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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 146621 times)
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« Reply #10470 on: Apr 15th, 2014, 10:30am »

Wired

Obama: NSA Must Reveal Bugs Like Heartbleed, Unless They Help the NSA

By Kim Zetter
04.15.14 | 6:30 am

After years of studied silence on the government’s secret and controversial use of security vulnerabilities, the White House has finally acknowledged that the NSA and other agencies exploit some of the software holes they uncover, rather than disclose them to vendors to be fixed.

The acknowledgement comes in a news report indicating that President Obama decided in January that from now on any time the NSA discovers a major flaw in software, it must disclose the vulnerability to vendors and others so that it can be patched, according to the New York Times.

But Obama included a major loophole in his decision, which falls far short of recommendations made by a presidential review board last December: According to Obama, any flaws that have “a clear national security or law enforcement” use can be kept secret and exploited.

This, of course, gives the government wide latitude to remain silent on critical flaws like the recent Heartbleed vulnerability if the NSA, FBI, or other government agencies can justify their exploitation.

A so-called zero-day vulnerability is one that’s unknown to the software vendor and for which no patch therefore exists. The U.S. has long wielded zero-day exploits for espionage and sabotage purposes, but has never publicly stated its policy on their use. Stuxnet, a digital weapon used by the U.S. and Israel to attack Iran’s uranium enrichment program, used five zero-day exploits to spread.

Last December, the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies declared that only in rare instances should the U.S. government authorize the use of zero-day exploits for “high priority intelligence collection.” The review board, which was convened in response to reports of widespread NSA surveillance revealed in the Edward Snowden documents, also said that decisions about the use of zero-day attacks should only be made “following senior, interagency review involving all appropriate departments.”

“In almost all instances, for widely used code, it is in the national interest to eliminate software vulnerabilities rather than to use them for US intelligence collection,” the review board wrote in its lengthy report (.pdf). “Eliminating the vulnerabilities — ‘patching’ them — strengthens the security of US Government, critical infrastructure, and other computer systems.”

When the government does decide to use a zero-day hole for national security purposes, they noted, that decision should have an expiration date.

“We recommend that, when an urgent and significant national security priority can be addressed by the use of a Zero Day, an agency of the US Government may be authorized to use temporarily a Zero Day instead of immediately fixing the underlying vulnerability,” they wrote. “Before approving use of the Zero Day rather than patching a vulnerability, there should be a senior-level, interagency approval process that employs a risk management approach.”

But Obama appeared to ignore these recommendations when the report was released. A month later, when he announced a list of reforms based on the review board’s report, the issue of zero days went unaddressed.

Last week, however, after the Heartbleed vulnerability was exposed, and questions arose about whether the NSA had known about the vulnerability and kept silent about it, the White House and NSA emphatically denied that the spy agency had known about the flaw or exploited it before this year.

Following a now-disputed report from Bloomberg that the NSA had been exploiting the Heartbleed flaw for two years, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence issued a statement denying that the NSA had known about the vulnerability before it was publicly disclosed.

“If the Federal government, including the intelligence community, had discovered this vulnerability prior to last week, it would have been disclosed to the community responsible for OpenSSL,” the statement said.

Intelligence authorities also revealed that in response to the presidential review board’s recommendations in December, the White House had recently reviewed and “reinvigorated an interagency process for deciding when to share” information about zero day vulnerabilities with vendors and others so that the security holes could be patched.

“When Federal agencies discover a new vulnerability in commercial and open source software … it is in the national interest to responsibly disclose the vulnerability rather than to hold it for an investigative or intelligence purpose,” the statement said.

The government process for deciding on whether or not to use a zero-day exploit is called the Vulnerabilities Equities Process, and the statement said that unless there is “a clear national security or law enforcement need,” the equities process is now “biased toward responsibly disclosing such vulnerabilities.”

This implies, of course, that the bias was aimed in favor of something else until now.

“If this is a change in policy, it kind of explicitly confirms that beforehand that was not the policy,” says Jason Healey, director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative at the Atlantic Council and a former officer in the Air Force’s cyber division.

The government’s use of zero-day exploits has exploded over the last decade, feeding a lucrative market for defense contractors and others who uncover critical flaws in the software used in cell phones, computers, routers, and industrial control systems and sell information about these vulnerabilities to the government.

But the government’s use of zero days for exploitation purposes has long contradicted Obama’s stated policy claims that the security of the internet is a high priority for his administration.

The NSA’s offense-oriented operations in the digital realm would also seem to directly oppose the agency’s own mission in the defensive realm. While the NSA’s Tailored Access Operations division is busy using zero days to hack into systems, the spy agency’s Information Assurance Directorate is supposed to secure military and national security systems, which are vulnerable to the same kinds of attacks the NSA conducts against foreign systems. The NSA is also supposed to assist the DHS in helping to secure critical infrastructures in the private sector, a duty that is compromised if the NSA is keeping silent about vulnerabilities in industrial control systems and other critical systems in order to exploit them.

The government has used its equities process to analyze its use of zero-day exploits for the better part of a decade. That process is patterned after the approach used by the military and intelligence community in times of war to decide when information gleaned through intelligence should be exploited for military gain or kept secret to preserve intelligence capabilities.

The equities process for zero days has until now largely been focused on critical infrastructure systems — for example, the industrial control systems that manage power plants, water systems, electric grids — with the aim of giving government agencies the opportunity to state when disclosing a vulnerability to the vendor might interfere with their own ability to exploit the vulnerability. When vulnerabilities have been found in more general computing systems that could have an impact on U.S. military and other critical government systems, sources say the government has engaged in a form of limited disclosure — working on ways to mitigate the risk to critical government systems while still keeping the vulnerability secret so that it can be exploited in enemy systems.

But the first hint that the government’s policy in this area was beginning to lean more toward disclosure than exploitation appeared in March during the confirmation hearing for Vice Admiral Michael Rogers to replace Gen. Keith Alexander as head of the NSA and the U.S. Cyber Command. In testimony to the Senate Armed Services Committee (.pdf), Rogers was asked about the government’s policies and processes for handling the discovery and disclosure of zero days.

Rogers said that within the NSA “there is a mature and efficient equities resolution process for handling ’0-day’ vulnerabilities discovered in any commercial product or system (not just software) utilized by the U.S. and its allies.”

The policy and process, he said, ensures that “all vulnerabilities discovered by NSA in the conduct of its lawful missions are documented, subject to full analysis, and acted upon promptly.” He noted that the NSA is “now working with the White House to put into place an interagency process for adjudication of 0-day vulnerabilities.”

He also said that “the balance must be tipped toward mitigating any serious risks posed to the U.S. and allied networks” and that he intended to “sustain the emphasis on risk mitigation and defense” over offensive use of zero days.

Rogers noted that when the NSA discovers a vulnerability, “Technical experts document the vulnerability in full classified detail, options to mitigate the vulnerability, and a proposal for how to disclose it.” The default is to disclose vulnerabilities in products and systems used by the U.S. and its allies, said Rogers, who was confirmed by the Senate and took command of the NSA and US Cyber Command in March.

“When NSA decides to withhold a vulnerability for purposes of foreign intelligence, then the process of mitigating risks to US and allied systems is more complex. NSA will attempt to find other ways to mitigate the risks to national security systems and other US systems, working with stakeholders like CYBERCOM, DISA, DHS, and others, or by issuing guidance which mitigates the risk.”

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/2014/04/obama-zero-day/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10471 on: Apr 15th, 2014, 10:34am »

Science Daily

Neuroscientists: Brain activity may mark beginning of memories

Date:
April 14, 2014

Source:
Johns Hopkins University

By tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists at the Johns Hopkins University believe they can mark the birth of a memory.

Using lab rats on a circular track, James Knierim, professor of neuroscience in the Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute at Johns Hopkins, and a team of brain scientists noticed that the rats frequently paused to inspect their environment with head movements as they ran. The scientists found that this behavior activated a place cell in their brain, which helps the animal construct a cognitive map, a pattern of activity in the brain that reflects the animal's internal representation of its environment.

In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Neuroscience, the researchers state that when the rodents passed that same area of the track seconds later, place cells fired again, a neural acknowledgement that the moment has imprinted itself in the brain's cognitive map in the hippocampus.

The hippocampus is the brain's warehouse for long- and short-term processing of episodic memories, such as memories of a specific experience like a trip to Maine or a recent dinner. What no one knew was what happens in the hippocampus the moment an experience imprints itself as a memory.

"This is like seeing the brain form memory traces in real time," said Knierim, senior author of the research. "Seeing for the first time the brain creating a spatial firing field tied to a specific behavioral experience suggests that the map can be updated rapidly and robustly to lay down a memory of that experience."

A place cell is a type of neuron within the hippocampus that becomes active when an animal or human enters a particular place in its environment. The activation of the cells helps create a spatial framework much like a map, that allows humans and animals to know where they are in any given location. Place cells can also act like neural flags that "mark" an experience on the map, like a pin that you drop on Google maps to mark the location of a restaurant.

"We believe that the spatial coordinates of the map are delivered to the hippocampus by one brain pathway, and the information about the things that populate the map, like the restaurant, are delivered by a separate pathway," Knierim said. "When you experience a new item in the environment, the hippocampus combines these inputs to create a new spatial marker of that experience."

In the experiments, researchers placed tiny wires in the brains of the rats to monitor when and where brain activity increased as they moved along the track in search of chocolate rewards. About every seven seconds, the rats stopped moving forward and turned their heads to the perimeter of the room as they investigated the different landmarks, behavior called "head-scanning."

"We found that many cells that were previously silent would suddenly start firing during a specific head-scanning event," Knierim said. "On the very next lap around the track, many of these cells had a brand new place field at that exact same location and this place field remained usually for the rest of the laps. We believe that this new place field marks the site of the head scan and allows the brain to form a memory of what it was that the rat experienced during the head scan."

Knierim said the formation and stability of place fields and the newly activated place cells requires further study. The research is primarily intended to understand how memories are formed and retrieved under normal circumstances, but it could be applicable to learning more about people with brain trauma or hippocampal damage due to aging or Alzheimer's.

"There are strong indications that humans and rats share the same spatial mapping functions of the hippocampus, and that these maps are intimately related to how we organize and store our memories of prior life events," Knierim said. "Since the hippocampus and surrounding brain areas are the first parts of the brain affected in Alzheimer's, we think that these studies may lend some insight into the severe memory loss that characterizes the early stages of this disease."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140414123513.htm

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« Reply #10472 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 12:17am »

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ingrid-newkirk/9-ways-pigs-are-smarter-t_b_5154321.html

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Pigs can use tools. A study conducted by Professor Donald Broom at Cambridge University found that pigs used a mirror placed in their enclosure to locate food reflected in it but otherwise not directly visible. Only a handful of other species, including dolphins, elephants, and chimpanzees, have passed the "mirror test" or have been documented to understand that mirrors are reflections, not windows.

for the other 8 reasons visit link. grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10473 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 12:53am »

JUST FOR YOU ~

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« Reply #10474 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 10:39am »

on Apr 16th, 2014, 12:17am, Sysconfig wrote:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ingrid-newkirk/9-ways-pigs-are-smarter-t_b_5154321.html

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Pigs can use tools. A study conducted by Professor Donald Broom at Cambridge University found that pigs used a mirror placed in their enclosure to locate food reflected in it but otherwise not directly visible. Only a handful of other species, including dolphins, elephants, and chimpanzees, have passed the "mirror test" or have been documented to understand that mirrors are reflections, not windows.

for the other 8 reasons visit link. grin


Smart little things!

Good morning Sys cheesy

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« Reply #10475 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 10:40am »

on Apr 16th, 2014, 12:53am, ZETAR wrote:
JUST FOR YOU ~

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THANK YOU Z!!!

GOOD MORNING cheesy

AND A GOOD MORNING TO ALL OF OUR UFOCASEBOOKERS grin

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« Reply #10476 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 10:46am »

Motherboard.com

The New UFO Hunters

Written by
Jack Phillips
April 15, 2014 // 07:30 PM CET

According to the British UFO Research Association, Britain’s oldest UFO group, the first evidence of the existence of UFOs as we know them came at about 2.59pm on June 24, 1947. That’s when a Mr Kenneth Arnold, while flying his plane across Washington State, saw a diagonal chain of nine mirror-bright objects moving in a manner "a saucer would if you skipped it across the water.” It is believed that this description established the now well-known expression “flying saucer,” which has since spawned countless books, TV series, feature films, comic books, and hobbyist groups.

But since that sighting decades ago, UFO enthusiasts haven’t had the best reputation. Some groups are now trying to change that; they want to be taken seriously.

Aerial Phenomenon Investigations is run by founder and director Antonio Paris, a former US Army Counterintelligence Officer and Department of Defence Counterintelligence Special Agent. Based in Florida, his 13-strong team of UFO investigators have tried to shake off the negative connotations surrounding all things extra-terrestrial. He says that he was upset to learn that most local UFO clubs were inundated with claptrap, “such as conspiracies and pseudoscience, astral projection, hypnosis,” as well as cryptozoology like the Bigfoot and Mothman myths. “I realized most of Ufology was a joke!” he said.

In a bid to silence the skeptics, Paris looks to explore the UFO phenomenon in an analytical, scientific way. His group aims to bring ufology into the 21st century by being more CSI than X-Files. Unlike other UFO organisations, they have a strict investigation protocol that enables them to conduct what they call a “case triage” to ensure they only investigate the “good” reports.

“The wider public believes in extra-terrestrial life but sadly the term UFO has become synonymous with aliens,” Paris said. As a result, his group doesn’t investigate the typical “I saw a light in the sky” cases. He says that the “pseudoscience, claptrap, conspiracies, and hoaxes” that pass for ufology in some parts is down to “Hollywood, media sound bites, and conspiracy groups,” and that, to his annoyance, “Any mention of UFOs to the general public and their first thought is tinfoil hats.”

Paris tries to distance himself from that crowd. He's a member of the Washington Academy of Sciences and a graduate of the S2 Institute’s Florida Private Investigator Course, as well as the author of two books: Aerial Phenomena: Reviving Ufology for the 21st Century; and Space Science: Challenges for the Extraterrestrial Hypothesis of UFO Phenomena, and the director and producer for the documentary Area 51: A History of this Reclusive Base.

more after the jump:
http://motherboard.vice.com/en_uk/read/the-new-ufo-hunters

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« Reply #10477 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 10:50am »

Defense News

If DoD Spending Levels Remain, $66B Modernization Cut Would Follow

Apr. 16, 2014 - 08:45AM
By MARCUS WEISGERBER

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon’s planned five-year spending plan for procurement and research-and-development projects, set forth in its 2015 budget proposal, would be cut by $66 billion if US federal spending caps remain in place, according to a new Defense Department report.

The cuts would impact dozens of Pentagon programs, including the Lockheed Martin F-35 joint strike fighter, Boeing KC-46 tanker and Airbus Light Utility Helicopter.

The Pentagon’s five-year spending plan submitted with its 2015 budget proposal is $115 billion above defense spending caps.

If the caps remain in place, the Army would not sign another multiyear procurement deal with Sikorsky for new Black Hawk helicopters and a fourth brigade of General Dynamics Stryker double-hull vehicles would also be canceled.

The Army would also reduce a buy of new Airbus UH-72 Light Utility Helicopters from 100 to 55 aircraft, meaning existing National Guard helicopters would get transferred to the active-duty for training.

The planned purchase of more than 1,000 Joint Light Tactical Vehicles would also be pushed back.

Procurement of the Marine Corps Sikorsky-built CH-53K helicopter would be postponed one year, should the caps remain in place. The Marine’s development of a new Amphibious Combat Vehicle would also be delayed.

The Bell-Boeing V-22 Osprey program would continue at planned spending levels, but procurement of Bell H-1 helicopters would also be pushed back, at increased cost.

In the Navy, three fewer DD-51 Flight III destroyers would be procured in 2017, 2018 and 2019. A second Virginia-class submarine in 2016 would be “unaffordable.”

The nuclear refueling of the aircraft carrier George Washington would be canceled and the ship would be retired, and the Navy would also delay the procurement of six Boeing P-8 maritime patrol aircraft.

If the spending caps remain in place, the Air Force would purchase five fewer Boeing KC-46 tankers and delay the start of the Combat Rescue Helicopter Program until 2019.

It would also purchase 10 fewer Lockheed Martin MC-130Js, one fewer Lockheed GPS III satellite and eliminate an adaptive engine program.

The Air Force would cut 16 Lockheed Martin F-35 joint strike fighters and the Air Force would field one fewer squadron of jets over the next five years, according to the report. The Marine Corps F-35B would remain in tact and the Navy would postpone its planned F-35 buys by two years.

The Pentagon would also cut planned procurement of 531 Raytheon Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missiles (AMRAAM). More than 17,000 Boeing Joint Direct Attack Munitions would also be cut.

As known, the Air Force would divest the Boeing KC-10 tanker fleet, the Northrop Grumman Global Hawk block 40 unmanned surveillance aircraft and cancel a planned buy of 38 General Atomics MQ-9 Reapers.

DoD would not fund the Ballistic Missile Defense Midcourse Defense Segment and additional ground-based sensors.


http://www.defensenews.com/article/20140416/DEFREG02/304160022/If-DoD-Spending-Levels-Remain-66B-Modernization-Cut-Would-Follow

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10478 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 11:02am »

"Aerial Phenomenon Investigations is run by founder and director Antonio Paris"


I've had a chance to meet Antonio and attend some meetings with him here in Florida. He is the real deal and is a breath of fresh air to ufology.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10479 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 11:25am »

who'd ever thunk it sad


User Image Criminal Prosecutions for Financial
Institution Fraud Continue to Fall
Number Year-to-date 1,251
Percent Change from previous year -2.4
Percent Change from 5 years ago -28.6
Percent Change from 10 years ago -57.7
Percent Change from 20 years ago -56.5

Table 1: Criminal Financial
Institution Fraud ProsecutionsFederal prosecutions for financial institution fraud have continued their downward slide despite the financial troubles reported in this sector. The latest available data from the Justice Department show that during the first eleven months of FY 2011 the government reported 1,251 new prosecutions were filed. If this activity continues at the same pace, the annual total of prosecutions will be 1,365 for this fiscal year, down 28.6 percent from their numbers of just five years ago and less than half the level prevalent a decade ago. See Table 1.

The comparisons of the number of defendants charged with financial institution fraud offenses are based on case-by-case information obtained by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) under the Freedom of Information Act from the Executive Office for United States Attorneys.

The long term trend in these prosecutions over the last two decades is shown more clearly in Figure 1. The vertical bars in Figure 1 represent the number of financial institution fraud prosecutions recorded each fiscal year. Projected figures for the current fiscal year are shown. Each presidential administration is distinguished by the color of the bars. To view trends month-by-month rather than year-by-year, see TRAC's monthly report series for the latest data.




Figure 1: Criminal Financial Institution Fraud Prosecutions over the last 20 years

Most Active and Least Active Districts

In terms of the sheer numbers, the U.S. Attorney offices during FY 2011 criminally prosecuted the most cases in the Southern District of Florida (Miami) with 84 defendants charged. The Southern District of New York (Manhattan) followed with 71 defendants, followed in third place by the Western District of Washington (Seattle) with 50.

At the other extreme, six out of the country’s total of 90 districts filed not a single case. These districts showing no activity were the Southern District of Indiana (Indianapolis), both the Middle (Baton Rouge) and the Western (Shreveport) Districts of Louisiana, North Dakota, the Eastern District of Oklahoma (Muskogee), and the Northern District of West Virginia (Wheeling).

Federal districts over which U.S Attorneys preside vary widely in size. After adjusting for population differences, the Southern District of Alabama (Mobile) rose to tie with Manhattan for first place on its relative volume of prosecutions. Mobile was also higher relative to population size than in Miami which dropped to third place. Table 2 shows the districts in the top 10 once adjusted for their varying population sizes.

« Last Edit: Apr 16th, 2014, 11:28am by Sysconfig » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10480 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 12:09pm »

on Apr 16th, 2014, 11:25am, Sysconfig wrote:
who'd ever thunk it sad


Sys, there's a simple answer. Suicides up, hence less people to prosecute! It all evens out in the end. grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10481 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 1:33pm »

HAVE A GREAT DAY CRYSTAL AND ALL THOSE ABOARD THE GOOD SHIP CASEBOOK...
NEVER LET ONES MIND REST WHILE YOUR BOAT IS AT ANCHOR...

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« Reply #10482 on: Apr 16th, 2014, 7:06pm »

on Apr 16th, 2014, 12:09pm, GhostofEd wrote:
Sys, there's a simple answer. Suicides up, hence less people to prosecute! It all evens out in the end. grin



ya know..that's an interesting thought..certainly levels the playing field..grin

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« Reply #10483 on: Apr 17th, 2014, 11:41am »

on Apr 16th, 2014, 11:02am, Swamprat wrote:
"Aerial Phenomenon Investigations is run by founder and director Antonio Paris"


I've had a chance to meet Antonio and attend some meetings with him here in Florida. He is the real deal and is a breath of fresh air to ufology.

Swamp


Good morning Swamp cheesy

He seems like a stand up kinda guy.

Crystal

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« Reply #10484 on: Apr 17th, 2014, 11:44am »

THANKS Z cheesy

GOOD MORNING UFOCASEBOOKERS

CRYSTAL


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