Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Dec 14th, 2017, 03:46am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 709 710 711 712 713  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 1069 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10650 on: May 11th, 2014, 09:52am »

Science Daily

New species of metal-eating plant discovered in the Philippines

Date:
May 9, 2014



User Image
This photo shows the newly described metal-eating plant, Rinorea niccolifera.
Credit: Dr. Edwino S. Fernando; CC-BY 4.0



Scientists from the University of the Philippines, Los Baños have discovered a new plant species with an unusual lifestyle -- it eats nickel for a living -- accumulating up to 18,000 ppm of the metal in its leaves without itself being poisoned, says Professor Edwino Fernando, lead author of the report. Such an amount is a hundred to a thousand times higher than in most other plants. The study was published in the open access journal PhytoKeys.

The new species is called Rinorea niccolifera, reflecting its ability to absorb nickel in very high amounts. Nickel hyperaccumulation is such a rare phenomenon with only about 0.5-1% of plant species native to nickel-rich soils having been recorded to exhibit the ability. Throughout the world, only about 450 species are known with this unusual trait, which is still a small proportion of the estimated 300,000 species of vascular plants.

The new species, according to Dr Marilyn Quimado, one of the lead scientists of the research team, was discovered on the western part of Luzon Island in the Philippines, an area known for soils rich in heavy metals.

"Hyperacccumulator plants have great potentials for the development of green technologies, for example, 'phytoremediation' and 'phytomining'," explains Dr Augustine Doronila of the School of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, who is also co-author of the report.

Phytoremediation refers to the use of hyperacccumulator plants to remove heavy metals in contaminated soils. Phytomining, on the other hand, is the use of hyperacccumulator plants to grow and harvest in order to recover commercially valuable metals in plant shoots from metal-rich sites.

The field surveys and laboratory work of the scientists are part of the research project funded by the Department of Science and Technology -- Philippine Council for Industry, Energy, and Emerging Technology Research and Development (DOST-PCIEERD).

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140509130040.htm

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10651 on: May 11th, 2014, 09:54am »




Please be an angel




User Image



http://www.soldiersangels.org/




User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
ZETAR
Mod Director
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2


PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 8452
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10652 on: May 11th, 2014, 1:47pm »

TO THE MATRIARCHS IN OUR LIVES ~ WITHOUT MOTHERS ~ NONE OF US WOULD BE >>>HERE<<< cool

User Image

SHALOM...Z
User IP Logged

GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2
Sysconfig
Guest
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10653 on: May 11th, 2014, 4:15pm »

To All Mothers..Our world without you would be:






















Love
Sys
« Last Edit: May 11th, 2014, 4:16pm by Sysconfig » User IP Logged

jm57
Senior Member
ImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 766
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10654 on: May 11th, 2014, 4:44pm »

on May 10th, 2014, 7:59pm, Swamprat wrote:
“UFO” crashes through St. Paul apartment window

Jeffrey DeMars, KARE
May 9, 2014

User Image



















Appears to be part of a wheel bearing assembly...


SAINT PAUL, Minn. - Bob Urman said he was sitting down in his recliner to take in a Twins game the night of May 7th when just after the first pitch, something came crashing through his St. Paul apartment's window.
"It scared the living heck out of me," said Urman. "I just stood there I was stunned."

He said the object broke through his double paned window, crashed into the back of his television set, broke glass all over the floor and when the metal object came to rest it was so hot it burned his carpet.

Urman said he called police and when they arrived the object was still hot to the touch.
"He went to reach for it and it was warm and he dribbled it out and he picked it up and put it on the shelf by the window," Urman explained.

Not one to be a believer of UFO's or anything extraordinary for that matter, Urman was convinced it fell off of a plane.
St. Paul police took it to the object to the airport where mechanics there said it looks like a part from a vehicle, not an airplane.

Urman isn't convinced of that, while he lives on Snelling Avenue, his window faces an ally, not the main thoroughfare.

The object is now part of an investigation and in the hands of the St. Paul police.
"When I was sitting here and I was trembling, I thought, what does it take to get to 81 you know," smiled Urman.
His 81st birthday is a month away.

As far as police are concerned, nobody was hurt, as far as they can tell no crime was committed, but if anybody recognizes what it could be feel free to call Saint Paul police.

http://www.kare11.com/story/news/local/2014/05/09/ufo-crash-window-saint-paul-airport-airplane-automobile-police-investigation/8909335/
User IP Logged

Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4289
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10655 on: May 11th, 2014, 8:09pm »

That makes sense JM; that would explain it being hot.
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
Sysconfig
Guest
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10656 on: May 11th, 2014, 8:32pm »

we hear of couples married decades that depart within hours..here is something almost miraculous..if not unheard of..


User Image
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/rare-set-twins-hold-hands-delivery-room/story?id=23673951

One Ohio mom got a very special present for Mother's Day, when her identical twin girls were born holding hands.

Sarah Thistlewhistle's daughters, Jenna and Jillian, are a rare set of monoamniotic or "mono mono" identical twins, which means they shared an amniotic sack and were in constant contact during the pregnancy.

The condition also meant that Thistlewhistle had to remain on bed rest for weeks at Akron General Medical Center in Akron, Ohio. The twins had to be constantly monitored for nearly two months, since mono mono twins can easily become entangled in each other's umbilical cords.

"It's really mentally challenging. It's a very tough experience to go through," Thistlewhistle told ABC News.

Thistlewhistle, who also has a 15-month-old son, had to check into the hospital for nearly two months so doctors could carefully monitor the babies.

PHOTO: A pair of mono mono twins held hands after being born.
Courtesy of Akron General Health System
PHOTO: A pair of "mono mono" twins held hands after being born.

"They hook you up to heart rate monitors to watch for heart deceleration or variables," Thistlewhistle said. "That's what they look for the whole time. I got ultrasounds every other week."

Thankfully for Thistlewhistle and her husband Bill, their daughters were born healthy at 33 weeks this past Friday. Doctors planned a Caesarian section because if the twins grew too large, they would be at greater risk for entanglement.

As the girls were born, doctors held them up over a sheet so that Thistlewhistle and her husband could see them. The newborns were holding hands.

"I didn't think they would come out and instantly holding hands. It was overwhelming. I can't even put into words," Thistlewhistle said. "There wasn't a dry eye in the whole OR."

Although the girls were born healthy, Thistlewhistle said Saturday they had some breathing problems, so they were moved to the neonatal unit at Akron Children's Hospital. Today Thistlewhistle will get to celebrate Mother's Day by introducing her daughters to their older brother for the first time.

"It's the first time that we'll all be together in one room," Thistlewhistle said.
User IP Logged

WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10657 on: May 12th, 2014, 08:34am »

GOOD MORNING UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy

CRYSTAL


~


Defense News

Japan To Take Major Step Toward Collective Self-Defense

May. 11, 2014 - 02:26PM
By PAUL KALLENDER-UMEZU

TOKYO — By the end of this week, a key panel will recommend Japan adopt the right to collective self-defense, a move that would fundamentally change Japan’s deterrence posture, according to a senior member of the Japanese government who requested anonymity.

The Advisory Panel on Reconstruction of the Legal Basis for Security, which first convened Feb. 8, 2013, under the express wish of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to push the changes through, will provide the parameters within which the government will reinterpret Japan’s constitution to allow Japan to exercise the right of collective self-defense under certain circumstances and to come to the aid of another nation under attack.

Narushige Michishita, director of the Security and International Studies Program at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, called this “a major change in one of the basic principles of Japan’s post-war defense policy.

“If we can use this new opportunity well ... we’ll be able to maintain the balance of power in the region against the might of China,” he said.

Under present interpretation of Article 9 of the postwar Japanese constitution, Japan chooses specifically not to exercise its right of collective self-defense that is allowed under Article 51 of the UN Charter.

Instead, a series of decisions by the Cabinet Legislation Bureau, which acts as legal council to the Cabinet, strictly limited Japan to only the right of individual self-defense while maintaining the minimum force necessary to achieve that.

However, following the advisory panel’s recommendations, the Cabinet will reinterpret the constitution to allow for collective self-defense, with legislation to allow the Self-Defense Forces to exercise the right as early as this fall, the source said.

The recommendations come on top of a slew of other major changes by the Abe administration, including the inauguration of the National Security Council (NSC), a new State Secrets Protection Law, a first National Security Strategy and new National Defense Program Guidelines, all from last December, which add up to extraordinarily rapid advances in pursuit of Abe’s nationalist agenda to “normalize” Japan.

The NSC is designed to speed up changes in times of crisis and the new guidelines focus defense on protecting Japan’s Nansei Shoto, or string of islands that stretch far south and west almost to Taiwan and are aimed directly at countering Chinese expansionism amid growing territorial disputes with that country, particularly with the Senkaku Islands.

Opposition Rises

The pace and perceived nature of these moves have stoked opposition both domestically — polls repeatedly show that a majority of Japanese people are against the change in interpretation — and from China in particular, which characterizes the change as a step toward rearmament.

Critics argue, among other things, that assuming the right to collective self-defense is unnecessary since Japan is protected by the US under the US-Japan Security Treaty and that such a move is provocative to China and thus destabilizing.

Proponents argue that Japan’s present limitations are too strict, so Japanese forces on overseas UN peacekeeping missions, for example, cannot protect other forces they are working with if they are attacked, thus severely hampering Japan’s usefulness as a regional US alliance partner. They point out that Japan is the only nation in the world that refuses to exercise a right that is allowed in the UN charter, the 1952 San Francisco Peace Treaty and the US-Japan Security Alliance.

Those in favor of the change also argue that allowing the exercise of the right to collective defense will come with a series of restrictions that make nonsense of claims that Japan is rearming.

In a May 7 meeting, the advisory panel is reported to have added a sixth “brake” or condition that must be met before a decision to exercise the right is taken.

Under these conditions, Japan will consider exercising the right only when:

■A close partner is subject to an illegal attack.

■ Such a use of force against the partner poses a clear and major threat to Japan’s security.

■ The partner has made a clear request that Japan come to its aid.

■ Japan has the express permission of any other country allowing its forces to pass through.

■The use is approved by the Diet.

■The sixth condition is now understood to be that the level of the use of force exercised is judged to be both necessary and proportional by the NSC.

The recommendations are actually the second attempt by Abe to boost Japan’s deterrent capabilities against increasing threats that were initially seen as mainly coming from North Korea when a first incarnation of the panel reported in 2007, during his first administration. That report concluded that Japan needed to reinterpret its constitution to meet four contingencies: Japan could defend US vessels on the high seas; intercept a ballistic missile or missiles targeting the United States; use weapons in international peace operations; and be able to offer rear logistics support to foreign contingents during peacekeeping operations if needed.

Since 2007, however, Japan’s security situation has worsened considerably, particularly with the need to deter Chinese expansionism in its territorial dispute over the Senkaku Islands, the senior Japanese government source said, making it even more vital for Japan to speed up the reinterpretation.

Faced with this situation, Michishita said any move to promote the right to exercise collective self-defense would be a stabilizing action for the region, and reassure the US and regional partners.

“If we have the option to exercise this right, we’ll be able to make Japan a better partner in a region-wide security community,” Michishita said. “It creates a chance to play a larger and more important security role and contribute to the stability of the region by deterring the use of force, thus once more re-ensuring Japan’s security.”


http://www.defensenews.com/article/20140511/DEFREG03/305110018/Japan-Take-Major-Step-Toward-Collective-Self-Defense

« Last Edit: May 12th, 2014, 08:34am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10658 on: May 12th, 2014, 08:40am »

WMUR New Hampshire

Several UFO reports investigated each month in New Hampshire

80 percent of reports come from Franconia area

by Jennifer Crompton
May 11, 2014

The movies have made aliens and UFOs part of our popular culture. But, sightings of unidentified flying objects are very much a part of our daily lives as well.

Whether alien spaceships, secret government projects or debris caught in the wind, they are actively investigated, even in New Hampshire.

Portsmouth couple Betty and Barney Hill's chilling story of a UFO sighting in the White Mountains and alleged encounter with aliens made headlines in the 1960s

These days, looking for UFOs is a hobby among some, with purported sightings often posted to YouTube.

It’s not something Erik Poore ever imagined himself doing, until the real estate photographer from Derry had his own experience.

“This was April 11, about 1:40 in the afternoon,” said Poore. "(I) simply was just out with the dog practicing flying this and didn't see anything ‘til I got home.”

Poore was test-flying his new mini-quad copter with its GoPro camera that day and what it saw above the Robert Frost Homestead in Derry has left him mystified.

“It crossed this entire sky in a second. In a little over half a second,” said Poore.

Something zipped from left to right, shot as the copter was still warming up on the ground. It’s barely visible until the video is slowed down. Click to view the video.

“And when I went back and looked at it frame by frame, I couldn't explain what that was,” said Poore.

Poore then posted the video to YouTube and contacted the Mutual UFO Network, a science-based organization that tries to identify and educate.

“It’s being investigated by our digital scientists to determine if they can figure out the distances, the velocity and what it might be,” said Mark Podell, a MUFON investigator.

Podell is a retired scientist from Bow and the MUFON investigator assigned to Poore's case.

“My personal feeling is based on my years of experience in looking at multiple UFO videos and UFOs. I believe it is either an experimental aircraft that belongs to the U.S. that is unknown to us or it’s some kind of off-world craft,” said Podell.

Podell calls himself a scientist with an open mind because of a sighting he had when he was 12.

Podell is one of nearly 100 MUFON investigators spread across the country. He's been working specifically in New Hampshire since late 2013, and he said he gets 5-10 new reported cases in New Hampshire every month.

“Eighty percent of the cases or more that I've investigated have been in and around Franconia,” said Podell. “And they're all describing, for the most part, orbs or triangular UFOs with three white orbs underneath them … and that's a very common observed craft … and there's a lot of debate out there as to who it belongs to.”

The Franconia Notch hotspot is near where Betty and Barney Hill had their alleged experience in the 1960’s.

Podell said UFO skeptics tend to ignore the science.

“One was the Exeter incident here in New Hampshire where some military people debunked the incident even though it was observed by three witnesses, two of them were policemen,” said Podell.

Podell said most U.S. reports are out west.

New Hampshire, meanwhile, has an average amount of sightings. Some are pranks, possible secret government projects and eventually identifiable, while we may never know the truth about others.

video after the jump:
http://www.wmur.com/special-reports/several-ufo-reports-investigated-each-month-in-new-hampshire/25896930

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
ZETAR
Mod Director
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar

GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2


PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 8452
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10659 on: May 12th, 2014, 12:47pm »

IN THE MYSTERY OF CREATIVITY ~ IN THE TURBULENT FOG OF IMAGINATION ~ SHELVE THOSE LIMITATIONS ~ cool

User Image

I DO HOWEVER FIND THIS CHALLENGING WHEN POSTING SUCH ON A UFO/CONSPIRACY SITE ~ grin

SHALOM...Z
User IP Logged

GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4289
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10660 on: May 12th, 2014, 1:48pm »

Meet the BAT, an airborne wind turbine
By Thom Patterson, CNN
May 12, 2014

User Image

(CNN) -- The first time you see this bizarre aircraft floating high above the horizon, you may be confused. It looks kind of like a giant, winged doughnut.

It's 35 feet wide, and inventors call it the BAT.

It's an unmanned, helium-filled, cylindrical blimp wrapped around three spinning blades that turn wind into electricity.
Can the BAT, which stands for buoyant airborne turbine, help bring life-saving electricity to an estimated 1 billion people in rural areas where power is unavailable?

Altaeros Energies, launched four years ago by a group of MIT grads, hopes so. The young company is competing with Google and other outfits trying to bring the first viable airborne wind turbine to market.

The sight of whirling wind turbine blades sitting atop towers has become common in states such as California and Texas and in Europe. But the BAT takes wind turbine technology to the next level, literally -- about 1,000 feet above the ground.

Towers are often too low to catch the best winds. By flying remote-controlled wind turbines where winds are stronger and more consistent, a lot more energy can be harvested, and it's clean energy from an endless source.

It's a dramatic idea that could change the course of countless lives around the planet. Suddenly, with airborne wind turbines, isolated communities in South American jungles or Alaskan islands could have easier, cheaper access to technology that most take for granted.
For those people, the cost of electric light and heat would plummet because fossil fuels for electric generators wouldn't have to be imported.

Experts offer three reasons why airborne wind turbines might work for remote areas:
• They're portable.
• They're computer controlled, requiring no onboard pilots and few operators.
• No expensive infrastructure, such as electrical grids or power stations, is required.

The BAT, Altaeros says, is portable enough to pack into two small shipping containers. It can be set up without heavy machinery in about a day. The thing flies via its helium-filled doughnut-shaped body. It's connected to the ground at all times by strong tethers, which carry electricity to a portable ground station.

The tethers also are connected to a computer-controlled automated system that optimizes the BAT's height, based on changing winds. During operation, no crew is required, Altaeros says. It can be monitored remotely and maintained with periodic on-site inspections.

The ground station can be connected to a power grid, or a local micro-grid, or customer equipment, Altaeros says.
Each BAT can crank out enough power for 12 homes, the company says.

During dangerous weather, the BAT is designed to reel itself down to the ground. Its spinning blades don't pose a significant threat to birds and bats, Altaeros says, because critters don't usually fly as high as the turbines.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/12/tech/innovation/big-idea-airborne-wind-turbines/index.html?hpt=hp_c2
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10661 on: May 13th, 2014, 09:30am »

GOOD MORNING UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy


User Image


CRYSTAL

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10662 on: May 13th, 2014, 09:35am »

Wired

Glenn Greenwald’s Pulse-Pounding Tale of Breaking the Snowden Leaks

By Kim Zetter
05.13.14 | 5:00 am

In June 2013, Edward Snowden was sitting in his room at the Mira hotel in Hong Kong, watching the world react to the first of his explosive leaks about the NSA’s out-of-control surveillance, when he was tipped off that the NSA might be closing in on him.

Snowden’s identity as the source of the documents was still unknown to the public. But through a “net-connected device” he installed at his now-abandoned home in Hawaii to watch out for the watchers — presumably an IP surveillance camera with microphone — he knew when two people from the NSA showed up at the house looking for him, an NSA “police officer” and someone from human resources.

This is one of the new details revealed in No Place to Hide, the much-anticipated book by journalist Glenn Greenwald, who worked with Snowden and documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras to publish a number of blockbuster stories about the NSA.

Snowden had known it would only be a matter of time before the NSA was on his trail — he had intentionally left electronic footprints behind that would help the agency identify him as the leaker.

Though he could have covered his tracks — the NSA’s internal security was so poor the agency failed to catch him downloading thousands of documents over many weeks — he hadn’t wanted his colleagues to be subjected to needless suspicion or false accusations during the inevitable investigation that would follow the leaks. Snowden in fact intended to reveal his identity with the first story that was published, but Greenwald convinced him to wait so that the public’s initial reactions would be focused on the NSA leaks and not the leaker.

The book, which is being released today, provides an extensive look at Greenwald’s earliest encounters — online and in person — with the mysterious whistleblower who for months would only identify himself as Cincinnatus. It also expands on existing reporting about the agency’s spy operations through the publication of more than 50 previously unpublished documents.

Although there may be little in the documents that’s startling to anyone who has carefully followed the leak revelations over the last year, the book does a good job of providing an overview of what the documents and stories have revealed until now, while adding fresh detail. [One complaint with the book, however, is the lack of an index. Greenwald has said he plans to publish it online today, but this won't likely satisfy readers with print copies who don't want to jump on their computer or phone each time they want to find something in the book.]

Among the fresh details he reports — the NSA routinely intercepts networking devices such as routers, servers, and switches as they’re in transit from U.S. sellers to international customers and plants digital bugging devices in them, before repackaging them with a factory seal and sending them on their way. Although it’s been previously reported that the NSA, CIA and FBI intercept laptops to install spyware, the tampering with network hardware would potentially affect more users and data.

He also reports that U.S. telecoms partnering with foreign telecoms to upgrade their networks help subvert foreign networks for the spy agency.

“The NSA exploits the access that certain telecom companies have to international systems, having entered into contracts with foreign telecoms to build, maintain, and upgrade their networks,” he writes. “The US companies then redirect the target country’s communications data to NSA repositories.”

In addition to this information, Greenwald devotes a fair amount of space in the book to bashing the Washington Post, the New York Times and other media for failing to hold the government accountable. Within these outbursts, though, readers can see impetus for First Look Media — the new media venture he launched this spring with Poitras, Pierre Omidyar and others — making it clear why he jumped ship from the Guardian when he did.

Though he ultimately was grateful to the Guardian for help publishing the stories and documents, Greenwald got so impatient with the paper over several delays with the first story that he considered publishing the stories and documents on his own at nsadisclosures.com.

“Risky. But bold. I like it,” Snowden told him about the plan. But friends and colleagues wisely advised against it, reminding him of the legal minefield he was entering if he went out on his own.

Greenwald also addresses how the Guardian and the Post got into a battle over the PRISM scoop, causing the latter to rush a story to print that was incorrect. It turns out a government official tipped off the Post that the Guardian was about to publish its own PRISM story, after the Guardian contacted officials for comment.

Contacting the government for comment is standard procedure to give officials a chance to make a case for withholding truly sensitive information. But in this case, Greenwald writes, the official exploited the process that was designed to protect national security simply to “ensure that his favored newspaper would run the story first.”

All of these are interesting asides, but it’s clear that the focus of the book is on Snowden and the tale of how the leaks came to be. Nearly half of the book is devoted to this backstory and to the man responsible for one of the most significant intelligence leaks of the century.

Though the broadstrokes of the story are by now well-known, Greenwald augments it with new details that paint a remarkable picture of the many obstacles and missteps that occurred along the way that could easily have short-circuited the whole operation.

It all began when Snowden made his first contact with Greenwald on Dec. 1, 2012 in an anonymous email sent under the name Cincinnatus — a reference to Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus, a virtuous Roman statesman and farmer who in the 5th century BC was called to Rome during a time of crisis to serve as dictator. Cincinnatus resigned his post just two weeks later, after resolving the crisis, and returned to his fields, thus establishing his legacy as someone who wielded power only when it was called upon for the public good.

Like Cincinnatus, Snowden intended that once his own task was completed he, too, would fade into the background. Though unlike Cincinnatus, he would never be able to fade into his former life.

Snowden Cincinnatus urged Greenwald in the email to install PGP, so the two could communicate securely. But Greenwald famously ignored the request. Cincinnatus tried again, helpfully providing step-by-step instructions, and Greenwald ignored this request, too. Two months later in January 2013, he provided a 10-minute video to walk Greenwald through the process, and Greenwald, busy with other projects, again did nothing.

It wasn’t until April, that things started to come together. During a visit to New York, Greenwald heard from Poitras who asked to meet him. She told him about an important anonymous source she had, apparently without knowledge that the source had contacted Greenwald months before. In fact, the connection between Snowden and Cincinnatus wouldn’t occur until after the first stories were published, when Greenwald suddenly remembered the long-abandoned Cincinnatus and sent him an email to say he’d finally installed PGP. It was then that Snowden spelled it out for him that he was Cincinnatus.

Following the initial meeting with Poitras and other discussions, Greenwald was certain the source was legitimate and contacted his editor at the Guardian, a paper he had only recently joined.

But while he was still getting up to speed on the encryption and security programs the source wanted them to use, Poitras introduced a wrinkle — she’d been communicating with the Washington Post about one story the source wanted the paper to publish — the PRISM story — but the relationship had quickly soured. She had taken the story to Bart Gellman, a freelance reporter for the Post, who was eager to proceed. But the Post’s lawyers were not. The anonymous source had insisted on a meeting in Hong Kong, but the lawyers argued against it, and the paper refused to pay Poitras’s expenses if she went.

Furious with the Post, Poitras asked Greenwald to go with her to Hong Kong instead. He’d already seen a sample of the documents — a file containing 25 documents that the source had called “the tip of the tip of the iceberg.”

On their way to the airport, Poitras reached into her backpack and pulled out a USB flash drive. “Guess what this is?” she asked Greenwald. “The documents. All of them.”

For the next sixteen hours, Greenwald sat on the plane to Hong Kong poring over the files, completely unmolested, while the stewardesses passed out cocktails and snacks around him.

Remarkably, the man who had become one of the government’s biggest agitators over its warrantless wiretapping program and other constitutional breaches held within his hands a weapon with the power to bring down the surveillance state and there was no one around to stop him.

Greenwald was amazed at how organized the documents were. Snowden had arranged them all carefully in folders, sub-folders and sub-sub-folders according to issue and importance, clearly indicating that he had read and understood each one. He had even provided glossaries of acronyms and program names as well as supporting documents that weren’t meant to be published but were included simply to provide context.

One of the last files Greenwald examined, right before he landed, was the file he should have read first. The file, named “README_FIRST,” contained Snowden’s full name, his Social Security number, CIA alias, and agency ID number.

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/2014/05/greenwald-no-place-to-hide/

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12241
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10663 on: May 13th, 2014, 09:38am »

Guardian

Intensive mobile phone users at higher risk of brain cancers, says study

Agence France-Presse in Paris
Tuesday 13 May 2014 09.58 EDT

People who use mobile phones intensively appear to have a higher risk of developing certain types of brain cancer, French scientists have said, reviving questions about phone safety.

Individuals who used their mobiles for more than 15 hours each month over five years on average had between two and three times greater risk of developing glioma and meningioma tumours compared with people who rarely used their phones, they found.

The study, appearing in the latest issue of British journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine, is the latest in a long-running exploration of mobile-phone safety.

Over the past 15 years most investigations have failed to turn up conclusive results either way, although several have suggested a link between gliomas and intensive, long-term use.

"Our study is part of that trend, but the results have to be confirmed," said Isabelle Baldi, of the University of Bordeaux in south-western France, who took part in the study.

In 2011 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) said radiofrequency fields used by mobile phones were possibly carcinogenic.

However, researchers have faced several challenges, including getting an accurate picture of phone use in real life, filtering out lifestyle factors such as smoking which amplify cancer risk and taking into account changing phone technology.

The new study looked at 253 cases of glioma and 194 cases of meningioma reported in four French departments between 2004 and 2006.

These patients were matched against 892 "controls" or healthy individuals drawn from the general population, in a bid to spot any differences between the two groups.

The comparison found a higher risk among those who used their phone intensively, especially among those who used it for their work, such as in sales. The duration of use in this category ranged from between two and 10 years, averaging at five years.

But the study also found several inconsistencies with other investigations that have suggested a link between heavy phone use and brain cancer.

For instance, in contrast with previous work, it found that cancer occurred on the opposite side of the brain – rather than on the same side – of where the phone was customarily used.

"It is difficult to define a level of risk, if any, especially as mobile phone technology is constantly evolving," the study acknowledged.

"The rapid evolution of technology has led to a considerable increase in the use of mobile phones and a parallel decrease of [radiowave intensity] emitted by the phones.

"Studies taking account of these recent developments and allowing the observation of potential long-term effects will be needed."

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/may/13/intensive-mobile-phone-users-higher-risk-brain-cancer-study

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4289
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10664 on: May 13th, 2014, 12:13pm »

500-year-old mystery: Wreck off Haiti may be Columbus' flagship Santa Maria
By Jethro Mullen and Haimy Assefa, CNN
Tue May 13, 2014

The location of the Santa Maria, Christopher Columbus' flagship for his journey to the new world, has remained a mystery since it ran aground in late 1492. Underwater explorer Barry Clifford claims he may have found the ship off the Haitian coast.

(CNN) -- Is a sunken shipwreck off Haiti the long-lost remains of the Santa Maria, Christopher Columbus' flagship from his first voyage to the Americas?

The underwater explorer Barry Clifford, who led a team that found and investigated the wreck, says he's confident it is.
"This is the ship that changed the course of human history," he told CNN.

If the claim is confirmed, it would go down as one of the most significant underwater archaeological discoveries ever.
"It is the Mount Everest of shipwrecks for me," said Clifford, 68.

But it isn't a new find for him. Clifford's announcement involves a wreck he and his team investigated in 2003. A cannon was found as part of the wreck. But, Clifford told CNN on Monday night, archaeologists at the time "misdiagnosed" the cannon.

Two years ago, after having researched the type of cannon used in Columbus' time, "I woke up in the middle of the night and said, 'Oh my God,' " Clifford told CNN on Monday. He realized the 2003 find might have been the one.

A couple of weeks ago, he returned to the wreck with a group of experts. The team measured and photographed the ship. But some items, including the cannon, had been looted from the ship in the intervening years, Clifford said.
The ship "still has attributes that warrant an excavation to determine the site's identity," archaeologist Charles Beeker of Indiana University said Tuesday. "Barry may have finally discovered the 1492 Santa Maria."
The evidence, Beeker said, is "very compelling."

The ship was found in the exact area where Columbus said the Santa Maria ran aground more than 500 years ago, Clifford said. The wreck is stuck on a reef off Haiti's northern coast, 10 to 15 feet beneath the water's surface.
Clifford plans to go back to Haiti next month to meet with authorities and decide what steps to take next.

Wrecked in 1492
It was the flagship of Columbus' small fleet that set sail from Spain in August 1492 under the sponsorship of King Ferdinand II and Queen Isabella I.

The voyage aimed to find a westward route to China, India and the gold and spice islands of the East. But the land the sailors set eyes on in October 1492 was an island in the Caribbean. Among the islands on which Columbus set foot was Haiti, where he established a fort.

In December, the Santa Maria accidentally ran aground off the island's coast. Some planks and provisions from the wrecked ship, which was about 117 feet (36 meters) long, were used by the garrison at the fort, according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica.

Columbus set off back to Spain with the two remaining ships, the Nina and the Pinta, in January 1493.

Archaeological study needed
Archaeologists will have to excavate and examine the ship found off Haiti in order to determine whether it is in fact the Santa Maria.

Most of the ship is in shape and will be possible to excavate with the help of the Haitian government, Clifford said.
His team has used sophisticated metal detectors and sonar scans to study the remains.

The ship is the right size, he said, and stones found at the site match the kind from the part of Spain where the ship was built.
Clifford made a name for himself salvaging pirate ships off the coasts of Cape Cod and Madagascar.


http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/13/world/americas/christopher-columbus-santa-maria/index.html?hpt=hp_t2
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
Pages: 1 ... 709 710 711 712 713  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 19,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls