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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 43069 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1095 on: Sep 11th, 2010, 10:00pm »

All news web

12 September 2010

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UFO found above Israel on Google Maps
Michael Cohen m.cohen@allnewsweb.com

An Internet user searching Google maps a few weeks ago made a startling discovery above a remote region of the Negev Desert in Israel (see photo above). He noticed what appeared to be a disc shaped UFO hovering around a hundred and twenty meters above the terrain. He wrote regarding his intruiging discovery:

On August 26, 2010, I was looking for a map of a place where I found an artifact in Israel back in 1982. I was searching the south Negev Desert on Google Earth, at the coordinates 29°46’6.28” North and 34°58’40” East. I found a white sphere about 120’ across, several hundred to thousands of feet in the air. The object appeared white, spherical, and has a distinct shadow below it. I would very much appreciate someone going to those coordinates and telling me what they think this object is.

Researchers will be hoping to determine if this object is indeed a UFO of alien origin or perhaps a secret government project.... or simply a hot air balloon?


http://www.allnewsweb.com/page1199999427.php

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« Reply #1096 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 06:57am »

Phantoms and Monsters

Saturday, September 11, 2010
Recent UFO Sightings, BioForms and Reverse Engineering

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The top image is the original submitted image followed by the same image with distortion and noise removed

MUFON CMS - Nashville, TN - 9/7/10 - (unedited): This is another example of the many strange and bizarre aerial objects that continuously fly thru the airspace of Tennessee. This is just another image of the biologic bioform UFO's that has been continuously witnessed for a long time. The problem is that not enough people are recording these anomalous objects. However, with enough awareness of these sightings... maybe more people will spend more time admiring the natural wonders of the heavens... and less time looking downward! It is truly an amazing world! He who has eyes... let him see!

**********

MUFON CMS - Murray Co., OK - 9/5/10 - (unedited): Driving west on HWY 110 in Murray County, OK, the witness noticed a white, late model car on the side of the road ahead of him. He decided to pull over to figure out what had drawn their attention. Looking up, the witness noticed a large strange craft at an altitude of about 2,000 ft and climbing straight up. The strange craft was orange in color and as large as a 727 airliner. It was shaped like the 1950s Flying Wing bomber at the front and had a huge fuselage protruding out the back of the craft that curved up like the back of a canoe only more so. The witness used to be a private pilot and at one time owned his own aircraft but was at a loss as to what he was seeing. At times he referred to this craft as an object at at other times as a plane. He does not want to be ridiculed by anyone and will not share this sighting with any friends.

As soon as the craft was noticed the witness retrieved his binoculars from his vehicle and got a good clear look at the craft at 15X power. Protruding on each side of the craft was a shiny rod exiting the front of the fuselage, running along entire length of the craft and then reattaching at the back of the fuselage at the same angle which may have been 45 degrees vs 90 degrees. These shiny rods were reflecting the sunlight very well. The time was around 7:30 pm on a clear day, the sun was still shinning bright yellow and not yet turning sunset orange. The witness is adamant that the craft was not glowing orange but instead had a surface that was orange. No insignias or markings, or cockpit area was noticed, nor was any sound from the craft of any kind noticed. Also visible were two short contrails from the craft that remained a constant length of about 1/3 the length of the craft. The short constant contrails were flat instead of round.

The witness watched the craft climb from about 2,000 ft altitude to about 50,000 ft altitude in about 4-5 mins time, after which the craft suddenly shot off to the East vanishing from sight all in a matter of seconds. At first the witness drove to his nearby house to alert his wife so that she may also see the craft but decided it would take her too long to come out of the house, so he returned to the spot at the side of the road and continued watching. The witness stated he had to quickly turn his body to follow the craft when it shot to the East. As was mentioned, the witness had for years been a private pilot and feels his estimates on size and altitudes are accurate.

video and more after the jump
http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2010/09/recent-ufo-sightings-bioforms-and.html

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« Reply #1097 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 07:02am »

New York Times

September 11, 2010
Russia Uses Microsoft to Suppress Dissent
By CLIFFORD J. LEVY

IRKUTSK, Russia — It was late one afternoon in January when a squad of plainclothes police officers arrived at the headquarters of a prominent environmental group here. They brushed past the staff with barely a word and instead set upon the computers before carting them away. Taken were files that chronicled a generation’s worth of efforts to protect the Siberian wilderness.

The group, Baikal Environmental Wave, was organizing protests against Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin’s decision to reopen a paper factory that had polluted nearby Lake Baikal, a natural wonder that by some estimates holds 20 percent of the world’s fresh water.

Instead, the group fell victim to one of the authorities’ newest tactics for quelling dissent: confiscating computers under the pretext of searching for pirated Microsoft software.

Across Russia, the security services have carried out dozens of similar raids against outspoken advocacy groups or opposition newspapers in recent years. Security officials say the inquiries reflect their concern about software piracy, which is rampant in Russia. Yet they rarely if ever carry out raids against advocacy groups or news organizations that back the government.

As the ploy grows common, the authorities are receiving key assistance from an unexpected partner: Microsoft itself. In politically tinged inquiries across Russia, lawyers retained by Microsoft have staunchly backed the police.

Interviews and a review of law enforcement documents show that in recent cases, Microsoft lawyers made statements describing the company as a victim and arguing that criminal charges should be pursued. The lawyers rebuffed pleas by accused journalists and advocacy groups, including Baikal Wave, to refrain from working with the authorities. Baikal Wave, in fact, said it had purchased and installed legal Microsoft software specifically to deny the authorities an excuse to raid them. The group later asked Microsoft for help in fending off the police. “Microsoft did not want to help us, which would have been the right thing to do,” said Marina Rikhvanova, a Baikal Environmental Wave co-chairwoman and one of Russia’s best-known environmentalists. “They said these issues had to be handled by the security services.”

Microsoft executives in Moscow and at the company’s headquarters in Redmond, Wash., asserted that they did not initiate the inquiries and that they took part in them only because they were required to do so under Russian law.

After The New York Times presented its reporting to senior Microsoft officials, the company responded that it planned to tighten its oversight of its legal affairs in Russia. Human rights organizations in Russia have been pressing Microsoft to do so for months. The Moscow Helsinki Group sent a letter to Microsoft this year saying that the company was complicit in “the persecution of civil society activists.”

Tough Ethical Choices

Microsoft, like many American technology giants doing business in authoritarian countries, is often faced with ethical choices over government directives to help suppress dissent. In China, Microsoft has complied with censorship rules in operating its Web search service, preventing Chinese users from easily accessing banned information. Its archrival Google stopped following censorship regulations there, and scaled back its operations inside China’s Internet firewall.

In Russia, leaders of advocacy groups and newspapers subjected to antipiracy raids said Microsoft was cooperating with the authorities because the company feared jeopardizing its business in the country. They said Microsoft needed to issue a categorical public statement disavowing these tactics and pledging to never cooperate in such cases.

Microsoft has not done that, but has promised to review its policies in Russia.

“We take the concerns that have been raised very seriously,” Kevin Kutz, director of public affairs for Microsoft, said in a statement. Mr. Kutz said the company would ensure that its lawyers had “more clearly defined responsibilities and accountabilities.”

“We have to protect our products from piracy, but we also have a commitment to respect fundamental human rights,” he said. “Microsoft antipiracy efforts are designed to honor both objectives, but we are open to feedback on what we can do to improve in that regard.”

Microsoft emphasized that it encouraged law enforcement agencies worldwide to investigate producers and suppliers of illegal software rather than consumers. Even so, it has not publicly criticized raids against small Russian advocacy groups.

With pirated software prevalent in this country, it is not surprising that some of these groups might have some on their computers. Yet the issue, then, is why the police choose to focus on these particular targets — and whether they falsify evidence to make the charges more serious.

Microsoft also says it has a program in Russia to provide free and low-cost software to newspapers and advocacy groups so that they are in compliance with the law.

But the review of these cases indicates that the security services often seize computers whether or not they contain illegal software. The police immediately filed reports saying they had discovered such programs, before even examining the computers in detail. The police claims have in numerous instances been successfully discredited by defendants when the cases go before judges.

Given the suspicions that these investigations are politically motivated, the police and prosecutors have turned to Microsoft to lend weight to their cases. In southwestern Russia, the Interior Ministry declared in an official document that its investigation of a human rights advocate for software piracy was begun “based on an application” from a lawyer for Microsoft.

In another city, Samara, the police seized computers from two opposition newspapers, with the support of a different Microsoft lawyer. “Without the participation of Microsoft, these criminal cases against human rights defenders and journalists would simply not be able to occur,” said the editor of the newspapers, Sergey Kurt-Adzhiyev.

The plainclothes officers who descended upon the Baikal Wave headquarters said they were from the division that investigated commercial crime. But the environmentalists said they noticed at least one officer from the antiextremism department, which tracks opposition activists and had often conducted surveillance on the group.

The officers said they had received a complaint from a man named Dmitri Latyshev, who claimed that he had been in the headquarters and spotted unlicensed Microsoft software on the computers. The police produced a handwritten complaint from Mr. Latyshev, dated Jan. 27. The raid occurred the next day.

People at Baikal Wave said they had never seen or heard of Mr. Latyshev. Located in Irkutsk recently, Mr. Latyshev said by phone that he had filed the complaint but would not say why.

Baikal Wave’s leaders said they had known that the authorities used such raids to pressure advocacy groups, so they had made certain that all their software was legal.

But they quickly realized how difficult it would be to defend themselves.

They said they told the officers that they were mistaken, pulling out receipts and original Microsoft packaging to prove that the software was not pirated. The police did not appear to take that into consideration. A supervising officer issued a report on the spot saying that illegal software had been uncovered.

Before the raid, the environmentalists said their computers were affixed with Microsoft’s “Certificate of Authenticity” stickers that attested to the software’s legality. But as the computers were being hauled away, they noticed something odd: the stickers were gone.

In all, 12 computers were confiscated. The group’s Web site was disabled, its finances left in disarray, its plans disclosed to the authorities.

The police also obtained personnel information from the computers. In the following weeks, officers tracked down some of the group’s supporters and interrogated them.

“The police had one goal, which was to prevent us from working,” said Galina Kulebyakina, a co-chairwoman of Baikal Wave. “They removed our computers because we actively took a position against the paper factory and forcefully voiced it.”

“They can do pretty much what they want, with impunity,” she said.

A Company’s Pollution

The paper factory is located on Lake Baikal, the world’s oldest and deepest lake, which is home to hundreds of species that exist nowhere else, including a freshwater seal. Over the years, the factory has spewed mercury, chlorine, heavy metals and other pollutants into the water.

Baikal Wave rejoiced when the factory closed in 2008, having succumbed to sizable losses, as well as pressure from environmentalists. But after the financial crisis hit, the Kremlin worried about unrest from unemployment. In January, Mr. Putin reopened the factory, which has employed as many as 2,000 people, saying that it no longer polluted the lake.

Baikal Wave, which was founded in Irkutsk, one of Russia’s largest cities, as the Soviet Union was collapsing, began planning a protest. That was when the officers showed up.

In a statement, the Irkutsk police said the raid was proper. “The inspection of Baikal Environmental Wave was intended to protect intellectual property and had no connection whatsoever with the activities of the advocacy organization,” the statement said.

It said a forensic examination of the computers in February showed that several contained illegal software that would have cost more than $3,300. Baikal Wave said the examination was fraudulent.

more after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/12/world/europe/12raids.html?ref=world

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« Reply #1098 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 07:06am »

New York Times

September 11, 2010
Inflation in China Is Rising at a Fast Pace
By KEITH BRADSHER

HONG KONG — For K. K. Lam, a 37-year-old accountant in Guangzhou, inflation means higher prices for pork and for vegetables like bok choy.

For Allen Dong, the sales manager for a home appliance manufacturer 700 miles to the northeast in Ningbo, inflation means trying to persuade retailers to pay more for dehumidifiers so his company can cover rising costs for wages and raw materials.

From street markets to corporate offices, consumers and executives alike in China are trying to cope with rising prices. The National Bureau of Statistics announced on Saturday that consumer prices in China were 3.5 percent higher compared with a year earlier, the largest increase in nearly two years.

To make matters worse, inflation over the short term also seems to be accelerating. A seasonally adjusted comparison of August prices to July prices showed that inflation was running at an annualized pace closer to 4.8 percent.

Prices are rising in China for reasons that many Americans or Europeans might envy. The economy is growing, stores are full and banks are lending lots of money, according to other statistics released by the government on Saturday. Compared with August of last year, industrial production rose 13.9 percent last month, retail sales increased 18.4 percent, bank lending climbed 18.6 percent and fixed-asset investment surged 24 percent.

All four categories rose slightly more than economists had expected, in the latest sign of the Chinese economy’s strength even as recoveries seem to be flagging elsewhere.

Separate data released on Friday by the General Administration of Customs showed that Chinese demand for imports also remained surprisingly strong. The trade surplus narrowed to $20 billion last month, and would have been nearly in balance without China’s $18 billion surplus with the United States.

But so much cash in the Chinese economy chasing a limited volume of goods is pushing up prices. Inflation is starting to become troublesome, especially for young people entering the work force and retirees on fixed incomes.

Young people with vocational school degrees typically earn $200 to $300 a month in factories near the coast these days, and somewhat less in the Chinese interior. Rising prices have prompted many to ask for bigger paychecks, and blue-collar incomes have increased faster than inflation.

But salaries for recent college graduates, at $300 to $500 a month in coastal areas, have actually declined in the last few years, even before adjusting for inflation. A rapid expansion of universities over the last decade has resulted in more young men and women with undergraduate degrees than companies are ready to hire, except at lower pay.

And as in many countries, retirees are among the most vulnerable to inflation. Ms. Lam said her own mother lived on a pension of just $150 a month.

Rising wages are putting pressure on companies to increase their prices. Mr. Dong, the sales manager at the Ningbo Deye Domestic Electrical Appliance Technology Company, said the company had to raise wages by 10 percent a year, while raw material costs were also climbing.

“It is impossible to transfer our cost increases entirely to our customers, because if we do so, they will all run away,” he said. “We are currently doing a study of our assembly line work processes to see where we can achieve greater efficiency.”

But as the powerful growth in fixed-asset investment last month showed, Chinese companies are still responding to rising prices by building more factories, office buildings and other equipment, instead of cutting back.

Pan Ning, the sales manager at the Newsunda Industries Company, a manufacturer of school bags and pocket calculators based in Shantou, said labor and raw material prices had been climbing by 5 to 10 percent. But as school years have begun around the world in the Northern Hemisphere, Newsunda has been able to raise the prices it charges to cover the increased costs, Ms. Pan said.

Chinese officials have said for many years that they regard 5 percent inflation as unacceptable, and they have shown a willingness to clamp down on bank lending and investment whenever annual increases come close to that level. They have taken some of these steps in recent months, but more recently eased back on lending controls as some Chinese economists suggested that domestic demand might not be as strong as the August data showed.

For now, many Chinese consumers are irked by rising prices for everyday necessities.

“I honestly don’t know how young people starting out in the work world manage,” Ms. Lam said. They pay nearly half their salaries for their own room in a shared apartment in a bad neighborhood, she said, “and if you add in food and transportation, there will be nothing extra left in your salary to send home.”

Hilda Wang contributed reporting from Hong Kong.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/12/business/global/12yuan.html?ref=world

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« Reply #1099 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 07:11am »

The Guardian

The drug billions that got me into a John le Carré spy thriller

Observer journalist Rajeev Syal is honoured that one of his articles graces the cover of the novelist's new book
Sunday 12 September 2010

I am feeling a little too pleased with myself. Smiley, you might say.

John le Carré, the spymaster novelist famed for his cold war characters, has generously reprinted an article I wrote for this newspaper on the inside cover of his latest novel as a way of illustrating a point about money laundering.

Our Kind of Traitor tells of a foul-mouthed Russian gangster who has "cleaned" billions of dirty dollars for his thuggish mates and wishes to tell MI5 about the world he inhabits. The master thriller writer, famed for his character George Smiley, tells how the proceeds of international crimes – mainly drug related – are washed through offshore bank accounts, enormous property deals and the purchase of international institutions.

My news story, which appeared in the Observer nine months ago, reported how leading banks around the world, desperate for cash in the current financial crisis, turned to the proceeds of organised crime as the only liquid investment capital available.

The head of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime said in an interview that colossal piles of drugs money had kept the world financial system afloat when it looked dangerously close to collapse. The market eventually absorbed the greater part of a mind-boggling $352bn (£229bn) of drugs profits into the global economic system, laundering that vast sum in the process.

The newspaper story was not, alas, le Carré's inspiration. It broke long after he had finished writing his book, but he has told interviewers that it confirmed the novel's main point: a huge slice of the global economy, as much as a fifth on some estimates, is made up by the profits of organised crime.

Recognition does not come to news reporters very often, which is why it's a thrill to see your work in a soon-to-be bestselling novel. But given the subject matter, it might be inappropriate to ask for any of its royalties to be filtered away for me into an offshore account.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/sep/12/drug-billions-john-le-carre

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« Reply #1100 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 07:20am »

Telegraph

Real ale is making a comeback, as drinkers increasingly opt for traditional beer rather than lager.

By Harry Wallop, Consumer Affairs Editor
Published: 12:59PM BST 12 Sep 2010

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Impersonators of wartime British prime minister Winston Churchill and general Bernard Montgomery pose with pints of real ale while promoting the start of the Great British Beer Festival Photo: REUTERS

Industry sales figures suggest that real ale, often characterised as a drink favoured by old men in dusty pubs, is gaining ground against lager, the carbonated version of beer.

Separate data also indicated that sales of bottled beer, frequently more expensive ales and niche beers, were increasing at supermarkets while beer in cans, invariably cheap lager, had seen a sales fall.

According to the Beer and Pub Association, ale's share of the overall beer market last year crept up from 20.4 per cent to 20.6 per cent the year before. Lager still predominates, but its share slipped a fraction from 74.5 to 74.3 per cent.

The increase in ale's share of the market is the first witnessed for a century, but it comes a few years after supermarkets noticed a definite uplift in real ale sales and confirms a shift in tastes, as consumers increasingly try a greater variety of drinks.

Beer drinking in general has been in almost perpetual decline since the 1970s, with the decline seen most notably at pubs in recent years, following the introduction of the smoking ban and above-inflation increases in alcohol duty.

However, the majority of people to have deserted pubs were lager drinkers. Many that remained loyal to their local were real ale drinkers.

Iain Loe, a spokesman for Camra, which campaigns for real ale, said drinkers were returning to real ale because of its moderate strength – often under 4 per cent – compared with stronger lagers that are usually above 5 per cent. "Real ale is a naturally refreshing drink; people are realising it is healthier than other types of alcohol," he said.

Consumers have also shown a greater willingness to try regional, niche beers, following the resurgence of so-called microbreweries during the 1990s, helped by tax-breaks. There are now 700 real ale brewers in Britain, the highest number since World War II.

And while beer sales in pubs have struggled, supermarkets have started stocking a far greater range of these regional real ales.

In the 12 months to August, sales of beer in bottles increased by 6.6 per cent, while sales in cans fell by 1.4 per cent, according to AC Nielsen, the market research company. This follows a similar pattern seen the year before.

Tesco, UK’s biggest off-licence retailer, has increased its range of ales from 20 in 2005 to 350.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/foodanddrinknews/7997538/Real-ale-makes-a-comeback.html

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« Reply #1101 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 07:24am »

Wired


Did Internet Founders Actually Anticipate Paid, Prioritized Traffic?
By Matthew Lasar, ars technica September 11, 2010 | 10:30 am | Categories: Internet Culture & Etiquette, Net Neutrality

AT&T has set off yet another net neutrality firestorm, claiming that a crucial internet standards-making body gave its blessing to ISP priority access deals way back at the beginning of it all. In the late 1990s, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) added the “DiffServ” field to Internet Protocol (IP), AT&T insists, “to facilitate paid prioritization as a means for encouraging the further growth and development of the internet.”

Paid priority access “was fully contemplated” and even “expressly contemplated” by the IETF decades ago, the telco has told the Federal Communications Commission, and is “fully consistent” with that body’s standards-making discussions.

Baloney, insists the IETF’s current chairman. “AT&T’s characterization is misleading,” Russ Housley told National Journal several days later. “IETF prioritization technology is geared toward letting network users indicate how they want network providers to handle their traffic, and there is no implication in the IETF about payment based on any prioritization.”

Obviously this is a hot historical debate, given that limiting content prioritization is central to the FCC’s proposed net neutrality rules, as well as the Google/Verizon open Internet manifesto. AT&T and various reform groups have been going at it for weeks over the issue.

So who is right here? And what is this DiffServ talk anyway?

One protocol to rule them all
When most people think of inventing, they usually conjure up big corporate labs with lots of equipment or, in earlier times, tinkerers at their basement tables. One of the more interesting aspects of internet history is how much of the ‘Net was invented at meetings — literally people in nice little rooms sitting around talking, with someone taking notes.

By 1973, some of the creators of the ARPANET held one of these gatherings at Stanford University, and they were worried. There were already 15 “nodes” in the network, mostly university based extensions. Each was busy experimenting with their own little terminal computer offshoot subnetworks. How would this ever-expanding octopus retain a single, coherent nervous system?

The answer they came up with was TCP—Transfer Control Protocol. The P-word is borrowed from diplomacy. Protocols are basically agreed upon standards for how information will be exchanged. TCP would be the master — adopted by all ARPANET connectors.

As summarized by internet historian Janet Abbate, TCP “did much more than just set up a connection between two hosts: it verified the safe arrival of packets using acknowledgments, compensated for errors by re-transmitting lost or damaged packets, and” — pay attention — “controlled the rate of data flow between the hosts by limiting the number of packets in transit.”

As the discussions continued through 1978, critics argued that TCP as originally envisioned required all portions of the network to do too much work. So they added another: Internet Protocol, which would just move packets from node to node — all of them labeled with numeric IP addresses.

IP functions would be performed on packet routing “gateway” machines. TCP would perform the verification tasks on hosts. Together, they would be known as TCP/IP.

“We wanted to have a common protocol and a common address space so that you couldn’t tell, to first order, that you were actually talking through all these different kinds of nets,” recalled internet pioneer Vinton Cerf.

more after the jump
http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2010/09/paid-prioritized-traffic/#ixzz0zJjkw0w0

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« Reply #1102 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 08:24am »

KOMO 4 News
Sand sculpting competition in Seattle.

FEDERAL WAY, Wash. - A huge world championship competition is going on right now in Federal Way that would put most people to shame when it comes to sand castle-building abilities.

The competitors are getting down and dirty - with shovels and pails and trowels - for a chance to win $65,000 worth of cash prizes.

The master sculptors literally come from around the world - 17 countries, to be exact - all pouring, pounding and carving to be king of the castle.

The competitors include at least one doctor and one dentist from Europe.

Video link:

http://www.komonews.com/news/local/102666109.html?tab=video

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« Reply #1103 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 09:00am »

Yahoo item



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« Reply #1104 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 10:03am »

Phil has a new thread on UFO's and nuclear sites. Interesting topic.

http://ufocasebook.conforums.com/index.cgi?board=disclosure&action=display&num=1284066579&start=0#1284303716

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« Reply #1105 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 9:19pm »

Quote:
The Rev Terry Jones has vowed to go ahead with the event at his church in Florida on Saturday to mark the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.


Yeah, right. THAT will foster better understanding, communication, and peaceful relations. In a pig's eye it will!

Hate fosters more hate, and BOTH sides are guilty of it.
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« Reply #1106 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 9:29pm »

UFO Stalker

25398
Log Number: US-09122010-0015
Submitted Date: 2010-09-12 21:32 GMT
Event Date: 2010-09-10 22:00 GMT

Status: Submitted
City: Bend
Region: Oregon
Country: US
Longitude: -121.3153096
Latitude: 44.0581728
Shape: Triangle
Distance: 500 feet or less
Location: Suburban
Terrain: Fields
Visibility: Clear
Weather: None

Description: Three of us were returning from a high school football game in a SUV traveling north on 17th street on the east side of Bend Oregon. It was 10 pm when we noticed lights to the north, off in the distance, perhaps several miles away It was a clear night and no moon light. As we discussed the incident later, all of us at first just assumed it was an aircraft at first. However the object then went from what seemed like a stationary point several miles off and at a high rate of speed, perhaps 1500 mph, as though it was shot from a gun, it came directly towards us and stopped a short ways off, maybe 1000 feet away. It stopped instantly; there did not appear to be any acceleration or deceleration -it just went full speed and stopped on a dime. Then the object in a similar manner shot off in easterly direction and stopped again then it came back again and hovered perhaps 500 feet away and not more than 500 in elevation. Then the object moved very slowly getting closer to us. We could see very clearly the object was triangular in shape perhaps the same mass as a medium sized motor home, not really very large. Underneath the object were perhaps 15 symmetrically placed bright white lights that formed the shape of a triangle with lights inside the triangular shape as well. I would estimate the diameter of the lights at 5� and they were definitely round in shape, the bottom side protruded down sort of like spot light in shape. All the lights were on and extremely bright, not flashing or pulsing or fading. The object was approximately 1/3 longer than the width of what appeared to be the rear of the object. On the sides were red lights that appeared to at times be on wings or perhaps the upper sides of the craft. One of the witnesses with me said he saw blue lights, which I did not see. When the craft was slowly hovering a short distance away it seemed that part of the craft, the part illuminated with the red lights, rotated or shifted some how in a very bizarre manner, as though they messed, passed through each other and traded sides on the craft which gave the impression it was flip flopping around, although the triangular shaped lights on the bottom remained constant and did not change or fluctuate in their positions.

These events all unfolded in about 90 seconds, then again the craft shot off, like shot from a gun. It went from a hovering position to full speed instantaneously which was at a very high rate of speed in a westerly direct and in just an instant out of sight. All of these maneuvers did not generate any noise, the craft was absolutely quiet and did not stir up any dust on the ground. We did not see it again, it was gone. All of us were shocked and nervously laughed about what we just seen. Not one of had ever seen anything like it before. We started to try to explain what we saw. We eliminated helicopters because it would have been noisy and would stirred up a bunch of dust. A helicopter could never perform those types of maneuvers, we eliminated airplanes for similar reasons. The only conclusion we could draw was that the object was a UFO. Perhaps this was a once in a life time event for the three of us, but we all agree, we hope to see it again. It was very interesting and facinating. In retrospect not one of us was fearful or frightened, only curious. I spent a good portion of the next evening looking into the night sky hoping to see it again. We all agreed we would never look up to the night sky in the same way after seeing our first UFO.

http://www.ufostalker.com/event/25398

Crystal

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WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1107 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 9:37pm »



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Lucky Bay by Ken Brokstein


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1108 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 9:48pm »

Hi Wings, just to let you know I've been reading your blog from time to time - even though this is my first post in it. Anyway I've read quite a bit of the stuff, but I'm still trying to catch up with the nonsense. cheesy wink

Some great UFO vids you've posted btw - that one in Hawaii for example. Keep em coming!
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1109 on: Sep 12th, 2010, 11:10pm »

Good evening Crystal.... You will be sleeping peacefully right now.... smiley Whereas my day is half way over.

I love the picture of the roo laying on the beach. I have seen them do that. Further up the road on the estuary near my home, about 5-10 minutes away by car, there are hundreds of roos... they lay in the fields and bask in the sunlight.... they don't bother about hiding during the day.... they have no fear of humans. Even the little babies come out of their mothers pouch to bask. I often take visitors there to see them. I noticed on my last drive up there that they are building a new housing estate, which made me sad. Roos are territorial and will be displaced or run over by cars. It makes me very sad. Whereas other critters like emus and possums will move on the roos won't. sad
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