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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 1635 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #11805 on: Nov 24th, 2014, 09:12am »

Science Daily

Geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet

Date:
November 20, 2014

Source:
California Institute of Technology

A team of researchers from Caltech and the China Earthquake Administration has discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet, north of the eastern end of the Himalayas. The geologists say that the ancient canyon--thousands of feet deep in places--effectively rules out a popular model used to explain how the massive and picturesque gorges of the Himalayas became so steep, so fast.

"I was extremely surprised when my colleagues, Jing Liu-Zeng and Dirk Scherler, showed me the evidence for this canyon in southern Tibet," says Jean-Philippe Avouac, the Earle C. Anthony Professor of Geology at Caltech. "When I first saw the data, I said, 'Wow!' It was amazing to see that the river once cut quite deeply into the Tibetan Plateau because it does not today. That was a big discovery, in my opinion."

Geologists like Avouac and his colleagues, who are interested in tectonics--the study of the earth's surface and the way it changes--can use tools such as GPS and seismology to study crustal deformation that is taking place today. But if they are interested in studying changes that occurred millions of years ago, such tools are not useful because the activity has already happened. In those cases, rivers become a main source of information because they leave behind geomorphic signatures that geologists can interrogate to learn about the way those rivers once interacted with the land--helping them to pin down when the land changed and by how much, for example.

"In tectonics, we are always trying to use rivers to say something about uplift," Avouac says. "In this case, we used a paleocanyon that was carved by a river. It's a nice example where by recovering the geometry of the bottom of the canyon, we were able to say how much the range has moved up and when it started moving."

The team reports its findings in the current issue of Science.

Last year, civil engineers from the China Earthquake Administration collected cores by drilling into the valley floor at five locations along the Yarlung Tsangpo River. Shortly after, former Caltech graduate student Jing Liu-Zeng, who now works for that administration, returned to Caltech as a visiting associate and shared the core data with Avouac and Dirk Scherler, then a postdoc in Avouac's group. Scherler had previously worked in the far western Himalayas, where the Indus River has cut deeply into the Tibetan Plateau, and immediately recognized that the new data suggested the presence of a paleocanyon.

Liu-Zeng and Scherler analyzed the core data and found that at several locations there were sedimentary conglomerates, rounded gravel and larger rocks cemented together, that are associated with flowing rivers, until a depth of 800 meters or so, at which point the record clearly indicated bedrock. This suggested that the river once carved deeply into the plateau.

To establish when the river switched from incising bedrock to depositing sediments, they measured two isotopes, beryllium-10 and aluminum-26, in the lowest sediment layer. The isotopes are produced when rocks and sediment are exposed to cosmic rays at the surface and decay at different rates once buried, and so allowed the geologists to determine that the paleocanyon started to fill with sediment about 2.5 million years ago.

The researchers' reconstruction of the former valley floor showed that the slope of the river once increased gradually from the Gangetic Plain to the Tibetan Plateau, with no sudden changes, or knickpoints. Today, the river, like most others in the area, has a steep knickpoint where it meets the Himalayas, at a place known as the Namche Barwa massif. There, the uplift of the mountains is extremely rapid (on the order of 1 centimeter per year, whereas in other areas 5 millimeters per year is more typical) and the river drops by 2 kilometers in elevation as it flows through the famous Tsangpo Gorge, known by some as the Yarlung Tsangpo Grand Canyon because it is so deep and long.

Combining the depth and age of the paleocanyon with the geometry of the valley, the geologists surmised that the river existed in this location prior to about 3 million years ago, but at that time, it was not affected by the Himalayas. However, as the Indian and Eurasian plates continued to collide and the mountain range pushed northward, it began impinging on the river. Suddenly, about 2.5 million years ago, a rapidly uplifting section of the mountain range got in the river's way, damming it, and the canyon subsequently filled with sediment.

"This is the time when the Namche Barwa massif started to rise, and the gorge developed," says Scherler, one of two lead authors on the paper and now at the GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences in Potsdam, Germany.

That picture of the river and the Tibetan Plateau, which involves the river incising deeply into the plateau millions of years ago, differs quite a bit from the typically accepted geologic vision. Typically, geologists believe that when rivers start to incise into a plateau, they eat at the edges, slowly making their way into the plateau over time. However, the rivers flowing across the Himalayas all have strong knickpoints and have not incised much at all into the Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, the thought has been that the rapid uplift of the Himalayas has pushed the rivers back, effectively pinning them, so that they have not been able to make their way into the plateau. But that explanation does not work with the newly discovered paleocanyon.

The team's new hypothesis also rules out a model that has been around for about 15 years, called tectonic aneurysm, which suggests that the rapid uplift seen at the Namche Barwa massif was triggered by intense river incision. In tectonic aneurysm, a river cuts down through the earth's crust so fast that it causes the crust to heat up, making a nearby mountain range weaker and facilitating uplift.

The model is popular among geologists, and indeed Avouac himself published a modeling paper in 1996 that showed the viability of the mechanism. "But now we have discovered that the river was able to cut into the plateau way before the uplift happened," Avouac says, "and this shows that the tectonic aneurysm model was actually not at work here. The rapid uplift is not a response to river incision."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141120141752.htm

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« Reply #11806 on: Nov 24th, 2014, 1:57pm »

Well..... don't count on wormholes to permit interstellar travel.


'Interstellar' Science: Is Wormhole Travel Possible?

by Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer
November 24, 2014 07:00am ET

Sci-fi fans who hope humanity can one day zoom to distant corners of the universe via wormholes, as astronauts do in the recent film "Interstellar," shouldn't hold their breath.

Wormholes are theoretical tunnels through the fabric of space-time that could potentially allow rapid travel between widely separated points — from one galaxy to another, for example, as depicted in Christopher Nolan's "Interstellar," which opened in theaters around the world earlier this month.

While wormholes are possible according to Einstein's theory of general relativity, such exotic voyages will likely remain in the realm of science fiction, said renowned astrophysicist Kip Thorne of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, who served as an adviser and executive producer on "Interstellar."
"The jury is not in, so we just don't know," Thorne, one of the world's leading authorities on relativity, black holes and wormholes, told Space.com. "But there are very strong indications that wormholes that a human could travel through are forbidden by the laws of physics. That's sad, that's unfortunate, but that's the direction in which things are pointing."

The major barrier has to do with a wormhole's instability, he said.

"Wormholes — if you don't have something threading through them to hold them open — the walls will basically collapse so fast that nothing can go through them," Thorne said.

Holding wormholes open would require the insertion of something that anti-gravitates — namely, negative energy. Negative energy has been created in the lab via quantum effects, Thorne said: One region of space borrows energy from another region that didn't have any to begin with, creating a deficit.

"So it does happen in physics," he said. "But we have very strong, but not firm, indications that you can never get enough negative energy that repels and keeps the wormhole's walls open; you can never get enough to do that."

Furthermore, traversable wormholes — if they can exist at all — almost certainly cannot occur naturally, Thorne added. That is, they must be created by an advanced civilization.

And that's exactly what happens in "Interstellar": Mysterious beings construct a wormhole near Saturn, allowing a small band of pioneers, led by a former farmer named Cooper (played by Matthew McConaughey) to journey far afield in search of a new home for humanity, whose existence on Earth is threatened by global crop failures.

Anyone interested in learning more about the science of "Interstellar" — which also features gravitational time dilation and depictions of several alien planets orbiting close to a supermassive black hole — can check out Thorne's new book, which is called, appropriately enough, "The Science of 'Interstellar.'"
Wormholes have been a staple of science fiction for decades. Interestingly, Thorne said that one of the genre's most famous titles helped inspire scientists to try to better understand the hypothetical structures.

"The modern research on the physics of wormholes largely stems from the movie 'Contact,' from conversations I had with [renowned late scientist] Carl Sagan — actually, when he was writing his novel 'Contact,'" Thorne said.

"Contact" features traversable wormholes. The novel came out in 1985, while the movie (which also stars Matthew McConaughey, apparently a wormhole connoisseur) was released in 1997.

http://www.space.com/27845-interstellar-movie-wormhole-travel-feasibility.html

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« Reply #11807 on: Nov 25th, 2014, 10:46am »

"Well..... don't count on wormholes to permit interstellar travel.


'Interstellar' Science: Is Wormhole Travel Possible?"



Well that puts a cramp in my holiday travel plans! grin

Good morning Swamprat & all of our UFOCasebookers cheesy

Crystal



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« Reply #11808 on: Nov 25th, 2014, 10:49am »

Reuters

Exclusive: U.S. to leave more troops in Afghanistan than first planned - sources

By Jessica Donati
KABUL Tue Nov 25, 2014 10:42am EST

(Reuters) - The United States is preparing to increase the number of troops it keeps in Afghanistan in 2015 to fill a gap left in the NATO mission by other contributing nations, according to three sources with direct knowledge of the situation.

The final numbers are still being agreed, but there will be at least several hundred more than initially planned, one of the sources said.

"If they hadn't done that, the mission would have lost bases," the source said.

Under the U.S. commitment, described as a "bridging solution" until other nations fulfill their pledges later in the year or the troops are no longer needed, Washington may provide up to 1,000 extra soldiers.

That figure was confirmed by all three sources, who said the final number was still under discussion and depended on when other countries stepped forward with their commitments.

The additional U.S. troops will be assigned to a 12,000-strong NATO force staying in Afghanistan to train, advise and assist Afghan forces through a new mission called Resolute Support, said the sources, who declined to be identified.

The coalition force in Afghanistan did not comment on the figures, but said it welcomed all commitments of troops to the new NATO-led mission.

"We are confident that we will have the necessary resources to launch the Resolute Support mission on Jan. 1, 2015. The process to generate the forces required for the mission is ongoing," the International Security Assistance Force said.

The bulk of Western combat troops, who once numbered up to 130,000, are to leave the country at the end of this year when the mission officially winds up after 13 years of war against a stubborn Taliban and its al Qaeda allies.

AFGHAN FORCES SUFFER HEAVY LOSSES

President Barack Obama had announced in May that U.S. troop levels would be cut to 9,800 by the end of the year, by half again in 2015 and to a normal embassy presence with a security assistance office in Kabul by the end of 2016.

"There will be 9,800 troops, plus at least a few hundred above and beyond that," the same source said.

Of the 9,800, some 8,000 had been earmarked for the NATO force and the remainder for a separate anti-terrorism operation.

The move to increase the U.S. presence left in Afghanistan comes shortly after Obama approved plans to give the U.S. military a wider role to fight the hardline Islamist Taliban movement alongside Afghan forces after the current mission expires.

While Afghanistan's military and police remain in control of all 34 provincial capitals, violence has risen in the last year and the rate of casualties suffered by local security forces has been described by the U.S. military as unsustainable.

Around 4,600 members of the Afghan security forces have been killed already in 2014, more than six percent higher than the same period of 2013.

The Taliban, ousted in 2001, has become increasingly bold in its attacks and controls several districts across a country where access to many areas is still limited by rugged terrain and poor security.

Despite more than $4 billion in aid to Afghan forces this year, police and soldiers frequently complain that they lack proper resources to fight the Taliban alone.


(Reporting by Jessica Donati; Editing by Mike Collett-White)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/11/25/us-afghanistan-usa-idUSKCN0J91BG20141125

Crystal


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« Reply #11809 on: Nov 25th, 2014, 10:50am »

Good evening Crystal.

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« Reply #11810 on: Nov 25th, 2014, 10:53am »

Associated Press

'Wizard of Oz' Cowardly Lion costume fetches $3M

Nov. 25, 2014 6:08 AM EST

NEW YORK (AP) — The Cowardly Lion costume from the classic film "The Wizard of Oz" and the piano from the movie "Casablanca" each sold for over $3 million at a New York City auction.

They were among Hollywood memorabilia offered at Bonhams on Monday.

The big cat outfit, which went for just over $3 million, had been authenticated as the one Bert Lahr wore in the 1939 film. Its face is a sculpted likeness of the late actor.

A spokesman for costume owner James Comisar says a secondary costume used in the film sold at auction in recent years for close to $1 million.

Comisar has a trove of TV memorabilia from shows including "I Love Lucy" and "Lost." He has said he plans to use money from the Cowardly Lion costume sale to exhibit his collection.

The upright "Casablanca" piano fetched $3.4 million.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/a3361887b320462c9817e551dd052d7f/wizard-oz-cowardly-lion-costume-fetches-3m#

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« Reply #11811 on: Nov 25th, 2014, 9:19pm »

Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore.

There's no place like home.

Of all the gin joints, in all the towns, in all the world, she walks into mine.

I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.
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« Reply #11812 on: Nov 26th, 2014, 10:45am »

on Nov 25th, 2014, 10:50am, INT21 wrote:
Good evening Crystal.

HAL
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Hey HAL cheesy

Crystal


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« Reply #11813 on: Nov 26th, 2014, 10:46am »

on Nov 25th, 2014, 9:19pm, ghostofsilver wrote:
Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore.

There's no place like home.

Of all the gin joints, in all the towns, in all the world, she walks into mine.

I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.



Good morning Ghost,

I love your choices. I am a screaming movie nut.

Crystal


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« Reply #11814 on: Nov 26th, 2014, 10:52am »

Telegraph

25 great closing lines in films


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Casablanca had its world premiere on November 26, 1942 at the Hollywood Theatre in New York. The final line of this brilliant film was spoken by nightclub owner Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart) to collaborationist police boss Captain Louis Renault (Claude Rains) as they leave vanquished Morocco to join the Free French army in West Africa.

“Louis, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship,” said Bogart.

The film, which starred Ingrid Bergman, won three Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Julius J Epstein, Philip G. Epstein and Howard Koch won Best Screenplay.


gallery after the jump:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturepicturegalleries/9698929/25-great-closing-lines-in-films.html

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« Reply #11815 on: Nov 27th, 2014, 07:38am »



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Happy Thanksgiving dear UFOCasebookers!


Crystal



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« Reply #11816 on: Nov 27th, 2014, 11:45am »

Crystal,

Happy Turkey day to you too!

Now comes Black Friday, and the stores around here open up 6:00 AM Friday morning.

Some open up at 6:00 PM Thanksgiving Day.

Shop until you drop, not for me.
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« Reply #11817 on: Nov 27th, 2014, 1:33pm »

Supermassive Black Holes Even Heavier Than Thought


by Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer
November 26, 2014



The enormous black holes that lurk at the hearts of all galaxies are significantly bigger than astronomers had imagined, a new study suggests.



Researchers have used a new method to measure the distance to the active spiral galaxy NGC 4151 — whose core is dubbed the "Eye of Sauron" because of its resemblance to the structure in the "Lord of the Rings" films — with unprecedented precision. This calculation enabled them to determine the mass of NGC 4151's central black hole more accurately — and the results were surprising.



"Our calculations show that the supermassive black holes are 40 percent heavier than previously thought," study co-author Darach Watson, of the ‪University of Copenhagen's ‪Niels Bohr Institute (NBI), said in a statement. "This fundamentally changes determinations of the masses of black holes."




Supermassive black holes can contain as much mass as hundreds of millions, or even several billion, suns.




The researchers used the twin Keck telescopes in Hawaii to measure the angle the dust ring makes in the sky — just 12 millionths of a degree. They combined the light collected by both telescopes, using a technique called interferometry. The method resulted in a resolution about 100 times greater than that achieved by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, researchers said.



The team could then calculate the distance to the Eye of Sauron using geometry. The distance from the black hole to the dust ring forms the base of an isosceles triangle, whose twin long legs are the distance from Earth to either side of the ring; with the angle of the sharp point of the triangle known, the legs' distance can be computed.



The team calculated the distance to NGC 4151 to be 62 million light-years, with an uncertainty of just 13.5 percent or so. This improved precision will help researchers estimate the true heft of supermassive black holes, Watson said.



"The calculations of the mass (weight) of the supermassive black holes at the heart of galaxies depends on two main factors: the rotational speed of the stars in the galaxy and how far it is from the black hole to the stars," he said. "The rotational speed can be observed, and the distance from the black hole out to the rotating disc of stars can now be calculated precisely using the new method."



Initial indications suggest that supermassive black hole masses have been underestimated by perhaps 40 percent. Researchers hope to extend their measurements to other active galaxies; the technique could eventually help astronomers better understand the rate at which the universe is expanding, study team members said.



The new study was published online today (Nov. 26) in the journal Nature.



http://www.space.com/27873-supermassive-black-hole-mass-eye-of-sauron.html
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« Reply #11818 on: Nov 27th, 2014, 3:28pm »

IN LIEU OF THE ONGOING AND EVER PRESENT TENSIONS ~ THIS ONE INDEED MAKE ME CHUCKLE! grin

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« Reply #11819 on: Nov 28th, 2014, 01:29am »

It is so perplexing as we are rewriting what we thought we knew with mathematical precision, about blackholes : that they are heavier by 40 percent and now our own atmosphere is discovered to have an invisible shield ala Star Trek
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Scientists detected an invisible shield roughly 7,200 miles above the Earth’s surface that is protecting us from harmful, super-fast electrons flying close to the speed of light.
lRelated UCSB professor who helped create blue LEDs shares Nobel Prize

It may sound like Star Trek tech, but this mysterious protective barrier isn't science fiction. The findings, described in the journal Nature, could help scientists better understand the complex dynamics of the Van Allen radiation belts.
Related story: Could plasma-surfing electrons star in future particle accelerators?
Related story: Could plasma-surfing electrons star in future particle accelerators?
Amina Khan

The Van Allen radiation belts, discovered in 1958, are two doughnut-shaped rings of energetic particles circling the Earth up to about 25,000 miles above the surface, and are held in place by the planet’s magnetic fields. Scientists have found that there appears to be an inner zone full of high-energy protons and an outer zone full of high-energy electrons. These belts are thought to be fed by cosmic rays and the solar wind, and they can swell and shrink over time in response to changes in space weather.
The high-energy "killer electrons" in the belt can wreak havoc with the sensitive electronics of orbiting satellites and even potentially harm the health of astronauts in space. So how is it that these high-speed particles, traveling faster than 100,000 miles per second, don’t regularly cause problems at the Earth’s surface?
Related story: A behind-the-scenes look at the Higgs boson search in 'Particle Fever'
Related story: A behind-the-scenes look at the Higgs boson search in 'Particle Fever'
Karen Kaplan

To find out why the particles don’t seem to reach Earth, scientists studied the belt using NASA’s twin Van Allen Probes. As it turns out, there seems to be a sharp cutoff of high-energy electrons around the 7,200-mile mark – almost as if the particles are hitting a glass wall, lead author Daniel Baker, director of the University of Colorado Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, said in a statement.

"The presence of such a clear, persistent and seemingly impenetrable barrier to inward transport of ultrarelativistic electrons at this very specific location presents a substantial puzzle," the study authors wrote.

The sharp cutoff took the scientists by surprise – they had expected to see a more natural, smooth transition. Previous theories suggested that the magnetic fields might be holding the electrons in place, or that human-generated radio signals from the ground were somehow blocking the onslaught. But now, given what the scientists were seeing, those theories didn’t make sense.

The researchers think it could have to do with electrically charged cold gas in a zone called the plasmasphere, which starts around 600 miles above the Earth and stretches thousands of miles into the outer, electron-dominated zone in the Van Allen belt. The low-level, hissing white noise generated by low frequency electromagnetic waves coming from the gas could be scattering the electrons at the gas' border, the scientists said.

The findings provide fresh insight into the complex workings of plasma physics – and could give engineers a better idea about where to safely park their orbiting satellites.

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