AND PART OF AN INSIDE JOKE grin

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10133 on: Feb 22nd, 2014, 1:59pm »

on Feb 22nd, 2014, 10:28am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
GOOD MORNING WONDERFUL Z AND ALL YOU WONDERFUL CASEBOOKERS grin

I WAS VERY HAPPY TO HEAR ABOUT THE FCC BACKDOWN, FOR NOW. UNTIL THEY THINK OF ANOTHER WAY TO SLINK BACK IN.

IT'S TRYING TO SNOW THIS MORNING.

CRYSTAL




IT IS SNOWING grin




hi Crystal and gang..
The FCC may have suspended its invasion into American newsrooms, but the controversial "Critical Information Needs" study also has George Soros' fingerprints all over it.

While disturbing, this should come as no surprise since Soros' gave more than $52 million to media organizations from 2000-2010.

Two schools were working with FCC on the project, according to Byron York of The Washington Examiner. The University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism and the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Communication and Democracy, were tasked by the FCC with coming up with criteria for what information is "critical" for Americans to have. The FCC study would have covered newspapers, websites, radio and television, according to The Washington Post.

On top of the 1st Amendment problems with this proposal, the schools involved have strong ties to liberal billionaire George Soros' Open Society Foundations and have gotten more than $1.8 million from since 2000.

The journalism programs at these schools have even more ties to Soros besides their funding, including faculty members writing for university-based publications allied with Soros-funded outlets.

The schools have collaborated on this project going back at least to 2012. Lewis A. Friedland, who was a "principle investigator" for the FCC on this project, also directs the Center for Communication and Democracy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He gave a presentation at Annenberg in Feb. 2012, on "communication ecology." This was just four months before the schools presented their findings to the FCC.

Tracking the $8.5 billion Soros-foundation world is challenging because he funds so much and many of those organizations then partner or even fund one another.

The University of Wisconsin-Madison got a whopping $1,672,397 from Soros between 2000 and 2012. The university also offers OSI-sponsored grants, scholarships and fellowships. Friedland also heads Madison Commons, a liberal journalism group "powered by" the university's School of Journalism. Madison Commons, in turn, is a project of the university but supported in part by American University's J-Lab. AU, including its Cairo campus, has received $588,395 from OSF since 2008.

The University Of Wisconsin School Of Journalism's left-wing tilt has caused controversy before. The school also houses the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism. That center narrowly avoided being banned from the campus when Gov. Scott Walker vetoed legislation that questioned the use of state funds to support a journalism group with a liberal agenda. The center has been a member of the Investigative News Network since 2011. This liberal network of journalism groups got $150,000 from Soros in 2012.

Madison's partner in the project, the University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, got $120,000 from Soros' Open Society Foundations in 2012. This is in addition to $75,000 given to the school as a whole in 2005, adding up to $195,000. The school has also partnered with Soros' Open Society Institute on at least two occasions: once when the Open Society Institute funded a week-long conference on "ethnic media" put on by the school, and once when it coordinated a journalism project in South Africa with the help of a grant from the South African branch of the Open Society Foundations, for which we do not have access to tax returns.

Ajit Pai, a Republican FCC commissioner, brought attention to the program in a Feb. 10 opinion piece. He has praised the suspension of the study, saying that "no study by the federal government, now or in the future, should involve asking questions to media owners, news directors, or reporters about their practices."

CNSNews.com is not funded by the government like NPR. CNSNews.com is not funded by the government like PBS.

CNSNews.com relies on individuals like you to help us report the news the liberal media distort and ignore. Please make a tax-deductible gift to CNSNews.com today. Your continued support will ensure that CNSNews.com is here reporting THE TRUTH, for a long time to come. It's fast, easy and secure.


I can smell the sulfur just looking at his photos.. cool
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« Reply #10134 on: Feb 22nd, 2014, 2:19pm »

Hi Harry and UFOCasebookers cheesy



Guardian

Writing The Snowden Files: 'The paragraph began to self-delete'

Was it the NSA? GCHQ? A Russian hacker? Who was secretly reading his book on Snowden while he wrote it, wonders Luke Harding.

By Luke Harding
Thursday 20 February 2014 11.20 EST

One day last summer – a short while after Edward Snowden revealed himself as the source behind the momentous leak of classified intelligence – the Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger got in touch. Would I write a book on Snowden's story and that of the journalists working with him? The answer, of course, was yes. At this point Snowden was still in Hong Kong. He was in hiding. He had leaked documents that revealed the US National Security Agency (NSA) and its British equivalent GCHQ were surveilling much of the planet.

Our conversation took place not in Alan's office but in an anonymous sideroom at the Guardian's King's Cross HQ. Was Rusbridger's office bugged? Nobody knew. But given the Guardian's ongoing publication of sensitive stories based on Snowden's files this seemed a reasonable assumption. Britain's spy agencies were good at what they did. Thus the project to chronicle Snowden's story began in an atmosphere of furtiveness. And perhaps mild paranoia.

I was part of a small team that examined Snowden's documents in a secure fourth-floor room overlooking Regent's Canal. Security was tight. Only a few trusted reporters were allowed in. Guards were posted outside. None of the laptops were connected to the internet or any other network. Cleaners were banned. Soon the room grew unkempt. Discarded sandwich packets and dirty coffee cups piled up.

Downing Street's response to Snowden's leak was initially slow – then strident. David Cameron sent his cabinet secretary Jeremy Heywood to visit the Guardian. Heywood demanded the return of Snowden's files. And, in passing, suggested the newspaper was now itself under secret observation. "I wonder where our guys are?" he said, gesturing vaguely to the flats opposite. These interactions culminated with the Guardian, under threat of government injunction, smashing up its laptops in an underground carpark as two boffins from GCHQ watched. It was beyond the plot of any thriller.

There were curious moments in New York, too, from where many Snowden stories were reported. Within hours of publication of the first one – which revealed that the NSA was mass-scooping data from the US telecoms company Verizon – diggers arrived outside the Guardian's loft office in Broadway. It was a Wednesday evening. They dug up the pavement and replaced it. The same thing happened outside the Guardian's Washington bureau, four blocks from the White House, and the Brooklyn home of US editor-in-chief Janine Gibson. Coincidence? Perhaps.

In July I flew to Rio de Janeiro to interview Glenn Greenwald, the then Guardian columnist to whom Snowden entrusted his files. The trip was pleasant. My hotel overlooked Copacabana beach; from the rooftop I could watch the surf and Rio's rich walking their dogs. Greenwald suggested we meet along the coast in the Royal Tulip hotel. We sat in the lobby. To our left a man with his back to us played with his iPhone; another individual lurked nearby. We shifted locations, twice. Eventually we hid in the business centre.

Greenwald's response to this apparent stalking – by who exactly? – was good humoured. He seemed unfazed. The CIA's station chief in Rio was known for his aggressive methods, Greenwald told me cheerfully. Weeks earlier an intruder had broken into the Rio home he shared with David Miranda and had stolen his laptop. (Nothing was on it.) I had been leaving my own laptop in the safe of my hotel room each day; returning from meeting Greenwald I found the safe would no longer lock.

I ventured out the next morning. My laptop was in the unlocked safe. (It didn't contain any secrets; merely a work in progress.) A tall American immediately accosted me. He suggested we go sightseeing. He said his name was Chris. "Chris" had a short, military-style haircut, new trainers, neatly pressed khaki shorts, and a sleek steel-grey T-shirt. He clearly spent time in the gym. Tourist or spook? I thought spook.

I decided to go along with Chris's proposal: why didn't we spend a couple of hours visiting Rio's Christ the Redeemer statue? Chris wanted to take my photo, buy me a beer, go for dinner. I declined the beer and dinner, later texting my wife: "The CIA sent someone to check me out. Their techniques as clumsy as Russians." She replied: "Really? WTF?" I added: "God knows where they learn their spycraft." This exchange may have irritated someone. My iPhone flashed and toggled wildly between two screens; the keyboard froze; I couldn't type.

Such moments may, of course, have an innocent explanation. Still, back at my home in Hertfordshire I took a few precautions. I worked offline. I stored each draft chapter in a TrueCrypt folder, a virtual encrypted disk accessible only via a long, complicated password. When I conducted interviews I left my mobile behind. Having seen Snowden's documents, I knew something of the NSA's and GCHQ's extraordinary capabilities. As of April 2013, the US spy agency had 117,675 active surveillance targets. Was I perhaps now one of them?

By September the book was going well – 30,000 words done. A Christmas deadline loomed. I was writing a chapter on the NSA's close, and largely hidden, relationship with Silicon Valley. I wrote that Snowden's revelations had damaged US tech companies and their bottom line. Something odd happened. The paragraph I had just written began to self-delete. The cursor moved rapidly from the left, gobbling text. I watched my words vanish. When I tried to close my OpenOffice file the keyboard began flashing and bleeping.

Over the next few weeks these incidents of remote deletion happened several times. There was no fixed pattern but it tended to occur when I wrote disparagingly of the NSA. All authors expect criticism. But criticism before publication by an anonymous, divine third party is something novel. I began to leave notes for my secret reader. I tried to be polite, but irritation crept in. Once I wrote: "Good morning. I don't mind you reading my manuscript – you're doing so already – but I'd be grateful if you don't delete it. Thank you." There was no reply.

A month later the mysterious reader – him, her, they? – abruptly disappeared. At a literary event in Berlin my Guardian colleague David Leigh told a journalist about my unusual computer experiences; he led with the anecdote in a piece for the leftwing daily Taz. After that, nothing. I finished The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World's Most Wanted Man in December.

In idle moments I wonder who might have been my surreptitious editor. An aggrieved analyst at the NSA's Fort Meade spy city? GCHQ? A Russian hacker? Someone else intent on mischief? Whoever you are, what did you think of my book? I'd genuinely like to know.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/feb/20/edward-snowden-files-nsa-gchq-luke-harding

Crystal


I had to look this one up:

boffins: A boffin is British slang for a scientist, engineer, or other person engaged in technical or scientific work. The original World War II conception of war-winning researchers means that the character tends to have more positive connotations than related characterisations like egghead, nerd, or geek.



« Last Edit: Feb 22nd, 2014, 2:30pm by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

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« Reply #10135 on: Feb 23rd, 2014, 09:52am »

on Feb 22nd, 2014, 10:46am, LoneGunMan wrote:
Crystal,
I have volunteered to be the monitor here at CaseBook for the nominal sum of 6 figures! I'm sure I will hear enthusiastically from DHS very soon on my appointment!!

Lone grin grin


Good morning Lone and UFOCasebookers cheesy

It's still snowing tongue

Crystal



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« Reply #10136 on: Feb 23rd, 2014, 09:57am »

Scientific American

Young Musicians Reap Longterm Neuro Benefits

People who played instruments as children responded a bit quicker to complex speech sounds as adults, even if they had not played an instrument in many years. Erika Beras reports.

Feb 22, 2014
By Erika Beras

Those piano lessons you endured as a child, and those hours your parents made you practice, may benefit you in your later years. Even if you haven’t played in decades. So finds a study in the Journal of Neuroscience. [Travis White-Schwoch et al, Older Adults Benefit from Music Training Early in Life: Biological Evidence for Long-Term Training-Driven Plasticity]

As we age, our response to fast-changing sounds slows down—which affects how we understand speech—and the world around us. But people who played instruments when they were young respond a bit quicker to such complex sounds. And the more years study subjects played instruments, the faster their brains responded to speech sound.

The researchers say that early acoustic experience may train the central auditory system—and that the changes are retained throughout life.

Previous studies of musicians have revealed that years of musical training may offset cognitive decline. This latest analysis shows that even if all you did was reluctantly pound a piano or blow a horn 40 years ago, you may still be reaping neurological benefits.

—Erika Beras

http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/early-music-perks/

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« Reply #10137 on: Feb 23rd, 2014, 10:04am »

Japan Times

New islet’s lava can fill six Tokyo Domes

Kyodo
Feb 23, 2014

An estimated 7.9 million cu. meters of lava has gushed out of the seabed to form the new landmass that has since merged with Nishinoshima Island — enough to fill Tokyo Dome six times, the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan says.

The GIAJ made the estimate by comparing aerial images of the merged island about 1,000 km south of Tokyo taken on Feb. 16 and Dec. 17.

What they found was that the approximately 800,000 cu. meters of lava they originally saw had expanded nearly tenfold in just two months, officials said.

The highest point on the merged island is now 66 meters, or 27 meters higher than in December, they said.

The new island is continuing to expand. Its existence was confirmed in November.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2014/02/23/national/new-islets-lava-can-fill-six-tokyo-domes/#.UwobdpDTm1s

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« Reply #10138 on: Feb 23rd, 2014, 10:06am »




Please be an angel



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http://www.soldiersangels.org/



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« Reply #10139 on: Feb 23rd, 2014, 10:47am »

Hello Crystal.


...The new island is continuing to expand. Its existence was confirmed in November...

The one to watch is the new Krakatoa.

When that lets go we are all in for a nasty time.

HAL
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