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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 43840 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10875 on: Jun 14th, 2014, 11:50pm »

Really good Shorts at ZH



http://www.zerohedge.com/

New York Times Says "Lack Of Major Wars May Be Hurting Economic Growth"
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 06/14/2014 - 16:02


Now that Q2 is not shaping up to be much better than Q1, other, mostly climatic, excuses have arisen: such as El Nino, the California drought, and even suggestions that, gasp, as a result of the Fed's endless meddling in the economy, the terminal growth rate of the world has been permanently lowered to 2% or lower. What is sadder for economists, even formerly respectable ones, is that overnight it was none other than Tyler Cowen who, writing in the New York Times, came up with yet another theory to explain the "continuing slowness of economic growth in high-income economies." In his own words: "An additional explanation of slow growth is now receiving attention, however. It is the persistence and expectation of peace." That's right - blame it on the lack of war!

Yes We can see the Saudis reaping a Windfall by cutting off Iraqi Oil..killing off the Shiites..jack up Prices and we pay for the whole stinking AQ army..Dis I forget the Boost to weapons sales..The makers are in Hog Heaven right now.
The Saudis are wagging us ever since Nixon went off the Gold Standard.Kissinger must be smiling now.

Bears watching this one




Congressman Asks NSA To Restore Two Years Of "Lost" Lois Lerner IRS Emails
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 06/14/2014 - 21:47

Yesterday, the republican campaign to get to the bottom of IRS' targeting of conservative groups was dealt an absolutely idiotic blow when the IRS, in all seriousness, announced that it had lost two years worth of emails to and from the chief subject of the investigation: former agency official Lois Lerner. What, however, was simply a bizarre, if idiotic, lie has just been taken to a whole new level of ridiculousness, when moments ago, representative Steve Stockman (R-Texas) announced he would request that the National Security Agency help in the hunt for missing emails to and from the IRS’s Lois Lerner, and recover two years worth of "lost" emails.

LOL Don't we Know It
nts: 993
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Tyler Durden's picture
[size=4]The Obama Administration Is Forcing Local Cops To Stay Silent On Surveillance
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 06/14/2014 - 20:12

The feds are so concerned that more truth about the VA scandal will get out there they have resorted to subpoenas to cover up as much as possible. Of course, considering that the entire Administration, and indeed the entire status quo in America, appears to be essentially a criminal syndicate, there is a naturally an endless stream of abuses that must be concealed from the plebs. One thing that has become entirely clear since the Snowden revelations is the fact that the status quo in both political parties has absolutely zero intent on rolling back unconstitutional surveillance whatsoever. This became completely obvious recently when: Congress Gutted Anti-NSA Spying Bill Beyond Recognition; Original Cosponsor Justin Amash Voted No. Fortunately for those of us interested in transparency, some additional information is starting to come out regarding just how far these crooks are willing to go in order to spy on your every move and conversation.


Meanwhile at the Russian Front..
Ukraine Military Transport Plane Shot Down, 49 Killed
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 06/14/2014 - 08:35

While the world's short attention span may have been diverted to Iraq where the ISIS insurgents are now knocking on Baghdad's door, and with it - Iraq's vast southern oil fields and infrastructure (which if taken offline would send oil up to $200 according to T. Boone Pickens). the "out of sight, out of mind" conflict in Ukraine, which the western media dropped covering like a hot potato some time in early May for reasons not entirely known, continues to escalate and where the latest outbreak of violence took place overnight when a Ukraine military transport Il-76 was allegedly shot down by separatists in the city of Lugansk as it was about to land.

« Last Edit: Jun 14th, 2014, 11:50pm by Sysconfig » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10876 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 12:24am »

on Jun 14th, 2014, 11:50pm, Sysconfig wrote:
Really good Shorts at ZH



http://www.zerohedge.com/

[...]

Congressman Asks NSA To Restore Two Years Of "Lost" Lois Lerner IRS Emails
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 06/14/2014 - 21:47

Yesterday, the republican campaign to get to the bottom of IRS' targeting of conservative groups was dealt an absolutely idiotic blow when the IRS, in all seriousness, announced that it had lost two years worth of emails to and from the chief subject of the investigation: former agency official Lois Lerner. What, however, was simply a bizarre, if idiotic, lie has just been taken to a whole new level of ridiculousness, when moments ago, representative Steve Stockman (R-Texas) announced he would request that the National Security Agency help in the hunt for missing emails to and from the IRS’s Lois Lerner, and recover two years worth of "lost" emails.

LOL Don't we Know It
nts: 993
Reads: 105,091



Recent tweets from CJ Ciaramella @cjciaramella , a reporter on the DC beat covering transparency, FOIA and related issues:


Well well, here's the IRS guide on electronic records management: http://1.usa.gov/1opJVCT


IRS guide instructs offices to provide "for backup and recovery of records to protect against information loss or corruption."


Also from IRS manual: Emails that are federal record are supposed to be printed and filed http://1.usa.gov/1opLeS6
« Last Edit: Jun 15th, 2014, 12:25am by jjflash » User IP Logged

The UFO Trail
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10877 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 01:06am »

Years ago I would have laughed at such a scenario as something from a bad tv movie..

Its like the entire establishment is run like a banana republic with crime syndicates running the show.
When a population starts seeing the corruption at the top whats to stop them from emulating and the whole thing turn into a free for all. Its unbelievable..I'm almost speechless.

If I had the money I would invest in stocks dealing with shredders and those nifty hand held magnetizers.

How are our kids going to cope..will they turn to us and say you could have stopped that..but could we really..what model to follow when the SEC and Wallstreet are erasing and burying history themselves.
Its pandemic. embarassed
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..you talkin' to me...YOU TALKIN' TO ME..??!


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10878 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 06:22am »

on Jun 14th, 2014, 8:36pm, ZETAR wrote:
SILVER ~ I CAN RELATE ~ NOT A DAY GOES BY WITHOUT ME THINKING OF MY MENTOR/FRIEND/FATHER ~ wink

TO THE DADS ~ cool

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SHALOM...Z


YESS!! Happy Fathers Day Silver and ZETAR, all dads included of course. I am thinking of my own Brazilian dad and the fathers in my fam, to whom I owe more than I can fathom.


GO!! DADS!! GO!!


grin


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Let us be sure that those who come after will say of us in our time, that in our time we did everything that could be done. We finished the race; we kept them free; we kept the faith.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10879 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 09:07am »

GOOD MORNING ALL,

HAPPY FATHER'S DAY!

CRYSTAL

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10880 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 09:11am »

GrandRapidsMN.com

Fall back position

Posted: Sunday, June 15, 2014 6:00 am
By Terry Mejdrich

The recent column, “Chimps, humans, and ET,” generated some interesting comments from readers. Several readers forwarded news articles and YouTube clips ‘proving’ the existence of extraterrestrials on earth.

Worldwide, UFO enthusiasts are a mixed bag of serious researchers, disturbed individuals, and con artists. There are those who believe an alien invasion is imminent. There are those who state categorically that they have been ‘processed’ by aliens and subjected to physical examinations. Others claim that they have been part of a forced breeding program to create alien-human hybrids. However outlandish these stories may be, for the most part these people are dead serious. Yet these stories are mostly anecdotal accounts and are unsupported by physical evidence. Without physical evidence it is impossible to prove or disprove them.

There is no doubt, however, that UFOs are real. When I was 10-years old, I noticed a very bright object in the late evening sky. It shown brightly and remained in a fixed position. It was much brighter than the planet Venus, which would have been the logical explanation. As dusk settled, it began to slowly move. I went into the house and tried to get the adults to come outside and look at it, but they were too busy playing cards. When I went back outside, the object had taken off, leaving a meandering reddish glowing trail painted brightly across the evening sky. It was not a planet or airplane. It might have been a weather balloon, but to my knowledge weather balloons do not leave trails. The point is I don’t know what it was, but that doesn’t mean it was an alien spacecraft or a divine creation.

Every period of human history has a ‘fall back’ position for the unexplained. For most of human history that ‘gap’ in knowledge has been filled by a divine presence, i.e. God or gods. Gods have always been the placeholders for our ignorance of natural phenomenon. Gradually, as the discoveries of science have cast light in the darkness, these placeholders have lost their relevance. So the hundreds of human-invented gods for all the natural forces and human emotions have dissipated under the gradual onslaught of discovered facts. Some will say we no longer need a ‘God of gaps’ and that eventually science will fill in all the remaining missing pieces.

Given our current physical form, it is doubtful this will ever happen. In other words we will never know “everything.” We are finite beings locked in four-dimensional space-time yet imbedded in an infinite reality. In a way, our current level of knowledge holds us hostage. In perhaps a more subtle way than invented gods, science can become its own “god of gaps.” In ages past, UFOs might have been explained as being angels or demons or divine messages, which would correspond to the thinking of the time. Now, with our tentative steps towards outer space and the recognition of the possibility of life beyond earth, extraterrestrials become the current imaginative explanation. This doesn’t disprove their existence, but it doesn’t make it necessarily so.

One could argue that the god explanations (religions) of olden times were based on ignorance of the natural world while science is based of established fact. Religions, in general, have a platform of firmly held beliefs that are not to be questioned. Thus these ideologies are accepted to be constant and unchanging even in the light of new information. One reason religions lose adherents is that those beliefs, when they involve natural phenomena, are proved wrong. When science or experience proves one part of a supposedly divinely inspired belief system wrong, followers begin to question the rest of it, and rightly so.

The philosophy of science leaves an open door for new information even when that new information disrupts current thinking. Since scientists are humans, the process of change, even in science, is often a turbulent one. But there are no heretic burnings or excommunications. Scientists don’t line up behind their postulates and theorems and make physical war on those with differing views. In general, religions are conservative and restrictive, resisting change, with roots set firmly in the past. Science is the accumulation of new information from the past but always seeking new insights and new understandings. It is never complete, never has all the answers, and doesn’t claim to. It is simply the best mental process humans have invented for discovering the true nature of reality. Without it the human race would still be wandering naked through the savannas of Africa along side the other great apes, and UFOs would go completely unnoticed.

http://www.grandrapidsmn.com/opinion/columnists/fall-back-position/article_1db65a38-f27b-11e3-ab06-001a4bcf887a.html

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10881 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 09:27am »

Science Daily

New computer program aims to teach itself everything about any visual concept

Date:
June 12, 2014

Source:
University of Washington

In today's digitally driven world, access to information appears limitless.

But when you have something specific in mind that you don't know, like the name of that niche kitchen tool you saw at a friend's house, it can be surprisingly hard to sift through the volume of information online and know how to search for it. Or, the opposite problem can occur -- we can look up anything on the Internet, but how can we be sure we are finding everything about the topic without spending hours in front of the computer?

Computer scientists from the University of Washington and the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Seattle have created the first fully automated computer program that teaches everything there is to know about any visual concept. Called Learning Everything about Anything, or LEVAN, the program searches millions of books and images on the Web to learn all possible variations of a concept, then displays the results to users as a comprehensive, browsable list of images, helping them explore and understand topics quickly in great detail.

"It is all about discovering associations between textual and visual data," said Ali Farhadi, a UW assistant professor of computer science and engineering. "The program learns to tightly couple rich sets of phrases with pixels in images. This means that it can recognize instances of specific concepts when it sees them."

The research team will present the project and a related paper this month at the Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition annual conference in Columbus, Ohio.

The program learns which terms are relevant by looking at the content of the images found on the Web and identifying characteristic patterns across them using object recognition algorithms. It's different from online image libraries because it draws upon a rich set of phrases to understand and tag photos by their content and pixel arrangements, not simply by words displayed in captions.

Users can browse the existing library of roughly 175 concepts. Existing concepts range from "airline" to "window," and include "beautiful," "breakfast," "shiny," "cancer," "innovation," "skateboarding," "robot," and the researchers' first-ever input, "horse."

If the concept you're looking for doesn't exist, you can submit any search term and the program will automatically begin generating an exhaustive list of subcategory images that relate to that concept. For example, a search for "dog" brings up the obvious collection of subcategories: Photos of "Chihuahua dog," "black dog," "swimming dog," "scruffy dog," "greyhound dog." But also "dog nose," "dog bowl," "sad dog," "ugliest dog," "hot dog" and even "down dog," as in the yoga pose.

The technique works by searching the text from millions of books written in English and available on Google Books, scouring for every occurrence of the concept in the entire digital library. Then, an algorithm filters out words that aren't visual. For example, with the concept "horse," the algorithm would keep phrases such as "jumping horse," "eating horse" and "barrel horse," but would exclude non-visual phrases such as "my horse" and "last horse."

Once it has learned which phrases are relevant, the program does an image search on the Web, looking for uniformity in appearance among the photos retrieved. When the program is trained to find relevant images of, say, "jumping horse," it then recognizes all images associated with this phrase.

"Major information resources such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are moving toward the direction of showing users visual information because it is easier to comprehend and much faster to browse through concepts. However, they have limited coverage as they are often manually curated. The new program needs no human supervision, and thus can automatically learn the visual knowledge for any concept," said Santosh Divvala, a research scientist at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence and an affiliate scientist at UW in computer science and engineering.

The research team also includes Carlos Guestrin, a UW professor of computer science and engineering. The researchers launched the program in March with only a handful of concepts and have watched it grow since then to tag more than 13 million images with 65,000 different phrases.

Right now, the program is limited in how fast it can learn about a concept because of the computational power it takes to process each query, up to 12 hours for some broad concepts. The researchers are working on increasing the processing speed and capabilities.

The team wants the open-source program to be both an educational tool as well as an information bank for researchers in the computer vision community. The team also hopes to offer a smartphone app that can run the program to automatically parse out and categorize photos.

This research was funded by the U.S. Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation and the UW.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140612152752.htm

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #10882 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 09:29am »




Please be an angel



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http://www.soldiersangels.org/



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« Reply #10883 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 2:13pm »

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All of us can thank Dads for their Contribution..we wouldn't be we without them!


Father Spawns Pests

source william banzai

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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2


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« Reply #10884 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 3:03pm »

IN OUR CIVIL APPROACH WE HAVE HAD A TAD FEW WHOM HAVE EARNED THIS PRESTIGIOUS POSTION ~ cool

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OF COURSE PRIOR TO SUCH RECOGNITION ~ COUNTLESS ATTEMPTS WERE MADE TO ADVISE THEM OF THEIR EVOLVING STATUS ~ rolleyes

SHALOM...Z
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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2
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« Reply #10885 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 4:42pm »

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"Let's see what's over there."
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« Reply #10886 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 7:06pm »

You guyz are amazin grin grin
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« Reply #10887 on: Jun 15th, 2014, 10:25pm »

http://a.gifb.in/062011/1308242139_lioness_tries_to_eat_baby_at_the_zoo.gif
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« Reply #10888 on: Jun 16th, 2014, 09:17am »

Swamprat, that photo looks like me before coffee! grin

GOOD MORNING UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy

~

The Atlantic

The Man Who Introduced the World to Flying Saucers

Kenneth Arnold saw something, said something, and ushered in the UFO-industrial complex.

by Megan Garber
Jun 15 2014, 6:00 PM ET

The plan was to launch a flying saucer. NASA's supersonic braking device—technically known as the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator, less technically an enormous inflatable disk—was designed to deliver heavy payloads to the surface of Mars. Payloads, the thinking went, that could include humans. The experimental craft was meant to launch last week; this weekend, that launch was postponed because of a very earthly impediment: uncooperative winds.

That the LDSD would be so subject to environmental vagaries explains in large part why its broader category of craft—the flying saucer—has figured relatively rarely in NASA's engineering repertoire. So what, then, accounts for their ubiquity—in our imagination, if not in our airspace? Why are the spaceships of Star Trek and Star Wars and Independence Day shaped the way they are?

Why, if saucers are relatively rare in science, have they been such a long-standing element of science fiction?

Nine Flashes of Light

If you wanted to put a precise date on the origins of our obsession with saucers, the most-cited contender is June 24, 1947. That was the day that Kenneth Arnold, an amateur pilot from Idaho, was flying his little plane, a CallAir A-2, over Mineral, Washington. The skies were clear; there was a light breeze. Arnold, who was en route to an air show in Oregon, was doing a little exploring on the side, near Mount Rainer: A Marine Corps C-46 transport airplane had gone down in the area recently, and there was a $5,000 reward for the person who found the wreckage.

Suddenly, as Arnold would later recall, he saw a bright light—just a flash, like a glint of sun as it hits a mirror when the glass is angled just so. It had a blue-ish tinge. At first, he thought the light must have been coming from another plane; when he looked around, though, all he could see was a DC-4. It seemed to be flying about 15 miles away from him. It was not flashing.

And then the lights came again—this time, in a series. Nine flashes, in rapid succession.

What did Arnold see that day? Or, more to the point, what would he say that he’d seen? As Ted Bloecher writes in his Report on the UFO Wave of 1947, released in 1967, Arnold would later describe the airborne objects as flying in "a diagonally stepped-down, echelon formation," the entire assemblage "stretched out over a distance that he later calculated to be five miles." The objects seemed to be flying on a single, horizontal plane, but they also weaved from side to side, occasionally flipping and banking—darting around, Arnold would say, like “the tail of a Chinese kite.” They moved in unison, Arnold said. They didn't seem to be piloted, he said. Once Arnold realized the objects were not, in fact, commercial jets—or, as he’d also thought for a moment, a skein of geese—he figured he was witnessing the testing of military aircraft.

If so, though, the objects would be very advanced aircraft. Arnold, still trying to figure out what he was looking at as he flew over Mount Rainier, decided to focus on the vehicles’ speed. He calculated the time it took the objects to travel between Mount Rainer and Mount Adams, a distance of about 50 miles: a minute and 42 seconds. Which was a rough approximation—but which would also mean that the objects were traveling at a rate, rough-approximation-wise, of 1,700 miles per hour. Which would mean that they were traveling around three times faster than any aircraft was capable of at the time. The formation of flying objects was flying, actually, more than twice the speed of sound. Chuck Yaeger wouldn’t make his supersonic flight—the one generally acknowledged to be the first—until later that year, in October.

Flying Objects, Unidentified

Arnold wasn’t sure what he’d seen; the flying objects he’d go on to describe remained, in the most literal sense, unidentified. What he did know was that the sighting gave him, he would later say, an "eerie feeling.”

An hour later—around 4 p.m. local time—Arnold landed his plane at the air strip in Yakima, Washington. He was a frequent visitor there, and told the staff, friends of his, about the strange objects he'd seen. The story, as you’d expect, spread quickly throughout the small-town airfield. And then, Arnold went about his planned trip: Refueling, he proceeded on to an air show in Pendleton, Oregon. What he didn’t know, however, was that, after he left, one of the guys from Yakima had called someone in Pendleton, spreading the news of the sighting outside of Washington.

more after the jump:
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/06/the-man-who-introduced-the-world-to-flying-saucers/372732/?google_editors_picks=true

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« Reply #10889 on: Jun 16th, 2014, 09:22am »

Wired UK

This signal-jamming coat lets its wearer 'disappear'

16 June 14 / by Kadhim Shubber



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When Edward Snowden received visitors in Hong Kong, he reportedly insisted they keep their phones inside a refrigerator. Guardian journalist Luke Harding, who reported on the Snowden files, has also spoken of keeping his phone in a cocktail shaker to keep it safe from snooping.

The common thread here is Faraday cages. Surround your device with metal and all electromagnetic waves will be blocked. That's also the premise behind the CHBL Jammer Coat, described as a "piece of clothing that enables it user to disappear."

The coat, from Austrian architectural design firm Coop Himmelb(l)au, is made from metallised fabrics and has pockets for multiple handsets and a tablet.

Previous designs for anonymising clothing, such as Adam Harvey's 'anti-drone' stealth wear, had an explicitly political aesthetic, drawing on the form of the hijab for example.

Created for the Abiti da lavoro "Work Clothes" exhibition at Milan's Triennale museum, the CHBL Jammer Coat is less overt and seeks to disguise the wearer's body shape by creating an "illusion of strange multiple body parts, which hides and frees the individual physicality".

It also looks very much like a big warm duvet. Which might just be perfect for when you want to wrap up in bed and avoid having any contact, electronic or otherwise, with other human beings.

http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2014-06/16/chbl-jammer-coat

Crystal

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« Last Edit: Jun 16th, 2014, 09:27am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

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