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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 76393 times)
INT21
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12585 on: Apr 20th, 2015, 1:49pm »

ZETAR,

You mean that ancient wisdom that gave us Phlogiston and the celestial spheres ?

Einstein reckons space is curved. Modern theoreticians say it probably is flat.

theories are like buses. Don't worry if you miss one. There will be another coming along soon.

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« Reply #12586 on: Apr 20th, 2015, 4:26pm »

on Apr 20th, 2015, 1:49pm, INT21 wrote:
..............
theories are like buses. Don't worry if you miss one. There will be another coming along soon.

HAL
INT21 smiley


laugh
So true.........
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« Reply #12587 on: Apr 20th, 2015, 5:07pm »

Reuters

Mon Apr 20, 2015 5:33pm EDT

U.S. Navy sends more warships near Yemen in security move

Reuters) - The U.S. Navy has sent an aircraft carrier and a guided-missile cruiser into the waters near Yemen, officials said on Monday, heightening the U.S. maritime security presence as concerns mount over Yemen's escalating conflict.

The U.S. Navy sent the carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt and its escort cruiser, USS Normandy, from the Gulf into the Arabian Sea on Sunday. Army Colonel Steve Warren, a Pentagon spokesman, denied reports the ships were on a mission to intercept Iranian arms shipments to Yemen.

The ships will join seven other U.S. warships in the waters near Yemen, which is torn by civil strife as Iranian-backed Houthi rebels battle forces loyal to the U.S.-backed president.

The U.S. Navy said it had increased its presence in the area because of the instability. It said in a statement the purpose was to "ensure the vital shipping lanes in the region remain open and safe."

The movements come as U.S. officials closely monitor an approaching convoy of seven Iranian ships believed to be headed toward Yemen with unknown cargo aboard.

At the White House, spokesman Josh Earnest acknowledged concerns about arms shipments from Tehran to the Houthis.

"We have seen evidence that the Iranians are supplying weapons and other forms of support to the Houthis in Yemen," Earnest said.

"That’s the kind of support that will only contribute to greater violence in that country, a country that’s already been racked by too much violence."

The Shi'ite Muslim Houthi fighters sidelined the central government after seizing the capital Sana'a in September and occupying a broad swath of Yemen, which borders oil giant Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia and a coalition of its Arab allies have launched air strikes in an effort to stop the advance of the Houthis, a move Tehran has condemned.

One U.S. official said the presence of the U.S. warships off Yemen give American decision-makers options for action in the event the situation deteriorates.

The other U.S. warships in the region include two destroyers, two mine-sweepers and three amphibious ships carrying 2,200 U.S. Marines.

The United States has deepened intelligence cooperation with Saudi Arabia as it carries out airstrikes in Yemen and is providing logistical support to the Saudi-led coalition. But it is stopping short of directly participating in the strikes.

(Reporting by David Alexander and Phil Stewart; Editing by Doina Chiacu and Christian Plumb)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/04/20/us-yemen-security-usa-navy-idUSKBN0NB28Q20150420

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« Reply #12588 on: Apr 21st, 2015, 10:01am »

HEY Y'ALL grin


Telegraph

Has Google found the Loch Ness Monster?

Google has used its Street View cameras to search for the Loch Ness Monster - and one picture in particular will attract the attention of Nessie hunters



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Is this the monster?
(Photo: Google)



By Oliver Smith
3:31PM BST 21 Apr 2015

Many have tried and failed to prove the existence of the Loch Ness Monster - now Google has joined the search.

The firm has, with the help of divers and local experts, used its Street View cameras to capture parts of the Scottish loch, the reputed home of the famous cryptid.

Its images, taken both above and below the surface of the water, are available to view from today - giving armchair travellers the chance to admire the Highlands scenery - or plunge to the depths in search of Nessie.

video and more after the jump:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/europe/uk/scotland/11549549/Has-Google-found-the-Loch-Ness-Monster.html

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« Reply #12589 on: Apr 21st, 2015, 10:08am »

Daily Mail

'UFO’ spotted in 55-year-old space photo: Conspiracy theorist says image proves aliens have been watching Nasa’s progress

Image was captured by Mercury-Redstone 1A probe in December 1960

Part of Project Mercury which was US' first mission to put men in space

By Ellie Zolfagharifard
Published: 13:18 EST, 20 April 2015
Updated: 13:40 EST, 20 April 2015



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A close up view of what Scott Waring believes is the UFO coming into view.
The image was taken as part of Project Mercury,
which was the US' first mission to put men in space.



A conspiracy theorist claims to have found evidence that aliens have been watching our early attempts at space travel.

UFO researcher Scott Waring says he has spotted an extra-terrestrial spacecraft in a 55-year-old photo from Nasa's Mercury Project.

Scientists say radical claims such as this are a simple case of pareidolia, which is the psychological response to seeing significant items in random places.

The image was taken by unmanned space probe Mercury-Redstone 1A on December 19, 1960.

'Why wouldn't aliens be interested in watching a historical moment in human history?,' asked Waring in his blog.

'Especially since the capsule was unmanned, there were no worries that they would be seen.'

The image was taken as part of Project Mercury, which was the US' first mission to put humans in space. It started in 1958 and ended in 1963.

The objectives of the program were to orbit a manned spacecraft around Earth, investigate man's ability to function in space, and to recover both the astronaut and spacecraft safely.

The first United States astronaut was Alan Shepard, whose suborbital flight of the Freedom 7 space capsule on May 5, 1961, was the first success of the Mercury program.

'It's actually the Earth in the background and the UFO is in space observing the Mercury capsule,' Waring said

This isn't the first time UFO hunters have scoured old Nasa images in the hope of finding evidence of alien life.

Earlier this year, Waring claimed to have seen two mysterious glowing objects in a photo from a Gemini mission in 1966.

And a ten-year old image of the Martian yielded what Waring believed to be a rock shaped uncannily like the President Obama's head - and that it could be part of a statue.


more after the jump:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3047497/UFO-spotted-55-year-old-space-photo-Conspiracy-theorist-says-image-proves-aliens-watching-Nasa-s-progress.html

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« Reply #12590 on: Apr 21st, 2015, 10:11am »





Ufo Sighting Over Templeton, California April 20, 2015
by Gagare1952
Published on Apr 20, 2015

Breaking News: My friend Robet.S.Taylor who lives in the city of Templeton, California
saw some strange orbs in the sky right before the earthquake today weird.

~

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« Reply #12591 on: Apr 21st, 2015, 10:37am »

France24.com

21 April 2015 - 17H06

Sweden opens world's first remote air control tower

Sweden on Tuesday inaugurated the world's first remote air control tower at the northern Ornskoldsvik airport, air traffic authorities said.

"The first Remote Tower Services landing!," Sweden's Air Navigation Services (LFV) announced on Twitter, under a picture taken from the plane before it landed around noon (1000 GMT).

The plane flew from the town of Sundsvall to Ornskoldsvik, around 150 kilometres (95 miles) to the north. Both the take-off and landing were guided by the air traffic control tower in Sundsvall.

According to LFV, cameras and sensors collect live-time information at the Ornskoldvik airport's remote tower, which is relayed to air traffic controllers in Sundsvall.

"We are the first in the world to have a remote tower.... The pilots in the plane were in contact with the tower in Sundsvall," LFV's communications director Elisabeth Lindgren told public radio SR.

Pilots experienced no difference in their communication with the tower.

"With the help of technology, air traffic is controlled the same way as in a traditional tower," LFV said in a statement.

"It went very safely," a SR journalist on board the first flight told the radio with a laugh after the landing, one of the 50 passengers on board.

"I held on to the armrest tightly but there was no problem. And if I understood correctly, for the pilot it made no difference," she added.

The two airports were chosen "for geographic reasons", Lindgren said without providing further details.

The technology is expected to be gradually rolled out in other airports in Sweden.

http://t.co/q5yWt4QepD

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« Reply #12592 on: Apr 21st, 2015, 2:45pm »

How Does Wireless Charging Work?

by Tia Ghose, Staff Writer
April 20, 2015

If you've ever untangled a Gordian knot of wires and cords, or seen your 2-year-old sucking on your laptop charger, you understand the appeal of wireless charging.
Until recently, however, there weren't alternatives to charging through bulky wires and cords. But as wireless charging becomes more advanced, it may be used to power a wide variety of things other than phones or watches, such as lamps or even electric buses, experts say.
But just what is wireless charging? And why is a technology developed a century ago just now becoming popular? We talked to a few experts to find out.

How it works

Wireless charging as a concept has been around since inventor and physicist Nikola Tesla first concluded that you could transfer power between two objects via an electromagnetic field, said Ron Resnick, president of the Power Matters Alliance, which has a wireless charging protocol.

Essentially, wireless charging uses a loop of coiled wires around a bar magnet — which is known as an inductor. When an electric current passes through the coiled wire, it creates an electromagnetic field around the magnet, which can then be used to transfer a voltage, or charge, to something nearby, Resnick said.

Most wireless power stations nowadays use a mat with an inductor inside, although electric toothbrushes, for example, have long had wireless charging embedded in their bases. Because the strength of the electromagnetic field drops sharply with distance (as the square of the distance between the objects), a device must be fairly close to a charging station to get much power that way, Resnick said.

But although the basic concept of wireless charging has been understood for more than 100 years, scientists hadn't figured out a way to efficiently transfer large amounts of power using this technique, Resnick said. The amount of electric charge transferred is proportional to the number of coils that can be looped around the tiny bar magnet, as well as the strength of the magnet. Until recently, wires and electronics couldn't be made small enough and cheaply enough to make wireless charging feasible.

Improvements in technology

But that's changed in recent years.

"The cost to do it has been really reduced," Resnick told Live Science. "To make it more efficient, you have to have very, very flat coils of wire," enabling many loops of wire to be coiled around the tiny bar magnet, he said.

What's more, wireless power stations must charge only objects that are supposed to be charged, such as a phone, and not, for example, a stray penny that falls on it, Resnick said.

To ensure that the wireless charging station doesn't power an errant object, wireless power stations use tiny transmitters that communicate with small receivers in a device, such as a phone, said John Perzow, vice president of market development for the Wireless Power Consortium, which created the Qi wireless charging technology.

In essence, the receiver "talks" to the charging station, Perzow said. "If it says I'm an authorized Qi receiver, it's OK to send me some power. I'll let you know how much power I need, and as those needs change, I'll let you know. And when I'm done charging, I'll let you know so you can go back to sleep," he told Live Science.

Future uses
Nowadays, both the Power Matters Alliance and Wireless Power Consortium have developed competing protocols, or systems, for wirelessly charging devices. Existing systems are used primarily to charge smartphones or smartwatches.

But wireless power may soon extend to many more applications. For instance, electric buses in South Korea can now be charged through a wireless platform, and IKEA is rolling out a new line of furniture, including lamps and tables, with built-in charging stations.

Other groups are integrating wireless charging stations into public locations so that people with so-called battery anxiety — that ever-present fear of running out of juice — can charge their devices on the go, Perzow said.

As technology improves, it may be possible to charge bigger and more power-hungry devices, such as blenders or even vacuum cleaners, Resnick said.

And companies are already designing systems in which wireless charging platforms in hotel rooms will be able to not only charge phones, but also figure out when people are in their rooms, sync their TV to the last spot in a movie they were watching on the plane and sense whether the air conditioning should be cranked up, Perzow said.

http://www.livescience.com/50536-what-is-wireless-charging.html

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« Reply #12593 on: Apr 21st, 2015, 2:46pm »

HAL,

TO WIT:

"Einstein reckons space is curved. Modern theoreticians say it probably is flat.

HMMM ~ SO POSSIBLY A CURVED FLAT PLANE cool

theories are like buses. Don't worry if you miss one. There will be another coming along soon.

AND AS YOU HAVE SO INSIGHTFULLY PREDICTED ~ I STUMBLED ACROSS THIS ~

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AT MINIMUM ~ IT SHOULD MAKE YA >>> IMAGINE <<<

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SHALOM...Z
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« Reply #12594 on: Apr 21st, 2015, 3:43pm »

ZETAR,

Kirlian photography was quite the in thing back in the seventies. It was supposed to be showing energy fields. Even energy fields from things that were not there, like missing fingers and sections of leaf that had been removed from the whole thing.

It was very interesting. The technical magazine Electronics Today International even ran an article on building your own Kirlian camera. I would have tried it but was in the army at the time.

As for curved space.

Begs the questions curved in which direction, and with reference to what ?

HAL
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« Reply #12595 on: Apr 21st, 2015, 7:00pm »

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I always found the aura topic interesting. First I have seen that pyramid pix. Nice catch Zetar. smiley
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« Reply #12596 on: Apr 21st, 2015, 8:51pm »

Universe has A Very Very Big Hole hole in it


Perhaps This is where Hell Freezes Over

http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/apr/20/astronomers-discover-largest-known-structure-in-the-universe-is-a-big-hole
An earlier image from the Planck telescope shows the Cold Spot, circled. Photograph: ESA and the Planck Collaboration

Hannah Devlin, science correspondent
@hannahdev

Monday 20 April 2015 12.22 EDT
Last modified on Tuesday 21 April 2015 06.06 ED
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Astronomers have discovered what they say is the largest known structure in the universe: an incredibly big hole.

The “supervoid”, as it is known, is a spherical blob 1.8 billion light years across that is distinguished by its unusual emptiness.

István Szapudi, who led the work at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, described the object as possibly “the largest individual structure ever identified by humanity”.
Hubble at 25: the best images from the space telescope - in pictures
View gallery

Its existence only emerged thanks to a targeted astronomical survey, which confirmed that around 10,000 galaxies were “missing” from the part of the sky it sits in.

Szapudi’s team was intentionally searching for the void because they believed that it could explain previous observations showing that part of the sky is unusually cool.

The so-called Cold Spot was discovered 10 years ago and has proved a sticking point for the best current models for how the universe evolved following the Big Bang. Cosmological theory allows for a bit of patchiness in the background temperature, due to warmer and cooler spots of various sizes emerging in the infant universe, but areas as large and cold as the Cold Spot are unexpected.

Prof Carlos Frenk, a cosmologist at the University of Durham, said: “The Cold Spot raised a lot of eyebrows. The real question was what was causing it and whether it was a challenge to orthodoxy.”

The latest study suggests that the Cold Spot can be partly explained by a gigantic region of emptiness at its centre, which drains energy from light travelling through it.

The supervoid is not an actual vacuum, as its name suggests, but has about 20% less stuff in it than our part of the universe – or any typical region. “Supervoids are not entirely empty, they’re under-dense,” said András Kovács, a co-author at the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest.

The structure may sound unremarkable – hardly a standalone object even – but scientists say it is unprecedented given how evenly distributed the universe normally is at this spatial scale. “This is the greatest supervoid ever discovered,” Kovács said. “In combination of size and emptiness, our supervoid is still a very rare event. We can only expect a few supervoids this big in the observable universe.”

Previously, astronomers observing in the direction of the Cold Spot had established that there was no distant void in that part of the sky, but until now the nearer sky had not been surveyed.

The latest study used the Hawaii’s Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) telescope located on Haleakala, Maui, and Nasa’s Wide Field Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite to count the number of galaxies in a patch of sky around 3 billion light years away – relatively close in the cosmic scheme of things.

The survey, described in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, confirmed that there was a roughly spherical region that was far less densely populated by galaxies than the surrounding sky and that it was centred on the Cold Spot.

However, rather than solving the puzzle the latest discovery has only served to deepen the mystery. “It just pushed the explanation one layer deeper,” said Dr Roberto Trotta, a cosmologist at Imperial College London. “Now we have to figure out how does the void itself form. It’s still a rare event.”

Even more perplexing, according to Frenk, is the fact that the supervoid can only account for about 10% of the Cold Spot’s temperature dip.

“The void itself I’m not so unhappy about. It’s like the Everest of voids – there has to be one that’s bigger than the rest,” he said. “But it doesn’t explain the whole Cold Spot, which we’re still in the dark about.”

This partial explanation could point to the existence of “exotic physics”: new weird effects that scientists don’t yet know about.

The existence of an empty patch helps explain the Cold Spot because assuming the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate, photons of light would be expected to lose energy (cool) as they cross a void.

This is because the photons convert kinetic energy to gravitational potential as they travel to the heart of the void and get further from denser surrounding patches of universe – think of it as climbing a hill. In a stationary universe, the situation would be symmetrical and so the photons would regain the lost energy on the way out of the void (down the hill). In an accelerated expansion of the universe, however, everything is effectively becoming less dense as space is stretched out, so voids become relatively shallower over time. This means by the time the light descends the virtual hill, the hill has become flatter and the light cannot pick up all the energy it lost on the way in. This means the light exits with a longer wavelength, corresponding to a cooler temperature.

The observation that the Cold Spot and supervoid coincide would fit with the idea that the universe is indeed expanding at an accelerating rate, which scientists put down to forces linked to dark energy. “This is independent evidence, in case anyone doubts it, for the existence of dark energy,” said Frenk.
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« Reply #12597 on: Apr 22nd, 2015, 08:48am »

GOOD MORNING ALL cheesy

Daily Express

Video of UFO by plane in Rome baffles investigators

UFO investigaors say they are baffled by the object caught on camera by a professional photographer in Rome.

By Jon Austin
PUBLISHED: 12:11, Wed, Apr 22, 2015

The unnamed man was filming a plane from his home on the City outskirts when the object was caught.He did not see the UFO until reviewing his video footage back, according to www.openminds.tvLocal UFO researchers were as baffled as the witness to what it the flying object could be.It is now being investigated by the Mediterranean UFO Center (C.UFO.M). C.UFO.M says the person who captured the footage is a professional photographer who specializes in taking photographs of actors, singers, and other important people. C.UFO.M said: "Upon review of the video, the photographer noticed a strange object pop onto the screen for a short period of time."

more after the jump:
http://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/572101/Watch-Video-of-UFO-by-plane-in-Rome-baffles-investigators

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« Reply #12598 on: Apr 22nd, 2015, 08:53am »

Wired

by Jessi Hempel
04.22.15
8:00 am


Computers That Know How You Feel Will Soon Be Everywhere

Sometime next summer, you ’ll be able to watch a horror series that is exactly as scary as you want it to be—no more, no less. You’ll pull up the show, which relies on software from the artificial intelligence startup Affectiva, and tap a button to opt in. Then, while you stare at your iPad, its camera will stare at you.

The software will read your emotional reactions to the show in real time. Should your mouth turn down a second too long or your eyes squeeze shut in fright, the plot will speed along. But if they grow large and hold your interest, the program will draw out the suspense. “Yes, the killing is going to happen, but whether you want to be kept in the tension depends on you,” says Julian McCrea, founder of the London-based studio Portal Entertainment, which has a development deal with a large unidentified entertainment network to produce the series. He calls Affectiva’s face-reading software, Affdex, “an incredible piece of technology.”

McCrea is one of the first outside developers to experiment with Affectiva’s developer tools to make technology capable of interpreting feelings based on tracking your facial expression. Scientists Roz Picard and Rana el Kaliouby spun the Waltham, Massachusetts-based tech startup out of MIT Media Lab in 2009. Picard has since left the company, but El Kaliouby, 36, remains the chief science officer and is committed to a bigger vision: “Personally, I’m not going to stop until this tech is embedded in all of our lives.” Already, CBS has used it to determine how new shows might go down with viewers. And during the 2012 Presidential election, Kaliouby’s team experimented with using it to track a sample of voters during a debate.

With $20 million in venture funding, the company has so far worked closely with a few partners to test its commercial applications. Now it plans to open its tools to everyone. Starting today, Affectiva will invite developers to experiment with a 45-day free test and then license its tools. You remember Intel inside? El Kaliouby envisions “Affectiva-embedded” technology, saying, “It’ll sit on your phone, in your car, in your fridge. It will sense your emotions and adapt seamlessly without being in your face.” It will just notice everything that’s happening on your face.

Millions of Faces

El Kaliouby has a PhD in computer science from Cambridge University, completed a post-doc at MIT Media Lab, and built Affectiva’s core technology as part of her academic work, intending to use it to help children with autism. “As I was doing that we started getting a lot of interest from industry,” says el Kaliouby. “The autism research was limited in scope,” she explained, so she turned to the business world to have a greater impact.

Affdex, the company’s signature software, builds detailed models of the face, taking into account the crinkle of the skin around the eye when you smile or the dip in the corner of your bottom lip when you frown. Since el Kaliouby started working on the Affectiva algorithms, the software has logged 11 billion of these data points, taken from 2.8 million faces in 75 countries.

With its massive data set, el Kaliouby believes Affectiva has developed an accurate read on human emotions. The software can, in effect, decode feelings. Consider Affectiva’s take on tracking empathy: “An example would be the inner eyebrow rise,” says el Kaliouby. “Like when you see a cute puppy and you’re, like, awww!” It can even note when you are paying attention.

The software relies on a so-called Facial Action Coding System, a taxonomy of 46 human facial movements that can be combined in different arrays to identify and label emotions. When it was developed in the late 1970s, humans scored emotional states manually by watching the movement of facial muscles. It was time intensive. “It takes about five minutes to code one minute of video,” says el Kaliouby. “So we built algorithms that automate it.” The software had to be trained to recognize variety in expressions. My smirk, for example, might not look like your smirk. “It’s like training a kid to recognize what an apple is,” el Kaliouby says.

Smile!

Five years in, the technology has become robust enough to be reliably useful. Experience designer Steve McLean, for example, who runs the Wisconsin design firm Wild Blue Technologies, has used Affectiva to build a video display for Hershey to use in retail stores. If you smile at the screen, the display dispenses a free chocolate sample. Tech startup OoVoo, which competes with Skype, has integrated the software into its videochat to create a product called intelligent video that can read chatters’ emotions. “We’re looking at focus groups, online education, and political affinity,” says JP Nauseef, managing director of Myrian Capital, which invested in both Affectiva and OoVoo and sits on Affectiva’s board.

But for all of Affectiva’s potential, it will take more than creative developers to help its technology catch on more broadly. “The hidden discussion that hasn’t been brought up is trust,” says Charlene Li, CEO of the research outfit Altimeter Group, who has followed Affectiva closely since 2011. “I love the product, but I’m also terrified by it,” she says. She points out that should this data fall into the wrong hands, it could be dangerous for consumers. What happens, for example, if you are often sad while using a piece of Affectiva-embedded software and the software’s developer chooses to sell that information to a pharmaceutical company?

It’s a concern that el Kaliouby takes very seriously. “We actually don’t store any personal information about the consumers, so we do not have any way of tying back the facial video to an individual,” she says. “We have 2.78 million face videos in the platform, and if your face was in there, none of our team would be able to pull it out for you.”

That may be so, but as the company makes its tools available to a broader set of developers, it will have to monitor how the software is rolled out to prevent them from abusing it—and to make sure that as users interact with it for the first time, they’re aware of it and feel they are in control of the experience.

The technology may be very good at reading your emotions. But humans will have to take care how to act on them.

http://www.wired.com/2015/04/computers-can-now-tell-feel-face/

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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #12599 on: Apr 22nd, 2015, 2:08pm »

SYS,

TO WIT:
"always found the aura topic interesting. First I have seen that pyramid pix. Nice catch Zetar."

THANK YOU SIR ~ I TAKE BREAKS FROM PRODUCTION (CLEAR MY MIND) AND THINK ABOUT SOME INDEED INTERESTING POSSIBILITIES ~ wink

WHAT IS UNQUESTIONABLY STUNNING ~ IMHO ~ IS THE DOUBLE-HELIX WHICH FOR ME ~ DISPUTES COINCIDENCE!

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GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2
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