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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 47648 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11220 on: Aug 15th, 2014, 10:20am »






Published on Aug 14, 2014

~

Crystal




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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11221 on: Aug 16th, 2014, 01:09am »


Take My Advice ..Don't
http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/175881/tomgram%3A_matthew_harwood%2C_one_nation_under_swat/#more
To Terrify and Occupy
How the Excessive Militarization of the Police is Turning Cops Into Counterinsurgents
By Matthew Harwood

Jason Westcott was afraid.

One night last fall, he discovered via Facebook that a friend of a friend was planning with some co-conspirators to break in to his home. They were intent on stealing Wescott's handgun and a couple of TV sets. According to the Facebook message, the suspect was planning on “burning” Westcott, who promptly called the Tampa Bay police and reported the plot.

According to the Tampa Bay Times, the investigating officers responding to Westcott’s call had a simple message for him: “If anyone breaks into this house, grab your gun and shoot to kill.”

Around 7:30 pm on May 27th, the intruders arrived. Westcott followed the officers’ advice, grabbed his gun to defend his home, and died pointing it at the intruders. They used a semiautomatic shotgun and handgun to shoot down the 29-year-old motorcycle mechanic. He was hit three times, once in the arm and twice in his side, and pronounced dead upon arrival at the hospital.

The intruders, however, weren’t small-time crooks looking to make a small score. Rather they were members of the Tampa Police Department’s SWAT team, which was executing a search warrant on suspicion that Westcott and his partner were marijuana dealers. They had been tipped off by a confidential informant, whom they drove to Westcott’s home four times between February and May to purchase small amounts of marijuana, at $20-$60 a pop. The informer notified police that he saw two handguns in the home, which was why the Tampa police deployed a SWAT team to execute the search warrant.

In the end, the same police department that told Westcott to protect his home with defensive force killed him when he did. After searching his small rental, the cops indeed found weed, two dollars' worth, and one legal handgun -- the one he was clutching when the bullets ripped into him.

Welcome to a new era of American policing, where cops increasingly see themselves as soldiers occupying enemy territory, often with the help of Uncle Sam’s armory, and where even nonviolent crimes are met with overwhelming force and brutality.

The War on Your Doorstep

The cancer of militarized policing has long been metastasizing in the body politic. It has been growing ever stronger since the first Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams were born in the 1960s in response to that decade’s turbulent mix of riots, disturbances, and senseless violence like Charles Whitman’s infamous clock-tower rampage in Austin, Texas.

While SWAT isn’t the only indicator that the militarization of American policing is increasing, it is the most recognizable. The proliferation of SWAT teams across the country and their paramilitary tactics have spread a violent form of policing designed for the extraordinary but in these years made ordinary. When the concept of SWAT arose out of the Philadelphia and Los Angeles Police Departments, it was quickly picked up by big city police officials nationwide. Initially, however, it was an elite force reserved for uniquely dangerous incidents, such as active shooters, hostage situations, or large-scale disturbances.

Nearly a half-century later, that’s no longer true.
In 1984, according to Radley Balko's Rise of the Warrior Cop, about 26% of towns with populations between 25,000 and 50,000 had SWAT teams. By 2005, that number had soared to 80% and it’s still rising, though SWAT statistics are notoriously hard to come by.

As the number of SWAT teams has grown nationwide, so have the raids. Every year now, there are approximately 50,000 SWAT raids in the United States, according to Professor Pete Kraska of Eastern Kentucky University’s School of Justice Studies. In other words, roughly 137 times a day a SWAT team assaults a home and plunges its inhabitants and the surrounding community into terror.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11222 on: Aug 16th, 2014, 02:19am »

you can lead a cat to milk but..
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you can't make it drink tongue
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11223 on: Aug 16th, 2014, 10:22am »


wow

http://www.cnet.com/news/this-man-made-breathing-leaf-is-an-oxygen-factory-for-space-travel/?ftag=ACQ63afa6d
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11224 on: Aug 16th, 2014, 10:27am »

on Aug 16th, 2014, 02:19am, Sysconfig wrote:
you can lead a cat to milk but..
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you can't make it drink tongue


Thanks for that laugh Sys,

Crystal


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« Reply #11225 on: Aug 16th, 2014, 10:29am »

GOOD MORNING ALL cheesy













CRYSTAL


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« Reply #11226 on: Aug 16th, 2014, 2:13pm »

Archaeology News Network

Neolithic henge discovered in England
16 August 2014

Archaeologists suspect a “sacred way” could have led to a henge 6,000 years ago at Iwade Meadows, to the west of the Kent industrial town of Sittingbourne.




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A Neolithic ditch which became a huge funerary monument when it was enlarged with
an outer ring during the Bronze Age has been found on housing development grounds
in Kent
[Credit: SWAT Archaeology]



Positioned on a north-west slope, the 30-metre diameter structure is one of several prehistoric monuments on a north-west slope above the Ridham fleet stream running through the centre of the site.

“Its purpose is not known,” says Dr Paul Wilkinson, of excavators SWAT Archaeology.

“But it may be that the monument was reused as an enclosure for stock management at this time or could formally have been used as a ‘sacred way’ leading to the Neolithic ‘henge’.

“The monuments are in a location that would have formerly had extensive views to the Swale Estuary and the Island of Sheppey beyond.

“The archaeological evidence suggests that the outer ditch may have originated in the Neolithic and been later transformed in the Bronze Age into a funerary monument with the addition of the inner ring.”

Archaeologists now hope to determine the exact date, phasing and character of the monuments.

“The outer ring has an entrance facing north-east suggesting that it may have originated as a henge-type monument – a ceremonial gathering place of which Stonehenge is our most well known example,” says Dr Wilkinson.

“The inner ring appears to be later and is an unbroken circuit. This may be associated with a Bronze Age burial, as a barrow, though no burials have yet been found.

“A second smaller monument lies close to the larger rings and may be a secondary barrow dating to the Bronze Age.

“While the monuments may have fallen out of use for their primary function by the middle Bronze Age they seem to have still been significant landscape features, as a track from the north-east is seen to have been extended to the causeway entrance of the outer ring.

“The importance of the location in the Neolithic period is reinforced by the rare findings of a series of pits close to the monuments that may indicate the area was being used before the construction of the monument or represents activity associated with it.”


http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2014/08/neolithic-henge-discovered-in-england.html#.U--sQukg8b2

Crystal

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« Reply #11227 on: Aug 17th, 2014, 01:42am »

so far one man dead and a box of sweet n milds stolen ..and some lcd tvs..maybe some nikes..

Looters continue to ignore curfew causing untold losses in comparison to what started event..Law enforcement stands idly by.

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source William Banzai7
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11228 on: Aug 17th, 2014, 09:58am »

GOOD MORNING UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy







CRYSTAL


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« Reply #11229 on: Aug 17th, 2014, 6:53pm »

Great Movie! Thanx Crystal.. Scary when The Triffs hit the Blind group..cheesy

Stephen Hawkings changes Mind On Theory Of Everything


In a Scientific American essay based on their new book A Grand Design, Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow are now claiming physicists may never find a theory of everything. Instead, they propose a "family of interconnected theories" might emerge, with each describing a certain reality under specific conditions.

Most of the history of physics has been dominated by a realist approach. Scientists simply accepted that their observations could give direct information about an objective reality. In classical physics, such a view was easily defensible, but the emergence of quantum mechanics has shaken even the staunchest realist.

In a quantum world, particles don't have definite locations or even definite velocities until they've been observed. This is a far cry from Newton's world, and Hawking/Mlodinow argue that - in light of quantum mechanics - it doesn't matter what is actually real and what isn't, all that matters is what we experience as reality.

As an example, they talk about Neo from The Matrix. Even though Neo's world was virtual, as long as he didn't know it there was no reason for him to challenge the physical laws of that world. Similarly, they use the example of a goldfish in a curved bowl. The fish would experience a curvature of light as its reality and while it wouldn't be accurate to someone outside the bowl, to the fish it would be.

Scientific American: The Elusive Theory of Everything (paywalled)


"In our view, there is no picture or theory-independent concept of reality. Instead we adopt a view that we call model - dependent realism: the idea that a physical theory or world is a model (generally of a mathematical nature) and a set of rules that connect the elements of the model to observations. According to model - dependent realism, it is pointless to ask whether a model is real, only whether it agrees with observation. If two models agree with observation, neither model can be considered more real than the other. A person can use whichever model is more convenient in the situation under consideration."

This view is a staunch reversal for Hawking, who 30 years ago argued that not only would physicists find a theory of everything, but that it would happen by the year 2000. In his first speech as Lucasian Chair at Cambridge titled "Is the end in sight for theoretical physics?," Hawking argued that the unification of quantum mechanics and general relativity into one theory was inevitable and that the coming age of computers would render physicists obsolete, if not physics itself.

Of course, Hawking has become rather well known for jumping way out on a limb with his public remarks and for decades he embraced supergravity as having the potential to solve theoretical physicist's ills, even hosting a major conference on it in 1982. However, but Hawking has never harbored allegiances to theories that describe a physical reality.

So, while two well-known physicists coming out against a theory of everything is compelling, it really shouldn't seem like anything new for Hawking.

"I take the positivist view point that a physical theory is just a mathematical model and that it is meaningless to ask whether it corresponds to reality. All that one can ask is that its predictions should be in agreement with observation."



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« Reply #11230 on: Aug 17th, 2014, 7:10pm »

No doubt Ebola kills But armed with Ignorance Kills Faster



http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-17/india-spain-testing-suspected-ebola-patients-liberian-quarantine-center-raided

India, Spain Testing Suspected Ebola Patients; Liberian Quarantine Center Raided



While the Ebola outbreak in west Africa has long since left the "under control" stage, things are about to go from worse to inconceivable for the poverty stricken African nations, after Liberian officials said they Ebola could soon spread through the capital's largest slum after residents raided a quarantine center for suspected patients and took items including blood-stained sheets and mattresses.

According to AP, the violence in the West Point slum occurred late Saturday and was led by residents angry that patients were brought from other parts of the capital to the holding center. It was not immediately clear how many patients had been at the center. West Point residents went on a "looting spree," stealing items from the clinic that were likely infected, said a senior police official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to brief the press. The residents took mattresses, sheets and blankets that had bloodstains, which could spread the infection.

It goes without saying that if and when Ebola strikes the heart of one of the poorest ghettos in Africa, then there is no model that can predict just how far and wide the disease could spread.

And speaking of spreading, what many have feared may have come to pass after Spain announced it was investigating a suspected case of Ebola after a Nigerian man presented symptoms of the virus at a hospital in Alicante several days after flying in from the West African country.

The Telegraph reports:

The man, who has not been named but is said to be in his 30s, was admitted into San Joan hospital in Alicante on Saturday evening where he was being treated in an isolation unit.

Hospital sources confirmed he was suffering a fever of 38.3 degrees Celsius (100.9F) as well as "other symptoms associated with Ebola - including physical discomfort, vomiting and bleeding".

The patient told doctors that he had arrived in Spain from Nigeria "a few days ago".

Hospital authorities said they had "activated protocol" to deal with the infectious disease while they awaited test results.
But even that is nothing compared to what may transpire if what the Times of India reported moments ago, turns out to be accurate: three persons from Ebola-affected Nigeria, who arrived here Saturday morning, have been admitted to the Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital for screening and treatment if required. The three Nigerians, aged 79, 37 and 4 years had fever and their tests were being done at the National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC), Delhi, an official release said here.

In addition to this, a 32-year-old Indian from Durg in Chhattisgarh who returned from Nigeria has been admitted to a hospital in Bhilai. His samples are also being tested at NCDC, the release said. WHO has said air travel, even from Ebola-affected countries, is low-risk for transmission of the disease. WHO has reported a total of 2,127 cases and 1,145 deaths due to Ebola from affected countries.
India is the second most populous country in the world with a population of over 1.2 billion.
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« Reply #11231 on: Aug 18th, 2014, 02:11am »

Analyzing Body Language..Nothing Happened..analyzing word Road Map..Nothing Happened
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It's Why four out of Five men Enjoy Pocket Pool cool
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11232 on: Aug 18th, 2014, 02:46am »

Another Sys Value added post! Three for one!




How weeds sweet talk a tomato
http://www.techtimes.com/articles/13140/20140815/plants-may-communicate-to-each-other-through-their-own-language.htm

How plants warn each other Revalidated

http://www.wired.com/2013/12/secret-language-of-plants/
Up in the northern Sierra Nevada, the ecologist Richard Karban is trying to learn an alien language. The sagebrush plants that dot these slopes speak to one another, using words no human knows. Karban, who teaches at the University of California, Davis, is listening in, and he’s beginning to understand what they say.


Original story reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine, an editorially independent division of SimonsFoundation.org whose mission is to enhance public understanding of science by covering research developments and trends in mathematics and the physical and life sciences.
The evidence for plant communication is only a few decades old, but in that short time it has leapfrogged from electrifying discovery to decisive debunking to resurrection. Two studies published in 1983 demonstrated that willow trees, poplars and sugar maples can warn each other about insect attacks: Intact, undamaged trees near ones that are infested with hungry bugs begin pumping out bug-repelling chemicals to ward off attack. They somehow know what their neighbors are experiencing, and react to it. The mind-bending implication was that brainless trees could send, receive and interpret messages.

The first few “talking tree” papers quickly were shot down as statistically flawed or too artificial, irrelevant to the real-world war between plants and bugs. Research ground to a halt. But the science of plant communication is now staging a comeback. Rigorous, carefully controlled experiments are overcoming those early criticisms with repeated testing in labs, forests and fields. It’s now well established that when bugs chew leaves, plants respond by releasing volatile organic compounds into the air. By Karban’s last count, 40 out of 48 studies of plant communication confirm that other plants detect these airborne signals and ramp up their production of chemical weapons or other defense mechanisms in response. “The evidence that plants release volatiles when damaged by herbivores is as sure as something in science can be,” said Martin Heil, an ecologist at the Mexican research institute Cinvestav Irapuato. “The evidence that plants can somehow perceive these volatiles and respond with a defense response is also very good.”


Richard Karban, an ecologist at the University of California, Davis, studies how sagebrush communicate. Richard Karban
Plant communication may still be a tiny field, but the people who study it are no longer seen as a lunatic fringe. “It used to be that people wouldn’t even talk to you: ‘Why are you wasting my time with something we’ve already debunked?’” said Karban. “That’s now better for sure.” The debate is no longer whether plants can sense one another’s biochemical messages — they can — but about why and how they do it. Most studies have taken place under controlled lab conditions, so one of the major open questions is to what extent plants use these signals in the wild. The answer could have big implications: Farmers might be able to adapt this chatter, tweaking food plants or agricultural practices so that crops defend themselves better against herbivores. More broadly, the possibility that plants share information raises intriguing questions about what counts as behavior and communication — and why organisms that compete with one another might also see fit to network their knowledge.

Scientists are also exploring how the messages from these signals might spread. Just a few months ago, the plant signaling pioneer Ted Farmer of the University of Lausanne discovered an almost entirely unrecognized way that plants transmit information — with electrical pulses and a system of voltage-based signaling that is eerily reminiscent of the animal nervous system. “It’s pretty spectacular what plants do,” said Farmer. “The more I work on them, the more I’m amazed.”


http://time.com/3131789/gut-bacteria-eating-habits-mind-control/




Microbes in our digestive tracts may influence our food choices and behavior, a study finds


Your willpower may not be entirely to blame for your eating habits — your gut bacteria may be responsible, too.

The gut microbiome, the collection of all the microbes in our digestive tracts, may influence our food choices and behavior, suggests a new study that recently appeared in the journal BioEssays.

Different bacteria have different nutritional needs based on the niches they’ve come to occupy in our guts, say researchers from University of California San Francisco, Arizona State University and the University of New Mexico. Sometimes the needs of those bacteria are “aligned with our own dietary goals, and others not,” says corresponding author Carlos Maley, the director of the UCSF Center for Evolution and Cancer.

These different microbes may be able to manipulate our dietary desires by releasing molecules that affect certain organ systems or influence our brain through the vagus nerve, says the study, which connects the brain to the stomach. (Yes, what happens in vagus doesn’t stay in vagus.)

“Microbes have the capacity to manipulate behavior and mood through altering the neural signals in the vagus nerve, changing taste receptors, producing toxins to make us feel bad, and releasing chemical rewards to make us feel good,” says senior author Athena Aktipis of the Arizona State University Department of Psychology.

It works both ways, however — what humans eat may also affect what food gut bacteria need. Bacteria specializing in digesting seaweed have been found in people in Japan, where seaweed is often a part of diets. And in one trial, humans who took a probiotic containing Lactobacillus casei saw their mood improve.

Understanding how microbes influence human behavior and vice versa may eventually help researchers learn how to curb unhealthy habits. “Because microbiota are easily manipulatable by prebiotics, probiotics, antibiotics, fecal transplants, and dietary changes, altering our microbiota offers a tractable approach to otherwise intractable problems of obesity and unhealthy eating,” the authors say in the study.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11233 on: Aug 18th, 2014, 09:28am »

Good morning Sys, glad you enjoyed the movie. One of my favorites.

GOOD MORNING ALL
cheesy



Telegraph

Gunmen attack Saudi prince's motorcade in Paris

Heavily armed robbers target convoy of Saudi prince in Paris, making off with 250,000 euros in cash and sensitive embassy documents

By Henry Samuel, Paris
10:23AM BST 18 Aug 2014

Heavily-armed robbers have attacked the motorcade of a Saudi prince in Paris, making off with €250,000 (£200,000) in banknotes and reportedly stealing "sensitive" documents, French police have confirmed.

Eight Kalashnikov-wielding assailants surrounded the motorcade at Porte de la Chapelle, northern Paris, as it was making its way from the Saudi embassy to an airport in Le Bourget, said police. There were no injuries.

During the spectacular heist at around 9pm on Sunday, the gunman stopped a Mercedes utility vehicle in the convoy and drove off with the car’s three occupants.

The assailants then let the three go and later burned the vehicle before vanishing.

No suspects have yet been apprehended.

According to the local daily Le Parisien, the men also stole documents said to be "sensitive".

"It's quite an unusual attack. They were clearly well-informed. It's true that it's quite a rare way of operating," the police source told AFP.

The Saudi embassy declined to comment.

The attack was highly “embarrassing” for Paris’ safety reputation among “Gulf residents who often travel with large sums of money”, according to Europe 1 radio.

While the attack was described as “rare”, there have been others on the outskirts of Paris.

Last month, around 15 individuals reportedly carried out a series of similar hold ups, blocking a road leading to the A6 motorway.

In July last year, daring thieves impersonated police officers to rob a senior official from the Saudi ministry of youth and sport shortly after his arrival in Paris – again near Le Bourget airport. The robbers made off with €200,000 (£160,000) in cash.

The robbers were armed and used two cars equipped with flashing lights and the word "Police" on them.

They stopped the car the Saudi official was travelling in and demanded an inspection of the boot, before making off with a suitcase containing €162,000, $30,000 and £10,000.

In Feburary, 2010, armed thieves stopped a vehicle carrying the Christina Chernovetska, daughter of the then mayor of Kiev, swiping jewellery worth 4.5 million euros.

According to Le Figaro, carjackers around Paris generally attack their prey on powerful, stolen motorbikes with false number plates, often targeting “women in luxury vehicles, tourists carrying large amounts of cash onboard taxis, and sometimes diplomatic vehicles”.

Tourists are also the targets of well-informed thieves.

Earlier this month, one Chinese visitor to the Chateau de Versailles lost €10,500 when thieves rifled through his pockets.

After recent complaints from China, France has stepped up security around Paris tourist attractions and has also urged shoppers to use credit cards instead of cash.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/11040749/Gunmen-attack-Saudi-princes-motorcade-in-Paris.html

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« Reply #11234 on: Aug 18th, 2014, 10:01am »

The Hill

Chinese hackers stole data for 4.5M patients

By Elise Viebeck
08/18/14 10:30 AM EDT

A leading hospital operator said Chinese hackers stole the personal data of about 4.5 million patients earlier this year, according to a report.

Community Health Systems, which runs 206 hospitals in 29 states, said data thieves made off with patient names, addresses, Social Security numbers and other details.

The hack likely took place in April or June, the company said, and did not include patient credit card or medical information. The story was first reported Monday by Reuters.

Law enforcement had previously warned the U.S. healthcare sector that its systems were vulnerable to attacks seeking intellectual property and patient data. The theft follows several major data breaches at U.S. companies including Target, Neiman Marcus and Michael's.

Community Health Systems reported the hack in a regulatory filing, saying it has expelled the hackers' malware from its network and will notify patients and government agencies as required by law.

The company did not explain why it believed the attack came from Chinese hackers except to say its security contractor, a unit of FireEye, agreed.

It is working with law enforcement to investigate, the report stated.

http://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/215377-chinese-hackers-stole-patient-data-for-45m-hospital-chain-says

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