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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 112945 times)
INT21
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10275 on: Mar 16th, 2014, 6:52pm »

Good evening Crystal,

Re: Epoch Times,

...In 2013, there were 1,180 UFO sightings in Canada, averaging about three each day, according to a survey published this week by the group Ufology Research.
..

That's a lot of ufos.

Can anyone produce an itemised list of these sightings ?

HAL
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10276 on: Mar 17th, 2014, 07:43am »

GOOD MORNING CRYSTAL AND THE INCREDIBLE CASEBOOK KREW...

HERE'S WISHING THAT IF YOU CAN'T HOLD SUNSHINE IN YOUR HANDS ~ HOLD IT IN YOUR HEART wink

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10277 on: Mar 17th, 2014, 08:52am »

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10278 on: Mar 17th, 2014, 09:36am »

on Mar 16th, 2014, 6:52pm, INT21 wrote:
Good evening Crystal,

Re: Epoch Times,

...In 2013, there were 1,180 UFO sightings in Canada, averaging about three each day, according to a survey published this week by the group Ufology Research.
..

That's a lot of ufos.

Can anyone produce an itemised list of these sightings ?

HAL
INT21


Good morning HAL,

I found this:

"Since 1989, UFOlogy Research of Manitoba has solicited sightings data from active Canadian researchers. This data is annually compiled into the "Canadian UFO Survey." The survey is made publicly available in an attempt to promote the dissemination of information across the field of ufology. This page contains many of the surveys, as well as the data...."

http://survey.canadianuforeport.com/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10279 on: Mar 17th, 2014, 09:37am »

GOOD MORNING AND HAPPY ST. PADDY'S DAY TO YOU Z grin

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10280 on: Mar 17th, 2014, 09:46am »

Telegraph

Robot solves Rubik's Cube in record time

The Cubestormer III robot breaks the Guinness World Record by solving a Rubik's Cube in just 3.253 seconds

10:47AM GMT 17 Mar 2014

The Cubestormer III robot which uses ARM processor technology smashed the Guinness World Record title for solving a Rubik's Cube, recording a time of 3.253 seconds at the Big Bang Fair in Birmingham.

It is the fastest-ever time set by a robot for the completion of a Rubik's Cube and the result of 18 months of effort by co-inventors David Gilday and Mike Dobson who worked on the project in their spare time. The new record beats the existing time of 5.27 seconds set two years ago by the same team.

Mr Gilday is a principle engineer at ARM, a processor design company based in Cambridge, and co-inventor Mr Dobson is a security systems engineer for Securi-Plex.

"We knew Cubestormer III had the potential to beat the existing record but with the robot perfoming physical operations quicker than the human eye can see there is always an element of risk"‚ said Mr Gilday.

The Big Bang UK Young Scientists & Engineers Fair is the largest celebration of science and engineering for young people in the UK, with over 75,000 people expected to attend.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/technology-video/10702307/Robot-solves-Rubiks-Cube-in-record-time.html

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10281 on: Mar 17th, 2014, 09:47am »

Crystal
Top of the morning to you.

And thanks for the link.

HAL
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10282 on: Mar 17th, 2014, 09:54am »

Wired

An Incredible Fantasy World Mapped With Google Street View

By Pete Brook
03.17.14
6:30 AM



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From German forests to the French Pyrenees, from the Rock of Gibraltar to Iceland’s tundra, artist Aaron Hobson spends endless hours traversing continents looking for eye-catching scenes. He’s a digital tourist and travel photographer, grabbing images from exotic locales in Google Street View (GSV) rather than mess with planes, climbing gear, or snow shoes.

There are plenty of GSV photo projects out there, but Hobson’s heavily ‘shopped Cinemascapes are a refreshing departure from the usual documentary reality. Not only does he find the most compelling views GSV has to offer, he then mashes them up with dream-like elements to create illusory panoramas.

“GSV is a fantasy world,” says Hobson. “The locations I visit are places of fantasy for most people, myself included. Most of the images beg for a narrative or a folk tale. Storytelling is my favorite form of art.”

Hobson estimates that 95% of his time on GSV yields nothing of interest, but an accidental benefit is an increased geographical knowledge. “You could probably jettison me out of a plane over rural Brazil and I’d know where I was and how to get home on foot,” he says. Though when he does happen across something good, it’s like finding a needle in a haystack.

“Patience is key. I will find an enticing destination and travel the road or roads ad nauseum,” he says. “If I’m lucky I will find the gem I am looking for along the way.”

Once he’s got a shot he likes, it’s time to add some fantasy. Extensively dodging and burning with a paintbrush-like technique, Hobson works to find the contrast of light and dark that suits, then skews reality further with layers of surreal color hues. At first his post-production was restricted to just the environment — billowing black clouds have become a signature of sorts. When threatening weather stopped carrying enough drama and weirdness, Hobson began suturing images and dropping in beyond-scale elements. As a result we have the Irish coast overlooking New York City, ocean floods in Spanish side streets, and Russian Orthodox spires in tidal swells.

Hobson came to surfing GSV when he was location scouting for a movie to be directed in Los Angeles. He’d never experienced the service and a producer suggested he try it out. “I was hooked,” he says. “Never even made it to LA to work on the film. I am a panoramic photographer and Street View was exactly how I see the world. It was a no brainer to check this technology out.”

Unfortuantely, having seen the advancement and consolidation of cinematic photo filters, Hobson has decided to put Cinemascapes into retirement. While his work is not purely about color and toning, he believes his methods have been reduced to a single tap.

“Instagram has taken the detailed and time-consuming skills I spent years mastering and wrapped them up into a one-button process,” Hobson reflects. “My nine-year-old can now make eerily similar images.”

All images: Aaron Hobson

It’s just about mad enough, it might be genius.

gallery after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/rawfile/2014/03/google-street-view-aaron-hobson/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10283 on: Mar 18th, 2014, 08:25am »

GOOD MORNING CRYSTAL ~ BOKER TOV ~ AND THE SPIRITED SPECULATORS OF CASEBOOK...

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« Reply #10284 on: Mar 18th, 2014, 10:06am »

GOOD MORNING Z cheesy

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« Reply #10285 on: Mar 18th, 2014, 10:08am »

Der Spiegel

Crimea Sanctions: Europe Should Impose Stiffer Penalties

A Commentary by David Böcking
March 18, 2014 – 12:25 PM

"Freedom isn't free." This bit of wisdom is one that American patriots are fond of slapping onto their back bumpers. But there is something to it. The fight for political convictions always comes with a price. Yet it appears to be one that German managers and corporate leaders are uninterested in paying.

E.on head Johannes Teyssen warned against endangering "very responsible policies toward the East" in an interview with SPIEGELthis week. Rainer Lindner, head of Germany's Committee on Eastern European Economic Relations, fears that "sanctions will certainly trigger counter-sanctions" -- as if effective penalties could ever be free of charge.

The concerns expressed by Germany's business community are understandable. But the government in Berlin should ignore them just the same. In addition to the travel bans and frozen accounts already imposed by the EU -- punitive actions that are essentially symbolic in nature -- Europe should also levy more significant economic sanctions against Russia. It is a question of credibility. Not doing so is tantamount to Germany and the EU saying: "You know what Mr. Putin? The Crimea isn't actually that important to us after all."

Led by German President Joachim Gauck, Berlin only recently demanded that the country take on more responsibility in the world. Chancellor Angela Merkel made clear early on that military intervention in the Crimea crisis isn't an option. That makes sense. But what other alternatives could Europe pursue?

The economic lever is all that's left. Russia is highly dependent on imports from the EU, particularly from Germany. But even more painful than a reduction of European exports to Russia would be a moratorium on EU natural gas and oil imports from Russia, or at least a credible threat from Brussels that it was prepared to do so. Russia and Putin's military machine, after all, are reliant on income generated by energy exports.

It would not be an easy step to take. But the difference could be compensated for via oil and natural gas deliveries from other sources. It is, of course, undeniable that such a step would drive up energy prices in Germany and the rest of the European Union. Economic growth, already weak, would suffer. But if we Germans are serious about taking on more foreign policy responsibility, then we also have to be prepared to pay the requisite price.

Translated from the German by Charles Hawley

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/commentary-time-for-more-painful-eu-sanctions-on-russia-a-959342.html

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« Reply #10286 on: Mar 18th, 2014, 10:15am »

Wired

A 10-Point Plan to Keep the NSA Out of Our Data

By Kim Zetter
03.18.14
6:30 AM

In this age of dragnet surveillance and rampant privacy invasions, when lawmakers seem disinclined to make the right decisions to protect our data and secure the integrity of the internet, the responsibility falls on the technology community to step in and do the right thing to secure our future. Just ask Edward Snowden.

“The people who are in the room at Austin right now, they’re the folks who can really fix things, who can enforce our rights for technical standards even when Congress hasn’t yet gotten to the point of creating legislation that protect our rights in the same manner,” the exiled whistleblower said last week at the South by Southwest conference in Austin over a video stream from Russia. “There’s a policy response that needs to occur, but there’s also a technical response that needs to occur. And it’s the makers, the thinkers, the developing community that can really craft those solutions to make sure we’re safe.”

With that in mind, WIRED consulted with experts to compile this list of 10 measures tech companies should adopt to protect customer data, whether it resides on a distant corporate server or is making its way across the Internet. The Electronic Frontier Foundation has a running scorecard tracking which companies are already employing some of these items on our wish list.

1) End-to-end encryption. This is the most important technological change, and the one that Snowden emphasized in his talk. End-to-end encryption would help protect data through its entire journey from sender to recipient. Google and other services currently only encrypt data as it makes its way from a user to a given service, where it is may be decrypted. That leaves data vulnerable to collection from the service provider’s servers or from internal data links where it might be unencrypted.

“End-to-end encryption … makes mass surveillance impossible at the network level,” Snowden said, and provides a more constitutionally protected model of surveillance, because it forces the government to target endpoints to get data — by hacking individual users — rather than conducting mass collection against people who are not the target of an investigation.

End-to-end crypto would frustrate agencies like the NSA and GCHQ, which have direct taps on fiber optic lines. But they aren’t the only spies with the capability to sniff raw internet traffic. End-to-end encryption would also impede any other government that has the wherewithal to install surveillance equipment on network tributaries. And it would stop governments from compelling companies like Google, who have offices within their borders, to hand over data belonging to activists and others who may be at risk of losing their lives if the government obtains their communications.

This reform would come at a considerable cost. It would require companies to re-engineer and re-architect their services, since algorithms for encrypting communication would need to move from the company’s cloud to the user’s phone or computer. That means developing new versions of email and messaging services.

“For that reason we’re going to need to put a lot of pressure on Google, Facebook, and Apple to get them to re-engineer their systems to offer this level of security, or we will see upstart new tech companies offering these things that are built-in from day one with these security features,” says Peter Eckersley, technology projects director for EFF.

2) Bake user-friendly encryption into products from the get-go. Currently, the only option available is for users to take it upon themselves to add end-to-end encryption to their communications.

PGP (Pretty Good Privacy), GPG, or Off-the-Record messaging all allow users to encrypt email and instant messaging communications. But they can be difficult to install and use, and they only work if the person with whom you’re communicating also has them installed. But if you’re offering a communications service or product today, you should already have user-friendly encryption baked in, and it should be one of the features users demand.

A handful of companies, like Silent Circle, are already producing communication systems and services that purport to encrypt email, instant messaging, text messaging, VOIP or video chat. But consumers have no way of knowing if a service is truly secure and robust. To that end, EFF is hosting a workshop in July at the Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security conference to develop metrics for judging, testing and awarding a prize for the best end-to-end encryption products.

“There should be an objective way to measure this,” Eckersley says. “If we give [a product or service] to a sample of activists and journalists and other at-risk communities to try, do 80 percent succeed in using the software after just a couple of minutes? Do 60 percent survive a modeled attack against the software? It’s one thing to use it and another thing altogether to actually be safe when someone sends you fake messages or tries to impersonate the person you’re talking with.”

3) Make all web sites SSL/TLS. Following revelations from the Snowden documents, Yahoo announced that it would enable encryption by default for anyone logging into its web-based email service. But that’s a move that should have happened long ago, without the Snowden revelations to spur it. There’s no excuse for other web sites, particularly ones handling sensitive communication with customers, to not use SSL.

4) Enable HTTP Strict Transport Security. Otherwise known as HSTS, this is a mechanism whereby domains like Facebook.com and Google.com tell your browser the first time it connects to their domain to always connect to a secure version of their web site, using an HTTPS connection by default, even if users fail to type HTTPS into their browser. If a spy agency or other intruder then attempts to hijack the user’s connection to Facebook by directing their browser to an unsecured connection — so the communication can be monitored — the browser will switch to the secured connection by default.

This also prevents fellow users on unsecured Wi-Fi networks — say, at Starbucks — from seeing your communication if you forget to initiate a secure connection with the site on your own. And it helps prevent an attacker from trying to get your browser to connect to an unsecured fake Facebook page, prompting your browser to produce an error message instead and refuse to connect to the page.

In order for HSTS to work, however, websites need to provide secure versions of their pages, and browsers need to support HSTS. Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Opera all support HSTS in their latest versions. Microsoft recently told EFF that it plans to begin supporting HSTS for web servers handling email, personal or business documents, and media, messaging, contacts, and credentials. But its own browser, Internet Explorer, currently does not support HSTS.

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2014/03/wishlist/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10287 on: Mar 18th, 2014, 10:16am »

on Mar 17th, 2014, 09:47am, INT21 wrote:
Crystal
Top of the morning to you.

And thanks for the link.

HAL
INT21

( Now I'm off to annoy Tomi01UK (again)) smiley



cheesy


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10288 on: Mar 18th, 2014, 10:23am »

Smoothy !
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« Reply #10289 on: Mar 18th, 2014, 10:25am »

on Mar 18th, 2014, 10:23am, supersidufo wrote:
Smoothy !


Smoothy to you too!

grin

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