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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 1095 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #1125 on: Sep 13th, 2010, 8:39pm »

on Sep 13th, 2010, 6:38pm, Swamprat wrote:
Fox News

New Sun Eruption May Supercharge Northern Lights


Published September 13, 2010

Space.com

The luminous aurora displays that make up Earth's northern lights may get a boost Monday night from a fresh eruption on the sun.
Skywatchers in the northern latitudes could see dazzling auroras as a result of the sun eruption that occurred late Friday, according to Spaceweather.com, a website that monitors solar weather.

The eruption was a coronal mass ejection that was not aimed directly at Earth but was expected to deliver a glancing blow to Earth's magnetic field, Spaceweather.com said. It could amplify the aurora displays for skywatchers in parts of Alaska, Canada, Iceland, Greenland and Scandavia, the website added.

Friday's coronal mass ejection came two days after another powerful solar flare.

Copyright © 2010 Space.com. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Read more:
http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2010/09/13/new-sun-eruption-supercharge-northern-lights/


WOW!
We might actually get to see them! Thanks Swamprat.
Crystal
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« Reply #1126 on: Sep 13th, 2010, 8:40pm »

I love this Stormtrooper



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« Reply #1127 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 04:41am »

Morning Crystal grin

Don't know if you have posted this or not yet....

The Web Braces for Biggest Wikileaks Dump to Date

http://www.disclose.tv/frameset.php?url=http://www.theatlanticwire.com/opinions/view/opinion/The-Web-Braces-for-Biggest-Wikileaks-Dump-to-Date-4992/
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« Reply #1128 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 07:47am »

on Sep 14th, 2010, 04:41am, Luvey wrote:
Morning Crystal grin

Don't know if you have posted this or not yet....

The Web Braces for Biggest Wikileaks Dump to Date

http://www.disclose.tv/frameset.php?url=http://www.theatlanticwire.com/opinions/view/opinion/The-Web-Braces-for-Biggest-Wikileaks-Dump-to-Date-4992/


Good evening Pen,
Well in case I didn't, thank you. Everyone has their agenda and our poor troops on the ground are just trying to do their job and make it home alive.
Crystal

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« Reply #1129 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 07:48am »



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« Reply #1130 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 07:52am »

New York Times

September 13, 2010
Confessing to Crime, but Innocent
By JOHN SCHWARTZ

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Eddie Lowery lost 10 years of his life for a crime he did not commit. There was no physical evidence at his trial for rape, but one overwhelming factor put him away: he confessed.

At trial, the jury heard details that prosecutors insisted only the rapist could have known, including the fact that the rapist hit the 75-year-old victim in the head with the handle of a silver table knife he found in the house. DNA evidence would later show that another man committed the crime. But that vindication would come only years after Mr. Lowery had served his sentence and was paroled in 1991.

“I beat myself up a lot” about having confessed, Mr. Lowery said in a recent interview. “I thought I was the only dummy who did that.”

But more than 40 others have given confessions since 1976 that DNA evidence later showed were false, according to records compiled by Brandon L. Garrett, a professor at the University of Virginia School of Law. Experts have long known that some kinds of people — including the mentally impaired, the mentally ill, the young and the easily led — are the likeliest to be induced to confess. There are also people like Mr. Lowery, who says he was just pressed beyond endurance by persistent interrogators.

New research shows how people who were apparently uninvolved in a crime could provide such a detailed account of what occurred, allowing prosecutors to claim that only the defendant could have committed the crime.

An article by Professor Garrett draws on trial transcripts, recorded confessions and other background materials to show how incriminating facts got into those confessions — by police introducing important facts about the case, whether intentionally or unintentionally, during the interrogation.

To defense lawyers, the new research is eye opening. “In the past, if somebody confessed, that was the end,” said Peter J. Neufeld, a founder of the Innocence Project, an organization based in Manhattan. “You couldn’t imagine going forward.”

The notion that such detailed confessions might be deemed voluntary because the defendants were not beaten or coerced suggests that courts should not simply look at whether confessions are voluntary, Mr. Neufeld said. “They should look at whether they are reliable.”

Professor Garrett said he was surprised by the complexity of the confessions he studied. “I expected, and think people intuitively think, that a false confession would look flimsy,” like someone saying simply, “I did it,” he said.

Instead, he said, “almost all of these confessions looked uncannily reliable,” rich in telling detail that almost inevitably had to come from the police. “I had known that in a couple of these cases, contamination could have occurred,” he said, using a term in police circles for introducing facts into the interrogation process. “I didn’t expect to see that almost all of them had been contaminated.”

Of the exonerated defendants in the Garrett study, 26 — more than half — were “mentally disabled,” under 18 at the time or both. Most were subjected to lengthy, high-pressure interrogations, and none had a lawyer present. Thirteen of them were taken to the crime scene.

Mr. Lowery’s case shows how contamination occurs. He had come under suspicion, he now believes, because he had been partying and ran his car into a parked car the night of the rape, generating a police report. Officers grilled him for more than seven hours, insisting from the start that he had committed the crime.

Mr. Lowery took a lie detector test to prove he was innocent, but the officers told him that he had failed it.

“I didn’t know any way out of that, except to tell them what they wanted to hear,” he recalled. “And then get a lawyer to prove my innocence.”

Proving innocence after a confession, however, is rare. Eight of the defendants in Professor Garrett’s study had actually been cleared by DNA evidence before trial, but the courts convicted them anyway.

In one such case involving Jeffrey Deskovic, who spent 16 years in prison for a murder in Poughkeepsie, prosecutors argued that the victim may have been sexually active and so the DNA evidence may have come from another liaison she had. The prosecutors asked the jury to focus on Mr. Deskovic’s highly detailed confession and convict him.

While Professor Garrett suggests that leaking facts during interrogations is sometimes unintentional, Mr. Lowery said that the contamination of his questioning was clearly intentional.

After his initial confession, he said, the interrogators went over the crime with him in detail — asking how he did it, but correcting him when he got the facts wrong. How did he get in? “I said, ‘I kicked in the front door.’ ” But the rapist had used the back door, so he admitted to having gone around to the back. “They fed me the answers,” he recalled.

Some defendants’ confessions even include mistakes fed by the police. Earl Washington Jr., a mentally impaired man who spent 18 years in prison and came within hours of being executed for a murder he did not commit, stated in his confession that the victim had worn a halter top. In fact, she had worn a sundress, but an initial police report had stated that she wore a halter top.

Steven A. Drizin, the director of the Center on Wrongful Convictions at the Northwestern University School of Law, said the significance of contamination could not be understated. While errors might lead to wrongful arrest, “it’s contamination that is the primary factor in wrongful convictions,” he said. “Juries demand details from the suspect that make the confession appear to be reliable — that’s where these cases go south.”

Jim Trainum, a former policeman who now advises police departments on training officers to avoid false confessions, explained that few of them intend to contaminate an interrogation or convict the innocent.

“You become so fixated on ‘This is the right person, this is the guilty person’ that you tend to ignore everything else,” he said. The problem with false confessions, he said, is “the wrong person is still out there, and he’s able to reoffend.”

Mr. Trainum has become an advocate of videotaping entire interrogations. Requirements for recording confessions vary widely across the country. Ten states require videotaping of at least some interrogations, like those in crimes that carry the death penalty, and seven state supreme courts have required or strongly encouraged recording.

These days Mr. Lowery, 51, lives in suburban Kansas City, in a house he is renovating with some of the $7.5 million in settlement money he received, along with apologies from officials in Riley County, Kan., where he was arrested and interrogated.

He has trouble putting the past behind him. “I was embarrassed,” he said. “You run in to so many people who say, ‘I would never confess to a crime.’ ”

He does not argue with them, because he knows they did not experience what he went through. “You’ve never been in a situation so intense, and you’re naïve about your rights,” he said. “You don’t know what you’ll say to get out of that situation.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/14/us/14confess.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #1131 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 07:56am »

New York Times

September 13, 2010
Civil Rights Photographer Unmasked as Informer
By ROBBIE BROWN

ATLANTA — That photo of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. riding one of the first desegregated buses in Montgomery, Ala.? He took it. The well-known image of black sanitation workers carrying “I Am a Man” signs in Memphis? His. He was the only photojournalist to document the entire trial in the murder of Emmett Till, and he was there in Room 306 of the Lorraine Hotel, Dr. King’s room, on the night he was assassinated.

But now an unsettling asterisk must be added to the legacy of Ernest C. Withers, one of the most celebrated photographers of the civil rights era: He was a paid F.B.I. informer.

On Sunday, The Commercial Appeal in Memphis published the results of a two-year investigation that showed Mr. Withers, who died in 2007 at age 85, had collaborated closely with two F.B.I. agents in the 1960s to keep tabs on the civil rights movement. It was an astonishing revelation about a former police officer nicknamed the Original Civil Rights Photographer, whose previous claim to fame had been the trust he engendered among high-ranking civil rights leaders, including Dr. King.

“It is an amazing betrayal,” said Athan Theoharis, a historian at Marquette University who has written books about the F.B.I. “It really speaks to the degree that the F.B.I. was able to engage individuals within the civil rights movement. This man was so well trusted.”

From at least 1968 to 1970, Mr. Withers, who was black, provided photographs, biographical information and scheduling details to two F.B.I. agents in the bureau’s Memphis domestic surveillance program, Howell Lowe and William H. Lawrence, according to numerous reports summarizing their meetings. The reports were obtained by the newspaper under the Freedom of Information Act and posted on its Web site.

A clerical error appears to have allowed for Mr. Withers’s identity to be divulged: In most cases in the reports, references to Mr. Withers and his informer number, ME 338-R, have been blacked out. But in several locations, the F.B.I. appears to have forgotten to hide them. The F.B.I. said Monday that it was not clear what had caused the lapse in privacy and was looking into the incident.

Civil rights leaders have responded to the revelation with a mixture of dismay, sadness and disbelief. “If this is true, then Ernie abused our friendship,” said the Rev. James M. Lawson Jr., a retired minister who organized civil rights rallies throughout the South in the 1960s.

Others were more forgiving. “It’s not surprising,” said Andrew Young, a civil rights organizer who later became mayor of Atlanta. “We knew that everything we did was bugged, although we didn’t suspect Withers individually.”

Many details of Mr. Withers’s relationship with the F.B.I. remain unknown. The bureau keeps files on all informers, but has declined repeated requests to release Mr. Withers’s, which would presumably explain how much he was paid by the F.B.I., how he was recruited and how long he served as an informer.

At the time of his death, Mr. Withers had the largest catalog of any individual photographer covering the civil rights movement in the South, said Tony Decaneas, the owner of the Panopticon Gallery in Boston, the exclusive agent for Mr. Withers. His photographs have been collected in four books, and his family was planning to open a museum, named after him.

His work shows remarkable intimacy with and access to top civil rights leaders. Friends used to say he had a knack for being in the right place at the right time. But while he was growing close to top civil rights leaders, Mr. Withers was also meeting regularly with the F.B.I. agents, disclosing details about plans for marches and political beliefs of the leaders, even personal information like the leaders’ car tag numbers.

David J. Garrow, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian who has written biographies of Dr. King, said many civil rights workers gave confidential interviews to the F.B.I. and C.I.A., and were automatically classified as “informants.” The difference, Mr. Garrow said, is the evidence that Mr. Withers was being paid.

Although Mr. Withers’s motivation is not known, Mr. Garrow said informers were rarely motivated by the financial compensation, which “wasn’t enough money to live on.” But Marc Perrusquia, who wrote the article for The Commercial Appeal, noted that Mr. Withers had eight children and might have struggled to support them.

The children of Mr. Withers did not respond to requests for comment. But one daughter, Rosalind Withers, told local news organizations that she did not find the report conclusive.

“This is the first time I’ve heard of this in my life,” Ms. Withers told The Commercial Appeal. “My father’s not here to defend himself. That is a very, very strong, strong accusation.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/14/us/14photographer.html?hp

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« Reply #1132 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 08:00am »

Fox News

Astronauts Losing Fingernails on Spacewalks

By Victoria Jaggard
Published September 14, 2010

National Geographic

If you're headed for space, you might rethink that manicure: Astronauts with wider hands are more likely to have their fingernails fall off after working or training in space suit gloves, according to a new study.

In fact, fingernail trauma and other hand injuries -- no matter your hand size -- are collectively the number one nuisance for spacewalkers, said study co-author Dava Newman, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

"The glove in general is just absolutely one of the main engineering challenges," Newman said. "After all, you have almost as many degrees of freedom in your hand as in the rest of your whole body." (See a space exploration time line.)

The trouble is that the gloves, like the entire space suit, need to simulate the pressure of Earth's atmosphere in the chilly, airless environment of space. The rigid, balloonlike nature of gas-pressurized gloves makes fine motor control a challenge during extravehicular activities (EVAs), aka spacewalks. (See pictures of early U.S. space exploration.)

A previous study of astronaut injuries sustained during spacewalks had found that about 47 percent of 352 reported symptoms between 2002 and 2004 were hand related. More than half of these hand injuries were due to fingertips and nails making contact with the hard "thimbles" inside the glove fingertips.

In several cases, sustained pressure on the fingertips during EVAs caused intense pain and led to the astronauts' nails detaching from their nailbeds, a condition called fingernail delamination.

While this condition doesn't prevent astronauts from getting their work done, it can become a nuisance if the loose nails gets snagged inside the glove. Also, moisture inside the glove can lead to secondary bacterial or yeast infections in the exposed nailbeds, the study authors say.

If the nail falls off completely, it will eventually grow back, although it might be deformed.

For now, the only solutions are to apply protective dressings, keep nails trimmed short -- or do some extreme preventative maintenance.
"I have heard of a couple people who've removed their fingernails in advance of an EVA," Newman said.

Read More:
http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2010/09/14/astronauts-losing-fingernails-spacewalks/
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« Reply #1133 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 08:04am »

New York Times

September 13, 2010
Microsoft Changes Policy Over Russian Crackdown
By CLIFFORD J. LEVY

MOSCOW — Microsoft announced sweeping changes on Monday to ensure that the authorities in Russia and elsewhere do not use crackdowns on software piracy as an excuse to suppress advocacy or opposition groups, effectively prohibiting its lawyers from taking part in such cases.

The company was responding to criticism that it had supported tactics to clamp down on dissent.

The security services in Russia in recent years have seized computers from dozens of outspoken advocacy groups and opposition newspapers, all but disabling them. Law-enforcement officials claim that they are investigating the theft of Microsoft’s intellectual property, but the searches typically happen when those groups are seeking to draw attention to a cause or an event. Allies of the government are rarely if ever investigated for having illegal software on their computers.

The raids have turned into a potent tool to muzzle opposition voices, and private lawyers retained by Microsoft have often bolstered the accusations, asserting that the company was a victim and calling for criminal charges. Until Monday, the company had rebuffed pleas from Russia’s leading human-rights organizations that it refrain from involvement in these cases, saying that it was merely complying with Russian law.

The new Microsoft policy was announced in an apologetic statement by the company’s senior vice president and general counsel, Brad Smith, issued from its headquarters in Redmond, Wash. His statement followed an article in The New York Times on Sunday that detailed piracy cases against prominent advocacy groups and newspapers, including one of Russia’s most influential environmental groups.

Mr. Smith said that Microsoft would make sure that it was no longer offering legal support to politically motivated piracy inquiries by providing a blanket software license to advocacy groups and media outlets. They would be automatically covered by it, without having to apply.

“We want to be clear that we unequivocally abhor any attempt to leverage intellectual property rights to stifle political advocacy or pursue improper personal gain,” Mr. Smith said in a post on the company’s blog. “We are moving swiftly to seek to remove any incentive or ability to engage in such behavior.”

Advocates and journalists who have been targets of such raids said they were pleased that Microsoft was announcing reforms, though some added that they remained suspicious of its intentions. The piracy cases have stirred resentment toward Microsoft in the nonprofit sector in Russia.

In his statement, Mr. Smith appeared to acknowledge that Microsoft needed to address the damage to its image. He said the company would set up a program to offer legal aid to nonprofit groups and media outlets in Russia that are caught up in software inquiries. He also said the company had retained an international law firm to investigate its operations in the country.

With the new, blanket licenses in place, any Microsoft programs on the computers of advocacy groups would carry Microsoft’s seal of approval, making it much harder for the authorities to charge those groups with stealing the company’s software, company executives said.

The licensing plan is intended to last until 2012 but could be extended, Mr. Smith said. The policy could have repercussions beyond Russia because the company indicated that it would apply to other countries as well, though it did not immediately detail which ones.

Microsoft will also step up its efforts to ensure that nonprofit groups and media outlets in Russia have access to a company program that provides Microsoft software at little or no cost. (Mr. Smith said that in the past year alone, the company had donated software with a market value of more than $390 million to over 42,000 nonprofit groups around the world.)

The article in The Times described the case of an environmental group in Siberia, Baikal Environmental Wave, which was raided by the police in January just as it was planning protests against a decision by Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin to reopen a paper factory that had long polluted Lake Baikal.

Plainclothes officers took 12 computers from Baikal Wave and immediately charged the group with piracy, even though its leaders said they had only licensed Microsoft software. After the raid, the group reached out to Microsoft’s Moscow office, seeking help in defending itself.

Baikal Wave asked Microsoft to confirm that its software was legal, but the company would not, angering the environmentalists. And Microsoft’s local lawyer in Siberia offered testimony to the police in the case on the value of the software that was said to have been stolen.

Prosecutors have not yet decided whether to bring charges against Baikal Wave.

On Monday night, Jennie Sutton, who helped found Baikal Wave two decades ago, said in a telephone interview from Irkutsk that the shift in Microsoft policy might significantly undercut the allegations in the group’s case and any future ones. “This is a victory,” Ms. Sutton said. “If Microsoft is against the police, then it will really look as if the cases that they are bringing are not fair and correct. And they won’t have this as an excuse to try and close us down.”

Dmitri Makarov, an organizer at the Youth Human Rights Movement, said that for months, he had been calling on Microsoft to acknowledge that the private lawyers whom it had retained across Russia had formed unseemly ties to the police.

He said he hoped that under the company’s new policy, the lawyers would never again harass the opposition. “This is what we have been asking for all along,” he said.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/14/world/europe/14raid.html?ref=world

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« Reply #1134 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 08:08am »

shocked

Those astronauts are serious.......
Removing your nails in advance? Yeow!!!!!!!!!!!
Thanks Swampy!!!!
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« Reply #1135 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 08:16am »

Telegraph

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Suspended disbelief: the amazing art of Li Wei

Chinese artist Li Wei creates images of himself and his friends being thrown off buildings, dangling from bridges and hanging off cars, all in the name of art. Li's photos can take up to six months to set up and involve huge crews organising props such as smoke, mirrors, wires and cranes. After the photographs are taken the father of one removes traces of the wires with a computer. Li, from Beijing, said: "One of the most difficult and expensive shots was where myself and 12 people were flying behind a car and we had to use a lot of cranes to keep us all suspended"

photos after the jump
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturepicturegalleries/8002095/Suspended-disbelief-the-amazing-art-of-Li-Wei.html

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« Reply #1136 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 08:22am »

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Pentagon’s Craziest PowerPoint Slide Revealed
By Noah Shachtman September 13, 2010 | 12:00 pm | Categories: Paper Pushers, Beltway Bandits, Politicians

And you thought winning the Afghanistan war was tough. Try building the Army’s new armored vehicle. Or piecing together the Navy’s new network.

All of the complexity of the Afghan conflict — and all of the bureaucracy NATO used to manage the counterinsurgency effort — was summed up by a single spaghetti monster of a PowerPoint slide. “When we understand [it],” war commander Gen. Stanley McChrystal joked when he saw the slide, “we’ll have won the war.”

But that slide was child’s play compared to the three-foot wall chart the military uses to explain its gajillion-step process for developing, buying, and maintaining gear. The “Integrated Acquisitions Technology and Logistics Life Cycle Management” diagram is kind of a precis to the whole interminable progression, from “decompose concept functional definition into component concepts & assessment objective” to “execute support program that meets materiel readiness and operational support performance requirements and sustains system in most cost-effective manner.” Stare long enough, and you’ll start to see why it takes a decade for the Defense Department to buy a tanker plane, or why marines are still reading web pages with Internet Explorer 6.

The chart is put out by the Pentagon’s Defense Acquisitions University, where the Pentagon educates 180,000 people a year on its, um, unique process for purchasing equipment.

“You ever read Superman comic books?” Eric Edelman, the former Pentagon policy chief, once asked me. “Well, acquisitions is like the Bizarro universe. Everything is reversed; the world is square, not round.”
Allow me to disagree. This world has no simple shape. From the looks of this chart, it’s a twisting, endlessly-recursive, M.C. Escher-on-LSD three-dimensional hedge maze. Actually, it’s kind of amazing our troops have any gear at all.

Editor’s note: Think you can top this slide’s insanity? Drop us a line.

Illo: Defense Acquisitions University


http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/09/revealed-pentagons-craziest-powerpoint-slide-ever/

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« Reply #1137 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 12:18pm »

UFO Blogger

China UFO News : Another UFO Shutdown Chinese Baotou Airport On September 11, 2010

According to shanghaidaily.com ATC official at Hohhot airport observed an UFO on radar. China UFO was 4 kilometers east of Baotou, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region at 8 p.m. on Sept. 11, 2010.

Its a third reported UFO sighting in China so far this year, airport officials immediately called off the landing of three flights from Shanghai and Beijing.

In July also, a UFO forced officials to shut down Xiaoshan airport in China's Zhijiang province: http://www.ufo-blogger.com/2010/07/china-airport-ufo-sighting-we-saw.html

"The airport received a notice from the Hohhot Air Traffic Management Bureau about the appearance of an UFO. To guarantee security, the aircraft heading for the airport had to land at secondary airports. Otherwise, it may have led to collisions," said Ms. Luo, from the Baotou Airport.

Around 9:14 p.m., three flights from Beijing and Shanghai to Baotou were delayed, and the aircraft were forced to circle in the air while waiting to land. Source: http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article/?id=449133&type=National

Furthermore, the Air China Flight 1107 from Beijing to Baotou landed at the Erdos Airport and the Juneyao Airlines Flight 1137 from Shanghai to Baotou landed at the Taiyuan Airport.

http://www.ufo-blogger.com/2010/09/china-ufo-shutdown-chinese-baotou.html

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« Reply #1138 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 12:33pm »

on Sep 14th, 2010, 12:18pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
UFO Blogger

China UFO News : Another UFO Shutdown Chinese Baotou Airport On September 11, 2010

According to shanghaidaily.com ATC official at Hohhot airport observed an UFO on radar. China UFO was 4 kilometers east of Baotou, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region at 8 p.m. on Sept. 11, 2010.

Its a third reported UFO sighting in China so far this year, airport officials immediately called off the landing of three flights from Shanghai and Beijing.

In July also, a UFO forced officials to shut down Xiaoshan airport in China's Zhijiang province: http://www.ufo-blogger.com/2010/07/china-airport-ufo-sighting-we-saw.html

"The airport received a notice from the Hohhot Air Traffic Management Bureau about the appearance of an UFO. To guarantee security, the aircraft heading for the airport had to land at secondary airports. Otherwise, it may have led to collisions," said Ms. Luo, from the Baotou Airport.

Around 9:14 p.m., three flights from Beijing and Shanghai to Baotou were delayed, and the aircraft were forced to circle in the air while waiting to land. Source: http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article/?id=449133&type=National

Furthermore, the Air China Flight 1107 from Beijing to Baotou landed at the Erdos Airport and the Juneyao Airlines Flight 1137 from Shanghai to Baotou landed at the Taiyuan Airport.

http://www.ufo-blogger.com/2010/09/china-ufo-shutdown-chinese-baotou.html

Crystal


Fascinating, WingsofCrystal!

So the Chinese avoid mid air collisions with unknown (alien?) aircraft, by diverting their planes. Makes a hell of a lot of sense.

I get the impression that in Europe and the US the official position is that UFOs are not real, misidentifications or even delusions. So giving official warnings to pilots avoid collisions, near misses (with hallucinations) is out! (Occasionally a discrete heads-up of weird proximity alerts will be given.) The inevitable, sad conclusion imo is that some commercial flights must have crashed in an ET collision, after which authorities covered up the true cause.


purr
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1139 on: Sep 14th, 2010, 3:50pm »

Hi Purr,
Yes, I would think that there have to be instances where ufo's have caused harm to commercial flights.
Crystal
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