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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 15669 times)
ZETAR
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12045 on: Jan 9th, 2015, 08:49am »

GHOST,

I QUITE AGREE wink...NONETHELESS ~ IT'S THOSE LAST THREE MOVES WHICH INDEED MAKE A DRAW AN INTERESTING MATCH...

SHALOM...Z
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Intelligence is not a moral category


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12046 on: Jan 9th, 2015, 09:12am »

ZETAR, IF BLACK IS THE THIEST THEY WILL BE SACRIFICING A LOT MORE.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN (THE CHESS ANALOGY)? THE RESULT WILL BE EITHER A LONE PAWN OR QUEEN AND THAT WILL BE DETERMINED BY BLACK. WHITE CANNOT FORCE THE OUTCOME.
SO IN THE END THE IDEAS OF BLACK PREVAIL OR WHITE BUT ONLY IF BLACK ALLOWS IT. I'M NOT LOOKING AT THE LAST 3 MOVES IN KEEPING WITH THE INTENT OF THE GAME WHERE THE FINAL OUTCOME IS THE GOAL UNLESS ONE IS STUDYING END GAME TECHNIQUES.

NOW THAT MY BRAIN IS LOOSENED UP I CAN RETURN TO MY PHILOSOPHY PODCAST I'VE BEEN GETTING INTO.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12047 on: Jan 9th, 2015, 09:43am »

GHOST,

I WAS (ALTHOUGH THOSE MULTIPLE OVERTONES DO EXIST) MERELY TRYIN TO SWAT THAT HORNETS NEST HANGING OUTSIDE SIR HAL'S CAVERNOUS ABODE...CHEERS MATE!

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SHALOM...Z
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12048 on: Jan 9th, 2015, 10:17am »

GOOD MORNIN' YA'LL grin

CRYSTAL


Associated Press

Explosions at building where 2 terror gunman are holed up

By LORI HINNANT and ELAINE GANLEY
Jan. 9, 2015 11:04 AM EST

PARIS (AP) — Explosions and gunshots rang out and smoke rose outside a building where two brothers suspected in a newspaper massacre are holed up with a hostage.

Security forces had surrounded the building for most of the day Friday, cornering the suspects in the killings at the Charlie Hebdo newspaper in Paris this week.

Police SWAT forces could be seen on the roof of the building.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/5817417ce93c4030a8632c528338c005/brothers-past-draws-scrutiny-french-manhunt-enters-day-3#


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« Reply #12049 on: Jan 9th, 2015, 10:22am »

Wired

A Bamboo Tower That Produces Water From Air

By Liz Stinson
01.09.15 | 6:30 am



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The WarkaWater tower is an unlikely structure to find jutting from the Ethiopian landscape. At 30 feet tall and 13 feet wide, it’s not half as big as its namesake tree (which can loom 75 feet tall), but it’s striking nonetheless. The spindly tower, of latticed bamboo lined with orange polyester mesh, isn’t art—though it does kind of look like it. Rather, the structure is designed to wring water out of the air, providing a sustainable source of H2O for developing countries.

Created by Arturo Vittori and his team at Architecture and Vision, the towers harvest water from rain, fog and dew. This isn’t a new idea—people have been doing this for as long as they’ve needed water, often with air wells. Often built as high-rising stone structures, air wells gather moisture from the air and funnel it into a basin for collection. The WarkaWater functions in much the same way, using mesh netting to capture moisture and direct it into hygienic holding tank accessed via a spout.

We wrote about the towers last year when Vittori unveiled a full-size prototype. The company has a newer version of the WarkaWater and a Kickstarter campaign to fund field testing in Ethiopia later this year. Based on tests performed in its Italian lab, the company claims the latest iteration can harvest 13 to 26.4 gallons of water daily. That’s less than most people flush away each day, but a significant quantity in a country where some 60 million people lack sufficient potable water.

more after the jump:
http://www.wired.com/2015/01/architecture-and-vision-warkawater/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12050 on: Jan 9th, 2015, 2:51pm »

ZETAR,

NOT ONLY MAY SHEEP SAFELY GRAZE, BUT HORNETS MAY BUZZ MERRILY.
'COURSE, IF THEY BECOME TOO ANNOYING I DO HAVE MY TRUSTY FLAME THROWER TO HAND. MUCH MORE EFFICIENT THAN KICKING THE NEST AND HAVING TO SWAT THEM INDIVIDUALLY.

AS FOR THE GAME, THE ATHEIST WOULD DECLINE TO PARTAKE. 'TIS IGNOBLE TO ATTACK AN UNARMED AGGRESSOR.

AFTER ALL, WHAT FACTS CAN THE THEIST BRING TO THE BOARD OF BATTLE ?

HAL
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12051 on: Jan 9th, 2015, 3:43pm »

HAL,

JUZZ WANTED TO BRING YA OUT OF HIBERNATION ~ THAT ASYMMETRICAL ILLUSION OF BEING UNARMED OFTEN IS THE TROGEN HORSE WHICH HITS THE MARK...NOT SURE IF THAT IS BEFORE OR AFTER A THEIST TURNS THE OTHER CHEEK grin

Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt.

William Shakespeare

IGNOBLE OR QUESTIONING ONES METAL...I'LL GIVE YOU THE OPPORTUNITY TO CALL IT A DRAW BEFORE WE START...JUST TELL ALFRED ~ "T0 THE HAL CAVE"

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ALL IN GOOD HUMOR MY ESTEEMED FRIEND ~ BEEN THROUGH THAT EGG SHAPED THEOLOGICAL DISCUSSION AND IT ALWAYS ENDS UP ~ EXACTLY WHERE IT STARTED ~ AT THE BEGINNING...WELL...THAT COLD ~ DAMP CAVERN...I THOUGHT NEEDED SOME HEAT cool

CARTE BLANCHE FOR CASEBOOK...

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12052 on: Jan 9th, 2015, 6:49pm »

These guys are always up for a good game of Chest and age no barrier

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« Reply #12053 on: Jan 10th, 2015, 02:31am »

New Discovery Channel President Declares "No More Bullsh*t" Policy
http://io9.com/new-discovery-channel-president-declares-no-more-bulls-1678581495
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ding ding ding Sys 2 fer 1 postsgrin


http://www.sci-tech-today.com/story.xhtml?story_id=021000G0BSSF


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Did Beethoven Compose from the Heart?
By Melissa Healy

Whether or not music stirs inside, each of us bears a living metronome at our core. It may tick at 40 or 100 beats per minute, in three-quarter time or in six-eight, erratically or like a Swiss clock. Hear it or not, the human heart quietly marks the rhythm of our lives.
A new study focusing on the music of Ludwig van Beethoven treats shifting musical rhythms as a sort of musical electrocardiogram. In Beethoven's dotted rhythms, tempo shifts, sudden pauses and composition notes, a trio of researchers suggest that they have gleaned the distant echo of the composer's heart.

Where most merely hear greatness, they hear cardiac arrhythmia.

Beethoven, the tragic musical genius who died, deaf, at age 56, lived with a heart that was, figuratively at least, broken many times over. Although definitive diagnoses died with him, music historians have speculated that he suffered from a wide range of medical conditions, including alcohol-induced cirrhosis, lead poisoning and syphilis.

Beethoven's heart was found structurally sound upon autopsy in 1827. But in an article published recently in the journal Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, the authors -- a cardiologist, an internal medicine specialist and a musicologist -- cite the rhythmic turnabouts in three of the master's compositions to diagnose, via "musical electrocardiogram," the irregular heartbeat of a man as beset by physical and psychic afflictions as he was blessed with musical genius.

What is clear from his personal letters and notes is that Beethoven began to lose his hearing around 1800, at the age of 30. He composed the bulk of his music even as the sounds of the world around him dimmed -- and that, say the authors of the new study, may have made him exquisitely attuned to his own heartbeat. Some of his most haunting and ambitious works -- the late string quartets, the Mass in D minor (Missa Solemnis), the Ninth Symphony in D minor -- were composed after he became completely deaf in 1819.

"This is entirely speculative," says University of Washington cardiologist Zachary D. Goldberger, who coauthored the paper with musicologist Steven M. Whiting and internal medicine specialist Joel D. Howell, both of the University of Michigan. "At least it gives us a new dimension by which to listen to his music."

Goldberger said the three were drawn to focus on the rhythmic shifts and punctuations of three Beethoven compositions that have been characterized by musicologists as particularly abrupt, dramatic or unusual in music of Beethoven's time -- the Piano Sonata in E flat major (Opus 81a, called "Les Adieux"), the String Quartet No. 13 in B flat major (Opus 130) and the Piano Sonata No. 12 in A flat major (Opus 110).

The authors note the "distinctive 'galloping' rhythm" of the Sonata in E flat major's adagio section and hear slow, irregular heartbeats, followed by "racing irregular heartbeats," in the allegro section that follows.

In the String Quartet No. 13, the authors hear, in a seven-measure section in the middle of the fifth movement (called the Cavatina), "a short paroxysm of an atrial tachyarrhythmia." They cite Beethoven's notation: that the passage should be played "beklemmt," or "heavy of heart." And they point to pianist Jonathan Biss' 2011 observation that the section always evoked a sensation of shortness of breath.

In the third movement of the Piano Sonata No. 12 in A flat major, the authors point to an "arioso dolente" (or lamenting song) preceding one of two fugues. The left hand plays a repetitive run of notes that "bears some resemblance to rapid tachyarrhythmia," they note. The right hand, simultaneously, plays an irregularly punctuated melody that "bears some resemblance to dyspnea," or shortness of breath, "which would not be an unusual sensation for someone experiencing a tachyarrhythmia."

"When your heart beats irregularly from heart disease, it does so in some predictable patterns," said coauthor Howell, a professor of internal medicine. "We think we hear some of those same patterns in his music."

Beethoven's litany of physical woes clearly predisposed him to atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter or even multifocal atrial tachycardia, the authors write. But they acknowledge that their observations are far from proof of those conditions. "Similar rhythmic intricacies" are found in other works by many composers, they add, and cardiac arrhythmia can hardly be ascribed to all who use irregular syncopation.

"However, in highly charged passages of certain pieces, the possibility of cardiac arrhythmia can lend a quite physical aspect to one's interpretation of the music in question," they wrote. "These passages can seem, in an unexpectedly literal sense, to be heartfelt."

© 2015 Los Angeles Times (CA) under contract with NewsEdge. All rights reserved.
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« Reply #12054 on: Jan 10th, 2015, 06:43am »

ZETAR,

AS POINTED OUT BY THE GOOD DOCTOR, THERE IS REALLY NOTHING NEW GOING ON WITHIN THE UFO SCENE.

AND WHILE I DO OCCASIONALLY ADD A WORD OR TWO TO SOME OF THE POLITICAL POSTS, I FIND THEM ALSO RATHER REPETITIVE.

SO IT LOOKS AS IF THERE WILL BE MORE TIME SPENT IN THE CAVE.

THE PROBLEM WITH BELIEVERS ISN'T THE TURNING OF THE OTHER CHEEK, IT'S THE WAY THEY TEND TO TALK FROM BETWEEN THE CHEEKS, IF YOU GET MY MEANING.

...ALL IN GOOD HUMOR MY ESTEEMED FRIEND ..

I WOULDN'T SEE IT ANY OTHER WAY.

smiley

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« Reply #12055 on: Jan 10th, 2015, 08:59am »

SATURDAY MATINEE!

GOOD MORNING UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy







CRYSTAL


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« Reply #12056 on: Jan 10th, 2015, 10:02am »

HAL,

KNOWING ONES PREDISPOSITIONS ~ AND ~ TO AID WHEN THOSE ASSUME AN ADVERSARY IS UNARMED ~ YA STEPPED INTO A BAITED FIELD AS MY >>>CHEEK REFERENCE<<< ANTICIPATED SUCH WRY BRIT HUMOR...JUZZZ MAKIN SURE UR HITTIN ON ALL EIGHT CYLINDERS...AHHHH WAIT A MINUTE...UR THAT XKE MODEL WITH TWELVE CYLINDERS...

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KEEPIN IT STIRRED ~ TILL THE NEXT EVENT grin

SHALOM...Z
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« Reply #12057 on: Jan 10th, 2015, 11:59am »

http://www.sci-tech-today.com/news/Religious-Experience----in-the-Brain-/story.xhtml?story_id=0200014PRC5G

Scientists Seek Religious Experience -- in the Brain
By Geoffrey Mohan Like this on Facebook Tweet this Link thison Linkedin Link this on Google Plus
PUBLISHED:
JANUARY
07
2015

At the push of a button, the gurney holding Auriel Peterson slides slowly into the pale blue glow of a magnetic resonance imaging machine. Soon, all that's visible are the shins of her black track pants and the chartreuse-and-white soles of her running shoes, angled like the fins of a torpedo.
Behind a window in an adjacent room, a splayed-out cauliflower pattern appears on a computer screen in black and white. It's Peterson's brain. And it's probably the last thing about this exercise that will be so simply shaded.

From Peterson's perspective, the next hour will be spent in service, like the day she packed donated eyeglasses to send to Zimbabwe. But the ardent Mormon also knows she could be adding to a centuries-old debate about God and science.

So she says a silent prayer: "I hope they get what they need."

::

Other animals have hierarchies, organized behaviors, even a semblance of norms. Only humans have religion and science. And the two have seldom been on civil terms.

Jeff Anderson and Julie Korenberg, neuroscientists at the University of Utah, want to change that. They're among a growing number of scientists aiming their field's most sophisticated machinery at religious cognition.

"It amazes me how one of the most profound influences on human behavior is virtually completely unstudied," Anderson said. "We think about how much this drives people's behavior, and yet we don't know the first thing about where in the brain that's even registered."

The researchers want to see more than religion's registry on the brain. They want to know whether it differs across sects, or by intensity of belief. They want to see what genes it activates, what hormones it releases, and how it relates to social behaviors. Can the same basic circuitry produce Mother Teresa and the Sept. 11 hijacker Mohamed Atta? If so, how?

To approach even speculative answers to such questions, the researchers have to capture what goes on in the brain of a believer during a religious moment.

Right now, that depends on whether a maw of helium-cooled superconducting magnets can become Auriel Peterson's personal church.

The 26-year-old community college student lies still, clears her mind. The machine whirs and clicks, taking rapid-fire snapshots of the flux of blood through billions of neurons.

"I want you to spend the next six or seven minutes in quiet prayer," Anderson says into a microphone.

Anderson's team has rigged a video screen above Peterson's face, and placed a set of switches at her fingertips so she can convey how intense her religious feelings are when she sees quotes from Scripture or the Book of Mormon or images of religious figures.

She is the fifth subject to be scanned, and the research team hopes to record 15 others before sorting through the data for something of significance to science.

And, maybe, to religion: Peterson wants to see how the spirit manifests on her brain too. So do a lot of other Mormons, apparently.

"Within a week of announcing that we were going to do this project, we had over a hundred volunteers," Anderson said.

That surprised Anderson's team. Expecting controversy, last year they held a public meeting about the project. Reaction was at times fractious, but mostly polite. So far, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has taken no position on whether its members should participate.

"I think some people worry that we're biologizing the religious response ... that that will demystify it or make it somehow less important," said Anderson, who was raised Mormon but left the church a decade ago.

There are plenty who would relish any data that support the idea that God is all in the mind. But Korenberg and Anderson aren't looking for how people come to believe in a supernatural being. They want to know what happens once they do believe.

"I think we're trying to do something much more simple, and that is look at private religious practice," said Korenberg, who is Jewish, was raised in a Catholic neighborhood in Natick, Mass., and sings in a Christian chorale. "I think that what we're expecting to find here is that Mormons aren't really going to be that different from Jews or Muslims."

Until now, Korenberg and Anderson have done what medical researchers do -- studied abnormalities. She has spent 15 years investigating the neurochemical and genetic roots of Williams syndrome, an obscure brain abnormality somewhat like the inverse of autism; it causes people to become hypersocial but befuddled by simple objects. They have extreme emotional reactions to music, akin to religious ecstasy.

Anderson, for his part, scanned the brains of people with autism, Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis. But he thought a lot about religion's hold on the mind, and when he had the chance to scan Zen Buddhist monks a few years ago, he jumped. And he realized he had been overlooking a ready-made sample right in front of him: Mormons.

"They have thousands of hours of practice doing exactly the one thing that we're interested in, which is identifying when they are feeling spiritual influences," Anderson said. "And there also is a really generous tradition of participation in science and contribution, voluntarism, that makes for a really nice study design and a focused group."

Other scientists who started from similar premises have strayed into metaphysics. Neuroscientist Andrew Newberg began by scanning the brains of Franciscan nuns and Tibetan Buddhists and wound up founding "neurotheology," which fuses science with mysticism. Newberg has co-written a series of bestselling books on the topic, including "Why God Won't Go Away."

"There's still value in doing those studies, even if the study doesn't answer the big question -- does God exist," said Newberg, now the research director of the Myrna Brind Center of Integrative Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University and Hospital in Philadelphia. "We still learn about the brain; we still learn about the nature of spiritual experiences and practices. And those have practical implications."

Neuroscientist Mario Beauregard of the University of Arizona is writing a book criticizing the scientific belief that there eventually will be a material explanation for everything. His work helped disprove earlier studies that purported to find a "God spot" in the brain.

"There really is no such thing," said Michael Inzlicht, a psychologist at the University of Toronto who also has studied religion's effect on the brain. "Thinking of God could maybe activate certain spots of the brain, but they weren't evolved for that purpose. They have evolved for some other reason and have been co-opted for religious cognition."

Most neuroscientists have long since abandoned any search for a "God spot," and settled on delving deeper into networks involving attention, salience, self-reflection, emotion and other functions.

Anderson and Korenberg are curious about chemicals produced or released by brain activity. Oxytocin, a hormone produced in the hypothalamus, has been associated with intimacy, fidelity and bonding, but also with social bias.

::

Peterson has been in the scanner for more than an hour when they slide the gurney out. She stirs, and asks for tissues. Tears streak her face.

Two assistants draw blood to test for levels of oxytocin and other chemicals and rush down the hall to put it in a centrifuge, then pack the samples on dry ice before such chemicals degrade. Then they lead Peterson to a meeting room for debriefing.

With pen and paper, she charts her emotional responses to each of the prompts. Then she checks off descriptions that fit her feelings, from a lexicon familiar to any Mormon -- promptings, warnings, burning in the bosom, alignment of heart and mind, pure intelligence.

"I don't have to pick one, right?" she says. "Good. There were so many."

Although she describes herself as "young in spirituality," Peterson, a third-generation Mormon, said she had ample practice at priming her mind for a spiritual state. The MRI machine wasn't much of an obstacle.

"I just had to tune out the noise," she says. "I just tried to remember people and experiences."

Some religious passages reminded her of people she had met on her mission, of elders, or of her father, an attorney in Fresno who emailed the ad for the Utah project and suggested she try it. Like him, Peterson was skeptical that science would show them much they did not already know about their spiritual life. But it was worth a try.

Peterson has trouble explaining what a religious moment is like. "It's one of those things you have to experience," she tells them. "It's like witnessing a baby being born. Until you see it, you really don't get it."

Then she and the scientists exchange thank-yous. They walk out into the twilight, alone again with their own questions.
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« Reply #12058 on: Jan 10th, 2015, 12:50pm »

ZETAR,

RE THE E TYPE.

YOU DON'T NEED MORE THAN SIX CYLINDERS, AT LEAST NOT IN A BRITISH ENGINE.

AND IT'S RED !! I MEAN REALLY RED.

JUST LOOKING AT IT MAKES ME FEEL ALL QUEASY. EXCUSE ME WHILE I GO STICK MY HEAD DOWN THE TOILET.

THERE IS ONLY ONE COLOUR FOR A BRITISH SPORTS CAR; AND IT ISN'T RED.

HAL
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« Reply #12059 on: Jan 11th, 2015, 07:04am »

GOOD MORNING grin


Japan Times

AIST brings mind-reading technology closer to reality

by Kazuaki Nagata

Staff Writer
11 January 2015







Communicating via brain waves, by merely thinking, may seem like a notion out of the world of science fiction, but it would be a dream come true for people who are physically unable to express themselves.

Helping to bring mental telepathy one step closer to reality is the Neurocommunicator, a system developed by the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), in Ibaraki Prefecture.

The device inputs an individual’s finely nuanced brain waves into a computer graphics application geared toward interpreting thoughts.

Ryohei Hasegawa, head of AIST’s Neurotechnology Group of Human Technology Research, said the Neurocommunicator facilitates brain wave communication for people who have been incapacitated by, for example, a stroke, spinal cord injury or neurological disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

“When people lose speaking and writing motility, their quality of life drastically declines,” Hasegawa, whose team unveiled the Neurocommunicator system in 2010, said in an interview last month.

ALS patients may have lost their ability to move or speak but their brain functions, their ability to think and understand, may remain intact and able to send signals that the Neurocommunicator can receive and interpret.

People produce small brain-wave signals through various activities, including thinking, blinking and recognizing. The Neruocommunicator takes advantage of what is called ERP, or “event related potential” — the mental responses to stimuli that can be observed in brain waves.

“There are various changes in electrical potential observed from the brain activities around the scalp. It’s quite well-known that alpha waves are used to see how people relax . . . (but the Neurocommunicator) looks at changes over short periods of time,” Hasegawa said.

The device’s components include headgear equipped with amplifiers and a compact brain-wave gauge capable of monitoring the most minute movements.

The gauge wirelessly sends eight channels of real-time information about brain activity around the scalp that is displayed on a computer screen.

Another screen, used by the patient, shows eight panels displaying physical activity choices — elimination of bodily waste, phlegm-clearing, drinking, being physically turned over, having a TV, air conditioner or light turned on, or having teeth brushed.

Each panel randomly flashes in a span of seconds. To communicate, the patient is told to stare at a certain panel and focus on recognizing when it flashes, which can then be read by the machine.

“When the designated panel flashes, the patients produce strong brain waves (that are not reflected in the other panels). We use this mechanism to guess which panel the patients have chosen,” Hasegawa said.

This strong wave is the ERP, which has a waveform unique to each individual.

Once a person’s ERP waveform has been identified, the communication process becomes quite simple. The patient just looks at the panels and makes a selection by recognizing when it flashes.

Staring at the TV panel and recognizing when it flashes would signal that one wants the television turned on.

The Neurocommunicator compares the ERP patterns in the panels with the individual’s ERP, taken in advance, to determine the patient’s selection in a matter of seconds.

Research has proven the device has an accuracy rate of over 90 percent.

The Neurocommunicator currently uses three different panel sets, which in combination can allow for as many as 512 different types of messages. It also has virtual avatars that can be used to verbalize them.

Although the Neurocommunicator has the potential to be a beneficial communication tool, Hasegawa said it is still unclear when his team can put it into practical use.

“Because AIST is semi-public, we cannot just put the technology on the market. We need to find private firms that can market this technology through licensing,” he said.

The system also needs further improvement, including an interface geared toward nonscientists.

“Right now, an experienced person is monitoring the brain waves. But there are situations where an elderly person is taking care of another elderly person, so we need to make it easy to use even for seniors who have never touched a computer before,” Hasegawa noted.

Another concern is that the flow of the brain waves can easily be affected by outside factors, including interference generated by other electronic devices nearby, he said. EPR impulses are extremely weak and easily overwhelmed by electromagnetic interference.

Although challenges remain in spreading brain wave communications, Hasegawa boasted of its potential.

For example, the system’s ability to detect changes in brain waves might allow doctors to spot declines in cognitive function, paving the way for early detection of dementia, he said.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2015/01/11/national/science-health/aist-brings-mind-reading-technology-closer-reality/#.VLJzaek5Ab0

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