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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 146409 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #1275 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 09:01am »

Wired Science


Video: Two Full Days of Saturn’s Aurora
By Lisa Grossman September 23, 2010 | 6:23 pm | Categories: Space


Saturn’s aurora shimmers and shines over the course of two full days in a new movie and images from Cassini orbiter. In an ongoing study compiling thousands of these images, scientists are beginning to decipher what drives the celestial light show.

Much like Earth’s northern and southern lights, Saturn’s aurora is triggered when charged particles from solar winds are channeled toward the poles by the planet’s magnetic field. At the poles, these particles interact with charged gas or plasma in the upper atmosphere and emit light. Saturn’s aurora can also be caused by electromagnetic waves generated when its moons move through its magnetosphere.

Cassini has already delivered some gorgeous examples of these colorful curtains of light.

“But to understand the overall nature of the auroral region we need to make a huge number of observations — which can be difficult because Cassini observation time is in high demand,” said astronomer Tom Stallard of the University of Leicester in the UK in a press release.

Rather than snapping photos of the aurora directly, Stallard and his colleagues are sifting through 7,000 images from Cassini’s VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instrument to piece together fragments of aurora into a more complete picture.

“As a whole, this wide set of observations will allow us to understand the aurora in general,” Stallard said. Stallard will present preliminary results at the European Planetary Science Congress in Rome on September 24.

The movie shows how the aurora vary over the course of a Saturnian day (about 10 hours and 47 minutes). On the noon (left) and midnight (right) sides, the aurora brighten significantly for several hours at a time, suggesting the brightening is connected with the direction of the Sun. Other features rotate with the planet below, reappearing at the same time and the same place on the second day. This suggests that these features are directly controlled by the direction of Saturn’s magnetic field.

So far, Stallard and his colleagues have made it through about 1,000 out of 7,000 VIMS images of Saturn’s auroral region.

Video after the jump
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/09/video-saturn-aurora/#ixzz10SIUXQ4a

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« Reply #1276 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 09:04am »

LA Times

Eddie Fisher dies at 82; popular singer known for high-profile marriages
From 1950 to '56, he recorded dozens of songs that made the top 40 and four that reached No. 1 on the pop charts. He wed Debbie Reynolds, Elizabeth Taylor and Connie Stevens.
By Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times

September 24, 2010

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Eddie Fisher, one of the most popular singers of the 1950s who made headlines with marriages to — and divorces from — some of the most famous Hollywood starlets of that era, has died. He was 82.

Fisher died Wednesday at his home in Berkeley of complications from hip surgery, his daughter Tricia Leigh Fisher told the Associated Press.

Between 1950 and 1956, Fisher recorded dozens of songs that made the top 40 and four that reached No. 1 on the pop charts.

Fisher's boyish good looks and natural charisma also helped him land roles on television shows and in such feature films as "Butterfield 8," "Nothing Lasts Forever" and "Bundle of Joy."

But he may be best remembered for his failed marriages to Debbie Reynolds, Elizabeth Taylor and Connie Stevens.

Fisher was born in Philadelphia on Aug. 10, 1928.

In 1950 he recorded his first hit, "Thinking of You." In 1951, he had his first million-seller, "Any Time."

His "golden sound," as Fisher described it in his 1999 memoir, "Been There, Done That," catapulted him "from the streets of Philadelphia to the White House. Harry Truman loved me. Ike loved me."

In 1955, Fisher married Reynolds — known as "America's Sweetheart." It didn't take long for their celebrated union to fall apart.

Fisher created a tabloid scandal in 1958 when he left Reynolds, then just 26, for Elizabeth Taylor.

The move, considered in Hollywood at the time to be one of the century's biggest scandals, helped torpedo Fisher's career and launch Taylor toward superstardom.

Fisher would later acknowledge that he had been battling what would become a years-long addiction to drugs, including methamphetamine and cocaine.

In 1962, he suffered a breakdown after the collapse of his marriage to Taylor, who then married Richard Burton.

A complete obituary will follow at latimes.com/obituaries and in Saturday's print edition of The Times.

http://www.latimes.com/news/obituaries/la-me-eddie-fisher-20100924,0,7087169.story

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« Reply #1277 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 09:09am »

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Groundwater Depletion Rate Accelerating Worldwide
ScienceDaily (Sep. 23, 2010) —

In recent decades, the rate at which humans worldwide are pumping dry the vast underground stores of water that billions depend on has more than doubled, say scientists who have conducted an unusual, global assessment of groundwater use.

These fast-shrinking subterranean reservoirs are essential to daily life and agriculture in many regions, while also sustaining streams, wetlands, and ecosystems and resisting land subsidence and salt water intrusion into fresh water supplies. Today, people are drawing so much water from below that they are adding enough of it to the oceans (mainly by evaporation, then precipitation) to account for about 25 percent of the annual sea level rise across the planet, the researchers find.

Soaring global groundwater depletion bodes a potential disaster for an increasingly globalized agricultural system, says Marc Bierkens of Utrecht University in Utrecht, the Netherlands, and leader of the new study.

"If you let the population grow by extending the irrigated areas using groundwater that is not being recharged, then you will run into a wall at a certain point in time, and you will have hunger and social unrest to go with it," Bierkens warns. "That is something that you can see coming for miles."

He and his colleagues will publish their new findings in an upcoming issue of Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

In the new study, which compares estimates of groundwater added by rain and other sources to the amounts being removed for agriculture and other uses, the team taps a database of global groundwater information including maps of groundwater regions and water demand. The researchers also use models to estimate the rates at which groundwater is both added to aquifers and withdrawn. For instance, to determine groundwater recharging rates, they simulate a groundwater layer beneath two soil layers, exposed at the top to rainfall, evaporation, and other effects, and use 44 years worth of precipitation, temperature, and evaporation data (1958-2001) to drive the model.

Applying these techniques worldwide to regions ranging from arid areas to those with the wetness of grasslands, the team finds that the rate at which global groundwater stocks are shrinking has more than doubled between 1960 and 2000, increasing the amount lost from 126 to 283 cubic kilometers (30 to 68 cubic miles) of water per year. Because the total amount of groundwater in the world is unknown, it's hard to say how fast the global supply would vanish at this rate. But, if water was siphoned as rapidly from the Great Lakes, they would go bone-dry in around 80 years.

Groundwater represents about 30 percent of the available fresh water on the planet, with surface water accounting for only one percent. The rest of the potable, agriculture friendly supply is locked up in glaciers or the polar ice caps. This means that any reduction in the availability of groundwater supplies could have profound effects for a growing human population.

The new assessment shows the highest rates of depletion in some of the world's major agricultural centers, including northwest India, northeastern China, northeast Pakistan, California's central valley, and the midwestern United States.

"The rate of depletion increased almost linearly from the 1960s to the early 1990s," says Bierkens. "But then you see a sharp increase which is related to the increase of upcoming economies and population numbers; mainly in India and China."

As groundwater is increasingly withdrawn, the remaining water "will eventually be at a level so low that a regular farmer with his technology cannot reach it anymore," says Bierkens. He adds that some nations will be able to use expensive technologies to get fresh water for food production through alternative means like desalinization plants or artificial groundwater recharge, but many won't.

Most water extracted from underground stocks ends up in the ocean, the researchers note. The team estimates the contribution of groundwater depletion to sea level rise to be 0.8 millimeters per year, which is about a quarter of the current total rate of sea level rise of 3.1 millimeters per year. That's about as much sea-level rise as caused by the melting of glaciers and icecaps outside of Greenland and Antarctica, and it exceeds or falls into the high end of previous estimates of groundwater depletion's contribution to sea level rise, the researchers add.


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100923142503.htm

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« Reply #1278 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 09:21am »

Seattle Times

Thursday, September 23, 2010 - Page updated at 11:16 AM

Montana woman fends off bear attack with zucchini
The Associated Press

FRENCHTOWN, Mont. Police say a Montana woman fended off a bear attack with an unlikely weapon, a zucchini.

Missoula County Sheriff's Lt. Rich Maricelli says a 200-pound black bear attacked one of the woman's dogs just after midnight Wednesday on the back porch of her home about 15 miles west of Missoula.

When the woman, whom police did not name, tried to separate the animals, the bear bit her in the leg.

Maricelli says the woman reached for the nearest object at hand on the porch's railing a large zucchini that she had harvested from her garden.

The woman flung the vegetable at the bear, striking it and forcing it to flee.

Maricelli says the woman did not need medical attention. Wildlife officials were trying to locate the bear on Thursday.


http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2012976003_bearzucchini24m.html

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« Reply #1279 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 1:33pm »

Hi Scar7,

I had an ongoing argument at OMF concerning Source A and his extraterrestrial friends. I'm not of the opinion that they are our space brothers. I'm not going to trust anything that slinks around at night scaring the daylights out of people and abducting them. If and when "they" arrive I'm staying away from them.

I don't really know what's going on. I read everything I can get my hands on and try to keep the brain going. But my gut tells me that something isn't kosher. That's just my opinion. Caution is not a dirty word. But I try not to include that opinion when I'm looking for articles for this thread. Hopefully I don't do that too often. Except when it comes to politicians. grin

Crystal

edit to add:
begin quote -
Post by DrDil
Hi Scar7,
You’re more than welcome to post whatever you like here at UFOCasebook as long as on-topic and within the rules, however I’ve deleted the following three comments as they are akin to spam.

Please refrain from posting similar comments in future.

Many Thanks.
on 09/24/10 at 11:08am, scar7 wrotecheesyONT TRUST. DONT TRUST. If they show, they are not what everyone wants to believe. DONT TRUST.
on 09/24/10 at 11:05am, scar7 wrotecheesyONT TRUST.
on 09/24/10 at 11:01am, scar7 wrotecheesyONT TRUST. DONT TRUST. If they do show, it is not the "crafts" everyone wants to believe in. DONT TRUST.
- end quote

Whew! I posted my answer and his posts were gone. I thought I had lost my sanity! It's hanging by a thread anyway. grin
never mind.............
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« Reply #1280 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 1:45pm »

American Chronicle article by Steve Hammons

More to NBC's 'The Event' than ETs, UFOs – more than meets the eye
Steve HammonsSeptember 23, 2010 (This article originally appeared on the Joint Recon Study Group site.)

A few of the puzzle pieces from several advance video clips and trailers came together in the premiere episode of NBC's "The Event" on Monday, Sept. 20.

Yet, not surprisingly, new questions and mysteries emerged.

Foremost in many viewers' minds: Who are the 90-plus detainees being held at a secret U.S. facility in Alaska?

Some speculation has focused on extraterrestrials, beings from another dimension or time travelers. Are they human, related to Earth humans or do they just appear human? Or, are they humans with special knowledge and abilities?

What is "the event" that their leader (Laura Innes as Sophie Maguire) cannot let the human race know about?

TRANSCENDING DUMBED-DOWN TV

But the detainees are not the only ones with secret information. A high-ranking intelligence advisor (Blake Sterling played by Zeljko Ivanek) to U.S. President Elias Martinez (Blair Underwood) seems to know a lot more. So does a CIA operative assigned to work with the detainees (Ian Anthony Dale as Simon Lee).

A hijacked airliner is used as a weapon, a flying bomb, and terrified passengers are about to be sacrificed. Yet, the airliner disappears.

The month of September will always remind Americans and people around the world of Sept. 11 and the subsequent developments in Iraq and Afghanistan. This element of "The Event" seems to do so as well.

The airliner is being used to apparently assassinate a president – a black Cuban-American president – who wants to make secret information about the detainees public. Does this scenario also have parallels or connections to our real-life history and current events?

And, can viewers connect the dots in this conspiracy theory from creator Nick Wauters, executive producer Steve Stark, director Jeff Reiner, showrunner Evan Katz, writers, consultants, cast and crew?

The show's creative team says they are determined to make the story move along at a pace that audiences will find rewarding, rather than tease or confuse viewers.

Many media watchers have been waiting for, begging for, television that does not "dumb down" the viewing public. We have wanted TV that gives the American and international public credit for having adequate knowledge and intelligence. Will "The Event" meet these expectations?

SCIENCE, HUMANITY AND EARTH

For people who are somewhat educated, follow the news media (mainstream and otherwise) and have reasonable common sense, the basic elements of "The Event" presented in the first episode might seem to ring interesting bells.

If the detainees are extraterrestrials or some unique kind of beings, is this really that much of an imagination stretch?

Believe it or not, there are indications that this is not necessarily a far-out fantasy, but rather, a real possibility or reality.

And if so, how would the "powers-that-be" or average people react to such a situation? We may have an opportunity to find out, not only by following the story of "The Event," but by also doing our own research and educating ourselves about what might be going on in real life.

A helpful resource that takes a look at this situation is the new book "UFOs: Generals, Pilots and Government Officials Go on the Record" by journalist Leslie Kean.

The upcoming book "A.D., After Disclosure: The People's Guide to Life After Contact" by Richard Dolan and Bryce Zabel, due out in October, is probably another.

In "The Event," the mysterious Alaska group's leader seems to warn the CIA operative that there is hidden information so sensitive that the human public cannot handle it. Is this also the case in our current state of human activities on Earth?

She may be right that it is difficult for us to face the sometimes sad state of affairs on Earth – poverty, overpopulation, starvation, disease, suffering, injustice, unnecessary wars, threats of nuclear destruction, dangerous climate change and similar human-made problems.

Or, is she referring to some type of major change related to scientific knowledge? Developments and discoveries in quantum physics and forward-leaning science appear to be leading to speculation that our whole understanding of time, space, human consciousness, Nature, spirituality, a higher being and other fundamental beliefs may need a major update.

Maybe there is some kind of mix or interface of changes in our scientific knowledge, our spiritual consciousness and the current state of human development on this planet.

Maybe we will get to a tipping point of understanding that will lead to the next steps for humanity.

That tipping point could lead to an interesting emerging event.

http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/186807

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« Reply #1281 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 1:51pm »

Geek Tyrant

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In honor of director Jason Heath's upcoming indie horror opus The Cthulhu Key: Legacy this weeks "Toy of the Week" returns and it's Cthulhu himself in bobble head form from the cool cats over at Funko. This wacky wobbler bobble head will be available in November and you can preorder it right here courtesy of Entertainment Earth, just click on the image above!

http://geektyrant.com/news/2010/9/24/toy-of-the-week-cthulhu-wacky-wobbler-bobble-head.html

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« Reply #1282 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 2:22pm »

Phantoms and Monsters

Friday, September 24, 2010
Photo: Mothman Seen In Nuremberg, Germany?

yorkpress - http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/8409893.Does_York_woman_s_holiday_picture_reveal_ghost_like_image_of_UFO_/

A woman from York captured an unexplained object in her holiday snaps this month, and wants your help identifying it.

Abbey Linfoot, 22, was on a European holiday with her boyfriend when she took a photo of this street in Nuremberg.

When she looked at the photo later, she saw something she couldn’t explain, high above the buildings.

“I was taking lots of photos to show people where we’d been, but when I got back into the car I noticed there was something on this one,“ said Abbey, who is currently studying at Newcastle University “I just though, ‘What it that? That looks weird’, and couldn’t work out what it was.”

Abbey has shown the picture to friends and family, including a photography student, and nobody has yet come up with a clear explanation.

“I thought it looked like a cherub,” said Bev, Abbey’s mother.

“I also thought it looked a bit like a naked Buzz Lightyear toy, but could be a bee or an insect or something.”

Looking into the region online, Bev found there had been a fatal crash at an airshow near Nuremberg earlier this summer.

“There was a crash on September 5 where one person was killed and nearly 40 injured.

It’s really odd,” said Bev.

So what do you think - is this a trick of the light, a partly-invisible insect, a naked space ranger or something else?


NOTE: not sure what to make of this but the influx of cellphone camera image overlays, especially in Europe, has me wondering.I attempted to pull up image info but there is nothing there but the link source. Should we keep an eye on Nuremberg in the near future? It'll be interesting to see if other sightings are reported...Lon

photos after the jump
http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/2010/09/photo-mothman-seen-in-nuremberg-germany.html

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« Reply #1283 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 2:53pm »

This is more my speed re: little friends. I think I was a Hobbit in another life.

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« Reply #1284 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 5:00pm »





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« Reply #1285 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 5:03pm »





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« Reply #1286 on: Sep 24th, 2010, 5:07pm »





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« Reply #1287 on: Sep 25th, 2010, 08:42am »

New York Times

September 24, 2010
List Shows Surprising Police Expenses for Summit Security
By IAN AUSTEN

OTTAWA — Canadians were amazed to learn that hosting the world’s leaders at back-to-back summit meetings on a weekend in June cost more than $1 billion, most of it for security. Their surprise was renewed this week when newly released documents provided a glimpse into how the police had managed to spend so much money in so little time.

The information provided by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to an opposition member of Parliament accounted for only about one-sixth of the overall cost of the summit meetings. But it included a wide array of unexpected or expensive items.

Among them were $13,711 for glow sticks; $62 million on accommodations and meals; $17,500 for “fireballs,” or magnetic warning lights for police cars; and $4.3 million for a temporary steel fence around a lakeside resort where the Group of 8 meeting took place.

Insects appeared to be a major preoccupation. The police spent $325,000 on kits containing insect repellent, hand sanitizer and sunscreen; $25,975 on electronic mosquito traps; and $13,900 on “bug jackets.”

The police force bought some special equipment for the meetings, including a $42,000 harpoon system to disable speedboats. It also bought $260,000 worth of digital cameras, many of them Nikon D300s’s; $260,000 worth of computers; and thousands of dollars in software.

“They took the position that money was no object,” said Dan McTeague, the Liberal member of Parliament from Toronto who requested the spending information. “If it weren’t so costly, it would be humorous.”

The contracts represent the latest in a series of disputes over the cost of the meetings. Canada initially agreed to host the gathering of the Group of 8 leaders in Huntsville, Ontario, a summer resort town. But before the event took place, it was superseded by the Group of 20 as the world’s premier economic gathering.

Because Huntsville was too small to host the larger gathering, Canada decided to stage the events at separate locations, the Group of 8 meeting in Huntsville and the Group of 20 meeting in Toronto, an approach that sent costs soaring.

The actions of the security forces were ultimately as much a source of contention as their expenses were. Five separate reviews are under way into the efforts of the police during the Group of 20 meeting in Toronto.

The documents released by the mounted police provided an incomplete record. They did not include the cost of a much larger security fence that made much of downtown Toronto resemble a prison camp. The Canadian Security Intelligence Service declined to provide any spending information, citing national security. And the Department of Foreign Affairs referred Mr. McTeague to its broad budget estimates, which do not break out the cost of the summit meetings.

Mr. McTeague said he was puzzled by how much the police spent on equipment because the force had led a $1 billion security effort at the Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver this year. He said it appeared that little, if any, of the equipment acquired for that operation was reused during the summit weekend.

Sgt. Julie Gagnon, a spokeswoman for the mounted police, said the costs incurred by the force for the meetings “were spent as per government polices and guidelines and as efficiently as possible.” The glow sticks, she added, were for “officer safety.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/25/world/americas/25canada.html?_r=1&ref=world

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« Reply #1288 on: Sep 25th, 2010, 08:44am »

New York Times

September 24, 2010, 8:41 pm
Malware Hits Computerized Industrial Equipment
By RIVA RICHMOND

The technology industry is being rattled by a quiet and sophisticated malicious software program that has infiltrated factory computers.

The malware, known as Stuxnet, was discovered in mid July, at least several months after its creation, by VirusBlokAda, a Belarussian computer security company that was alerted by a customer.

Security experts say Stuxnet attacked the software in specialized industrial control equipment made by Siemens by exploiting a previously unknown hole in the Windows operating system.
The malware marks the first attack on critical industrial infrastructure that sits at the foundation of modern economies.

It also displays an array of novel tactics like an ability to steal design documents or even sabotage equipment in a factory that suggest its creators are much more sophisticated than hackers whose work has been seen before. The malware casts a spotlight on several security weaknesses.

Eric Chien, the technical director of Symantec Security Response, a security software maker that has studied Stuxnet, said it appears that the malware was created to attack an Iranian industrial facility. Security experts say that it was likely staged by a government or government-backed group, in light of the significant expertise and resources required to create it. The specific facility that was in Stuxnet’s crosshairs is not known, though speculation has centered on gas and nuclear installations.

Since it was unleashed, Stuxnet has spread to plants around the world. Siemens said it has received 15 reports from affected customers, five of which were located in Germany. All of these sites successfully removed the malicious program, which can be detected and removed by commercial antivirus programs. “Up to now there have been no instances where production operations have been influenced,” the company said in an e-mailed statement. Security researchers initially believed Stuxnet’s primary purpose was espionage because of its ability to steal design documents for industrial control systems. But more in-depth study of the program, which is extremely large and highly complex by malware standards, has revealed that it can also make changes to those systems.

Exactly what Stuxnet might command industrial equipment to do still isn’t known. But malware experts say it could have been designed to trigger such Hollywood-style bedlam as overloaded turbines, exploding pipelines and nuclear centrifuges spinning so fast that they break. “The true end goal of Stuxnet is cyber sabotage. It’s a cyber weapon basically,” said Roel Schouwenberg, a senior antivirus researcher at Kaspersky, a security software maker. “But how it exactly manifests in real life, I can’t say.”

Stuxnet’s remarkable sophistication has surprised many security professionals. Its authors had detailed knowledge of Siemens’ software and where its security weaknesses are. They discovered and used four unknown security flaws in Microsoft’s Windows operating system. And they masked their attack with the aid of sensitive intellectual property stolen from two hardware companies, Realtek and JMicron, which are located in the same office park in Taiwan.

“It’s impossible this was created by some teenager in his basement,” Mr. Chien said. “The amount of resources and man hours to put this together,” he said, show “it has to be something that was state originated.”


http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/09/24/malware-hits-computerized-industrial-equipment/?ref=technology

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« Reply #1289 on: Sep 25th, 2010, 08:48am »

New York Times

September 23, 2010
Lawyers Look to Exploit a Scientific Error
By WILLIAM J. BROAD

The spying indictment filed late last week against a former Los Alamos scientist contains evidence of tape-recorded conversations, clandestine meetings, confidential places for the transfer of documents and a pattern of false statements.

But the indictment also contains a glaring scientific error, which is prompting debate among legal and nuclear experts on whether the government’s case could be hurt.

“At a minimum, it’s incredibly sloppy but it tends to undermine the credibility of the entire indictment,” said Steven Aftergood, a security expert at the Federation of American Scientists. “Anyone who has read a book about nuclear weapons,” he added, would have spotted the mistake.

Federal prosecutors charged the scientist, P. Leonardo Mascheroni, and his wife, Marjorie, with trying to sell classified nuclear information to a foreign power. The two were arraigned Monday in Albuquerque and pleaded innocent. If convicted, both face up to life in prison.

According to the indictment, Dr. Mascheroni told an F.B.I. agent posing as a Venezuelan spy that a secret nuclear reactor could be constructed underground for “enriching plutonium,” the fuel of most nuclear arms.

But specialists agree that reactors cannot enrich plutonium. The government’s reference to enrichment, they say, refers to a separate process in which hundreds or thousands of spinning machines purify uranium, another bomb fuel.

“It doesn’t make sense,” Harold M. Agnew, a former director of Los Alamos, said of the enrichment claim in an interview. “I haven’t the slightest idea what that would be about.”

Charles P. Demos, a former official with the Department of Energy, which runs the nation’s nuclear weapons program, agreed. “You don’t enrich plutonium,” he said in an interview. “You create plutonium.”

The mistake could prove inconsequential legally, since the Department of Justice could file what is known as a superseding indictment, which adds or corrects information in the original charges. The erroneous phrase would then be removed.

But already, defense lawyers are citing the phrase in an effort to undermine the prosecution, and they could also cite any corrections in the indictment as part of their defense.

“This raises questions about the credibility of the allegations,” said Erlinda Ocampo Johnson, a lawyer for Mrs. Mascheroni. “We’re going to dissect every bit of the case to make sure the government has not overstepped its bounds.”

The technical error is particularly embarrassing, some lawyers said, because of the bungled case that federal prosecutors brought against Wen Ho Lee, another former scientist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, in 1999. In that case. Dr. Lee was charged with mishandling nuclear weapon secrets with the intention of aiding a foreign power. But the criminal case unraveled after defense lawyers zeroed in on factual errors, procedural missteps and conspicuous gaps in the evidence.

A Department of Justice spokesman, Dean Boyd, said its officials would make no comment about the phrase in question. “We look forward to presenting our case in court,” he said, “and will let a jury decide the guilt or innocence of the defendants.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/24/science/24scientist.html?ref=science

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