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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 94443 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11295 on: Aug 28th, 2014, 12:53pm »

Seattle Times

By PAM BELLUCK
August 27, 2014 at 7:11 PM

Scientists switch bad memories for good ones in mice

Using a technique in which light is used to switch neurons on and off, neuroscientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology appear to have unlocked some secrets about how the brain attaches emotions to memories and how those emotions can be adjusted.

Memories and the feelings associated with them are not set in stone. You may have happy memories about your family’s annual ski vacation, but if you see a tragic accident on the slopes, those feelings may change. You might be afraid to ski that mountain again.

Using a technique in which light is used to switch neurons on and off, neuroscientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) appear to have unlocked some secrets about how the brain attaches emotions to memories and how those emotions can be adjusted.

Their research, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, was conducted on mice, not humans, so the findings cannot immediately be translated to the treatment of patients. But experts said the experiments may eventually lead to more effective therapies for people with psychological problems such as depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder.

“Imagine you can go in and find a particular traumatic memory and turn it off or change it somehow,” said David Moorman, an assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, who was not involved in the research. “That’s still science fiction, but with this we’re getting a lot closer to it.”

The MIT scientists labeled neurons in the brains of mice with a light-sensitive protein and used pulses of light to switch the cells on and off, a technique called optogenetics. Then they identified patterns of neurons activated when mice created a negative memory or a positive one.

A negative memory formed when mice received a mild electric shock to their feet; a positive one was formed when the mice, all male, were allowed to spend time with female mice.

Later, mice that had been shocked were put in the company of females — a positive experience — while scientists used the light to activate the memory of the shock. As a result, the negative memory became less negative; the mice became less fearful in the place where they had been conditioned to remember the shock.

The mice that originally spent time with the females later received mild electric shocks while scientists activated the neurons associated with this positive memory. The memory became less enticing, the scientists concluded: The mice froze more and sniffed less, standard measures of fear and reward in rodents.

The study’s senior author, Susumu Tonegawa, a professor of biology and neuroscience at MIT, said the findings provided a neurological basis for psychotherapy in which patients are encouraged to unearth a good memory to “reduce the feelings of a bad memory they have or stress they have had.”

Roger Redondo, a postdoctoral student and one of the study’s lead authors, said the experiments showed it was possible to alter the emotional perception of a memory “without any drugs and without the mice being brought back to the area where the memory occurred.”

The scientists also discovered important differences in the way neurons work in two key brain areas, the hippocampus and the amygdala. The hippocampus is involved in forming new memories and encoding factual details such as where, what and when. The amygdala helps link emotions to memory.

The experiments found that neurons in the hippocampus can be changed to make a bad memory less negative, and vice versa. But neurons in the amygdala did not change, leading scientists to conclude that these neurons are prewired to reflect positive or negative emotions.

Joshua Johansen, a neuroscientist at Riken Brain Science Institute in Japan who was not involved in the research, said the findings “provide clues as to how we go about tackling things like anxiety disorder.”

He cautioned that this research is in its infancy and that it involved normal behaviors, not disorders. But, Johansen said, “if we can figure out how to associate bad experiences with neutral or pleasurable experiences,” it could guide development of drugs, gene therapy or other treatments for mental illness.

http://seattletimes.com/html/nationworld/2024404653_adjustingmemoryxml.html

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11296 on: Aug 28th, 2014, 3:15pm »

on Aug 26th, 2014, 3:09pm, drwu23 wrote:
I must say that the propeller on the front of that 'vimana' looks pretty high tech.


laugh


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11297 on: Aug 28th, 2014, 5:51pm »

Coming near you soon..Identifying you By your Funk!
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2014/08/28/cops-could-use-bacterial-signatures-to-catch-a-murderer/
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11298 on: Aug 29th, 2014, 10:58am »

on Aug 28th, 2014, 5:51pm, Sysconfig wrote:
Coming near you soon..Identifying you By your Funk!
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2014/08/28/cops-could-use-bacterial-signatures-to-catch-a-murderer/



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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11299 on: Aug 29th, 2014, 11:02am »

New York Daily News

Pennsylvania woman sees UFO — cops see it too

Stephanie Wilkerson and her neighbor saw bright flashing lights in the sky. She called 911, and police saw it too.

BY Deborah Hastings
Thursday, August 28, 2014, 7:46 PM

She was just relaxing on her porch, she says, when a giant circle of flashing lights appeared in the dark skies over her Pennsylvania home.

Stephanie Wilkerson grabbed her cellphone, shot some video and called over her neighbor, who saw what she saw. Then she called 911 and an officer came over. He saw it, too.

"I thought it was a plane until I realized it wasn't moving," she told ABC News. "I watched it for about 20 minutes and I started noticing it changing colors."

Her neighbor brought his binoculars. He thought it was a planet. Then the flashing object became yellow. "That's not a planet," he said, according to Wilkerson.

That's when she called 911.

An officer arrived from the Lower Paxton Township Police Department.

He didn't know what the flashing lights were, either.

video and more after the jump:
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/penn-woman-sees-ufo-calls-cops-article-1.1920832?cid=bitly

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11300 on: Aug 29th, 2014, 11:07am »

Science News

Babies may be good at remembering, and forgetting

by Laura Sanders
7:33pm, August 28, 2014

In one of my earliest memories, I’m wiggling around on the kitchen floor of my childhood home. My mom had just dropped a bunch of oranges for my brother and me to bang around, maybe to loosen them up for juicing. We scramble and grab the oranges, throwing them against the floor with glee. I don’t know how old I was at the time, but I’d guess I was between 3 and 4.

As Baby V charges through her second year of life, I often wonder if she’s going to remember any such twinkling moments. Will she remember her intense joy at seeing the garbage truck roll by every Friday morning? Will she remember the trauma of having her teeth brushed?

I won’t know, of course, at least not until she’s old enough for me to ask her. Although scientists have long been fascinated with how the brain forms memories, they’ve paid less attention to how those memory-storing brain systems first emerge.

Nobody knows exactly why babies spend much of their time in a foggy state of “infantile amnesia.” Recent work from mice hints that a flurry of newborn nerve cells in the brain’s hippocampus might interfere with early memories. Other research suggests that in young babies, key memory areas in the brain aren’t yet fully connected to other regions.

Reasons for this temporary amnesia aside, the good news is that it eventually disappears. The consensus, from both people’s personal experiences and a handful of studies, seems to be that children start forming long-lasting memories around 3 1/2 years old.

As with any average, subtle differences hide in that number. Women seem to remember events that happened slightly earlier in their lives than men. Cultural differences may exist too: New Zealand Maori adults can reach back further into their early lives than those of European or Asian ethnicity, one study found.

Most of these studies asked adults to recount their earliest memories. Now, some researchers are starting to think that the problem might not be a matter of memory formation, but one of remembering. And one of the ways to test this idea is to ask people about their earliest memory before they forget. In other words, ask a kid.

When scientists have done that, they found that earliest memories get even earlier. Children are able to call up memories, verified independently by their parents, from their very early lives, a study published in 2010 in Developmental Psychology suggests. In that study, over 20 percent of 5-year-olds and 8- to 9-year olds recounted events from their first year, some from the very first months of life.

Combined with data from lab experiments, those results suggest that very young babies are actually quite good at forming memories, Sinéad Mullally of Newcastle University and Eleanor Maguire of University College London write in the July Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience.

And there’s more evidence that babies’ and young children’s brains can encode information just fine, but aren’t able to recall it later. In a recent study, 3-year-olds were good at remembering something for about 15 minutes, but not over the course of 24 hours. In the test, children were shown a locked pirate’s treasure chest in a sandbox. Alas, no key was in sight. When choosing between three objects 15 minutes later, the 3-year-olds were more likely to pick the key, remembering that it could be used to unlock treasure. But by a full day later, the kids had forgotten that the key would come in handy, and weren’t more likely to choose the key over the other objects. Four-year-olds, on the other hand, still chose the key a full day after encountering the locked treasure chest.

In their review, Mullally and Maguire write that brain imaging techniques might be helpful in sorting out how the brain begins to remember. Certain imaging methods might ultimately allow scientists to watch a memory stick around or disappear as a child grows up. New windows into the growing mind may reveal some surprises in our earliest lives.

https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/growth-curve/babies-may-be-good-remembering-and-forgetting

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11301 on: Aug 29th, 2014, 6:26pm »

http://imgick.nj.com/home/njo-media/width620/img/union_impact/photo/fernandes3jpg-e06019967c91fd86.jpg
Woman working 4 jobs to make ends meet dies while napping in car between shifts

http://www.nj.com/union/index.ssf/2014/08/deceased_woman_in_elizabeth_worked_four_jobs
_napped_in_car_overcome_by_fumes_police_say.html#incart_river




Rip sad



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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11302 on: Aug 29th, 2014, 10:05pm »

Sys Tweet Of The Day

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11303 on: Aug 30th, 2014, 08:56am »

GOOD MORNING UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy






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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11304 on: Aug 30th, 2014, 4:16pm »

SYS,

SOUNDS LIKE THIS MAN MUST HAVE BEEN A TOURIST AS BRASIL IS A "FREE SEX" SOCIETY ~ SOCIAL MORES ARE QUITE/VASTLY DIFFERENT FROM THE U.S. ~ BRASILIANS ARE TOLERANT TO A QUANTUM NUMBER OF UNIQUE INDIVIDUALS ~ AT LEAST FROM MY EXPERIENCE ~ ON THE OTHER HAND THIS COULD HAVE BEEN A BUSINESS TACTIC TO TAINT BUSINESS TO MICKY D'S ~ YA NEVER KNOW grin grin grin

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OR IS THIS JUST A NEW WAY TO DEFINE ~ GOLDEN ARCHES cool

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11305 on: Aug 30th, 2014, 10:33pm »

The Blue eyes Win

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2738224/Is-rise-blue-eyes-attractive-Scientists-believe-colour-dominant-like-peacocks-tail.html

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« Reply #11306 on: Aug 31st, 2014, 10:54am »

MORNIN' ALL grin





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« Reply #11307 on: Sep 1st, 2014, 11:45am »

GOOD MORNING cheesy





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xx Blessed Be The Peacemakers
« Reply #11308 on: Sep 1st, 2014, 11:27pm »

ExNSA Director and Veterans Pen Open Appeal To Merkel
MEMORANDUM FOR: Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany
FROM: Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS)
SUBJECT: Ukraine and NATO

We the undersigned are longtime veterans of U.S. intelligence. We take the unusual step of writing this open letter to you to ensure that you have an opportunity to be briefed on our views prior to the NATO summit on September 4-5.

You need to know, for example, that accusations of a major Russian "invasion" of Ukraine appear not to be supported by reliable intelligence. Rather, the "intelligence" seems to be of the same dubious, politically "fixed" kind used 12 years ago to "justify" the U.S.-led attack on Iraq. We saw no credible evidence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq then; we see no credible evidence of a Russian invasion now. Twelve years ago, former Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, mindful of the flimsiness of the evidence on Iraqi WMD, refused to join in the attack on Iraq. In our view, you should be appropriately suspicions of charges made by the US State Department and NATO officials alleging a Russian invasion of Ukraine.

President Barack Obama tried yesterday to cool the rhetoric of his own senior diplomats and the corporate media, when he publicly described recent activity in the Ukraine, as "a continuation of what’s been taking place for months now … it’s not really a shift."

Obama, however, has only tenuous control over the policymakers in his administration – who, sadly, lack much sense of history, know little of war, and substitute anti-Russian invective for a policy. One year ago, hawkish State Department officials and their friends in the media very nearly got Mr. Obama to launch a major attack on Syria based, once again, on "intelligence" that was dubious, at best.

Largely because of the growing prominence of, and apparent reliance on, intelligence we believe to be spurious, we think the possibility of hostilities escalating beyond the borders of Ukraine has increased significantly over the past several days. More important, we believe that this likelihood can be avoided, depending on the degree of judicious skepticism you and other European leaders bring to the NATO summit next week.

Experience With Untruth

Hopefully, your advisers have reminded you of NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen’s checkered record for credibility. It appears to us that Rasmussen’s speeches continue to be drafted by Washington. This was abundantly clear on the day before the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq when, as Danish Prime Minister, he told his Parliament: "Iraq has weapons of mass destruction. This is not something we just believe. We know."

Photos can be worth a thousand words; they can also deceive. We have considerable experience collecting, analyzing, and reporting on all kinds of satellite and other imagery, as well as other kinds of intelligence. Suffice it to say that the images released by NATO on August 28 provide a very flimsy basis on which to charge Russia with invading Ukraine. Sadly, they bear a strong resemblance to the images shown by Colin Powell at the UN on February 5, 2003 that, likewise, proved nothing.

That same day, we warned President Bush that our former colleague analysts were "increasingly distressed at the politicization of intelligence" and told him flatly, "Powell’s presentation does not come close" to justifying war. We urged Mr. Bush to "widen the discussion … beyond the circle of those advisers clearly bent on a war for which we see no compelling reason and from which we believe the unintended consequences are likely to be catastrophic."

Consider Iraq today. Worse than catastrophic. Although President Vladimir Putin has until now showed considerable reserve on the conflict in the Ukraine, it behooves us to remember that Russia, too, can "shock and awe." In our view, if there is the slightest chance of that kind of thing eventually happening to Europe because of Ukraine, sober-minded leaders need to think this through very carefully.

If the photos that NATO and the US have released represent the best available "proof" of an invasion from Russia, our suspicions increase that a major effort is under way to fortify arguments for the NATO summit to approve actions that Russia is sure to regard as provocative. Caveat emptor is an expression with which you are no doubt familiar. Suffice it to add that one should be very cautious regarding what Mr. Rasmussen, or even Secretary of State John Kerry, are peddling.

We trust that your advisers have kept you informed regarding the crisis in Ukraine from the beginning of 2014, and how the possibility that Ukraine would become a member of NATO is anathema to the Kremlin. According to a February 1, 2008 cable (published by WikiLeaks) from the US embassy in Moscow to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, US Ambassador William Burns was called in by Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, who explained Russia’s strong opposition to NATO membership for Ukraine.

Lavrov warned pointedly of "fears that the issue could potentially split the country in two, leading to violence or even, some claim, civil war, which would force Russia to decide whether to intervene." Burns gave his cable the unusual title, "NYET MEANS NYET: RUSSIA’S NATO ENLARGEMENT REDLINES," and sent it off to Washington with IMMEDIATE precedence. Two months later, at their summit in Bucharest NATO leaders issued a formal declaration that "Georgia and Ukraine will be in NATO."

Just yesterday, Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseny Yatsenyuk used his Facebook page to claim that, with the approval of Parliament that he has requested, the path to NATO membership is open. Yatsenyuk, of course, was Washington’s favorite pick to become prime minister after the February 22 coup d’etat in Kiev. "Yats is the guy," said Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland a few weeks before the coup, in an intercepted telephone conversation with US Ambassador to Ukraine Geoffrey Pyatt. You may recall that this is the same conversation in which Nuland said, "Fuck the EU."

Timing of the Russian "Invasion"

The conventional wisdom promoted by Kiev just a few weeks ago was that Ukrainian forces had the upper hand in fighting the anti-coup federalists in southeastern Ukraine, in what was largely portrayed as a mop-up operation. But that picture of the offensive originated almost solely from official government sources in Kiev. There were very few reports coming from the ground in southeastern Ukraine. There was one, however, quoting Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, that raised doubt about the reliability of the government’s portrayal.

According to the "press service of the President of Ukraine" on August 18, Poroshenko called for a "regrouping of Ukrainian military units involved in the operation of power in the East of the country. … Today we need to do the rearrangement of forces that will defend our territory and continued army offensives," said Poroshenko, adding, "we need to consider a new military operation in the new circumstances."

If the "new circumstances" meant successful advances by Ukrainian government forces, why would it be necessary to "regroup," to "rearrange" the forces? At about this time, sources on the ground began to report a string of successful attacks by the anti-coup federalists against government forces. According to these sources, it was the government army that was starting to take heavy casualties and lose ground, largely because of ineptitude and poor leadership.

Ten days later, as they became encircled and/or retreated, a ready-made excuse for this was to be found in the "Russian invasion." That is precisely when the fuzzy photos were released by NATO and reporters like the New York Times’ Michael Gordon were set loose to spread the word that "the Russians are coming." (Michael Gordon was one of the most egregious propagandists promoting the war on Iraq.)

No Invasion – But Plenty Other Russian Support

The anti-coup federalists in southeastern Ukraine enjoy considerable local support, partly as a result of government artillery strikes on major population centers. And we believe that Russian support probably has been pouring across the border and includes, significantly, excellent battlefield intelligence. But it is far from clear that this support includes tanks and artillery at this point – mostly because the federalists have been better led and surprisingly successful in pinning down government forces.

At the same time, we have little doubt that, if and when the federalists need them, the Russian tanks will come.

This is precisely why the situation demands a concerted effort for a ceasefire, which you know Kiev has so far been delaying. What is to be done at this point? In our view, Poroshenko and Yatsenyuk need to be told flat-out that membership in NATO is not in the cards – and that NATO has no intention of waging a proxy war with Russia – and especially not in support of the ragtag army of Ukraine. Other members of NATO need to be told the same thing.

For the Steering Group, Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #11309 on: Sep 2nd, 2014, 01:00am »

Do your Porkchops Glow at Night? How about that German Baloney..My favorite at Food Lion..
Try eating while the lights are out and let me know the results. Swamp has graciously volunteered! Thank you..cheesy

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/11068298/Radioactive-wild-boar-roaming-the-forests-of-Germany.html

Twenty-eight years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, its effects are still being felt as far away as Germany – in the form of radioactive wild boars.
Wild boars still roam the forests of Germany, where they are hunted for their meat, which is sold as a delicacy.
But in recent tests by the state government of Saxony, more than one in three boars were found to give off such high levels of radiation that they are unfit for human consumption.
Outside the hunting community, wild boar are seen as a menace by much of Germany society. Autobahns have to be closed when boar wander onto them, they sometimes enter towns and, in a famous case in 2010, a pack attacked a man in a wheelchair in Berlin.
But radioactive wild boars stir even darker fears.

They are believed to be a legacy of the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, when a reactor at a nuclear power plant in then Soviet-ruled Ukraine exploded, releasing a massive quantity of radioactive particles into the atmosphere.
Even though Saxony lies some 700 miles from Chernobyl, wind and rain carried the radioactivity across western Europe, and soil contamination was found even further away, in France.
Wild boar are thought to be particularly affected because they root through the soil for food, and feed on mushrooms and underground truffles that store radiation. Many mushrooms from the affected areas are also believed to be unfit for human consumption.
Since 2012, it has been compulsory for hunters to have wild boar they kill in Saxony tested for radiation. Carcasses that exceed the safe limit of 600 becquerels per kg have to be destroyed.
In a single year, 297 out of 752 boar tested in Saxony have been over the limit, and there have been cases in Germany of boar testing dozens of times over the limit.
The radioactivity causes economic problems as well. Many hunters sell the boar as game, and across Germany hundreds of thousands of euros are paid out each year out in government compensation to hunters whose kills have to be destroyed.
"It doesn't cover the loss from game sales, but at least it covers the cost of disposal," Steffen Richter, the head of the Saxon State Hunters Association, told Bild newspaper.
Germany's radioactive boar problem is not expected to go away any time soon. With the levels of contamination still showing in tests, experts predict it could be around for another 50 years.
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