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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 91998 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #1065 on: Sep 9th, 2010, 6:49pm »

Vets Rock

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Mission: To provide veterans of the US Military with the basic needs of food, shelter, transportation and clothing. We carry out this mission through direct donations, grants, concerts/music events and other fund raising activities across the United States.

Our Philosophy
It is our belief that all veterans of the US Military deserve to have basic needs provided to them for their service and sacrifice to our nation. We also believe that it is our duty as Americans to see that the men and women who have protected and fought for our rights and freedoms are cared for at every turn and given the respect and admiration that they deserve.

Vision Statement
It is our vision that VETS ROCK will raise the awareness of veterans needs in this nation and that through various partnerships with US based companies, other non-profit organizations and direct communications with the general public, all of our veterans will one day be cared for and respected by all Americans regardless of the time a veteran served or the conflict they were or were not involved in.

http://vetsrock.org/

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« Reply #1066 on: Sep 9th, 2010, 7:10pm »

The quality is poor but this has been getting attention so I thought I would post it.



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« Reply #1067 on: Sep 9th, 2010, 7:11pm »

Fresno again



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« Reply #1068 on: Sep 9th, 2010, 7:13pm »




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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1069 on: Sep 9th, 2010, 8:11pm »

http://tucsoncitizen.com/paranormal/2010/09/08/star-trek-made-nbc-debut-44-years-ago-today-in-1966/

Tucson Citizen

‘Star Trek’ made NBC debut 44 years ago today in 1966


by Cherlyn Gardner Strong on Sep. 08, 2010, under UFOs

Star Trek has been on my mind lately. Over the last week, many of my UFO, alien and alien technology discussions seem to evoke the series in one way or another. Additionally, William Shatner disclosed in an interview the other day that he believes in aliens, but not UFOs.

It doesn’t surprise me that Shatner believes in aliens. Shatner’s Captain Kirk got to make out with the sexiest aliens in the universe during the series run. Certainly, those episodes made many male Trekkies extremely hopeful for the existence of female extraterrestrial life, too.

I realized that it was 44 years ago today that the show debuted on NBC. On September 8, 1966, television viewers climbed aboard the starship Enterprise, to boldly go where no man has gone before.

The opening line, “to boldly go where no man has gone before,” was taken almost verbatim from a US White House booklet on space produced after the Sputnik flight in 1957. – Wikipedia

If you are itching to watch the Star Trek intro in order to pay homage to one of the greatest shows in television history, I’ve included a version from YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdjL8WXjlGI&feature=player_embedded
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« Reply #1070 on: Sep 9th, 2010, 8:58pm »

on Sep 9th, 2010, 8:11pm, Swamprat wrote:
http://tucsoncitizen.com/paranormal/2010/09/08/star-trek-made-nbc-debut-44-years-ago-today-in-1966/

Tucson Citizen

‘Star Trek’ made NBC debut 44 years ago today in 1966


by Cherlyn Gardner Strong on Sep. 08, 2010, under UFOs

Star Trek has been on my mind lately. Over the last week, many of my UFO, alien and alien technology discussions seem to evoke the series in one way or another. Additionally, William Shatner disclosed in an interview the other day that he believes in aliens, but not UFOs.

It doesn’t surprise me that Shatner believes in aliens. Shatner’s Captain Kirk got to make out with the sexiest aliens in the universe during the series run. Certainly, those episodes made many male Trekkies extremely hopeful for the existence of female extraterrestrial life, too.

I realized that it was 44 years ago today that the show debuted on NBC. On September 8, 1966, television viewers climbed aboard the starship Enterprise, to boldly go where no man has gone before.

The opening line, “to boldly go where no man has gone before,” was taken almost verbatim from a US White House booklet on space produced after the Sputnik flight in 1957. – Wikipedia

If you are itching to watch the Star Trek intro in order to pay homage to one of the greatest shows in television history, I’ve included a version from YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdjL8WXjlGI&feature=player_embedded


AW!!!! I remember watching "Star Trek" on tv in 1966. Thanks Swamprat. What a nice article.
Crystal
« Last Edit: Sep 9th, 2010, 9:00pm by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

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« Reply #1071 on: Sep 9th, 2010, 8:59pm »

Sy Fy is premiering "Beast Legends" in about 2 minutes on the Sy Fy channel.

http://www.syfy.com/beastlegends/index.php

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« Reply #1072 on: Sep 10th, 2010, 08:15am »

LA Times

San Bruno fire chief puts explosion death toll at 6
September 10, 2010 | 4:21 am

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The explosion and massive fire that ripped through San Bruno left six dead, the fire chief said Friday morning, and he expected the toll to rise as more homes are searched.

San Bruno Fire Captain Charlie Barringer stood on Glenview Drive a block above Claremont Drive about 2 a.m. and surveyed the damage as firefighters pointed their hoses at the smoldering remains of a half dozen homes.

The power was still out. Spot fires were still burning in yards near the charred remains of station wagons, the air thick and acrid. Many houses remained eerily untouched, SUVs still parked in the driveways, solar-powered garden lights burning, newspapers wrapped in plastic still lying where they were tossed on the grass Thursday morning.

Barringer has been based at the local station for the past three years, one of three firefighters on Engine 52, the first to respond to the explosion.

“I thought a 747 had landed on us,” he said. “It shook our station right to its foundation.”

Within a minute, he had sounded a four-alarm fire, he said. Soon after, he said firefighters discovered a gas line had exploded, destroying not only homes but the grid of water mains that supplied the local fire hydrants. His crew had no water to fight the fires.

“We were overwhelmed. We had multiple neighborhoods on fire,” he said.

Barringer said the neighborhood has not had problems with gas leaks in recent years. A PG&E crew of several men with hard hats, shovels, an earth mover and two trucks was out at the corner of Claremont and Sneath Lane as he spoke, digging through the concrete, but they referred questions to a spokesman. Neighbors standing across the street claimed a gas line runs nearby, and a slight scent of gas was in the air Friday morning.

Barringer said that when his engine first responded to the explosion, the crew strung together hoses to pump water from two to three miles away. By 2 a.m., they were still using the hoses. Police and coroner’s investigators roamed the darkness with flashlights, snapping photographs, setting up road blocks with flares and saying the area was considered a crime scene.

Kathy Crouse, 61, sat on a corner in the dark with a police scanner, waiting for news. Her house on Sequoia Avenue was not damaged by the explosion, she said, but a friend who lived on Claremont fled just as her house burned, grabbing her car keys as flames singed the shirt on her back. Crouse bought her a new shirt at Kohl’s and the woman went to stay with her daughter nearby.

“She’s so in shock,” Crouse said.

Crouse works at the CVS in town, which like many businesses offered donated food to those displaced by the explosion. When she stopped by late Thursday, she said a neighbor asked her whether his house had survived. She didn’t know, and was unsure what to tell him.

Her son, a carpenter, helped other neighbors build wooden braces to stabilize the fire hoses snaking across the roads.

“All we can do is rebuild and move on,” Johnson said as he stood on Sneath overlooking Claremont, where billows of smoke rose from burned homes.

While Johnson waited, a woman who said she lived at the corner of Glenview and Earle Avenue—the epicenter of the explosion—walked by looking for her son’s girlfriend. Her son was among those badly burned by the explosion, she said—he had been home at the time, walked outside with his girlfriend and was burned. His girlfriend has been missing since.

She walked off into the darkness in the direction of her home, Johnson said.

A state official said Thursday night that 53 homes had been destroyed.

“It’s horrible,” Barringer said. “It’s real difficult for us. This is like a second neighborhood for me.”

His crew saved about 20 homes on Glenview, he said. They lost five.

Barringer said he had worked strike teams in the Los Angeles area during past fire seasons, and was grateful to see firefighters from surrounding counties pitching in to handle the aftermath of the explosion. He pointed to a shopping plaza on the opposite hill, where officials had set up a command post.

“We’ll be out here probably for at least a week,” he said.

As he spoke, Barringer received a radio message to return to the station to get some rest before returning to the neighborhood at about 5 a.m. Friday morning to begin a house to house search for bodies.

“I’m sure there’s going to be a few more,” he said as he left.

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2010/09/san-bruno-fire-chief-puts-explosion-death-toll-at-6.html

Crystal

edit to add new link:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/39089768/ns/us_news/
people smelled gas a week before this explosion
« Last Edit: Sep 10th, 2010, 2:36pm by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

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« Reply #1073 on: Sep 10th, 2010, 08:18am »

New York Times

September 9, 2010
Dissidents Claim Iran Is Building a New Enrichment Site
By DAVID E. SANGER

WASHINGTON — A dissident group that had previously revealed the existence of several hidden nuclear sites in Iran claimed Thursday that it had evidence that the country was building another secret uranium enrichment plant.

The group, the People’s Mujahedeen of Iran, showed satellite photographs of an extensive tunnel-digging operation near a military garrison northwest of Tehran. But the group had no pictures of the interior and no evidence to back up its claim that the site was intended to hold several thousand centrifuges, the machines used to enrich nuclear fuel for power production or weapons. The Obama administration, which publicly revealed evidence a year ago of a hidden nuclear facility near the holy city of Qum, reacted cautiously to the group’s announcement.

In recent months officials have said they had no evidence of another enrichment facility, though they have expressed suspicions about a number of deep tunnels built into hillsides or mountains. One United States government official said the evidence from the People’s Mujahedeen, which was turned over to American officials this week, would require careful examination.

A new enrichment plant, if it existed, would heighten suspicions that Iran was trying to evade international inspectors and find another way to produce fuel usable in a bomb. But there are other possible explanations for an underground facility, including a location to store conventional weapons.

The exile opposition group has a long and tense history with the United States government, and it has openly called for a change of government in Iran. But it accurately revealed the existence of the country’s main underground nuclear enrichment center, at Natanz, and the facility at Qum, which is still under construction. Both are now visited regularly by international nuclear inspectors.

Some other allegations from the group, one American official noted Thursday, “haven’t proven as accurate.”

Alireza Jafarzadeh, a spokesman for the group, presented satellite photographs of the suspect site, near Qazvin, to reporters in Washington. His group called it the Behjatabad-Abyek site, named for nearby towns. “This is certainly part of the secret weapons program,” he said.

He and Soona Samsami, who played a role in revealing a secret site in Tehran where inspectors later discovered Iran was secretly manufacturing centrifuges, alleged that some of the same companies involved in building the Qum facility were involved in this project. But Mr. Jafarzadeh said he could not identify the sources of his information inside the country for fear of jeopardizing their safety.

Iran has declared that it plans to build 10 new enrichment sites, far more production capacity than it would need for its nascent nuclear power projects. Under the rules of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Iran would be required to reveal those construction plans well in advance; the Iranians say they no longer subscribe to that provision of the agency’s rules.

The agency could demand access to the new facility, but it is unclear if the Iranians would permit such an inspection.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/10/world/middleeast/10nuke.html?ref=world

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« Reply #1074 on: Sep 10th, 2010, 08:22am »

Telegraph

The TaxPayers' Alliance campaign group has taken advice from leaders of the prominent right wing Tea Party movement in a bid to galvanise anti-government sentiment.

By Andrew Hough
Published: 10:00AM BST 10 Sep 2010

The influential group, which campaigns for lower government spending, has sought advice from FreedomWorks, a Washington-based organisation linked to the right-wing movement.

Officials from both organisations attended a conference in London on Thursday where tactics were shared between several taxpayer lobby groups.

They described their activities as "an insurgent campaign" against government tax and spending policies.

The TPA has seen its supporter base rise more than 70 per cent over the past year to about 55,000. FreedomWorks meanwhile has claimed to have convened 800,000 activists.

"You could say our time has come," Matthew Elliott, chief executive of TPA, told The Guardian.

"We need to learn from our European colleagues and the Tea Party movement in the US. It will be fascinating to see whether it will transfer to the UK. Will there be the same sort of uprising?"

According to its website, FreedomWorks was founded in 1984 and has hundreds of thousands of grassroots volunteers nationwide. It is credited with helping fuel protests against the Obama administration.

“FreedomWorks recruits, educates, trains and mobilises millions of volunteer activists to fight for less government, lower taxes, and more freedom,” it claims.

Terry Kibbe, a consultant at Freedom Works, told the newspaper that she wanted to help European campaign groups create grassroots activist wings.

“We have been working to identify groups in Europe that would be amenable to becoming more activist-based, think tanks that could start activist wings," she said.

"We have worked with the TaxPayers' Alliance, in Austria and in Italy, and we want to do more."

In the less than two years after the tea party movement was born out of conservative discontent at soaring spending and budget deficits, it is migrating from the margins to the mainstream of US politics.

The Right-wing populist movement has spread across the country mainly in reaction to President Barack Obama's liberal agenda and in anger at the US bank bail-out.

The movement's adherents draw their name and inspiration from the Boston Tea Party of 1773, when angry American colonists dumped tea into Boston harbour in protest at the taxes levied by the British parliament.

And it was also in Massachusetts, some 236 years later, that the new Tea Party incarnation came of age when Scott Brown, a Republican long-shot, last month won a solidly Democratic seat previously held by Edward Kennedy.

The movement has been championed by Sarah Palin, a potential Presidential candidate, who is seen by many as a Tea Party heroine.

Last month tens of thousands of politically conservative Americans turned out to support Glenn Beck, a right wing broadcaster, and Mrs Palin at a highly controversial Washington rally to honour the US military.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/7993781/TaxPayers-Alliance-seeks-advice-from-Tea-Party-movement-leaders.html

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« Reply #1075 on: Sep 10th, 2010, 08:27am »

Telegraph

Pudding trolleys should be reintroduced to restaurants because diners are willing to pay up to 50 per cent more for a dessert if they view them before ordering, a study indicates.

By Andrew Hough
Published: 7:30AM BST 10 Sep 2010

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Researchers found that diners are more likely order a sweet if they can actually see it rather than choosing from pictures or a menu description.

Experts said the new study debunked most behavioural theories that assumed the form of the menu presentation did not matter to consumers.

Scientists from the California Institute of Technology found that the value of consumer goods depended how they were presented.

The study, published in the American Economic Review, concluded that diners would be willing to pay, on average, 50 per cent more for items they could reach out and touch.

"Even if you don't touch the item the fact that it is physically present seems to be enough,” said Prof Antonio Rangel, who led the study.

“This … response is more likely to be deployed when making contact with the stimulus is a possibility."

Prof Rangel, from the university’s neuroscience and economics department, said his team wanted to prove whether it mattered if restaurants listed the name of the dessert, showed a picture, or brought a “cart” around”.

He said they also wanted to see whether a consumer was willing to pay more for a physical product to be shown to them.

In their study, the team presented foods to hungry subjects in three different forms including in a text-only format, a high-resolution photograph and in a tray placed in front of the subjects before measuring “their willingness to pay for the food”.

They found there was no difference between the values subjects put on the food depicted in the text and in the picture.

But bids on food on the tray were on average 50 per cent higher than the other two “bids”.

To ensure subjects were not influenced by the smell of a product the team also tested subjects with other “goods”, which resulted in the same results.

"We knew then that whatever is driving this effect is a more general response,” Prof Rangel said.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/foodanddrinknews/7991439/Pudding-trolleys-should-return-to-restaurants.html

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« Reply #1076 on: Sep 10th, 2010, 08:33am »

Wired Danger Room


How to Catch a Terrorist: Read His Brainwaves — Really?
By Spencer Ackerman September 10, 2010 | 7:00 am | Categories: Bizarro


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It’s been a dream of scientists, interrogators and law enforcement professionals for years: Strap a terrorist suspect to a couple of electrodes, start asking him questions, and watch his brainwaves rat him out.

In a recent paper, a Northwestern University professor uses some of his recent fieldwork to urge the intelligence community to give the science another shot. Just one problem: His self-described “Oddball Approach” to exposing terrorists probably won’t work in the real world.

Psychologist J. Peter Rosenfeld writes in the journal Psychophysiology that he can predict and prevent terrorist attacks, all after running a clinical trial in which his students had to plan a mock assault. The idea was to create a test that would allow interrogators a foolproof way of extracting information about planned attacks from resistant suspects using just two wires connected to the forehead. “They could either send him to Egypt for the waterboard,” Rosenfeld tells Danger Room, “or give him a scientifically based test.”

Rosenfeld’s students received a briefing on a series of options that they could employ: four potential locations in Houston, four types of bombs, and four dates in July. Individually, they wrote letters to their “superiors” in their imaginary terror cells outlining their intended acts.

Enter the probe. Psychologists established decades ago that people will involuntarily activate a certain brainwave when they encounter a familiar stimulus, known as a P300. In theory, it’s better than a lie detector: you don’t have to worry about the brain letting out a P300 out of nervousness, the way a panicked heart can create false positives for polygraphs. As Wired.com reported shortly after the September 11 attacks, that’s why every couple of years someone proposes using electroencephalography — EEG, to you and me — as a reliable (and, potentially, legally admissible) alternative to the old lie detector.

During a 25-minute test, Rosenfeld’s students were shown a screen that flashed hundreds of names of random cities, dates and bomb methods. Sure enough, the students’ P300s told Rosenfeld when and where the hypothetical attacks would take place. Even if someone tries hard not to remember his intended terrorist act, “we still catch them eight out of nine or 10 times,” Rosenfeld says. “It’s pretty damn good.”

Now to convince someone in the intelligence community. And that may be more difficult than the respected psychologist figures. Anyone familiar with interrogations of real-life terrorist suspects will immediately spot a problem with Rosenfeld’s test: it presumes way too much knowledge on the part of both the interrogator and the interrogated.

The typical terrorist who finds himself in front of FBI or CIA agents won’t necessarily know everything about a particular plot. The 9/11 hijackers, for instance, were kept deliberately in the dark about everything besides their specific piece of the operation. And that’s on the off chance that someone that spies or G-men round up have even made it into the active stage of terror-plotting, a pretty elite group.

Alternatively, someone who finds himself in an interrogation chair might have been caught red-handed — think underpants bomber Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab — rendering Rosenfeld’s test moot. It then falls to interrogators to figure out a suspect’s place in the conspiracy, something that’s a lot harder to determine than with a simple synaptic firing. Anyone might recognize Osama bin Laden and let out some P300s, but that doesn’t mean that he’s collaborated with him.

Most often, interrogators don’t have any idea whether the guy in the chair opposite them is a bit player or a terror master. That’s why real-life interrogator tools for unraveling terror webs are far more simplistic, in order to draw out broad information and then whittle it down.

Ali Soufan, for instance, a retired FBI counterterrorist, got the first-ever al-Qaeda confirmation of the terrorist group’s culpability for 9/11. His secret weapon? Sugarless cookies, fed to a hungry al-Qaeda affiliate named Abu Jandal.

Rosenfeld concedes that his test depends on both terrorist and interrogator having a great deal of knowledge about a given plot. (Self-deprecatingly, he refers to his P300 test as his “Oddball Approach.”)

He says he’s had just one interaction with an American spook since his paper came out earlier this summer, a Defense Intelligence Agency official named Donald Krapohl, who was skeptical that the P300 test would be useful to interrogators for precisely that reason. (In an email, Krapohl confirmed corresponding with Rosenfeld, but did not receive permission from his bosses to speak with me for this story.)

Aside from a guy who works with the Transportation Security Administration at Midway Airport in Chicago, Rosenfeld says, “We haven’t had any [other] bites in the counterterrorism community.”

That points to a fundamental clinical disconnect. Rosenfeld wants to help U.S. counterterrorists. But he doesn’t know any. So it’s hard for him to design a test that’s relevant to actual interrogators.

“It’s like I tell everybody,” he says. “We’ve done a lot of work in the lab now for a long time, and we’d really like to see it out in the real world.” Anyone from Langley wants to give Rosenfeld a shout, he’s ready to put some electrodes together in the hope that he can help stop the next attack.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/09/how-to-catch-a-terrorist/#ixzz0z8K0MK31

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« Reply #1077 on: Sep 10th, 2010, 08:35am »

Wired

Massive Cache of Iraq War Docs to Be Published by WikiLeaks
By Kim Zetter September 9, 2010 | 5:31 pm | Categories: Bradley Manning, Wikileaks

A massive cache of previously unpublished classified U.S. military documents from the Iraq War is being readied for publication by WikiLeaks, a new report has confirmed.

The documents constitute the “biggest leak of military intelligence” that has ever occurred, according to Iain Overton, editor of the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, a nonprofit British organization that is working with WikiLeaks on the documents.

The documents are expected to be published in several weeks.

Overton, who discussed the project with Newsweek, didn’t say how many documents were involved or disclose their origin, but they may be among the leaks that an imprisoned Army intelligence analyst claimed to have sent to WikiLeaks earlier this year.

Pfc. Bradley Manning, who has been charged with improperly downloading and leaking classified information, disclosed to a former hacker in May that he had given WikiLeaks a database covering 500,000 events in the Iraq War between 2004 and 2009. Manning said the database included reports, dates, and latitude and longitude of events, as well as casualty figures.

A leak of this sort would vastly dwarf the cache of about 75,000 documents that WikiLeaks published in July from the Afghanistan War. That cache involved field reports from analysts who compiled information from informants and others on incidents and intelligence.

Overton said that his group is working on the new cache of documents with major television networks and print-media outlets in several countries, including the United States, to produce documentaries and stories based on them. The collaboration is similar to what was done in July when WikiLeaks worked with three news outlets — The New York Times, the Guardian and Der Spiegel — to simultaneously publish stories on the Afghan War logs.

Overton told Newsweek that the media organizations working on the new Iraq documents have taken into consideration the controversy that surrounded the publication of the Afghan War logs.

WikiLeaks, which published unredacted raw documents on its website at the same time the news outlets published their stories, was criticized by the Defense Department and others for potentially disclosing identifying information that could put the lives of informants and their families in danger. There has been no evidence to date, however, that anyone has suffered actual harm due to the documents.

“We are hugely aware that this is an issue, and we’re taking it very seriously,” Overton said, noting that his organization would not be publishing raw documents but would instead be mining them for information for stories.

The media organizations working with WikiLeaks will each be making financial contributions to the production costs, according to Overton. It’s not clear if this means the media organizations will contribute money to WikiLeaks or will simply be pooling money to produce joint media projects and stories related to the documents.

Overton said he would not be answering any more questions about the issue, when contacted by Threat Level for clarification.

Newsweek has quoted anonymous sources who say that some of the most-disturbing information in the documents relates to the abusive treatment of detainees by Iraqi security forces.

The Defense Department did not respond to a request for comment from Threat Level.

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/09/iraq-war-docs/#ixzz0z8KnmPpt

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« Reply #1078 on: Sep 10th, 2010, 08:43am »

Hollywood Reporter

“Here you have” virus hits close to home at ABC News
by THR Staff on September 9th, 2010 6:47 pm

The "Here you have" virus http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/virus-mail-spreads-online/story?id=11596433 slamming corporations around the U.S. on Thursday didn't spare the media sector either, with Disney and Comcast among the organizations where clicking on an innocently labeled e-mail attachment sent hundreds of messages into unsuspecting in-boxes. ABC News was among the Disney divisions hit, which gave Diane Sawyer a first-person angle to the story on "World News Tonight" (see video above).

video after the jump
http://rewired.hollywoodreporter.com/2010/09/09/here-you-have-virus-abc-news/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+HollywoodRewired+%28The+Hollywood+Reporter+-+Rewired%29

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« Reply #1079 on: Sep 10th, 2010, 08:52am »

Science Daily

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'Tractor Beam' One Step Closer to Reality: Laser Moves Small Particles

ScienceDaily (Sep. 9, 2010) — Researchers from The Australian National University have developed the ability to move particles over large distances, using a specially designed laser beam.

Professor Andrei Rode's team from the Laser Physics Centre at ANU have developed a laser beam that can move very small particles up to distances of a metre and a half using only the power of light.

Whilst the laser beam won't work in the vacuum of space, the breakthrough has many important uses on Earth, such as the assembly of micro machines and electronic components.

Professor Rode said his team used the hollow laser beam to trap light-absorbing particles in a 'dark core'. The particles are then moved up and down the beam of light, which acts like an optical 'pipeline'.

"When the small particles are trapped in this dark core very interesting things start to happen," said Dr Rode.

"As gravity, air currents and random motions of air molecules around the particle push it out of centre, one side becomes illuminated by the laser whilst the other lies in darkness.

"This creates a tiny thrust, known as a photophoretic force that effectively pushes the particle back into the darkened core.

"In addition to the trapping effect, a portion of the energy from the beam and the resulting force pushes the particle along the hollow laser pipeline."

Professor Rode added there are a number of practical applications for this technology.

"These include, directing and clustering nano-particles in air, the micro-manipulation of objects, sampling of atmospheric aerosols, and low contamination, non-touch handling of sampling materials.

"On top of this, the laser beam could be used for the transport of dangerous substances and microbes, in small amounts," he said.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100909173132.htm

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