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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 45315 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10605 on: May 4th, 2014, 11:05am »

Scientists are ready to put element 117 which is 40% heavier than lead on the Periodic Table.

These "super" elements are claimed to be almost supernatural in the energy they hold.

Yet Bob Lazar's UFO element 115 is being put on hold.

The GSI Helmholtz Center in Germany for heavy ion research claims they may look at 115 in another 10 years.

I smell the Helmholtz Center is being government mis-directed.

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« Reply #10606 on: May 4th, 2014, 12:03pm »

113, 114, 115,116 are already recognized on the table, the excitement about 117 is that it is stable so it may have many uses unlike 115 and 113 that are classed as unstable or so is claimed? You have to keep in mind that these are man made and not available naturally in nature but to create such a heavy element that is stable opens a lot of doors for the future.
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« Reply #10607 on: May 4th, 2014, 3:03pm »

This is Good news..

Iran confirms Biblical version Of Jewish Homeland..

http://debka.com/article/23892/High-ranking-Iranian-cleric-visits-Shiraz-synagogue-confirms-Biblical-version-of-Jewish-homeland-
Even if this was part of the Iranian president Hassan Rouhani’s campaign of smiles for the West, the visit to the Shiraz synagogue Friday night, May 1, by the head of his assistant for minority affairs, Hojat- Islam Ali Yunessi, was especially noteworthy. He was the first high-ranking Iranian cleric to visit a Jewish synagogue in a decade and, moreover, he delivered a speech in praise of Iran’s ancient Jewish community’s successful coexistence with other groups.

But most remarkably, he admitted that historical research and archeological excavations in the last 150 years had corroborated the Biblical account of the deeds of the Persian emperor Cyrus the Great (550-530 BCE).
(The Bible recounts that Cyrus issued a fabled decree for the emancipation of slaves, including the Jewish people, from Babylonian captivity, and allowed them to return to their homeland in Judah and rebuild their Temple in Jerusalem.)

That reference alone will undoubtedly be enough to bring Iran’s radical elements down on Yunessi’s head for his temerity in gainsaying precepts laid down by the founder of its Islamic Revolution. Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini declared the Jewish Bible a forgery because of its many contradictions of the Koran text and denounced all Persian rulers prior to his revolution as symbols of despotism and repression.

Yanessi did, however, take the precaution of pointing out that it would be a mistake to equate Judaism and Zionism because, he said, some Jews are anti-Zionist.
According to debkafile’s Iranian sources, Yanessi acted out a gesture on behalf of President Rouhani that was designed to allay Iranian Jews’ fear of fallout from the constant denunciations of the rulers of Tehran by Israel’s leaders.

The Voice of America TV this week quoted the late Rabbi Ovadia Yosef as cursing the Iranians and hoping for their destruction. Although this quote was lifted from a speech the rabbi made many years ago, it got Iranian Jews worried.

But Rouhani sent his ally to the synagogue most of all in the hope of winning points with American Jews and their support for the comprehensive nuclear accord soon to be signed between Iran and the Six Powers.

The Iranian president has demonstrated notable diplomatic and tactical versatility for making sure that the accord goes through and results in the substantial easing of sanctions, urgently needed to boost the ailing Iranian economy.
Tehran is pinning high hopes on the visit to Israel this week by US National Security Adviser Susan Rice and the senior US negotiator Wendy Sherman on a twofold mission:

1. To try and talk Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu out of his absolute conviction that the accord to be signed, which will acknowledge Iran as a nuclear threshold state, is bad and harmful to Israel’s and world security.
2. If that doesn’t work, Rice and Sherman will try and obtain an Israeli pledge not to resort to a military strike against Iran’s nuclear facilities, an action that would scuttle the Obama administration’s entire Iran strategy.
The coming visit by these two senior American officials has caused few ripples in Israel. However, for the Iranians, so much is at stake, that Rouhani sent a prominent cleric to stand up in a Shiraz synagogue and underwrite Cyrus the Great’s acknowledgement of the Jewish homeland in Judah and their temple in Jerusalem. He considered it was worthwhile for the sake of an international accord that accepts Iran’s nuclear threshold status and averts an Israeli attack.


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« Reply #10608 on: May 4th, 2014, 10:46pm »

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Duly Non-Elected Government of Ukraine
grin
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« Reply #10609 on: May 5th, 2014, 12:03am »

A Dutch Guerillera in Colombia..

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/a-meeting-with-dutch-farc-member-tanja-nijmeijer-a-966813-2.html

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mmmm
I hope she succeeds in an end to that war..If she thinks like the Purr I Have come to know...she will.. cool
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« Reply #10610 on: May 5th, 2014, 12:27am »

Don't Trust Anyone Over 30

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young-blood-may-hold-key-to-reversing-aging


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/05/science/young-blood-may-hold-key-to-reversing-aging.html?_r=0
Two teams of scientists published studies on Sunday showing that blood from young mice reverses aging in old mice, rejuvenating their muscles and brains. As ghoulish as the research may sound, experts said that it could lead to treatments for disorders like Alzheimer’s disease and heart disease.

“I am extremely excited,” said Rudolph Tanzi, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, who was not involved in the research. “These findings could be a game changer.”

The research builds on centuries of speculation that the blood of young people contains substances that might rejuvenate older adults.

In the 1950s, Clive M. McCay of Cornell University and his colleagues tested the notion by delivering the blood of young rats into old ones. To do so, they joined rats in pairs by stitching together the skin on their flanks. After this procedure, called parabiosis, blood vessels grew and joined the rats’ circulatory systems. The blood from the young rat flowed into the old one, and vice versa.

Later, Dr. McCay and his colleagues performed necropsies and found that the cartilage of the old rats looked more youthful than it would have otherwise. But the scientists could not say how the transformations happened. There was not enough known at the time about how the body rejuvenates itself.

It later became clear that stem cells are essential for keeping tissues vital. When tissues are damaged, stem cells move in and produce new cells to replace the dying ones. As people get older, their stem cells gradually falter.

In the early 2000s, scientists realized that stem cells were not dying off in aging tissues.

“There were plenty of stem cells there,” recalled Thomas A. Rando, a professor of neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine. “They just don’t get the right signals.”

Dr. Rando and his colleagues wondered what signals the old stem cells would receive if they were bathed in young blood. To find out, they revived Dr. McCay’s experiments.

The scientists joined old and young mice for five weeks and then examined them. The muscles of the old mice had healed about as quickly as those of the young mice, the scientists reported in 2005. In addition, the old mice had grown new liver cells at a youthful rate.



The young mice, on the other hand, had effectively grown prematurely old. Their muscles had healed more slowly, and their stem cells had not turned into new cells as quickly as they had before the procedure.

The experiment indicated that there were compounds in the blood of the young mice that could awaken old stem cells and rejuvenate aging tissue. Likewise, the blood of the old mice had compounds that dampened the resilience of the young mice.

Amy J. Wagers, a member of Dr. Rando’s team, continued to study the blood of young mice after she moved in 2004 to Harvard, where she is an associate professor. Last year, she and her colleagues demonstrated that it could rejuvenate the hearts of old mice.

To pinpoint the molecules responsible for the change, Dr. Wagers and her colleagues screened the animals’ blood and found that a protein called GDF11 was abundant in young mice and scarce in old ones. To see if GDF11 was crucial to the parabiosis effect, the scientists produced a supply of the protein and injected it into old mice. Even on its own, GDF11 rejuvenated their hearts.
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« Reply #10611 on: May 5th, 2014, 08:17am »

GOOD MORNING UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy

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« Reply #10612 on: May 5th, 2014, 08:20am »

Associated Press

Malaysian plane's likely flight path gets 2nd look

By KRISTEN GELINEAU
— May. 5, 2014 3:36 AM EDT

SYDNEY (AP) — An international panel of experts will re-examine all data gathered in the nearly two-month hunt for the missing Malaysia jet to ensure search crews who have been scouring a desolate patch of ocean for the plane have been looking in the right place, officials said Monday.

Senior officials from Malaysia, Australia and China met in the Australian capital to hash out the details of the next steps in the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which will center around an expanded patch of seafloor in a remote area of the Indian Ocean off Western Australia. The area became the focus of the hunt after a team of analysts calculated the plane's likeliest flight path based on satellite and radar data.

Starting Wednesday, that data will be re-analyzed and combined with all information gathered thus far in the search, which hasn't turned up a single piece of debris despite crews scouring more than 4.6 million square kilometers (1.8 million square miles) of ocean.

"We've got to this stage of the process where it's very sensible to go back and have a look at all of the data that has been gathered, all of the analysis that has been done and make sure there's no flaws in it, the assumptions are right, the analysis is right and the deductions and conclusions are right," Angus Houston, head of the search operation, told reporters in Canberra.

Investigators have been stymied by a lack of hard data since the plane vanished on March 8 during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. A weekslong search for surface debris was called off last week after officials determined any wreckage that may have been floating has likely sunk.

"Unfortunately, all of that effort has found nothing," Australian Transport Minister Warren Truss said. "We've been confident on the basis of the information provided that the search area was the right one, but in practice, that confidence has not been converted into us discovering any trace of the aircraft."

Houston has warned the underwater search is likely to drag on for up to a year.

Houston and Truss met with Malaysian Defense Minister Hishammuddin Hussein and Chinese Transport Minister Yang Chuantang in Canberra on Monday to map out the next steps of the underwater search, which will focus on a 60,000 square kilometer (23,000 square mile) patch of seafloor. Officials are contacting governments and private contractors to find out whether they have specialized equipment that can dive deeper than the Bluefin 21, an unmanned sub that has spent weeks scouring the seafloor in an area where sounds consistent with a plane's black box were detected in early April.

The Bluefin has been limited by the fact it can dive only to depths of 4.5 kilometers (2.8 miles) — and parts of the search zone are likely deeper than that. Adding to the difficulties is the fact no one really knows exactly how deep the water in the search area is.

"I don't know that anyone knows for sure, because it's never been mapped," Truss said, adding that detailed mapping of the seafloor will be a key focus of the next phase of the search.

In addition to deeper diving capabilities, the new equipment will be able to send information back to crews in real time. The Bluefin's data can be downloaded only once it returns to the surface after each of its 16-hour dives.

It will likely take another two months before any new equipment is in the water, Truss said. The Bluefin will continue to be used in the meantime, though its search is currently on hold while the Ocean Shield, which has the sub on board, is taking on supplies at a base in Western Australia.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/malaysia-planes-likely-flight-path-gets-2nd-look

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« Reply #10613 on: May 5th, 2014, 08:23am »

Poughkeepsie Journal

UFO documentary film to be screened in Highland

7:02 a.m. EDT May 5, 2014

The Town of Lloyd Historical Preservation Society will show of the documentary movie, "In the Night Sky: I Recall a UFO," 7:30 p.m. Monday in the Vineyard Commons Theater/Meeting Room, 300 Vineyard Ave., Highland. The producers, Felix and Sarah Olivieri of Big Guy Media in Rifton, will introduce their movie and answer questions afterward. Free admission.

The Olivieris, along with author Linda Zimmerman, interviewed believers and skeptics, visited many Hudson Valley UFO hotspots. The true focus of the movie is the witnesses' stories, emphasizing not just the thrill of the sighting, but also lasting impressions.

"In the Night Sky: I Recall a UFO," won the People's Choice Award at the 2013 International UFO Congress EBE Film Festival. It was selected to be shown at the 2013 Hoboken International Film Festival, the 2013 Kingston NY Film Festival, and the 2014 Beacon NY Film Festival.

For more details about the movie, check out a preview at www.nightskyufo.com or on YouTube. For more information about the society's programs call 845-255-7742 or visit the TOLHPS website at www.tolhps.org

http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/news/local/2014/05/04/ufo-documentary-film-screened/8702147/

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« Reply #10614 on: May 5th, 2014, 12:16pm »




Please be an angel



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« Reply #10615 on: May 5th, 2014, 7:29pm »

what is being sold here?

By Julian Ryall, Tokyo

12:55PM BST 05 May 2014

According to Kyodo News, the Chinese report says key North Korean leaders should be detained in special camps where they can be monitored, but also prevented from directing further military operations or taking part in actions that could be damaging to China’s national interest.

The report suggests “foreign forces” could be involved in an incident that leads to the collapse of internal controls in North Korea, resulting to millions of refugees attempting to flee. The only route to safety the vast majority would have would be over the border into China.

The Chinese authorities intend to question new arrivals, determine their identities and turn away any who are considered dangerous or undesirable.

“This only underlines that all the countries with a stake in the stability of north-east Asia need to be talking to each other,” Jun Okumura, a visiting scholar at the Meiji Institute for Global Affairs, told The Telegraph.

“What we have learned from the collapse of other dictatorships – the Soviet Union, Muammar Gaddafi’s Libya – is that the more totalitarian the regime, the harder and faster they fall,” he added.

“This is why we need contingency plans and I am sure that the US and South Korea have extensive plans in place, but the release of Chinese measures is new,” he said.

Okumura believes that the timing of the leak of the study is significant, given that China can have been expected to have similar contingency plans in place for the past two decades that North Korea has been teetering on the edge of implosion.

The release of the study comes just days after Beijing issued a thinly veiled warning to Pyongyang, ahead of a fourth anticipated nuclear test, that China would “by no means allow war or chaos to occur on our doorstep.”

China, which is North Korea’s sole remaining significant supporter, also refused to export any crude oil over its border to the North in the first three months of the year.




China has drawn up detailed contingency plans for the collapse of the North Korean government, suggesting that Beijing has little faith in the longevity of Kim Jong-un’s regime.


Documents drawn up by planners from China’s People’s Liberation Army that were leaked to Japanese media include proposals for detaining key North Korean leaders and the creation of refugee camps on the Chinese side of the frontier in the event of an outbreak of civil unrest in the secretive state.


The report calls for stepping up monitoring of China’s 879-mile border with North Korea.


Any senior North Korean military or political leaders who could be the target of either rival factions or another “military power,” thought to be a reference to the United States, should be given protection, the documents state.



Related Topics

World »
Aerospace & Defense »









(Reuters) - Lockheed Martin is on the lookout for acquisition deals and expects the crisis in Ukraine to boost sales of its missile defense system MEADS, the company's chief executive told German weekly paper Welt am Sonntag.

"We see strong demand for defense systems in the world. Here in Europe it is for missile defense systems. Many of our NATO partners are also looking at our F-35 fighter jet program," Marilyn Hewson, company CEO, was quoted as saying.

Across the world there are around 20 new clients for its Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS) Hewson told the paper.

MEADS is a mobile system designed to defeat tactical ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, unmanned aerial vehicles and aircraft.
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« Reply #10616 on: May 6th, 2014, 09:31am »

"According to Kyodo News, the Chinese report says key North Korean leaders should be detained in special camps where they can be monitored, but also prevented from directing further military operations or taking part in actions that could be damaging to China’s national interest.

The report suggests “foreign forces” could be involved in an incident that leads to the collapse of internal controls in North Korea, resulting to millions of refugees attempting to flee. The only route to safety the vast majority would have would be over the border into China.

The Chinese authorities intend to question new arrivals, determine their identities and turn away any who are considered dangerous or undesirable."



Good morning Sys,

That is sure disturbing.

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« Reply #10617 on: May 6th, 2014, 09:34am »

GOOD MORNING UFOCASEBOOKERS! grin


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« Reply #10618 on: May 6th, 2014, 09:37am »

Defense News

Step by Step: US Army Slowly Nears Apache, Black Hawk Replacements

May. 5, 2014 - 08:40PM
By PAUL McLEARY



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Four bidding contractors likely will be cut to two in July in the US Army's effort to replace its Apache and Black Hawk helicopters. Above: the AVX. (AVX)



WASHINGTON — In July, the US Army will make its first big decision on how to proceed with the ambitious, decades-long developmental project to replace up to 4,000 Apache and Black Hawk helicopters by the mid-2030s.

Four contractors are working on demonstrator and technology projects under the Joint Multi-Role (JMR) program, which will eventually develop the baseline requirements for the $100 billion Future Vertical Lift (FVL) effort.

The teams will submit their work to the Army in June for evaluation, after which the number of competitors will likely be whittled to two that will build actual demonstrator aircraft that will fly from 2017 to 2019.

After the flight tests and technology development, JMR will go away, and the FVL program will kick off with a request for proposals open to all comers who think they can meet the specifications developed under the JMR program.

Until then, teams led by Bell Helicopter, a partnership between Sikorsky Aircraft and Boeing, AVX Aircraft, and Karem Aircraft are working to make it past the July make-or-break point.

“They’re doing initial design work, and we’re starting to get into component-level preliminary design reviews,” said Dan Bailey, head of the Army’s JMR/FVL programs. “They’re designing a conceptual aircraft that is a kind of ‘snap the chalk line’ view of what the user requirements might be in the future.

“But they’re also designing a demonstrator aircraft that will demonstrate the enabling technologies that will be resident on the conceptual design.”

This initial phase is focused on developing a design that future mission sets and other technologies will be plugged into, though what the FVL will look like in two decades is almost completely up in the air.

Both the Sikorsky-Boeing team and AVX are developing plans for coaxial-rotor technologies, while the teams led by Bell and Karem have said they are developing tilt-rotor designs.

Specifications include a design that would be capable of performing both medium utility and attack missions, with a 230-knot cruising speed, and of hovering at 6,000 feet in 95-degree temperatures.

Bailey said the program is moving slowly by design, partly due to lessons learned from failures of ambitious programs such as Future Combat Systems, which wrote complex requirements documents that couldn’t possibly be met within the budgets and timelines that leaders established. The program was later canceled.

He also stressed the demonstrators taking to the air in 2017 “won’t be the FVL solution — they’re demonstrators, they’re X-planes.

“They won’t have production-representative engines, they won’t have real mission systems architecture, and communications at the bare minimum, but they’ll demonstrate some key technologies,” he said.

In other words, the current phase is envisioned as a venue for industry to show off technologies that would enable Army rotary-wing aviation to take the next leap forward in speed, lift, protection and interoperability.

While the service is taking a slow approach, the idea has been percolating for decades. Bruce Tenney, chief of advanced design at the Army’s Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center, this year told the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank here that “the FVL initiative is about the fourth one of these that we’ve tried over the past 15 years.”

A series of studies was kicked off in the 1990s, but it wasn’t until 2004 that the Army really started looking at joint heavy lift, he said.

“My team spends a lot of time engaged with the vendors,” Bailey told Defense News, “and we’re learning collectively. We’re not building prototypes of the FVL solution, so we’re not trying to build the aircraft that will eventually be selected [by 2019], as we don’t yet know what the full FVL requirements are.

“We’re trying to inform ourselves through the [science and technology] program to make the decisions associated with FVL.”

The Pentagon requested a relatively modest $52 million in the fiscal 2015 budget to fund the JMR demonstrator program.

But Bailey said the Army has “put technology investment agreements in place with all four vendors for the entire scope of the program, all the way through fiscal year ’19, so the work that we’re doing now on that is just the first phase of what’s been negotiated.”

While the four competitors are working on the aircraft’s design, other industry teams are working on a digital backbone that will allow mission systems to be plugged into the aircraft.

A contract for the joint common architecture standard will be awarded in July for more lab-based testing.

The results will go into the request for proposals to be issued in 2019.


http://www.defensenews.com/article/20140505/DEFREG02/305050028/Step-by-Step-US-Army-Slowly-Nears-Apache-Black-Hawk-Replacements

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« Reply #10619 on: May 6th, 2014, 09:41am »

Wired

Beyond Honeybees: Now Wild Bees and Butterflies May Be in Trouble

By Brandon Keim
05.06.14 | 6:30 am

By now you probably know about the plight of America’s honeybees: the collapsed colonies and dying hives, threatening pollination services to crops and the future of a much-beloved insect.

But it’s not just honeybees that are in trouble. Many wild pollinators—thousands of species of bees and butterflies and moths—are also threatened. Their decline would affect not only our food supply, but our landscapes, too. Most honeybees live in commercially managed agricultural colonies; wild pollinators are caretakers of our everyday surroundings.

“Almost 90 percent of the world’s flowering species require insects or other animals for pollination,” said ecologist Laura Burkle of Montana State University. “That’s a lot of plants that need these adorable creatures for reproduction. And if we don’t have those plants, we have a pretty impoverished world.”

Compared to honeybees, wild pollinators are not well studied, and their condition has received relatively little public attention. Most people don’t realize that there are thousands of bee species in the United States. Even many butterflies are overlooked, with the plight of just a few species, particularly monarchs, widely recognized.

Wild bees and butterflies are out on the landscape, making them difficult to count, and a lack of historical baselines makes it challenging to detect long-term trends. Slowly but surely, though, results from field studies and anecdotal reports from experts are piling up. They don’t paint a pretty picture. Many pollinator populations seem to be dwindling.

According to a recent survey organized by the Xerces Society, an invertebrate conservation group, nearly one-third of North American bumblebee species are declining. Other studies have reported similar trends, documenting dramatic declines in once-common species such as the American bumblebee. If that’s happening to bumblebees, says Xerces Society executive director Scott Black, it’s quite possible, even likely, that others are hurting, too.

“There’s very little information status on most of the bees other than bumblebees, but if you look at the life histories of these groups, many are likely even more sensitive to the disturbances leading to the declines, such as pesticides and habitat loss,” Black said. “Although we don’t know what’s going on with all bees, I think we could be seeing real problems.”

Among other pollinators, iconic monarch butterfly declines are well documented: Their numbers are now at a small fraction of historical levels. And entomologist Art Shapiro of the University of California, Davis spent most of the last four decades counting butterflies across central California, and found declines in every region. These declines don’t just involve butterflies that require very specific habitats or food sources, and might be expected to be fragile, but so-called generalist species thought to be highly adaptable. Many other entomologists have told Black the same thing.

“Species that used to be in all our yards are dropping out, but nobody’s monitoring them,” Black said.

Plenty of blame to go around

Some of the factors behind the declines have also been implicated in honeybee die-offs. Like honeybees, wild pollinators are sensitive to pesticides, including neonicotinoids, an enormously popular class of insect-killers used in most major crops that has been linked to bee deaths.

Their use has been restricted on farms in the European Union but continues on U.S. farms. They’re also used even more intensively in nurseries and gardens. What’s more, says Black, instructions on minimizing honeybee harm from pesticides, such as spraying them in the morning, may end up targeting other pollinators.

It’s difficult to quantify the harms caused by pesticides—not just neonicotinoids, but dozens of other chemicals, their effects varying by dose and combination—but “it’s logical to think they’re having some kind of effect,” said biologist Claire Kremen of the University of California, Berkeley. “It’s amazing we see as many pollinators as we do. Those are the ones who’ve survived this continuous pummeling.”

Significant as pesticide impacts could be, though, they may be eclipsed by habitat loss. Across the United States, pollinator habitat is disappearing at rates usually reserved for descriptions of Amazon rain forest deforestation. This is most striking in the Midwest, where more than 36,000 square miles of wetlands and prairie—an area larger than Indiana—has been converted to cropland since 2008.

Farms don’t need to be bad for pollinators. The wetlands and drainage ditches of California’s rice fields provide valuable food and shelter to butterflies, Shapiro says. But in the Midwest and elsewhere, the widespread use of herbicide-resistant crop varieties has allowed farmers to apply herbicide more intensively than ever. It’s now possible to wander a corn farm for days without seeing a single bee.

Add urban and suburban development that produces landscapes of chemically maintained, regularly mowed lawns and roadsides, and “habitat loss is generally thought to be the most important factor driving bee declines,” wrote researchers in 2010.

Averting disaster

What are the long-term consequences of pollinator loss? Presently it’s hard to say. In a given locale, losing a few species might have little effect, as others will take over their ecological role. Lose enough, though, and a tipping point might be reached, resulting in a collapse of pollinators and the plants that rely on them to reproduce.

“You can use the example of an airplane: Start to undo some rivets and screws, and it’s still going to fly, because there’s still redundancy in the system,” said Burkle. “But at some point it begins to fall apart.”

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/2014/05/wild-bee-and-butterfly-declines/

Crystal


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