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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 44100 times)
INT21
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12000 on: Dec 31st, 2014, 2:44pm »

ZETAR and all here.

Man, I can not catch a break. wink

Here's hoping for all the best for all of us in the coming year.

Enjoy !

HAL
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Isn't it midnight, on the other side of the world.
Do you remember
the face of a pretty girl ?
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12001 on: Dec 31st, 2014, 3:19pm »

HEY ~ HEY ~ HEY ~ BROTHA HAL

NICE TOUCH!

THOSE SCHMART BIRDS OF A FEATHER...

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INDEED SIR ~ CHEERS MATE ~ MAY THE BEST OF THE NEW YEAR ~ FIND YOUR PATH

LIKE A FAMILY REUNION

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12002 on: Dec 31st, 2014, 4:36pm »

on Dec 31st, 2014, 2:44pm, INT21 wrote:
ZETAR and all here.

Man, I can not catch a break. wink

Here's hoping for all the best for all of us in the coming year.

Enjoy !

HAL
INT21 smiley smiley



The 20 and 1 questions INTerrogation guy is back! grin
May your Azimuth be at its highest in 2015!
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12003 on: Jan 1st, 2015, 09:52am »

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"Let's see what's over there."
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12004 on: Jan 1st, 2015, 11:06am »

Hey Swamprat,

I am glad to see the back of 2014!

I sure hope 2015 is better.

Good morning to you and all of our UFOCasebookers
cheesy

Crystal


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« Reply #12005 on: Jan 1st, 2015, 11:09am »

Science News


A bilingual brain is prepped for more than a second language

by Lisa Seachrist Chiu 10:00am
December 31, 2014

Just before winter break, my fifth grader came home from school, opened her mouth and produced what sounded to me like a stuttering mess of gibberish. After complaining that when she spends the entire day immersed in Chinese, she sometimes canít figure out what language to use, she carried on speaking flawless English to me and Chinese to a friend while they did their homework.

Quite honestly, I had been eagerly anticipating this very day for a long time. Having worked several years to establish the Chinese language immersion elementary school my daughter attends, I could barely contain my excitement at this demonstration that she truly grasps a second language.

Early language programs are hot, in no small part because, when it comes to language, kids under the age of 7 are geniuses. Like many parents, I wanted my child to be fluent in as many languages as possible so she can communicate with more people and because it gives her a prime tool to explore different cultures.

Turns out, it may also benefit her brain.

With the help of advanced imaging tools that reveal neural processes in specific brain structures, researchers are coalescing around the idea that fluency in more than one language heightens executive function ó the ability to regulate and control cognitive processes. Itís a radical shift from just a few decades ago when psychologists routinely warned against raising children who speak two languages, lest they become confused and suffer delays in learning.

One of the most intriguing aspects about bilingual people is that they are constantly activating both languages in their brains, says Viorica Marian, who studies the cognitive and neurological effects of bilingualism at Northwestern University. So, for example, your brain starts guessing words the minute you hear even a fragment of a word. An English-only speaker might hear the word can and his or her brain activates the words candy and candle as possibilities. Someone who speaks two languages will activate similar sounding words in both languages. The trick is to use the appropriate word.

To compare how bilingual and monolingual speakers accomplish this task, Marian and her colleagues had subjects perform a language comprehension task while observing what parts of the brain become active using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Volunteers ages 18 to 27 heard a series of words like cloud and were shown pictures that included clouds ó and similar sounding words like clown. The subjects simply had to choose the picture that matched the word.

Bilingual people were no faster at completing the task than those who only speak one language, Marian and colleagues report in the December Brain & Language. However, the monolingual volunteers were forced to activate regions in their brains associated with inhibition and executive control when completing this routine task. Bilingual volunteers, because their brains are always filtering out words from another language, had very little activation in these brain regions. Those who spoke only one language were working harder.

In effect, routinely filtering out words from another language and using the appropriate language is such a potent workout for the brain that other tasks involving executive function are relatively easy.

That extra brain exercise may be crucial as we age. Studies around the world show that bilingual people start showing the symptoms of Alzheimerís disease about 5 years later than monolingual people. Most recently, Evy Woumans, Wouter Duyck and colleagues at the University in Ghent in Belgium reported in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition that bilingual Alzheimerís patients developed significant symptoms on average 4.6 years later than monolingual Alzheimerís patients and received their diagnoses 4.8 years later than monolingual people. Itís important to note that Alzhiemerís disease is not developing later in bilingual people ó the numbers reflect that this group is dealing much better with the damage caused by the disease.

And, it turns out, language may have a stronger effect than education, socioeconomic status and participating in mentally taxing hobbies like playing music. Researchers at the University of Hyderabad, India, and the University of Edinburgh in Scotland demonstrated a similar bilingual advantage in the development of Alzheimerís symptoms among subjects who were illiterate.

So, why would being bilingual have a greater effect than, say, playing the piano? The answer may lie in the fact that we are constantly using language. Anything that is hard to do is good for the brain: solving math problems, playing chess, playing music. But engaging in any of those activities employs language because it requires thought. In effect, if you are bilingual, you are thinking twice.

So, maybe placing my child in a language immersion school will have lifelong benefits I never imagined.

And, while l speak only one language, research is also telling me that itís not too late to step up: A study published this month found that adults who took six months of Spanish language classes had improved executive function compared with those who didnít study language.

https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/growth-curve/bilingual-brain-prepped-more-second-language?tgt=nr

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12006 on: Jan 1st, 2015, 11:52am »

Happy New Year !

We can only hope 2015 can be better.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12007 on: Jan 1st, 2015, 6:40pm »

on Jan 1st, 2015, 11:52am, ghostofsilver wrote:
Happy New Year !

We can only hope 2015 can be better.



Happy New Year Ghostofsilver!

From your mouth to God's ear.

Crystal


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12008 on: Jan 2nd, 2015, 09:50am »

GOOD MORNING ALL cheesy






CRYSTAL


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« Reply #12009 on: Jan 2nd, 2015, 09:52am »

Science Daily

'Bad luck' of random mutations plays predominant role in cancer, study shows

Date:
January 1, 2015

Source:
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have created a statistical model that measures the proportion of cancer incidence, across many tissue types, caused mainly by random mutations that occur when stem cells divide. By their measure, two-thirds of adult cancer incidence across tissues can be explained primarily by "bad luck," when these random mutations occur in genes that can drive cancer growth, while the remaining third are due to environmental factors and inherited genes.

"All cancers are caused by a combination of bad luck, the environment and heredity, and we've created a model that may help quantify how much of these three factors contribute to cancer development," says Bert Vogelstein, M.D., the Clayton Professor of Oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, co-director of the Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

"Cancer-free longevity in people exposed to cancer-causing agents, such as tobacco, is often attributed to their 'good genes,' but the truth is that most of them simply had good luck," adds Vogelstein, who cautions that poor lifestyles can add to the bad luck factor in the development of cancer.

The implications of their model range from altering public perception about cancer risk factors to the funding of cancer research, they say. "If two-thirds of cancer incidence across tissues is explained by random DNA mutations that occur when stem cells divide, then changing our lifestyle and habits will be a huge help in preventing certain cancers, but this may not be as effective for a variety of others," says biomathematician Cristian Tomasetti, Ph.D., an assistant professor of oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health. "We should focus more resources on finding ways to detect such cancers at early, curable stages," he adds.

In a report on the statistical findings, published Jan. 2 in Science, Tomasetti and Vogelstein say they came to their conclusions by searching the scientific literature for information on the cumulative total number of divisions of stem cells among 31 tissue types during an average individual's lifetime. Stem cells "self-renew," thus repopulating cells that die off in a specific organ.

It was well-known, Vogelstein notes, that cancer arises when tissue-specific stem cells make random mistakes, or mutations, when one chemical letter in DNA is incorrectly swapped for another during the replication process in cell division. The more these mutations accumulate, the higher the risk that cells will grow unchecked, a hallmark of cancer. The actual contribution of these random mistakes to cancer incidence, in comparison to the contribution of hereditary or environmental factors, was not previously known, says Vogelstein.

To sort out the role of such random mutations in cancer risk, the Johns Hopkins scientists charted the number of stem cell divisions in 31 tissues and compared these rates with the lifetime risks of cancer in the same tissues among Americans. From this so-called data scatterplot, Tomasetti and Vogelstein determined the correlation between the total number of stem cell divisions and cancer risk to be 0.804. Mathematically, the closer this value is to one, the more stem cell divisions and cancer risk are correlated.

"Our study shows, in general, that a change in the number of stem cell divisions in a tissue type is highly correlated with a change in the incidence of cancer in that same tissue," says Vogelstein. One example, he says, is in colon tissue, which undergoes four times more stem cell divisions than small intestine tissue in humans. Likewise, colon cancer is much more prevalent than small intestinal cancer.

"You could argue that the colon is exposed to more environmental factors than the small intestine, which increases the potential rate of acquired mutations," says Tomasetti. However, the scientists saw the opposite finding in mouse colons, which had a lower number of stem cell divisions than in their small intestines, and, in mice, cancer incidence is lower in the colon than in the small intestine. They say this supports the key role of the total number of stem cell divisions in the development of cancer. Using statistical theory, the pair calculated how much of the variation in cancer risk can be explained by the number of stem cell divisions, which is 0.804 squared, or, in percentage form, approximately 65 percent.

Finally, the research duo classified the types of cancers they studied into two groups. They statistically calculated which cancer types had an incidence predicted by the number of stem cell divisions and which had higher incidence. They found that 22 cancer types could be largely explained by the "bad luck" factor of random DNA mutations during cell division. The other nine cancer types had incidents higher than predicted by "bad luck" and were presumably due to a combination of bad luck plus environmental or inherited factors.

"We found that the types of cancer that had higher risk than predicted by the number of stem cell divisions were precisely the ones you'd expect, including lung cancer, which is linked to smoking, skin cancer, linked to sun exposure, and forms of cancers associated with hereditary syndromes," says Vogelstein.

"This study shows that you can add to your risk of getting cancers by smoking or other poor lifestyle factors. However, many forms of cancer are due largely to the bad luck of acquiring a mutation in a cancer driver gene regardless of lifestyle and heredity factors. The best way to eradicate these cancers will be through early detection, when they are still curable by surgery," adds Vogelstein.

The scientists note that some cancers, such as breast and prostate cancer, were not included in the report because of their inability to find reliable stem cell division rates in the scientific literature. They hope that other scientists will help refine their statistical model by finding more precise stem cell division rates.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150101142318.htm

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12010 on: Jan 2nd, 2015, 10:08am »

In 2015, resolve to:
Stop and smell the flowers,

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Enjoy nature,
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Share what you have,
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Pray every day,
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...and don't poke the bear.....
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12011 on: Jan 2nd, 2015, 10:24am »

SWAMPRAT,

YOU'RE ON A SEMINOLE ROLL ~ WELL DONE!

SHALOM...Z
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12012 on: Jan 2nd, 2015, 10:49am »

I'VE ALWAYS BEEN IMPRESSED WITH THE COLLECTIVE CADRE OF CASEBOOK WIT AND INTELLECT...

AND...AS WE >>>KEEP ON TRUCKIN<<< WITH THOSE COSMIC INSIGHTS FROM ~ SYSCO...

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TO WIT:
Perseverance, Belief, Desire, Dream, ... This foretaste of the creative art accompanies the intuitive grasp of an unknown entity that will not take definite shape except by the action of a constantly vigilant technique.

ONCE TASTED ~ THAT INFINITE THIRST REMAINS
cool

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@ TOMI ~ wink

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HMMMM ~ GETTIN THIRSTY ~ QUENCHED WITH IMAGINATION ~ THERE'S JUST THAT "TAINT" TASTE TO IT ALL ~ TAINT ENOUGH OF IT grin

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12013 on: Jan 2nd, 2015, 11:48am »

"YOU'RE ON A SEMINOLE ROLL "

You WOULD have to mention Seminoles......SOB!
sad
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12014 on: Jan 2nd, 2015, 12:01pm »

SWAMPRAT,

HEY MAN ~ WE'RE LISTENING TO THE SAME VIOLINS...


TCU Horned Frogs
Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl
Final - Wednesday, December 31, 11:30 AM
Georgia Dome, Atlanta, Georgia

9 Ole Miss Rebels (9-4)

6 TCU Horned Frogs (12-1)

3 - 42 A "W" FOR TCU

YEP ~ THOSE BRIGHTER MOMENTS OF THE SEASON MAKE BEING BEATEN LIKE A RENTED MULE PALATABLE...BUT STILL LIKE THE LAND SHARKS AND DEM REBELS...

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TILL NEXT SEASON...HOTTY TODDY

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SHALOM...Z

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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2
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