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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 127721 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11160 on: Aug 3rd, 2014, 7:57pm »

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/ebola-terror-gatwick-passenger-collapses-3977051
Ebola terror at Gatwick as passenger collapses and dies getting off Sierra Leone flight

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/ebola-terror-gatwick-passenger-collapses-3977051#ixzz39NJzZnrw
Follow us: @DailyMirror on Twitter | DailyMirror on Facebook

Airport staff tonight told of their fears of an Ebola outbreak after a passenger from Sierra Leone collapsed and died as she got off a plane at Gatwick.

Workers said they were terrified the virus could spread globally through the busy international hub from the West African country which is in the grip of the deadly epidemic.

The woman, said to be 72, became ill on the gangway after she left a Gambia Bird jet with 128 passengers on board. She died in hospital on Saturday.

Ebola has killed 256 people in Sierra Leone. A total of 826 have died in West Africa since the outbreak began in February. Tests were carried out to see if the woman had disease.

The plane was quarantined as ­officials desperately tried to trace everyone who had been in contact with the woman.

Airport workers faced an anxious wait to see if the woman had Ebola. One said: “Everyone’s just ­petrified.

“We’ve all seen how many people have died from Ebola, especially in Sierra Leone, and it’s terrifying.”



http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/ebola-terror-gatwick-passenger-collapses-3977051#ixzz39NKBz8ud
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Speaking of the horrific moment the passenger collapsed, the shocked staff member added: “The woman was sweating buckets and vomiting.

“Paramedics arrived to try and help her. The next thing everybody was there… emergency crews, airfield operations, even immigration.

“They closed down the jet bridge and put the aircraft into quarantine.

“They took everyone’s details, even the guy who fuels the aircraft.”

The plane carrying the woman came from Freetown in Sierra Leone – a country with the highest number of victims from the disease.

It stopped at Banjul in The Gambia before landing in Gatwick at 8.15am on Saturday after a five-hour flight.

Public Health England tried to allay fears of an Ebola ­breakout in Britain.

It said the woman showed no ­symptoms during the flight.
One ­official added: “Public Health England is aware a passenger arriving on a flight from The Gambia that landed at Gatwick airport on Saturday fell ill shortly after disembarking.

"The passenger was taken to hospital and sadly died.

“In line with standard ­procedures, tests are being undertaken to determine the cause of death.

“The patient’s symptoms suggest that Ebola is very unlikely but as a precaution this is one of the tests being undertaken.

"The patient was not symptomatic on the plane and therefore there is no risk of Ebola being passed on to either flight crew or other passengers.

“England has world class health care and disease control systems which are active permanently, ­regularly tested and proven to be effective.

“As such, if the UK does see a case of imported Ebola, this will not result in an outbreak in this country.”

Last week, the Ebola crisis was described as out of control by World Health Organisation chief Margaret Chan and could be ­“catastrophic”.

At the same time, Sierra Leone declared a state of emergency and called in troops to quarantine victims. Liberia also imposed controls.

Ms Chan revealed 60 doctors, nurses and health care workers had now lost their lives trying to save others. She said: “This outbreak is moving faster than our efforts to control it.

“If the situation continues to ­deteriorate, the consequences can be catastrophic in terms of lost lives but also severe socio-economic disruption as well as a high risk of spread to
other countries.”

Ms Chan met the presidents of Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Ivory Coast. She told them: “This meeting must mark a turning point in the outbreak response.”
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11161 on: Aug 4th, 2014, 01:26am »

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Katy on Remembrance Day...she prob did the same thing on Alhilli massacre and MH370..Death really becomes her..
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11162 on: Aug 4th, 2014, 11:50am »

GOOD MORNING UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy


Science News


Siberian crater mystery may be solved

by Science News Staff
3:00pm, August 1, 2014

Guest post by Thomas Sumner

Methane, not an alien spacecraft crash, is probably responsible for the 30-meter-wide crater that suddenly appeared in Siberia in mid-July.

While air normally contains just 0.000179 percent methane, air near the bottom of the crater was composed of 9.6 percent methane, Nature reports. Researchers suspect that rising summer temperatures in the region thawed permafrost in the ground. As the soil defrosted, methane gas trapped in the permafrost pooled underground before bursting to the surface and ripping a hole in the ground.

Scientists believe that as regional temperatures rise, these kinds of craters could become more common.

https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker/siberian-crater-mystery-may-be-solved

Crystal


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« Reply #11163 on: Aug 4th, 2014, 11:54am »

Wired

Bee-Killing Pesticides Found in Midwest Rivers
By Brandon Keim
08.04.14

Pesticides linked to declining bee and bird populations have been found in streams across the upper Midwest, raising yet more concerns about these chemicals’ environmental effects.

Researchers from the United States Geological Survey tested waters at nine sites in Iowa and Nebraska. They found neonicotinoids in each, frequently at levels that may harm insects and the life that depends on them.

“This wasn’t a toxicity study, but there’s research out there indicating that these concentrations could be of concern,” said USGS chemist Michelle Hladik, lead author of the paper describing the survey in the journal Environmental Pollution.

The findings are the latest in a fast-growing body of research that highlights the environmental threats posed by neonicotinoid pesticides, which are now the world’s most widely used insecticides. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently conducting a review of neonicotinoid use.

Commercially introduced in the 1990s, their popularity exploded a decade ago, when companies started selling neonicotinoid-coated seeds. In Iowa, for example, the amount of neonicotinoids used on corn and soybeans rose from roughly 90,000 pounds in 2004 to 740,000 pounds in 2013. Iowa is not unique; the trend was repeated throughout the Midwest and across much of North America.

As neonicotinoid use increased, some researchers wondered whether they could be connected to exceptionally severe seasonal die-offs in commercial honeybee colonies. This is likely the case: While die-offs involve many factors, including disease and parasites, it’s now understood that even minuscule neonicotinoid exposures can weaken and confuse honeybees, leaving them more vulnerable to other stresses. Wild bees and butterflies, many populations of which are also declining, are also threatened. So are soil-dwelling and aquatic invertebrates, which are exposed to neonicotinoids that wash from seed coats and leach into local waterways.

These invertebrates form the foundations of food chains. Many scientists now warn of a second “silent spring,” a term originally coined to describe the mid-20th century loss of songbirds killed by pesticides.

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/2014/08/neonicotinoids-midwest/

Crystal


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« Reply #11164 on: Aug 5th, 2014, 04:10am »

Great article..I remember Linda at Earth Files picked that up years ago and dropped it.She does great work when she wants too...that stuff is killing the bees and related pollinators..
Maybe Monsanto figures we can pollinate with greenflies.

MrEd will love this..
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2715693/Neighing-Horses-talk-EYES-EARS-Creatures-use-subtle-body-language-communicate-thoughts.html
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11165 on: Aug 5th, 2014, 11:22am »

Hey Sys,

Horses are smart as all get out. My brother had a horse but he was mean. He would bite you if he got the chance. Most aren't that way though.

Good morning!

Crystal


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« Reply #11166 on: Aug 5th, 2014, 11:24am »

Wired

Visit the Wrong Website, and the FBI Could End Up in Your Computer

By Kevin Poulsen
08.05.14

Security experts call it a “drive-by download”: a hacker infiltrates a high-traffic website and then subverts it to deliver malware to every single visitor. It’s one of the most powerful tools in the black hat arsenal, capable of delivering thousands of fresh victims into a hackers’ clutches within minutes.

Now the technique is being adopted by a different kind of a hacker—the kind with a badge. For the last two years, the FBI has been quietly experimenting with drive-by hacks as a solution to one of law enforcement’s knottiest Internet problems: how to identify and prosecute users of criminal websites hiding behind the powerful Tor anonymity system.

The approach has borne fruit—over a dozen alleged users of Tor-based child porn sites are now headed for trial as a result. But it’s also engendering controversy, with charges that the Justice Department has glossed over the bulk-hacking technique when describing it to judges, while concealing its use from defendants. Critics also worry about mission creep, the weakening of a technology relied on by human rights workers and activists, and the potential for innocent parties to wind up infected with government malware because they visited the wrong website. “This is such a big leap, there should have been congressional hearings about this,” says ACLU technologist Chris Soghoian, an expert on law enforcement’s use of hacking tools. “If Congress decides this is a technique that’s perfectly appropriate, maybe that’s OK. But let’s have an informed debate about it.”

The FBI’s use of malware is not new. The bureau calls the method an NIT, for “network investigative technique,” and the FBI has been using it since at least 2002 in cases ranging from computer hacking to bomb threats, child porn to extortion. Depending on the deployment, an NIT can be a bulky full-featured backdoor program that gives the government access to your files, location, web history and webcam for a month at a time, or a slim, fleeting wisp of code that sends the FBI your computer’s name and address, and then evaporates.

What’s changed is the way the FBI uses its malware capability, deploying it as a driftnet instead of a fishing line. And the shift is a direct response to Tor, the powerful anonymity system endorsed by Edward Snowden and the State Department alike.

Tor is free, open-source software that lets you surf the web anonymously. It achieves that by accepting connections from the public Internet—the “clearnet”—encrypting the traffic and bouncing it through a winding series of computers before dumping it back on the web through any of over 1,100 “exit nodes.”

The system also supports so-called hidden services—special websites, with addresses ending in .onion, whose physical locations are theoretically untraceable. Reachable only over the Tor network, hidden services are used by organizations that want to evade surveillance or protect users’ privacy to an extraordinary degree. Some users of such service have legitimate and even noble purposes—including human rights groups and journalists. But hidden services are also a mainstay of the nefarious activities carried out on the so-called Dark Net: the home of drug markets, child porn, murder for hire, and a site that does nothing but stream pirated My Little Pony episodes.

Law enforcement and intelligence agencies have a love-hate relationship with Tor. They use it themselves, but when their targets hide behind the system, it poses a serious obstacle. Last month, Russia’s government offered a $111,000 bounty for a method to crack Tor.

The FBI debuted its own solution in 2012, in an investigation dubbed “Operation Torpedo,” whose contours are only now becoming visible through court filings.

Operation Torpedo began with an investigation in the Netherlands in August 2011. Agents at the National High Tech Crime Unit of the Netherlands’ national police force had decided to crack down on online child porn, according to an FBI affidavit. To that end, they wrote a web crawler that scoured the Dark Net, collecting all the Tor onion addresses it could find.

The NHTCU agents systematically visited each of the sites and made a list of those dedicated to child pornography. Then, armed with a search warrant from the Court of Rotterdam, the agents set out to determine where the sites were located.

That, in theory, is a daunting task—Tor hidden services mask their locations behind layers of routing. But when the agents got to a site called “Pedoboard,” they discovered that the owner had foolishly left the administrative account open with no password. They logged in and began poking around, eventually finding the server’s real Internet IP address in Bellevue, Nebraska.

They provided the information to the FBI, who traced the IP address to 31-year-old Aaron McGrath. It turned out McGrath was hosting not one, but two child porn sites at the server farm where he worked, and a third one at home.

Instead of going for the easy bust, the FBI spent a solid year surveilling McGrath, while working with Justice Department lawyers on the legal framework for what would become Operation Torpedo. Finally, on November 2012, the feds swooped in on McGrath, seized his servers and spirited them away to an FBI office in Omaha.

A federal magistrate signed three separate search warrants: one for each of the three hidden services. The warrants authorized the FBI to modify the code on the servers to deliver the NIT to any computers that accessed the sites. The judge also allowed the FBI to delay notification to the targets for 30 days.

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/2014/08/operation_torpedo/

Crystal


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« Reply #11167 on: Aug 5th, 2014, 11:28am »

Business Insider

South Korean Shipyard Workers Wear Robo-Suits For Super-Strength

by Dylan Love
Aug. 5, 2014, 10:12 AM



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If Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering gets its way, employees will be carrying out their duties while decked out in strength-enhancing robotic exoskeletons, according to New Scientist.

As one of the largest shipbuilders in the world, the company is investigating ways to make its workflow more productive. But after researching the use of such robo-suits on the job and finding them to be helpful, the company is now working on improving its prototype model so that the suits might soon see regular use on the job.

The prototype robo-suits weigh a tad under 62 pounds and can accommodate anyone from 5-foot-3 to 6-feet tall. Users can walk at their normal gait and get assistance from the suit in lifting and moving objects that weigh up to 66 pounds during the suit's three-hour battery life. Engineers have ambitions of eventually getting total lifting capacity to 220 pounds.

To don the exoskeleton, workers start by strapping their feet on to foot pads at the base of the robot. Padded straps at the thigh, waist, and across the chest connect the user to the suit, allowing the robot to move with their bodies as it bears loads for them. A system of hydraulic joints and electric motors running up the outside of the legs links to a backpack, which powers and controls the rig.

The only negative feedback received so far is employee disappointment that the suit can't move faster and is unable to lift heavier loads.

http://www.businessinsider.com/daewoo-robotic-exoskeletons-2014-8#ixzz39XHTOnD8

Crystal





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« Reply #11168 on: Aug 5th, 2014, 11:30am »




Please be an angel



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« Reply #11169 on: Aug 6th, 2014, 1:18pm »

HEY YA'LL grin


Scientific American

Next Mars Rover Will Make Oxygen from CO2

The spacecraft, due in 2020, will have a reverse fuel cell to produce oxygen for fuel—or to breathe

Aug 7, 2014 |By Andy Extance

Nasa’s Mars 2020 rover will take a small step towards helping us directly explore the red planet, by studying how to convert its carbon dioxide atmosphere to oxygen. Jack Mustard from Brown University suggests the Mars Oxygen In-situ resource utilization Experiment (MOXIE) technology could in future help refuel vehicles returning to Earth. ‘It represents an opportunity to sever the tether between Earth and exploration,’ says Mustard, who chaired the Mars 2020 science definition team.

Based on the current Curiosity rover’s design, Mars 2020 will carry seven instruments, including MOXIE, together costing approximately $130 million. MOXIE itself will be a reverse fuel cell, developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, converting CO2 into oxygen and carbon monoxide via solid oxide electrolysis. The oxygen can then either be breathed by people, or burned as fuel.

The Mars 2020 mission’s other themes include assessing its landing site’s geology, and searching for signs of ancient Martian life. To achieve that it will carry an analytical arsenal for studying both mineral and organic – and therefore potentially once living – matter.

Los Alamos National Laboratory, in New Mexico, will lead development on SuperCam, the successor to Curiosity’s ChemCam imaging and chemical analysis tool. Like ChemCam, SuperCam will use Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), which can determine a target’s elemental composition from over six metres away. As well as visible and infrared spectroscopy analysis of reflected light, it will add Raman and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

The Planetary Instrument for X-Ray Lithochemistry, PIXL, will be an x-ray fluorescence spectrometer mounted on a robotic arm so it can be placed next to targets. It displaces α-particle x-ray spectrometers (APXS) used by Curiosity and previous missions, Nasa’s Mitch Schulte tells Chemistry World. PIXL offers ‘two orders of magnitude better spatial resolution, higher sensitivity and accuracy, and the capability to detect and quantify 10 additional elements,’ he explains.

Raman on Mars

NASA will also develop the Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals (SHERLOC) ultraviolet (UV) laser spectrometer. It will be the first UV Raman spectrometer on Mars’ surface, and its ability to detect organic ring structures will be important in hunting for life.

However, Mustard – who helped set Mars 2020’s science goals but didn’t select its payload – is troubled by the use of Raman spectroscopy. ‘I’m speaking from limited knowledge of these instruments, but I’m concerned that relying on unproven technologies will mean it takes a lot of time to accomplish the goals. We recommended that there be an ability to measure the mineralogy of the site efficiently. Curiosity is painfully slow in being able to get at the hard-core science measurements.’ Schulte sought to defuse this concern. ‘Development of Raman instruments for flight has been ongoing for a number of years and has become sufficiently mature,’ he says.

Mars 2020 takes its place in a procession of probes headed for our neighbor planet. After its 2016 launch Nasa’s next mission, InSight, is set to study the planet’s deep interior for the first time.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/next-mars-rover-will-make-oxygen-from-co2/

Crystal


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« Reply #11170 on: Aug 6th, 2014, 1:24pm »

Wired

How Hackable Is Your Car? Consult This Handy Chart

By Andy Greenberg
08.06.14

Last year, when hackers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek showed they could hijack the steering and brakes of a Ford Escape and a Toyota Prius with nothing but laptops connected to the cars, they raised two questions: Could hackers perform the same tricks wirelessly, or even over the Internet? And even more pressing: Is your specific car vulnerable, too?

If you own a Cadillac Escalade, a Jeep Cherokee or an Infiniti Q50, you may not like the answer.

In a talk today at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas—and an accompanying 92-page paper—Valasek and Miller will present the results of a broad analysis of dozens of different car makes and models, assessing the vehicles’ schematics for the signs that hint at vulnerabilities to auto-focused hackers. The result is a kind of handbook of ratings and reviews of automobiles for the potential hackability of their networked components. “For 24 different cars, we examined how a remote attack might work,” says Valasek, director of vehicle security research at the security consultancy IOActive. “It really depends on the architecture: If you hack the radio, can you send messages to the brakes or the steering? And if you can, what can you do with them?”

Miller and Valasek are quick to disclaim that their results aren’t definitive assertions about security vulnerabilities in cars and trucks so much as warnings of potential weaknesses. In contrast to their 2013 research, they didn’t do any hands-on hacking. In fact, their recent work consisted mostly of signing up for mechanics’ accounts on the websites of all the carmakers, downloading the cars’ technical manuals and wiring diagrams, and analyzing the computer networks those documents revealed. “We wanted to take a step back and look at a whole range of cars in much less detail, to really see what was out there,” says Valasek.

In the two researchers’ analysis, three vehicles were ranked as “most hackable”: the 2014 models of the Infiniti Q50 and Jeep Cherokee and the 2015 model of the Cadillac Escalade. The full results, summarized in the chart below, show that the 2010 and 2014 Toyota Prius didn’t fare well either.



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A plus sign represents “more hackable,” a minus sign “less hackable.”
Credit: Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek



All the cars’ ratings were based on three factors: The first was the size of their wireless “attack surface”—features like Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, cellular network connections, keyless entry systems, and even radio-readable tire pressure monitoring systems. Any of those radio connections could potentially be used by a hacker to find a security vulnerability and gain an initial foothold onto a car’s network. Second, they examined the vehicles’ network architecture, how much access those possible footholds offered to more critical systems steering and brakes. And third, Miller and Valasek assessed what they call the cars’ “cyberphysical” features: capabilities like automated braking, parking and lane assist that could transform a few spoofed digital commands into an actual out-of-control car.

The Infiniti Q50 in particular was a model of insecure architecture, the two researchers say. The sports sedan’s wireless features included remote keyless entry, Bluetooth, a cellular connection, wireless tire pressure monitoring, and an Infiniti Connection system that interfaces with a “personal assistant” app on the driver’s smartphone. Miller and Valasek say that within the Q50’s network, those radio and telematic components were directly connected to engine and braking systems. And the sedan’s critical driving systems had computer-controlled features like adaptive cruise control and adaptive steering that a hacker could potentially hijack to physically manipulate the car.

Jeep’s 2014 Cherokee didn’t rate much better, with many of those same wireless features plus a Wi-Fi network, and even more automated driving features like parallel parking assistance that could potentially be triggered at high speeds. “It’s awesome that it has all these features,” says Miller. “But it’s a little scary that they can all talk to each other.”

The researchers point to Audi’s A8, by contrast, as an example of a strong network layout. Its wireless features were separated from its driving functions on its internal network, with a gateway that would block commands sent to steering or brakes from any compromised radios.

In a statement to WIRED, Infiniti spokesperson Kyle Bazemore responds to the researchers’ findings by pointing out that Miller and Valasek didn’t actually hack a Q50. But he writes that the company is nonetheless examining the researchers’ conclusions. “As the potential for ‘hacking’ into the electronic systems of all automobiles may grow, we will continue to integrate security features into our vehicles to help protect against cyber-attacks,” adds Bazemore.

Neither Toyota nor GM immediately responded to a request for comment. A spokesperson for Chrysler wrote in a statement that the company will “endeavor to verify these claims and, if warranted, we will remediate them.” The company also took a jab at Miller and Valasek for not sharing their research with the companies before going public with their findings: “We support the responsible disclosure protocol for addressing cyber security threats. Accordingly, we invite security specialists to first share with us their findings so we might achieve a cooperative resolution. To do otherwise would benefit only those with malicious intent.”

Miller and Valasek counter that they’ve shared their report with the Department of Transportation and the Society of Automobile Engineers, an industry group. Their goal is to use public pressure—and if necessary, shame—to push car companies to think about their security architecture.

The possibility of car hacking, after all, is becoming more real; In some cases the researchers analyzed car models over time to see how they were becoming more digitized and thus potentially more insecure. Infiniti, for instance, more than tripled the number of electronic control units (ECUS) in its Q50 between 2006 and 2014; Jeep and Range Rover both more than doubled them between 2010 and 2014. Meanwhile cars are increasingly connected to smartphones and the Internet, in some cases integrating into their dashboards Web browsers that are well-known targets for hackers. “Our main takeaway is that companies should consider security before adding pieces onto an automobile, especially when those pieces have remote connectivity or cyberphysical attributes,” says Valasek.

Miller and Valasek also recommend automakers think about more actively foiling hackers. For their talk, the hacker duo has created a prototype of an intrusion detection system for cars–a $150 device that plugs directly into a vehicle’s network to monitor and block suspicious commands.

The two researchers, whose earlier work was funded with a grant from DARPA, aren’t the first to examine the wirelessly hackability of cars. In 2010 a team of researchers from the University of Washington and the University of California San Diego showed they could take over a car via a smorgasbord of wireless vulnerabilities. Their attack points included the car’s Bluetooth connection, its OnStar-like cellular radio, a rogue Android app on the driver’s phone synched to the car’s network, and even a malicious audio file burned onto a CD in the car’s stereo.

But those hackers wouldn’t name the car they tested. Miller and Valasek, since the beginning of their auto-hacking exploits, haven’t been so discreet.

“You can grab a Consumer Reports magazine from a newsstand right now and see ratings for car safety features,” says Valasek. “We’re doing the same thing, but for vehicles’ cybersecurity.”

http://www.wired.com/2014/08/car-hacking-chart/

Crystal






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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11171 on: Aug 6th, 2014, 2:29pm »

Crystal, hope I read the chart right, but that 2010 Range Rover Sports looks like a good one!


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« Last Edit: Aug 6th, 2014, 2:30pm by purr » User IP Logged

Let us be sure that those who come after will say of us in our time, that in our time we did everything that could be done. We finished the race; we kept them free; we kept the faith.

-RONALD REAGAN
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« Reply #11172 on: Aug 6th, 2014, 2:58pm »

on Aug 6th, 2014, 2:29pm, purr wrote:
Crystal, hope I read the chart right, but that 2010 Range Rover Sports looks like a good one!


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Hi ya Purr cheesy

I'll take one too. It looks to be a good one.

Crystal


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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11173 on: Aug 6th, 2014, 9:18pm »

CRYSTAL ~ SAW THIS AND THOUGHT IT QUITE LOVELY

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11174 on: Aug 7th, 2014, 01:23am »

that was really radical Z

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Send me More Sanctions like this please..

what else is on horizon..

oh the monkey got choked and they all went to heaven in a little row boat..clap clap.. cool
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