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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 1661 times)
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« Reply #11190 on: Aug 9th, 2014, 02:06am »

Breaking!

Tobacco Cure for Ebola!

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2014-08-04/ebola-drug-made-from-tobacco-plant-saves-u-dot-s-dot-aid-workers

A tiny San Diego-based company provided an experimental Ebola treatment for two Americans infected with the deadly virus in Liberia. The biotechnology drug, produced with tobacco plants, appears to be working.

In an unusual twist of expedited drug access, Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., which has nine employees, released its experimental ZMapp drug, until now only tested on infected animals, for the two health workers. Kentucky BioProcessing LLC, a subsidiary of tobacco giant Reynolds American Inc. (RAI:US), manufactures the treatment for Mapp from tobacco plants.

The first patient, Kent Brantly, a doctor, was flown from Liberia to Atlanta on Aug. 2, and is receiving treatment at Emory University Hospital. Nancy Writebol, an aid worker, is scheduled to arrive in Atlanta today and will be treated at the same hospital, according to the charity group she works with. Both are improving, according to relatives and supporters.

STORY: It's Been a Dream Week for Tobacco, the Life-Saving Plant

A tiny San Diego-based company provided an experimental Ebola treatment for two Americans infected with the deadly virus in Liberia. The biotechnology drug, produced with tobacco plants, appears to be working.

In an unusual twist of expedited drug access, Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., which has nine employees, released its experimental ZMapp drug, until now only tested on infected animals, for the two health workers. Kentucky BioProcessing LLC, a subsidiary of tobacco giant Reynolds American Inc. (RAI:US), manufactures the treatment for Mapp from tobacco plants.

The first patient, Kent Brantly, a doctor, was flown from Liberia to Atlanta on Aug. 2, and is receiving treatment at Emory University Hospital. Nancy Writebol, an aid worker, is scheduled to arrive in Atlanta today and will be treated at the same hospital, according to the charity group she works with. Both are improving, according to relatives and supporters.

STORY: It's Been a Dream Week for Tobacco, the Life-Saving Plant

The antibody work came out of research projects funded more than a decade ago by the U.S. Army to develop treatments and vaccines against potential bio-warfare agents, such as the Ebola virus, Arntzen said in a telephone interview.

Tobacco Plant

The tobacco plant production system was developed because it was a method that could produce antibodies rapidly in the event of an emergency, he said.

To produce therapeutic proteins inside a tobacco plant, genes for the desired antibodies are fused to genes for a natural tobacco virus, said Arntzen. The tobacco plants are then infected with this new artificial virus, he said.

VIDEO: Aid Workers Testify on Response to Ebola Outbreak


The infection results in the production of antibodies inside the plant,” Arntzen said. The plant is eventually ground up and the antibody is extracted, he said. The whole process takes a matter of weeks.

When confronted by reporters about the Ebola infections in Liberia and subsequent treatments, Whaley said he needed to get up to speed on the developing events.

“This is all new to me,” said Whaley, who was dressed in shorts, a well-worn T-shirt and flip-flops while addressing reporters’ questions outside the company’s offices in a San Diego business park. “I just don’t want to give out any inaccurate information, that’s all.”

Antibody Cocktail

Mapp’s drug is being developed with Toronto-based Defyrus Inc., which has six employees, according to Defyrus CEO Jeff Turner. ZMapp is a “cocktail” of monoclonal antibodies that help the immune system attack the virus.

Monoclonal antibodies designed to fight and block specific proteins can stop the virus from latching onto and entering cells, said Heinz Feldmann, chief of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ Laboratory of Virology in Hamilton, Montana.

The key is to find antibodies that can prevent viral infection, and to attack several points on the virus so that mutants won’t “escape” treatment, he said.

Zmapp -Zombie App hehe
« Last Edit: Aug 9th, 2014, 02:07am by Sysconfig » User IP Logged

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« Reply #11191 on: Aug 9th, 2014, 04:00am »

I wonder how Prince Bandar feels about bombs falling on his Toys

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Kurdish forces kill ISIL Chechen commander in heavy fighting
Special to WorldTribune.com
NICOSIA — A leading commander of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant is said to have been killed in the battle for Iraq’s Kurdistan.
Abu Omar Chechen
Abu Omar Chechen
Kurdish sources have reported that a leading ISIL commander, who headed the movement’s Chechen wing, was killed in fighting near the Mosul dam northwest of the Iraqi city. They said Abu Omar Chechen died in a battle with the Peshmerga, or forces loyal to the Kurdish Regional Government, on Aug. 6.
“Abu Omar was killed with other Chechens from his unit in heavy fighting,” a source said.
The sources said Abu Omar had organized most of the ISIL advance toward Kurdistan. They said he led more than 1,000 fighters, regarded as the best in the Al Qaida-aligned movement, which now controls large parts of Iraq and Syria.
KRG has reported progress in the counter-attack against ISIL. Officials said the Peshmerga mobilized thousands of troops in a multi-pronged assault on ISIL positions around the Kurdish villages of Rabia and Sinjar.
“Many ISIL fighters are leaving Mosul for the south because of Peshmerga pressure,” Peshmerga spokesman Brig. Gen. Hilka Hikmat said.
Hikmat said Kurdish forces were moving to regain all of the towns lost to ISIL in August. He said the Iraq Air Force was supporting Peshmerga by bombing ISIL positions.
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« Reply #11192 on: Aug 9th, 2014, 11:23am »

GOOD MORNING FELLOW UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy





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« Reply #11193 on: Aug 9th, 2014, 5:15pm »

on Aug 9th, 2014, 11:23am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
GOOD MORNING FELLOW UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy





CRYSTAL





That was a Real Gem Wings, pure Americana..
Lord I miss the good guys
Iliked the part what gang are you with? I ride alone..
I hear ya.. grin


wait a minute we are the good guys!
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« Reply #11194 on: Aug 10th, 2014, 02:40am »

Hope For Africa

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« Reply #11195 on: Aug 10th, 2014, 02:53am »

Keep your eyes wide open Huge Full Moon Tonight Sunday!
Anniversaty Of Hiroshima and Gulf of Tonkin justed passed us..
Take care driving and walking!!!
http://news.yahoo.com/supermoon-sunday-largest-full-moon-rises-125608551.html




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« Reply #11196 on: Aug 10th, 2014, 07:41am »

Enter The Quantum Pigeon

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One of the most exotic aspects of nature is quantum non-locality which was first discovered more than four decades ago. It is referred to as “the most profound discovery of science.”
There are different types of non-locality which quantum mechanics showed could not exist in classical physics. In classical physics for a particle to experience a force, it must be at the same location where the force is. In quantum mechanics you can have a force in one place while the particle moves outside. Nevertheless, the particle will still feel this force. This is called the Aharonov-Bohm effect.
There is another kind of non-locality that has to do with the relation between two particles that used to be next to each other in the past and then subsequently were separated to a large distance. Even after they were separated far apart, they appeared to maintain a strange kind of connection — what Einstein called “spooky action at a distance.” However, these surprising kinds of connections had many limitations. For example, the particles had to originally be next to each other and only a relatively small number of particles in the universe could be connected with each other at a time.
While the above was remarkable enough, now it appears this was only part of the story as demonstrated in a recent paper by a team from the Institute for Quantum Studies at Chapman University co-authored by Yakir Aharonov, Fabrizio Colombo, Sandu Popescu, Irene Sabadini, Daniele Struppa, and Jeff Tollaksen. They introduced a new kind of quantum connectivity between particles which transcends these limitations. This connectivity is happening all the time on a much bigger, cosmic scale.
“With the new kind of quantum linkages which we have introduced, the particles don’t have to interact in the past. In fact, they have no idea that the other particle even existed,” said Jeff Tollaksen, Director of the Institute for Quantum Studies at Chapman University.
- See more at: http://disinfo.com/2014/08/scientists-introduce-new-cosmic-connectivity-quantum-pigeonhole-paradox/#sthash.pl0jrwuj.dpuf

Aharonov found that Nature gains something very beautiful and exciting with this indeterminism: the present is not only affected by the past but it is also affected by the future. That is, the future (also known as post-selection) can come back to the present (like in the movie “Back to the Future”). So quantum mechanics does not pick out an arrow of time, it works just as well from past to future as from future to past. The quantum world links the future with the past in subtle and significant ways; and in dramatic contrast to everything previously known about time.
At first blush, you might think that we could build time machines with this new physics. If we could have such time machines, then when they take us back in time, a paradox will ensue: if one goes back in time in a time machine and kills one’s grandfather, then that individual would never be born. If that individual will never be born how can they come back and kill their grandfather? This is the paradox that happens when we say that you are allowed to come back from the future and effect the past or the present.
In contrast, Aharonov (et. al.’s) theories don’t allow for such paradoxes. Quantum mechanics has just the right kind of uncertainties so that when one does experiments in the present, there is always some possible noise in the result of this experiment, some possible mistakes due to the noise in the quantum uncertainties of the measuring device. Everybody knows that if your only tool is a hammer, then you tend to treat everything as if it were a nail. And the “hammer-type” measurements that are made in the present moment are not helpful in ascertaining the relevance of the future on the present. But a whole new world opens up when gentle measurements are made. [b]For example, in some sense, particles everywhere are now more connected than previouslythought.
“It seems to be impossible,” says Tollaksen. “But it is a direct consequence of quantum mechanics” and, he adds, “It really has immense implications.”
To backup such extraordinary claims, the Chapman University team has been introducing a series of new paradoxes which are consequences of this new kind of connectivity but which also can be verified experimentally. They have called the first the “quantum pigeonhole paradox.” The classical pigeonhole principle states: “If you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes at least two of the pigeons end up in the same hole.” This is an obvious yet fundamental principle of nature as it captures the very essence of counting. Yet the Chapman team showed that it was false in quantum mechanics: “You can put an infinite number of pigeons in two boxes, and no two pigeons will be in the same box,” says Tollaksen (see arxiv.org/abs/1407.3194).
“The new results seem fascinating,” said Leonard Susskind of Stanford University. “I would guess that the new effect is a serious step in understanding quantum correlations.”

So when Moksha told me one day..someone is messing with Time..I believed him.. cool
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« Reply #11197 on: Aug 10th, 2014, 09:45am »

on Aug 9th, 2014, 5:15pm, Sysconfig wrote:
That was a Real Gem Wings, pure Americana..
Lord I miss the good guys
Iliked the part what gang are you with? I ride alone..
I hear ya.. grin


wait a minute we are the good guys!


Good morning Sys,

I love this movie! Makes me smile every time.

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« Reply #11198 on: Aug 10th, 2014, 09:51am »

Associated Press

25 years ago, a different Ebola outbreak in Va.

By MATTHEW BARAKAT
Aug. 10, 2014 9:55 AM EDT

RESTON, Va. (AP) — It had all the makings of a public-health horror story: an outbreak of a wildly deadly virus on the doorstep of the nation's capital, with dozens of lab monkeys dead, multiple people testing positive, and no precedent in this country on how to contain it.

Americans' introduction to the Ebola virus came 25 years ago in an office park near Washington Dulles International Airport, a covert crisis that captivated the public only years later when it formed the basis of a bestselling book.

Initially thought to be the same hyper-deadly strain as the current Ebola outbreak that has killed hundreds in Africa, the previously unknown Reston variant turned out to be nonlethal to humans. But the story of what might have been illustrates how far U.S. scientists have come in their understanding of a virus whose very name strikes fear, even in a country where no one has fatally contracted it.

Gerald Jaax, one of the leaders of a team of Army scientists that responded to the 1989 outbreak in Reston, Virginia, closely watched the meticulously planned transfers this month of two American aid workers from Liberia to a specialized facility in Atlanta, the first Ebola patients ever brought to the U.S. Jaax recalled his days urgently trying to corral the country's first known outbreak.

In the fall of 1989, dozens of macaques imported from the Philippines suddenly died at Hazelton Research Products' primate quarantine unit in Reston, where animals were kept and later sold for lab testing. Company officials contacted the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick, Maryland — Jaax's unit — concerned they might be dealing with an outbreak of hemorrhagic fever among the monkeys.

Initial testing revealed something much worse: Ebola, specifically the Zaire strain, which had a 90 percent fatality rate in humans. Four workers at the quarantine facility tested positive for exposure to the virus.

Amazingly, they never even got sick.

Researchers eventually realized they were dealing with a different strain, one now known as Ebola-Reston. Though its appearance under a microscope is similar to the Zaire strain, Ebola-Reston is the only one of the five forms of Ebola not harmful to humans.

But Jaax and his unit, including his wife Nancy , also a scientist, did not know that while at the monkey house. They just knew they had to clean it out, and do it while keeping a relatively low profile that wouldn't scare the neighbors.

"You could walk in and smell monkey everywhere," said Dr. C.J. Peters, who oversaw the Army's response to the outbreak. "There was a little shopping center nearby. ... There was plenty of opportunity for trouble."

While the Army scientists had strong protocols in place for studying viruses safely in a lab, they were not well prepared to stabilize and contain an outbreak in a private facility. At the time, Jaax said, nobody — including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control — had that kind of experience. In the Reston incident, the CDC took the lead in managing the human-health aspect of the response, while the Army dealt with the monkeys.

Back in 1989, there was concern that Ebola could spread through the air, said Peters, now a professor with University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. Indeed, researchers concluded there must have been some sort of aerosol spread of the virus within the monkey house, Jaax said.

The Reston animals had to be euthanized from a safe distance — "monkeys are aerosol-producing machines," Jaax said. In his 1995 book "The Hot Zone," Richard Preston described how Jaax modified a mop handle so it could be used to pin a monkey in its cage where it could safely be injected and eventually euthanized. Later, to disinfect the air, the team cooked formaldehyde crystals on electric frying pans.

Ebola is no longer thought to be an airborne virus; scientists say the disease can only be spread through direct contact with bodily fluids.

The Reston crisis also elevated Ebola into the public consciousness, albeit not immediately. In an era when the country was preoccupied with the AIDS epidemic, which hit 100,000 cases in the U.S. that year, the Army and CDC scientists carried out their tasks in relative obscurity .

It was only after "The Hot Zone" became a best-seller and focused attention on the public-health battle to confront emerging disease outbreaks that the Reston event became well known and Ebola became a household word.

"The big difference between now and 1989 is that nobody else knew what Ebola was," said Jaax, now an associate vice president at Kansas State University.

One of the most important legacies of Reston, Jaax said, was that none of the dozens who worked to contain the outbreak was exposed to the virus. The plans developed on the fly to keep the responders safe worked, he said, and provided a good blueprint for the protocols used to bring back the American aid workers earlier this month.

Dr. Amesh Adalja, senior associate at the UPMC Center for Health Security in Baltimore and an infectious disease physician, said the Reston responders' incorrect belief that they were dealing with a virus that was deadly to humans provided the ideal trial run for handling such an outbreak.

"It's like you're performing with a net underneath you, but you don't know it's a drill," Adalja said.

Ebola-Reston returned to the U.S. in 1996 in monkeys in Texas that had been imported from the Philippines. The Philippines has seen three outbreaks since the strain was identified, affecting primates, pigs and nine people. The workers who handled the animals developed antibodies, but did not get sick.

Hazelton abandoned the Reston facility in 1990, and the company was later swallowed up by a competitor. The monkey house was torn down a few years later. The new building there hosts several small offices and a day-care center.

Some of the office park workers are aware of the site's history; many are not.

Back in 1989, Vicky Wingert worked at the local homeowners' association, in offices across the street from the monkey house. She said nobody had any idea there was a problem until people showed up in hazmat suits. Even then, very little information trickled out, she said.

"At the time, it wasn't a big deal. Looking back, it probably should have been," she said.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/25-years-ago-different-ebola-outbreak-va

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« Reply #11199 on: Aug 10th, 2014, 09:57am »

Science Daily

Learning from origami to design new materials

Date:
August 7, 2014

Source:
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

A challenge increasingly important to physicists and materials scientists in recent years has been how to design controllable new materials that exhibit desired physical properties rather than relying on those properties to emerge naturally, says University of Massachusetts Amherst physicist Christian Santangelo.

Now he and physicist Arthur Evans and polymer scientist Ryan Hayward at UMass Amherst, with others at Cornell and Western New England University, are using origami-based folding methods for "tuning" the fundamental physical properties of any type of thin sheet, which may eventually lead to development of molecular-scale machines that could snap into place and perform mechanical tasks. Results are reported today in an early online edition of Science.

At a physics meeting a couple of years ago, Santangelo mentioned the unusual properties of a special type of origami fold called Miura-ori to fellow physicist Jesse Silverberg of Cornell, a long-time origami enthusiast. Miura-ori, named after the astrophysicist who invented the technique, is a series folded parallelograms that change the stiffness of a sheet of paper based only on the crease pattern.

Also known as tessellation, this special folding, which occurs naturally in some leaves and tissues, arranges a flat surface using a repeated pattern of alternating mountain-and-valley zigzag folds. Objects folded this way contract when squeezed, a bit like an accordion, so they can be packed into a very small shape but unfolded with little effort from the corners. This technique has been used in space to launch satellites with solar arrays that can be unfolded using only a few small motors at the edges.

Santangelo explains, "As you compress most materials along one axis, they expand in other directions. In other words, squeezing a hunk of material causes it to leak out the sides. A rare class of materials, however, does the opposite. If you compress them along one direction, they collapse uniformly in all directions. Miura-ori shows us how to use this property to make new devices. Exotic materials can be formed from traditional materials simply by altering microscopic structure."

Santangelo, with Silverberg and Itai Cohen at Cornell and Tom Hull at Western New England, describe in their new paper how to alter patterns and introduce defects to tune a thin sheet's stiffness and create a material in which physical properties can be programmed and reprogrammed.

Silverberg says, "The work brings together origami, metamaterials, programmable matter crystallography and more. It's totally bizarre and unique to have so many of these ideas intersecting at the same time."

Santangelo says active materials can change their shape, size, and/or physical properties with changes in temperature, pressure, electro-magnetic fields, or other aspects of their environment. With such materials, researchers may be able to create entire structures and systems out of single pieces that are flexible, elastic and resilient.

Santangelo adds, "In particular, this gives us the ability to make a reprogrammable material. By toggling elements of the origami structure between two stable states, we can make the structure stiffer, selectively weaken certain parts, and so on. And we can do it reversibly. Given origami's scale-free geometric character, this framework for metamaterial design can be directly transferred to milli-, micro- and nanometer size systems."

He adds that metamaterials are rapidly emerging at the frontier of scientific and technological innovation due to their exotic and tunable material properties, which arise from arrangements of smaller units within the bulk system to generate exotic, non-natural properties on larger scales. Miura-ori can be considered a mechanical metamaterial because its stiffness can be controlled by the specific fold angles of the parallelograms, Silverberg explains.

The physicists point out that is rare to find metamaterials that can be reconfigured beyond their original design, but origami-inspired mechanical metamaterials offer enhanced flexibility because their properties are linked to alterable folding pattern. So-called "pop-through defects" made by changing crease directions, can be introduced to change a sheet's stiffness, so multiple stable configurations can come from a single structure yielding programmable metamaterials.

Using numerical simulations, Evans and Santangelo calculated the effect that a pop-through defect has on Miura-ori. They showed that it instantly makes the entire sheet stiffer, and the effect is additive. The Cornell group will present this research at the Sixth International Meeting on Origami in Science, Mathematics and Education on Aug. 10 in Tokyo.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140807145858.htm

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« Reply #11200 on: Aug 10th, 2014, 8:38pm »

CRYSTAL ~ CASEBOOK ~ ALWAYS AN HONOR TO SHARE ~ wink

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« Reply #11201 on: Aug 11th, 2014, 09:50am »

GORGEOUS Z, THANK YOU cheesy

GOOD MORNING FELLOW UFOCASEBOOKERS!


Wired

Turns Out Your Complex Passwords Aren’t That Much Safer

By Robert McMillan
08.11.14

When the computer security company Hold Security reported that more than 1.2 billion online credentials had been swiped by Russian hackers, many people were worried—and justifiably so. Hold isn’t saying exactly which websites were hit, but with so many credentials stolen, it’s likely that hundreds of millions of ordinary consumers were affected.

Some of these may be incredibly complex passwords—with lots of jumbled numbers and symbols. And some may be incredibly simple—using just the simplest of English words, like, say, “password.” But after the hack, most all of them have left their users vulnerable to attack. According to Alex Holden, Hold Security’s founder, the “vast majority” of the passwords he uncovered had been stored in plain text on company servers.

What this shows that a complex password isn’t necessarily a secure password. As we’ve written before, password systems have a very annoying way of putting most of the hard work onto the shoulders of the users. You’ve got to mix up a jumble of numbers and letters (some in capitals, please) and special characters. Some passwords time-out after 90 days, forcing you to reset them. But that doesn’t mean they’re that much safer than simple passwords.

Some of our ideas about passwords date back to the 1980s, when the National Institute of Standards and Technology came up some guidelines for creating secure passwords for local area networks. Back then, they’d mail them out to interested computer security types via U.S. Post. Now, NIST is trying to help the U.S. move beyond the password, says Donna Dodson NIST’s chief cyber security advisor. “Putting the burden of security on the end-user and making it more complex just doesn’t work,” she says. “The security has to be usable for the end-user. Otherwise they’re going to find workarounds.”

‘Everyone is confused in this space. We don’t know half of why we’re doing this stuff.’

In some situations, a complex password can help you. But in others—like when the company holding your password stores it in plain text, without encrypting it—that complexity is meaningless. And some passwords may seem complex, when they’re actually pretty easy to guess. They can trip you up, even if they’re stored using cryptographic techniques, when someone hacks into the machines that they live on. The lesson here is that system administrators—the people who oversee all those password rules you have to follow—need to shoulder a bit more of the work. They need to better understand what makes a secure password—and how passwords should be stored.

“Everyone is confused in this space,” says Cormac Herley, a Microsoft researcher who’s been studying passwords for years. System administrators will lay down rules for passwords but often, “we don’t know half of why we’re doing this stuff.,” says Herley. And they may not realize they should be spending their time securing systems in other ways.

Unsafe P@ssw0rds

That’s why Herley, along with researchers at Microsoft and Ottawa’s Carleton University, set out to to take a cold hard look at passwords and here’s what they found: the way we traditionally measure password strength is inconsistent—and often say nothing about how hard it might be to guess a password.

Here’s an example: some systems force you to chose an eight-character password, using capital letters, numbers and at least one number. That sounds pretty secure, but it’s not. The word P@ssw0rd fits these criteria and password cracking tools such as JohntheRipper or hashcat will guess it in minutes. That’s because they use something called “mangling rules” which take dictionary words and substitute letters such as a for @ or s for $.

“The cracking software that’s out there has known about all of these tricks for more than a decade,” says Herley. “A lot of the password completion policies don’t push people toward randomness and things that will pass 1014 guesses, they push people toward predictable strategies that will not.”

Try out enough password-strength checkers, and you’ll get the impression that more is always better when it comes to password. But that’s not really the case, Herley says. Randomness is the key. But the problem—and it’s a near-fatal one—is that humans are really, really bad at generating random passwords. So maybe we should just expect our passwords to suck, and concentrate on protecting accounts in other ways–like with two-factor authentication, where you have to use a password in tandem with something like a fingerprint, a text message, or a random number generated on a device you lug around.

The Fool’s Wager

What’s more, system administrators need to spend more time securing the passwords they store. If sysadmins had been taking care of business before the Russian hack—locking down their websites and protecting their users passwords with cryptography instead of storing them in plain text—users would be a lot better off. “Rather than asking the end-user to do all the work—and there’s actually not a lot of evidence that people will do the work—why don’t we invest more effort on the system side by checking that we don’t leak the password database?” says Paul van Oorschot, a computer science professor who did this research with the Microsoft team.

Some companies seem to get this. Amazon, for example, is ok with six-character passwords—no numbers or special characters required. Apple, on the other hand, forces you to run the gauntlet: capital letters, numbers, lower-case letters.

The way Herley and van Oorschot see things, some accounts are perfectly fine to have completely low security. Using the word “password” as your throw-away password when you’re forced to register to read an online news article may not be such a big deal. On the other hand, if you’re using Gmail as your primary email account, you’re going to make things more difficult. You want a password that’s really hard to guess, and you want Google to text you a second password whenever you try to log in from a different device.

Either way, pinning your security on an insanely complex password is a fool’s wager. Just ask the people running the airline, travel and social networking sites that got hacked by Alex Holden’s Russian hackers. “Why are we burdening users with demands to chose stronger and stronger things with the goal of withstanding increasingly sophisticated guessing attacks when 1.2 billion credentials are just spewed from servers that are improperly protected,” says Herley. “That seems like a big waste of effort.”

http://www.wired.com/2014/08/passwords_microsoft/

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« Reply #11202 on: Aug 11th, 2014, 09:52am »

Science Daily

Water tractor beam: Complex waves generate flow patterns to manipulate floating objects

Date:
August 10, 2014

Source:
Australian National University

Physicists at The Australian National University (ANU) have created a tractor beam on water, providing a radical new technique that could confine oil spills, manipulate floating objects or explain rips at the beach.

The group, led by Professor Michael Shats discovered they can control water flow patterns with simple wave generators, enabling them to move floating objects at will.

"We have figured out a way of creating waves that can force a floating object to move against the direction of the wave," said Dr Horst Punzmann, from the Research School of Physics and Engineering, who led the project.

"No one could have guessed this result," he said.

The new technique gives scientists a way of controlling things adrift on water in a way they have never had before, resembling sci-fi tractor beams that draw in objects.

Using a ping-pong ball in a wave tank, the group worked out the size and frequency of the waves required to move the ball in whichever direction they want.

Advanced particle tracking tools, developed by team members Dr Nicolas Francois and Dr Hua Xia, revealed that the waves generate currents on the surface of the water.

"We found that above a certain height, these complex three-dimensional waves generate flow patterns on the surface of the water," Professor Shats said. "The tractor beam is just one of the patterns, they can be inward flows, outward flows or vortices."

The team also experimented with different shaped plungers to generate different swirling flow patterns.

As yet no mathematical theory can explain these experiments, Dr Punzmann said.

"It's one of the great unresolved problems, yet anyone in the bathtub can reproduce it. We were very surprised no one had described it before."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140810214202.htm

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11203 on: Aug 11th, 2014, 11:15am »

I think that's the principal that the machine uses that actor Kevin Costner patented and tried to sell during the BP spill!

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11204 on: Aug 11th, 2014, 6:10pm »

Robin Williams passed away. He was 63.



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