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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 76435 times)
Luvey
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1215 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 07:25am »

on Sep 20th, 2010, 07:19am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Good morning all,
cheesy
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Good morning Crystal..... grin Hope you have a fantastic day!

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« Reply #1216 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 07:26am »

New York Times

September 19, 2010
Taiwanese Tourists Shot in New Delhi
By JIM YARDLEY and HARI KUMAR

NEW DELHI — Two armed assailants riding a motorcycle opened fire on a tourist bus parked outside of New Delhi’s most famous mosque on Sunday, in an attack that comes as the city prepares to host the Commonwealth Games in two weeks.

Two Taiwanese tourists were wounded in the shooting, which occurred outside the Jama Masjid mosque at 11:30 a.m., the police said. The two attackers indiscriminately fired seven or eight rounds into the bus before escaping on their motorcycle as a nearby police officer tried to chase. A citywide manhunt was under way for the two attackers.

“It is difficult to say what the motive is,” Karnail Singh, the New Delhi joint police commissioner, told reporters.

The target as well as the timing immediately raised questions about whether the shooting was a deliberate terrorist attack. Security is a paramount concern for the Games, which open Oct. 3 and are expected to bring thousands of athletes and spectators to New Delhi for the sports competition among nations of the former British empire.

Various media organizations published a letter in Hindi purporting to be from the Indian Mujahedeen and claiming responsibility for the attack. The Indian government considers the group to be a terrorist organization. It is unclear which news organizations received the original communication, which also threatened the Games, and by late evening there were questions and skepticism about what connection the letter might have to the actual attack.

On Sunday, Sheila Dikshit, the chief minister of New Delhi, sought to calm fears about the attack, urging the public not to panic and repeating that the police had initiated a major investigation into the shooting. “It is not correct to write or assume that this is a terror attack,” Ms. Dikshit said on NDTV, a 24-hour news channel in New Delhi.

Commonwealth Games organizers said in a statement on Sunday that the shooting would have “no impact” on the Games. Officials “have made elaborate arrangements to provide the Commonwealth Games athletes and officials a safe and secure environment,” it said.

The two injured Taiwanese tourists were undergoing surgery in a New Delhi hospital on Sunday. Dr. Amit Banerjee, of Lok Narayan Jay Prakash Hospital, said that the tourists had suffered abdominal injuries.

The Jama Masjid is one of India’s largest mosques and is located in the old part of the city, across from the historic Red Fort. Built in the 17th century, the mosque attracts thousands of Muslims for Friday Prayer. In 2006, it was attacked by two low-intensity blasts that injured more than a dozen people. The mosque itself was not damaged.

Heather Timmons contributed reporting.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/20/world/asia/20delhi.html?_r=1&src=me&ref=world

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« Reply #1217 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 07:32am »

New York Times

September 19, 2010
Mormon-Owned Paper Stands With Immigrants
By JEREMY W. PETERS

SALT LAKE CITY — Joseph A. Cannon is nobody’s liberal. His résumé reads as if it belongs to a delegate to the Republican National Convention, which, incidentally, he was in 2004.

He was an official for the Environmental Protection Agency under Ronald Reagan and chairman of the Utah Republican Party. As editor of The Deseret News, he published editorials condemning deficit spending, same-sex marriage and lenient alcohol laws.

So it was something of a head-scratcher, Mr. Cannon said, when his voice mail and e-mail started filling up with messages from people calling him a “liberal freak” for the sympathetic way his paper often writes about illegal immigrants.

“You have become a dangerous newspaper, one that I am on the verge of discontinuing,” wrote one outraged reader.

The News’s push for a more liberal embrace of undocumented immigrants has led to a collision between its editorial mission and its conservative, mostly Mormon, readers. But if this issue seems to stray from the reliably conservative politics of The News, Utah’s second-largest paper behind The Salt Lake Tribune, that may be in part because it is owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Hispanics are the most populous minority group in the country — and they represent a vast potential constituency for the Mormon church, which has already made considerable efforts to develop strong relations with Hispanic communities. Those efforts include, since February, a Spanish-language paper called El Observador.

“The church’s practice is to say, ‘Look, we’re not immigration agents. We care for the soul,’ ” Mr. Cannon said in an interview from his office in downtown Salt Lake City, where he can look out his window at the towering spires of the Salt Lake Temple.

Both The News and El Observador are owned by the Deseret Media Companies (pronounced DEZ-er-ET; it is named after the provisional state of Deseret founded by Mormons in the Salt Lake Valley in 1849), which also owns Utah’s largest television station, KSL, and its largest news Web site, KSL.com.

Because any editorial that appears under the Deseret Media masthead carries the unofficial imprimatur of the church in many Mormons’ eyes, Deseret editors and executives could indeed help shape opinions in the heavily Mormon state Legislature, where lawmakers are debating a zero-tolerance illegal immigration law similar to the one passed in Arizona this year.

For the time being, church leaders seem uninterested in wading into the debate by taking an official policy position, as they did by declaring support for the referendum to ban same-sex marriage in California. Rather, it has made only a benign public appeal for “careful reflection and civil discourse” on the issue. But that has hardly soothed matters.

That the main sponsor of the Arizona law, Russell Pearce, is a Mormon has not been lost on many Hispanics here. And some active Mormons said they thought that the church, through its media properties, was trying to reassure Hispanics who were suspicious that it condoned anti-immigrant attitudes.

“Some of my Latino friends have said, ‘I’m going to leave the church over this,’ ” said Tony Yapias, director of Proyecto Latino de Utah, a Latino outreach group. “My view is that this is an aggressive way for the L.D.S. church to very effectively use their media power to try to soften up the community. They’re sending a message to their members.”

Both Mr. Cannon and Deseret Media’s chief executive, Mark H. Willes, said they never sought approval from church officials on any editorial or article they ran. They said the church also never asked to see an article before it was printed, though former editors said the practice had been to fax drafts of editorials to church headquarters.

The newsroom at The Deseret News is a mix of practicing and nonpracticing Mormons and people of other religious beliefs. It is not a strictly doctrinaire environment. There is a coffee machine in the break room, despite the church’s discouragement of drinking caffeinated beverages.

But as Mr. Cannon makes clear, The Deseret News is hardly going to run something that would offend its owners.

“No one is going to write an editorial here that we thought was inconsistent with or would poke the church in the eye,” said Mr. Cannon, who this week will move on to become a special adviser to the editorial board. “That’s not going to happen.”

Themes that appear in The Deseret News’s coverage of immigration are often echoed in El Observador. Its editor, Patricia Dark, said the paper now had 7,000 subscribers who received home delivery. Subscribers pay nothing; the three-times-a-week paper is subsidized by the church.

With a staff of three full-time reporters, El Observador typically devotes two or three articles in each edition to immigration-related topics. A major theme is the effect that deportation has on families. “Terror en familias hispanas” read one recent front-page headline.

“The breaking up of families is horrific, so we want to highlight that,” said Ms. Dark. Among Mormons, whose faith teaches that the family bond should be eternally inviolate, the issue of severing families is especially resonant.

Selecting themes and story lines that will appeal to Mormon values has been one way Deseret Media has tried to shift the debate.

Last month, Mr. Willes took the highly unusual step of writing an editorial that simultaneously ran on the front pages of The News and El Observador. The editorial, accompanied in print by an image of the Statue of Liberty with its famous inscription “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,” was also read by Mr. Willes on KSL, Salt Lake City’s NBC affiliate, and the KSL radio station.

“We, of all people, should be sensitive to the desire of others to provide more opportunities for themselves and their families,” Mr. Willes wrote, making a direct appeal to Mormons’ sense of their history. Like Mormons, who fled the Midwest in the mid-19th century after failing to assimilate into society, undocumented immigrants know what it is like to be outcasts, Mr. Willes said.

But those who find their positions on immigration criticized by Mr. Willes’s media companies see journalistic bias, not Mormon values, at work.

“Obviously, they’re trying to sway public opinion in a big way,” said Stephen Sandstrom, a Republican state representative who is sponsoring a bill that would create a set of strict immigration laws similar to Arizona’s. Mr. Sandstrom, a Mormon, said he was not deterred. “I do have people in e-mails saying, ‘You’d better not back down or I’ll know the church got to you.’ And I just assure them that the L.D.S. church is not directing me one way or another on this.”

The immigration issue has become intensely personal for Mr. Willes, a former publisher of The Los Angeles Times who was selected by church leaders to run Deseret Media a year and a half ago.

He has consulted lawyers to advise him on the technicalities of immigration law and convened a committee of Deseret Media editors and executives that meets to brainstorm ideas on immigration coverage. “Everywhere we looked, the problem just seemed substantially more complicated than the dialogue,” he said.

Mr. Cannon acknowledged that changing minds would be difficult, but he said he hoped at the very least to challenge readers to reflect on immigration through the teachings of their religion.

“What are the two commandments? Love God and love your neighbor,” he said. “These people are our neighbors — incontestably, by any definition, they are our neighbors.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/20/business/media/20deseret.html?ref=us

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« Reply #1218 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 07:35am »

Science Daily

Magical BEANs: New Nano-Sized Particles Could Provide Mega-Sized Data Storage
ScienceDaily (Sep. 20, 2010) —

The ability of phase-change materials to readily and swiftly transition between different phases has made them valuable as a low-power source of non-volatile or "flash" memory and data storage. Now an entire new class of phase-change materials has been discovered by researchers with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley that could be applied to phase change random access memory (PCM) technologies and possibly optical data storage as well. The new phase-change materials -- nanocrystal alloys of a metal and semiconductor -- are called "BEANs," for binary eutectic-alloy nanostructures.

"Phase changes in BEANs, switching them from crystalline to amorphous and back to crystalline states, can be induced in a matter of nanoseconds by electrical current, laser light or a combination of both," says Daryl Chrzan, a physicist who holds joint appointments with Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division and UC Berkeley's Department of Materials Science and Engineering. "Working with germanium tin nanoparticles embedded in silica as our initial BEANs, we were able to stabilize both the solid and amorphous phases and could tune the kinetics of switching between the two simply by altering the composition."

Chrzan is the corresponding author on a paper reporting the results of this research which has been published in the journal NanoLetters titled "Embedded Binary Eutectic Alloy Nanostructures: A New Class of Phase Change Materials."

Co-authoring the paper with Chrzan were Swanee Shin, Julian Guzman, Chun-Wei Yuan, Christopher Liao, Cosima Boswell-Koller, Peter Stone, Oscar Dubon, Andrew Minor, Masashi Watanabe, Jeffrey Beeman, Kin Yu, Joel Ager and Eugene Haller.

"What we have shown is that binary eutectic alloy nanostructures, such as quantum dots and nanowires, can serve as phase change materials," Chrzan says. "The key to the behavior we observed is the embedding of nanostructures within a matrix of nanoscale volumes. The presence of this nanostructure/matrix interface makes possible a rapid cooling that stabilizes the amorphous phase, and also enables us to tune the phase-change material's transformation kinetics."

A eutectic alloy is a metallic material that melts at the lowest possible temperature for its mix of constituents. The germanium tin compound is a eutectic alloy that has been considered by the investigators as a prototypical phase-change material because it can exist at room temperature in either a stable crystalline state or a metastable amorphous state. Chrzan and his colleagues found that when germanium tin nanocrystals were embedded within amorphous silica the nanocrystals formed a bilobed nanostructure that was half crystalline metallic and half crystalline semiconductor.

"Rapid cooling following pulsed laser melting stabilizes a metastable, amorphous, compositionally mixed phase state at room temperature, while moderate heating followed by slower cooling returns the nanocrystals to their initial bilobed crystalline state," Chrzan says. "The silica acts as a small and very clean test tube that confines the nanostructures so that the properties of the BEAN/silica interface are able to dictate the unique phase-change properties."

While they have not yet directly characterized the electronic transport properties of the bilobed and amorphous BEAN structures, from studies on related systems Chrzan and his colleagues expect that the transport as well as the optical properties of these two structures will be substantially different and that these difference will be tunable through composition alterations.

"In the amorphous alloyed state, we expect the BEAN to display normal, metallic conductivity," Chrzan says. "In the bilobed state, the BEAN will include one or more Schottky barriers that can be made to function as a diode. For purposes of data storage, the metallic conduction could signify a zero and a Schottky barrier could signify a one."

Chrzan and his colleagues are now investigating whether BEANs can sustain repeated phase-changes and whether the switching back and forth between the bilobed and amorphous structures can be incorporated into a wire geometry. They also want to model the flow of energy in the system and then use this modeling to tailor the light/current pulses for optimum phase-change properties.

The in-situ Transmission electron microscopy characterizations of the BEAN structures were carried out at Berkeley Lab's National Center for Electron Microscopy, one of the world's premier centers for electron microscopy and microcharacterization.

Berkeley Lab is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory located in Berkeley, California. It conducts unclassified scientific research and is managed by the University of California for the DOE Office of Science.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100917085626.htm

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« Reply #1219 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 07:37am »

Science Daily

Data Clippers to Set Sail to Enhance Future Planetary Missions
ScienceDaily (Sep. 17, 2010) —

A new golden age of sailing may be about to begin -- in space. Future missions to explore the outer planets could employ fleets of 'data-clippers' -- manoeuvrable spacecraft equipped with solar sails, to ship vast quantities of scientific data to back Earth.

According to Joel Poncy of Thales Alenia Space, the technology could be ready in time to support mid-term missions to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Poncy will be presenting an assessment of data clippers at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) 2010 in Rome on Sept. 20, 2010.

"Space-rated flash memories will soon be able to store the huge quantities of data needed for the global mapping of planetary bodies in high resolution. But a full high-res map of, say, Europa or Titan, would take several decades to download from a traditional orbiter, even using very large antennae. Downloading data is the major design driver for interplanetary missions. We think that data clippers would be a very efficient way of overcoming this bottleneck," said Poncy.

Poncy and his team at Thales Alenia Space have carried out a preliminary assessment for a data clipper mission. Their concept is for a clipper to fly close to a planetary orbiter, upload its data and fly by Earth, at which point terabytes of data could be downloaded to the ground station. A fleet of data clippers cruising around the Solar System could provide support for an entire suite of planetary missions.

"We have looked at the challenges of a data clipper mission and we think that it could be ready for a launch in the late 2020s. This means that the technology should be included now in the roadmap for future missions, and this is why we are presenting this study at EPSC," said Poncy.

Poncy's team have assessed the communications systems and tracking devices that a data clipper would need, as well as the flyby conditions and pointing accuracy required for the massive data transfers. Recent advances in technology mean that spacecraft propelled by solar sails, which use radiation pressure from photons emitted by the Sun, or electric sails, which harness the momentum of the solar wind, can now be envisaged for mid-term missions. The Japanese Space Agency, JAXA, is currently testing a solar sail mission, IKAROS.

"Using the Sun as a propulsion source has the considerable advantage of requiring no propellant on board. As long as the hardware doesn't age too much and the spacecraft is manoeuvrable, the duration of the mission can be very long. The use of data clippers could lead to a valuable downsizing of exploration missions and lower ground operation costs -- combined with a huge science return. The orbiting spacecraft would still download some samples of their data directly to Earth to enable real-time discoveries and interactive mission operations. But the bulk of the data is less urgent and is often processed by scientists much later. Data clippers could provide an economy delivery service from the outer Solar System, over and over again," said Poncy.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100919182645.htm

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« Reply #1220 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 07:41am »

Wired

First Habitable Exoplanet Could Be Discovered by May
By Lisa Grossman September 20, 2010

A new mathematical analysis predicts the first truly habitable exoplanet will show itself by early May 2011.

Well, more or less. “There is some wiggle room,” said Samuel Arbesman of the Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science, lead author of a new paper posted online and to be published in PLoS ONE October 4. His calculations predict a 50 percent probability that the first habitable exoplanet will be discovered in May 2011, a 66 percent chance by the end of 2013 and 75 percent chance by 2020.

“This is, as far as we can tell, right around the corner,” said exoplanet expert Greg Laughlin of the University of California, Santa Cruz, coauthor of the paper.

Astronomers have found 490 planets outside our solar system to date, and those planets have been getting steadily smaller and more Earth-like. But none so far actually resemble Earth in its most important property: the ability to support life.

So Arbesman and Laughlin devised a mathematical way to define habitability using the techniques of scientometrics, the scientific study of science itself.

The pair considered a planet’s mass and its surface temperature at the points in its orbits when it is closest and furthest away from its star, and calculated which of these properties would be friendliest to liquid water (and therefore, presumably, life). Then they plotted their habitability function on a scale of 0 to 1, where 0 is uninhabitable and 1 is a clone of Earth.

Next, the researchers turned to the exoplanets that have already been found. They calculated the habitability metric for 370 exoplanets whose masses and distances from their stars are relatively well-known, and plotted that number against the planet’s date of discovery. Then they used a statistical method called bootstrapping, which looks at subsets of data to get a better idea of the overall distribution, to extrapolate forward to a planet with a habitability value of 1.

The median date for this planet to make its grand entrance, they found, is early next May. And the planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft may not be the one to find it, the researchers add.

“To find the really good stuff that Kepler is going to detect is going to take a few years,” Laughlin said. “Because the mission has only been flying for a bit more than a year, they just haven’t had time to find the planets that are genuinely habitable. Though they will.”

“We simply wanted to say it’s an open field, we don’t know who’s going to win,” Arbesman said. “But it seems like whoever does win, it’s going to happen soon.”

Exoplanet expert Sara Seager of MIT says she’s not surprised.

“They made a prediction you could probably make without all that probability,” she said. “People are specifically searching for planets that have liquid water. Just knowing how many people are looking and how many stars they’re looking at… If you want a big Earth around a small star, that could happen any day.”

Arbesman and Laughlin admit their habitability metric is a little optimistic and their analysis leaves out factors like the march of technology. “It’s not a scientific result, it’s not a discovery,” Laughlin said. “It’s just something to spark discussion, to point out an interesting trend.”

And if they’re wrong, he adds, we’ll know soon enough.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/09/habitable-world-next-may/

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« Reply #1221 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 07:44am »

Telegraph

Surfing dogs of all sizes take part in the 2nd Huntington Beach Surf Dog competition in California

Photo gallery after the jump

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/picturegalleries/howaboutthat/8013487/Surfing-dogs-of-all-sizes-take-part-in-the-2nd-Huntington-Beach-Surf-Dog-competition-in-California.html

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« Reply #1222 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 07:46am »

on Sep 20th, 2010, 07:25am, Luvey wrote:
Good morning Crystal..... grin Hope you have a fantastic day!

Pen


Good evening Pen!
Hope your day was a good one. It's been unusually rainy here. We normally don't get much rain until November. Everyone is spoiled. grin
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« Reply #1223 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 07:53am »

UFO Digest

Ghosts, Earthbound Spirits, Nightmares and Psychics: The Unseen World
Submitted by Paul Schroeder on Sun, 09/19/2010 - 14:39

The feeling of unseen human hands and their undeniable touches on my arms, back and shoulders with concurrent accompanying psychic disturbances increase, but now when I do experience these symptoms of a lost soul/ ghost who jumps on me, an energy connection is felt such that my skin burns where I am touched.

At one time, in order to block these experiences, knowing that some medications did change brain chemistry to the extent as to simply put one beyond the reach of such creatures, I tried antihistamines and did indeed manage to stop it all temporarily.

I had read that on the Internet and just wanting to feel normal, again, tried it on myself. I don't know how it works but it works..... temporarily.

But, one can't live on Benedryll.

Other medications have specifically been developed for people who are troubled by 'seeing things', 'hearing things' and 'feeling things' and these were pharmacologically designed because modern medicine makes no differentiation, no distinctions between spiritual dysfunctions and psychological dysfunctions.
A modern clinician unarmed and unversed in such spiritual truths, perceives a child patient who experiences these phenomena as more psychotic than more psychic, and not ever as a young 'sensitive' who has not yet learned but must, how to close his energies to such entities...

I was told by others early on that what I was going through was a blessing.

I did not accept that at the time.

It has been a tough learning experience for both me and the unseen world; I once advised a spirit whose hand rested heavily on my right shoulder(I could feel the span of fingers) to "cross over to the other side", of course meaning the other dimension that we all come from and and go to, 'Heaven' , and a few seconds later, it obliged my request by crossing over to my left side and good naturedly resting its hand, THERE.

I deduced that rather than it having a rarefied sense of humor, it had no idea whatsoever what I was referring to...

Of course, when none of this works, or when a demon or non juvenile reptilian cruises in, for what turns out to be an extended visit, an onset of the most awful nightmares unlike any you can imagine, vivid and terrifying ensues.

Such entities refuse rescue and delight in tormenting humans; nothing else except unholy ones could do such violence to mere dreams.

During such sieges, I am in spiritual crises and I have had to neatly d iscard any pedestrian Freudian or Jungian explanations as simply moot and seek metaphysical approaches that do, after a fashion, work.

Recently, in self defense for myself as well as in empathy and pathos for a lost soul, I counsel any such spirit who stumbles onto me with love and compassion, as one would a lost traveler.

It could very well be you or I who were so lost.

Rather than dismiss an unseen touch and the ghost as though it were a fly at my mustache, or treat it with the disgust or shock that a ghost often elicits from a random stranger, I openly complain to the spirit that phantoms DO fill the air around us, and add that although we all come from God, one way or the other, we all must have to fight very hard to return to God.

I relay this to the unseen intelligence, touching me, with a newfound lack of fear and with real pathos and as much sympathy as I can muster all the while fully aware that it is likely psychically dangerous and as much disturbed as it was when it was a person, in the body.

more after the jump
http://www.ufodigest.com/article/ghosts-earthbound-spirits-nightmares-and-psychics-unseen-world

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« Reply #1224 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 07:58am »

The new Hawaii five O is on tonight!!!!! grin
I don't care if every actor in it is a stuffed toy, I can't wait to see the scenery.
Crystal

USA TODAY Never underestimate a network's determination to turn a favored actor into a star.

With Moonlight and Three Rivers, CBS has tried and failed twice to sell Australian import Alex O'Loughlin to a skeptical American public (three times, if you count the CBS-produced feature The Back-up Plan). But this time, the sale is likely to go through, even though this by-the-book remake succeeds more despite his leaden performance than because of it.

Stepping into the role so much more distinctively played by Jack Lord, O'Loughlin stars as Steve McGarrett, a military cop who comes home to investigate the murder of his father. With a push from the governor (a cameo by Jean Smart), he's soon forming his own unfettered task force - a formidable group made up of Chin Ho Kelly (Lost's Daniel Dae Kim); a now-feminized Kono (Battlestar Galactica's Grace Park); and, as "Danno" Williams, Scott Caan, who steals every scene he's in.

As origin stories go, it's efficiently told, with a gunfight every 15 minutes or so and enough explosions for even the most demanding action fan. It's TV at its least challenging, but it has an incredibly gorgeous setting, a pre-sold concept, a cushy time slot, a solid supporting cast and a starmaking turn by Caan. And if the actual star marries the body of a surfer to the magnetism of a board, let's just say it won't be the first time CBS has overcome such a problem.

Theme song sounds great, though. At least the network got that part totally right.

By Robert Bianco, USA TODAY

http://www.wltx.com/news/story.aspx?storyid=98844&catid=35

edit to add:

Tonight's 'Hawaii Five-0' includes original's Mercury Marquis

When the new Hawaii Five-O premieres on CBS tonight (10 p.m. ET/PT), the new Steve McGarrett dusts off his dad's old 1974 Mercury Marquis. And it just so happens that the sedan was the one used in the original series.

Cars played a big role in the 1970s original, with Jack Lord wheeling around Oahu as he played out his character as crime-cracking head of Hawaii's state police force.

The new Steve McGarrett, played by Alex O'Loughlin, is a Navy vet whose father was murdered. That's him in the photos, peering at the vintage Mercury.

"There are a lot of things in the new show that pay homage to the original. It was a great show of its time, (but) it's 2010," O'Loughlin told USA TODAY's Bill Keveney.

After the original Hawaii Five-O ended, the black Marquis was later given to a stunt man, John Nordlum, the Honolulu Advertiser reported in April. The car was lead character McGarrett's second, after a 1968 Mercury Parklane Brougham. Producers borrowed the newer car for the new series.

By the way, Nordlum has done his own maintenance on the car's 460-cubic-inch V-8.

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/driveon/post/2010/09/tonights-hawaii-five-0-includes-originals-mercury-marquis/1
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« Reply #1225 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 08:21am »

on Sep 20th, 2010, 07:46am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Good evening Pen!
Hope your day was a good one. It's been unusually rainy here. We normally don't get much rain until November. Everyone is spoiled. grin
Crystal


Thanks Crystal... I had a lovely day. It was such a beautiful warm, sunny, balmy day today.... we are coming out of winter, not that we have much of a winter, with a few stormy days here and there. Some years it gets rougher, but not often. Plenty of rain though. I love it when it rains at night as we have a tin roof, and its wonderful to snuggle up in bed and listen to the rain pounding on the roof. "As snug as a bug in a rug" smiley
I am glad you had the rain.... grin
Take care
Pen
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1226 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 08:23am »

on Sep 20th, 2010, 08:21am, Luvey wrote:
Thanks Crystal... I had a lovely day. It was such a beautiful warm, sunny, balmy day today.... we are coming out of winter, not that we have much of a winter, with a few stormy days here and there. Some years it gets rougher, but not often. Plenty of rain though. I love it when it rains at night as we have a tin roof, and its wonderful to snuggle up in bed and listen to the rain pounding on the roof. "As snug as a bug in a rug" smiley
I am glad you had the rain.... grin
Take care
Pen


I know what you mean about the rain on a tin roof. We had one in the mountains of Arizona, a tin roof that is. It was wonderful listening to the rain.
Crystal
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« Reply #1227 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 08:25am »

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I see the Depression is affecting the First family......

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« Reply #1228 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 08:35am »

New York Times

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September 19, 2010
For the Unemployed Over 50, Fears of Never Working Again
By MOTOKO RICH

VASHON ISLAND, Wash. — Patricia Reid is not in her 70s, an age when many Americans continue to work. She is not even in her 60s. She is just 57.

But four years after losing her job she cannot, in her darkest moments, escape a nagging thought: she may never work again.

College educated, with a degree in business administration, she is experienced, having worked for two decades as an internal auditor and analyst at Boeing before losing that job.

But that does not seem to matter, not for her and not for a growing number of people in their 50s and 60s who desperately want or need to work to pay for retirement and who are starting to worry that they may be discarded from the work force — forever.

Since the economic collapse, there are not enough jobs being created for the population as a whole, much less for those in the twilight of their careers.

Of the 14.9 million unemployed, more than 2.2 million are 55 or older. Nearly half of them have been unemployed six months or longer, according to the Labor Department. The unemployment rate in the group — 7.3 percent — is at a record, more than double what it was at the beginning of the latest recession.

After other recent downturns, older people who lost jobs fretted about how long it would take to return to the work force and worried that they might never recover their former incomes. But today, because it will take years to absorb the giant pool of unemployed at the economy’s recent pace, many of these older people may simply age out of the labor force before their luck changes.

For Ms. Reid, it has been four years of hunting — without a single job offer. She buzzes energetically as she describes the countless applications she has lobbed through the Internet, as well as the online courses she is taking to burnish her software skills.

Still, when she is pressed, her can-do spirit falters.

“There are these fears in the background, and they are suppressed,” said Ms. Reid, who is now selling some of her jewelry and clothes online and is late on some credit card payments. “I have had nightmares about becoming a bag lady,” she said. “It could happen to anyone. So many people are so close to it, and they don’t even realize it.”

Being unemployed at any age can be crushing. But older workers suspect their résumés often get shoved aside in favor of those from younger workers. Others discover that their job-seeking skills — as well as some technical skills sought by employers — are rusty after years of working for the same company.

Many had in fact anticipated working past conventional retirement ages to gird themselves financially for longer life spans, expensive health care and reduced pension guarantees.

The most recent recession has increased the need to extend working life. Home values, often a family’s most important asset, have been battered. Stock portfolios are only now starting to recover. According to a Gallup poll in April, more than a third of people not yet retired plan to work beyond age 65, compared with just 12 percent in 1995.

Older workers who lose their jobs could pose a policy problem if they lose their ability to be self-sufficient. “That’s what we should be worrying about,” said Carl E. Van Horn, professor of public policy and director of the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University, “what it means to this class of the new unemployables, people who have been cast adrift at a very vulnerable part of their career and their life.”

Forced early retirement imposes an intense financial strain, particularly for those at lower incomes. The recession and its aftermath have already pushed down some older workers. In figures released last week by the Census Bureau, the poverty rate among those 55 to 64 increased to 9.4 percent in 2009, from 8.6 percent in 2007.

But even middle-class people who might skate by on savings or a spouse’s income are jarred by an abrupt end to working life and to a secure retirement.

“That’s what I spent my whole life in pursuit of, was security,” Ms. Reid said. “Until the last few years, I felt very secure in my job.”

As an auditor, Ms. Reid loved figuring out the kinks in a manufacturing or parts delivery process. But after more than 20 years of commuting across Puget Sound to Boeing, Ms. Reid was exhausted when she was let go from her $80,000-a-year job.

Stunned and depressed, she sent out résumés, but figured she had a little time to recover. So she took vacations to Turkey and Thailand with her husband, who is a home repairman. She sought chiropractic treatments for a neck injury and helped nurse a priest dying of cancer.

Most of her days now are spent in front of a laptop, holed up in a lighthouse garret atop the house that her husband, Denny Mielock, built in the 1990s on a breathtaking piece of property overlooking the sound.

As she browses the job listings that clog her e-mail in-box, she refuses to give in to her fears. “If I let myself think like that all the time,” she said, “I could not even bear getting out of bed in the morning.”

With her husband’s home repair business pummeled by the housing downturn, the bills are mounting. Although the couple do not have a mortgage on their 3,000-square-foot house, they pay close to $7,000 a year in property taxes. The roof is leaking. Their utility bills can be $300 a month in the winter, even though they often keep the thermostat turned down to 50 degrees.

They could try to sell their home, but given the depressed housing market, they are reluctant.

“We are circling the drain here, and I am bailing like hell,” said Ms. Reid, emitting an incongruous cackle, as if laughter is the only response to her plight. “But the boat is still sinking.”

It is not just the finances that have destabilized her life.

Her husband worries that she isolates herself and that she does not socialize enough. “We’ve both been hard workers our whole lives,” said Mr. Mielock, 59. Ms. Reid sometimes rose just after 3 a.m. to make the hourlong commute to Boeing’s data center in Bellevue and attended night school to earn a master’s in management information systems.

“A job is more than a job, you know,” Mr. Mielock said. “It’s where you fit in society.”

Here in the greater Seattle area, a fifth of those claiming extended unemployment benefits are 55 and older.

To help seniors polish their job-seeking skills, WorkSource, a local consortium of government and nonprofit groups, recently began offering seminars. On a recent morning, 14 people gathered in a windowless conference room at a local community college to get tips on how to age-proof their résumés and deflect questions about being overqualified.

Motivational posters hung on one wall, bearing slogans like “Failure is the path of least persistence.”

Using PowerPoint slides, Liz Howland, the chipper but no-nonsense session leader, projected some common myths about older job-seekers on a screen: “Older workers are less capable of evaluating information, making decisions and problem-solving” or “Older workers are rigid and inflexible and have trouble adapting to change.”

Ms. Howland, 61, ticked off the reasons those statements were inaccurate. But a clear undercurrent of anxiety ran through the room. “Is it really true that if you have the energy and the passion that they will overlook the age factor?” asked a 61-year-old man who had been laid off from a furniture maker last October.

Gallows humor reigned. As Ms. Howland — who suggested that applicants remove any dates older than 15 years from their résumé — advised the group on how to finesse interview questions like “When did you have the job that helped you develop that skill?” one out-of-work journalist deadpanned: “How about ‘during the 20th century?’ ”

During a break, Anne Richard, who declined to give her age, confessed she was afraid she would not be able to work again after losing her contract as a house director at a University of Washington sorority in June. Although she had 20 years of experience as an office clerk in Chattanooga, Tenn., she feared her technology skills had fallen behind.

“I don’t feel like I can compete with kids who have been on computers all their lives,” said Ms. Richard, who was sleeping on the couch of a couple she had met at church and contemplating imminent homelessness.

Older people who lose their jobs take longer to find work. In August, the average time unemployed for those 55 and older was slightly more than 39 weeks, according to the Labor Department, the longest of any age group. That is much worse than in August 1983, also after a deep recession, when someone unemployed in that age group spent an average of 27.5 weeks finding work.

At this year’s pace of an average of 82,000 new jobs a month, it will take at least eight more years to create the 8 million positions lost during the recession. And that does not even allow for population growth.

Advocates for the elderly worry that younger people are more likely to fill the new jobs as well.

“I do think the longer someone is out of work, the more employers are going to question why it is that someone hasn’t been able to find work,” said Sara Rix, senior strategic policy adviser at AARP, the lobbying group for seniors. “Their skills have atrophied for one thing, and technology changes so rapidly that even if nothing happened to the skills that you have, they may become increasingly less relevant to the jobs that are becoming available.”

more after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/20/business/economy/20older.html?hp

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« Reply #1229 on: Sep 20th, 2010, 12:41pm »

Blastr!

Talk to the people involved with NBC's new series The Event and there's one thing you won't find out about ... what the actual event really is. Despite that, we were able to expose some other secrets by chatting with stars Blair Underwood and Jason Ritter and creator Nick Wauters.

What we do know is that the series premieres after Chuck at 9 p.m. ET, in Heroes' old slot. And while it's got plenty of action and you hear comparisons to 24 and Lost, there's no denying that The Event is not really like any other show on TV right now.

In fact, here are 11 secrets we uncovered about the new series. Consider them spoilers:

The Event, the series, is ...

"It is a combination mix of adventure, political intrigue," said Wauters. "There is a love story. There's a little bit of science fiction in there. It is definitely a thriller. So there are a lot of different elements that you will find in this show."

That's a lot of stuff to throw in one series. But the show's creator, who is a big fan of serialized shows, promises, "This kind of has the pace of 24 and the character development of Lost."

"But really, overall, the first few episodes will really just take you on an amazing roller-coaster ride. I think that is a ride you're not going to want to miss. Definitely check out the pilot: Something happens at the end of that you won't expect. That I can guarantee you," said Wauters with a laugh. "This show is not really—you really can't define or understand the show until you've seen the last few seconds, and then that's what defines this show."

The event, meaning the actual event the series is based on, is ...

Sorry, you're just not going to find out that easily. According to Underwood, who plays President Elias Martinez, "What I can tell you ... is that the event is something very eventful, but it is something that can potentially change the course of mankind as we know it. In a nutshell, that's what is to come."

So it's a global event of some kind. Wauters gets slightly more specific. "The event is a seminal event that will take place within the world of our show and affect our characters. We'll follow our characters as things lead up to the event, throughout the event, and then after the event. So the event is not the endgame, and things will happen past the event in the series."

However, it's not all about the event, said Underwood. "With a show named The Event ... I think it's very wise and clever to focus on the characters that are within this world."

The Event is planned in three parts

"In terms of what the event is, of course, that's the overriding question. The way the series is laid out is that there's a pre-event," said Underwood. "The event is something that is to come. It's all about ramping up to the event. We will see the event at some point, and then it's the consequences and the aftermath of that event."

"For the most part, only a few, a handful of people are aware that this might be coming, and eventually more and more people will find out, including our audience. And then our audience will experience that journey with our characters, and waiting for the event to take place, and then going through that event, and then living past it," said Wauters.

And how long before the event happens? We'll have to wait and see, said the cagey creator.

And you thought Lost messed with time:

Almost from the beginning of the pilot, The Event skips around in time in a way that few other shows have been able to get away with. "I knew I had to play with time and structure and time shifts and things like that," said Wauters.

For Ritter, who plays Sean Walker — the everyman whose girlfriend mysteriously vanishes and who stumbles upon a government conspiracy while investigating her disappearance—it's one of the things that drew him to the project.

"I was fascinated by having to put all these puzzle pieces together. Seeing these characters jump back and forth through time and have, for instance, my character be in a completely different place emotionally in the space of 11 days was really intriguing to me. And then, on the other hand, all the characters felt fully fleshed out and real, and it felt like we were in the hands of the first chapter of a really great story. And that was exciting to me."

How The Event is NOT like 24, Lost, FlashForward or Heroes

"Here's the deal," said Underwood. "I think people should watch the show, because, really, tonally ... and I know this has been said, but it's really true ... in the tone of the show, it has elements of 24 in its tone, and elements of Lost tonally. So to have a political thriller with science fiction undertones is something that obviously speaks to an audience," said Underwood.

"24 is gone. Lost is gone. Heroes is gone. FlashForward people liked from the very beginning. All those shows are gone now. So this show, The Event, fills the void, and it's not just tapping into those touchstones and those elements. It really is well done and well written. We have Evan Katz, who was part of the 24 team for years, Jeffrey Reiner, Nick Wauters. So we have a great team of people that know how to do just that," he said.

"They've carved out their own story and way to intrigue people," added Ritter. "But I think one of the things that they really wanted to make sure is that they knew exactly where they were going."

It is sci-fi, but it didn't start out that way

According to Wauters, the original version of the script actually did not have any sci-fi in it. But then NBC asked if he would add "some kind of science-fiction twist. ... They almost sounded apologetic, like, 'We're sorry, but we would like some sci-fi.' I'm a huge sci-fi geek, so I was more than happy to do it ... to oblige," he said with a laugh.

But The Event has only a touch of sci-fi in it so far, said Ritter. "We're only in the middle of shooting episode six right now. But so far this has rung true. The pilot is about 95 percent action and political conspiracy and things like that, and about 5 percent sci-fi. Just a tiny little element in there to make it interesting. And that's been about the percentage of the show. I mean, it generally takes place in the world that we are living in, with just a little fantastical element that sort of takes it to the next level, which is really exciting."

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Crystal

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