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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 112496 times)
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« Reply #1305 on: Sep 25th, 2010, 7:11pm »





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« Reply #1306 on: Sep 25th, 2010, 7:16pm »

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« Reply #1307 on: Sep 25th, 2010, 7:18pm »





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« Reply #1308 on: Sep 25th, 2010, 7:25pm »

Technorati.com


Chinese Media To U.S. Regarding UFO Coverage: Grow A Pair
Author: Tim Brosnan
Published: September 25, 2010 at 4:21 pm


China's People's Daily Online, http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90001/90782/7149965.html

the official news agency of the Central Committee of the Communist Party in China (CPC), is reporting that two students photographed a UFO above the city of Pingyao September 22 while taking nightscape photos during the 10th Pingyao International Photography Festival.

Over a 40-minute period, the students snapped roughly 200 pictures of the UFO, which they described as "a sphere with two flickering columns on its two sides," but which could not be seen with the naked eye.

The only published image, shown here, does not impress. Grainy and indistinct, it's typical of the vast majority of UFO photos.

But the real story here isn't the photo. It's People's Daily's persistent willingness to report UFO sightings without flip comment, specious hypothesis, de rigueur debunker counterpoint, or meteorological speculation.

The People's Daily headline is straightforward: "UFO photographed over ancient Chinese city. " Not "Purported UFO..." Not even "Suspected UFO..."

There's no reference to Little Green Men and no evidence of any invitation extended to air traffic controllers, military spokespeople or government officials to make official non-statements.

It's just so ... so ... Un-American.

If two students attending a photography festival in the United States were to tell the local media that they'd photographed a UFO, it's a virtual certainty that they'd be either ignored or made a laughing stock. Substance abuse, at a minimum, would be assumed and implied.

So why does China handle the topic so differently?

And why don't we?

Maybe it's because, when you get right down to it, we really do know everything worth knowing.

Previous China UFO coverage at Technorati

•Third UFO-Related Airport Shutdown In China This Year (September 21, 2010) - Baotou Airport reroutes flights for almost an hour after UFO detected in vicinity More UFO Love For China, This Time In Zhejiang Province (September 6, 2010) - Haining City television reporters capture distant UFO on camera
•Chinese astronomer claims some UFOs are of extraterrestrial origin (August 27, 2010) - Respected member of Chinese scientific community makes no bones about the existence of UFOs
•Time magazine debunks China UFOs, ignores obvious questions (August 23, 2010) - Time explains China UFOs as private airplanes flying without flight plans
•China's second mass UFO sighting in two weeks (July 21, 2010) - Lantern-like objects hover over Chongqing's Shaping Park
•UFOs cause flight delays in China (July 12, 2010) - Xiaoshan Airport in Zeijiang Province shut down for several hours


http://technorati.com/technology/article/chinese-media-to-us-regarding-ufo/

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« Reply #1309 on: Sep 25th, 2010, 7:45pm »

This is on AOL

Former Air Force Officers: UFOs Tampered With Nuclear Missiles
Updated: 5 hours 25 minutes ago
Lee Speigel

AOL News (Sept. 25) -- Former U.S. Air Force officers and a former enlisted man are about to break many years of silence about an alarming series of UFO encounters at nuclear weapons sites -- incidents officially kept secret for decades.

When the group appears at a press conference at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Monday, it will offer testimony about events so chilling, it will seem like a day at a science fiction movie festival.

To put you in the mood for the stories that will soon unfold, we're presenting one here, involving former Air Force Capt. Robert Salas, one of the hosts of the Washington event.

Former Air Force Capt. Robert Salas says he was involved in a 1967 incident at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana in which a UFO reportedly tampered with nuclear missiles.
Salas, co-author of "Faded Giant" (BookSurge Publishing), was a first lieutenant in 1967, serving as a missile-launch officer while stationed at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana.

On March 16, 1967, Salas was 60 feet below ground working a 24-hour shift monitoring a launch-control center outfitted with 10 nuclear Minuteman missiles.

"I got a call from the topside guard, telling me they were watching some strange lights flying around in the sky, making odd maneuvers. They didn't think they were airplanes because they were going very fast, turning on a dime and not making a bit of noise," Salas told AOL News.

"A few minutes later, he called back, this time screaming into the phone, scared to death, and he said, 'Sir, I'm looking out my front window and there is a glowing red oval-shaped object hovering right above the front gate, and I've got all the guards out here with their weapons drawn.' "

The guard told Salas the UFO was approximately 30 to 40 feet in diameter with a very bright, pulsating light.

When the guard asked what they should do next, Salas' immediate response was that they had to do whatever was necessary to protect the nuclear missile area, "so basically, I was giving them permission to use whatever force they needed to use to keep anything out."

As Salas started to inform his duty partner and commander about what was going on 60 feet above them, something chilling happened.

"All of a sudden, we started getting bells and whistles going off. As we looked at the display board in front of us, sure enough, the missiles began going into an unlaunchable, or no-go, mode. They couldn't be launched -- it went from green to red.

"We also had a couple of security violations, meaning there were lights indicating some kind of intrusion at the missile sites, where the missiles were actually located, about a mile or two away from the launch control facility."

Salas said they immediately performed a system checklist to see what was wrong and to determine how it was possible that 10 nuclear missiles could suddenly be deactivated.

"We were getting mostly guidance and control systems failure, and when I called the guard again, he told me the UFO just left and took off at high speed. So I ordered the guards to go out to the missile sites, and while they were out there, they saw the object again at one of the launch facilities.

"It scared them to death again, and they actually lost radio contact while they were near the object and then they returned to the base. I later learned they never returned to security guard duty."

Salas said it was extraordinary that they lost so many missiles at the same time. Isolated mishaps had made a single missile go "unlaunchable," but never 10 at once. And never 10 at once during a UFO sighting.

As a result of the incident, the missiles had to be fixed to get them all back into launch mode.

more after the jump
http://www.aolnews.com/weird-news/article/former-air-force-officers-ufos-tampered-with-nuclear-missiles/19647296

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« Reply #1310 on: Sep 26th, 2010, 08:21am »

New York Times

September 25, 2010
Iran Fights Malware Attacking Computers
By DAVID E. SANGER

WASHINGTON — The Iranian government agency that runs the country’s nuclear facilities, including those the West suspects are part of a weapons program, has reported that its engineers are trying to protect their facilities from a sophisticated computer worm that has infected industrial plants across Iran.

The agency, the Atomic Energy Organization, did not specify whether the worm had already infected any of its nuclear facilities, including Natanz, the underground enrichment site that for several years has been a main target of American and Israeli covert programs.

But the announcement raised suspicions, and new questions, about the origins and target of the worm, Stuxnet, which computer experts say is a far cry from common computer malware that has affected the Internet for years. A worm is a self-replicating malware computer program. A virus is malware that infects its target by attaching itself to programs or documents.

Stuxnet, which was first publicly identified several months ago, is aimed solely at industrial equipment made by Siemens that controls oil pipelines, electric utilities, nuclear facilities and other large industrial sites. While it is not clear that Iran was the main target — the infection has also been reported in Indonesia, Pakistan, India and elsewhere — a disproportionate number of computers inside Iran appear to have been struck, according to reports by computer security monitors.

Given the sophistication of the worm and its aim at specific industrial systems, many experts believe it is most probably the work of a state, rather than independent hackers. The worm is able to attack computers that are disconnected from the Internet, usually to protect them; in those cases an infected USB drive is plugged into a computer. The worm can then spread itself within a computer network, and possibly to other networks.

The semiofficial Mehr news agency in Iran on Saturday quoted Reza Taghipour, a top official of the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, as saying that “the effect and damage of this spy worm in government systems is not serious” and that it had been “more or less” halted.

But another Iranian official, Mahmud Liai of the Ministry of Industry and Mines, was quoted as saying that 30,000 computers had been affected, and that the worm was “part of the electronic warfare against Iran.”

ISNA, another Iranian news agency, had reported Friday that officials from Iran’s atomic energy agency had been meeting in recent days to discuss how to remove the Stuxnet worm, which exploits some previously unknown weaknesses in Microsoft’s Windows software. Microsoft has said in recent days that it is fixing those vulnerabilities.

It is extraordinarily difficult to trace the source of any sophisticated computer worm, and nearly impossible to determine for certain its target.

But the Iranians have reason to suspect they are high on the target list: in the past, they have found evidence of sabotage of imported equipment, notably power supplies to run the centrifuges that are used to enrich uranium at Natanz. The New York Times reported in 2009 that President George W. Bush had authorized new efforts, including some that were experimental, to undermine electrical systems, computer systems and other networks that serve Iran’s nuclear program, according to current and former American officials.

The program is among the most secret in the United States government, and it has been accelerated since President Obama took office, according to some American officials. Iran’s enrichment program has run into considerable technical difficulties in the past year, but it is not clear whether that is because of the effects of sanctions against the country, poor design for its centrifuges, which it obtained from Pakistan, or sabotage.

“It is easy to look at what we know about Stuxnet and jump to the conclusion that it is of American origin and Iran is the target, but there is no proof of that,” said James Lewis, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington and one of the country’s leading experts on cyberwar intelligence. “We may not know the real answer for some time.”

Based on what he knows of Stuxnet, Mr. Lewis said, the United States is “one of four or five places that could have done it — the Israelis, the British and the Americans are the prime suspects, then the French and Germans, and you can’t rule out the Russians and the Chinese.”

President Obama has talked extensively about developing better cyberdefenses for the United States, to protect banks, power plants, telecommunications systems and other critical infrastructure. He has said almost nothing about the other side of the cybereffort, billions of dollars spent on offensive capability, much of it based inside the National Security Agency.

The fact that the worm is aimed at Siemens equipment is telling: the company’s control systems are used around the world, but have been spotted in many Iranian facilities, say officials and experts who have toured them. Those include the new Bushehr nuclear power plant, built with Russian help.

But Bushehr is considered by nuclear weapons experts to be virtually no help to Iran in its suspected weapons program; there is more concern about the low-enriched uranium produced at Natanz, which could, with a year or more of additional processing, be converted to bomb fuel.

John Markoff contributed reporting from San Francisco, and William Yong from Tehran.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/26/world/middleeast/26iran.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #1311 on: Sep 26th, 2010, 08:24am »

New York Times

September 25, 2010
Egypt and Thirsty Neighbors Are at Odds Over Nile
By THANASSIS CAMBANIS

BATAMDA, Egypt — One place to begin to understand why this parched country has nearly ruptured relations with its upstream neighbors on the Nile is ankle-deep in mud in the cotton and maize fields of Mohammed Abdallah Sharkawi. The price he pays for the precious resource flooding his farm? Nothing.

“Thanks be to God,” Mr. Sharkawi said of the Nile River water. He raised his hands to the sky, then gestured toward a state functionary visiting his farm. “Everything is from God, and from the ministry.”

But perhaps not for much longer. Upstream countries, looking to right what they say are historic wrongs, have joined in an attempt to break Egypt and Sudan’s near-monopoly on the water, threatening a crisis that Egyptian experts said could, at its most extreme, lead to war.

“Not only is Egypt the gift of the Nile, this is a country that is almost completely dependent on Nile water resources,” said a spokesman for the Egyptian Foreign Ministry, Hossam Zaki. “We have a growing population and growing needs. There is no way we can accept this kind of threat.”

Ever since civilization first sprang forth here, Egyptians have clustered along the Nile’s silt-rich banks. Almost all of the country’s 80 million people live within a few miles of the river, and farmers like Mr. Sharkawi have hardly changed their farming methods in four millenniums. Egypt’s population is growing briskly, however, and by the year 2017 at current rates of usage the Nile’s water will barely meet Egypt’s basic needs, according to the Ministry of Irrigation.

And that is assuming that the river’s flow is undiminished. Under British colonial rule, a 1929 treaty reserved 80 percent of the Nile’s entire flow for Egypt and Sudan, then ruled as a single country. That treaty was reaffirmed in 1959. Usually upstream countries dominate control of a river, like the Tigris and Euphrates, which are much reduced by the time they flow into Iraq from Turkey and Syria. The case of the Nile is reversed because the British colonials who controlled the region wanted to guarantee water for Egyptian agriculture.

The seven upstream countries — Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi and Rwanda — say the treaty is an unfair vestige of colonialism, while Egypt says those countries are awash in water resources, unlike arid Egypt, which depends on just one.

Today’s confrontation has unfolded in slow motion. In April, negotiations between the nine Nile countries broke down after Egypt and Sudan refused to give ground. The upstream countries quickly got together and in May came up with a formula that would free them to build their own irrigation projects and dams, reducing the flow to Lake Nasser, the vast man-made reservoir that straddles Egypt and Sudan.

So far Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya and Rwanda have signed the new Nile basin accord, which would require only a simple majority of member countries to approve new projects. Egypt wants to retain veto power over projects in any country, and with Sudan argues that the main provisions of the colonial-era treaty should be preserved.

Congo and Burundi have not yet taken sides. Egypt and Sudan have until May 2011 to resume negotiations, or else the upstream countries will activate the new agreement.

The threat of losing Nile water has animated Egypt, which until recently had virtually ignored the upstream countries. And Cairo received another jolt this spring, when Ethiopia inaugurated a $520 million hydroelectric dam on a Nile tributary, part of a decade-long project to create a modern electricity infrastructure. Italy, Ethiopia and the European Investment Bank financed the project, according to Ethiopian media reports.

Adding urgency, say diplomats and water experts in Egypt, investors from China and the Persian Gulf region have expressed interest in underwriting enormous agriculture projects in Uganda and Ethiopia, which would use Nile water.

Currently, several upstream nations, including Ethiopia and Uganda, are planning hydroelectric dams. If the upstream countries move slowly and fill the reservoirs over a period of 5 to 15 years, however, Egyptian officials concede that the hydroelectric plants will not significantly hurt Egyptian consumption.

Egyptian officials are also confident that the World Bank, the traditional donor for dams, would not approve them over Cairo’s objections, even if the officials remain concerned that governments and private investors might feel free to lend the money.

But agricultural projects, potentially far more damaging to Egypt, are another matter. Not only would they permanently reduce the amount of water that reaches Egypt’s border, but they have also already attracted the interest of wealthy Arab nations and the Chinese, who see an enormous profit potential in them.

Egyptian water experts said that the upstream countries wasted colossal amounts of water that run off unused into swamps. The upstream countries point to Egypt’s own wasteful practices, saying that 75 percent of Egypt’s water is used for agriculture, most of it wasted by inefficient, old-fashioned practices.

“I feel that we are all mad,” said Diaa el-Quosy, an American-trained water expert who advises Egypt’s irrigation minister. “Everyone wants to take his own share and then more.” He said that once political tensions cooled, the nine Nile basin countries could find “creative solutions” to manage the river’s flow effectively. “There is water enough for everyone,” he said.

In Egypt, however, decades of bellicose rhetoric about the Nile have made the river’s water an explosive issue. “Violating Egypt’s quota of Nile water is a genocidal war against 80 million people,” an Egyptian commentator, Hazem el-Beblawi, wrote this year in Al Masry Al Youm, an Egyptian daily.

Water experts say that Egypt has done little to curtail its own misuse of water.

Despite periodic government efforts to promote less wasteful practices, irrigation water still flows largely through dirt channels often choked with weeds. Much of it leaches into the ground before reaching crops. “Egypt doesn’t act like a country dying of thirst,” said Dan Morrison, author of “The Black Nile,” in which he chronicled his journey from the river’s origins to its mouth at the Mediterranean, and encountered the most pronounced waste in Egypt. So long as water is free for farmers, Mr. Morrison said, there is little incentive to conserve.

One solution Mr. Morrison proposed would entail Egypt’s importing food staples from upstream nations that can farm more efficiently with Nile water.

Isam Abdurahman, a Ministry of Agriculture farm supervisor, said the government was taking steps to try to conserve water, including paving some irrigation canals and managing farmers more strictly. This year, for instance, because of low river levels, rice cultivation was banned entirely in some areas, while the cotton quota was severely restricted. Mr. Sharkawi was permitted to plant only one field with cotton, rather than four.

And in a few desert areas like Toshka, near the Sudanese border, Egypt has experimented with large-scale modern drip irrigation. The vast majority of its farmers, however, are small land holders like Mr. Sharkawi, who cultivates maize, cotton and alfalfa in the Nile Delta.

He cannot afford to invest in drip irrigation or sprinkler systems that would lose less water to evaporation. Furthermore, like most Egyptian family farmers, he favors the most water-hogging crops, like rice, maize and cotton, rather than lower-intensity fruits and vegetables.

Upstream leaders like Ethiopia’s prime minister caution that Nile water use is “not a zero-sum game,” but in Egypt’s Delta that’s exactly how millions of farmers view it. If he had to pay for his water, Mr. Sharkawi said, he simply would lose his land. “Since the time of the ancient Egyptians,” he said, “we’ve always lived like this. It is the same for me, and it will be the same for my children.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/26/world/middleeast/26nile.html?ref=world

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« Reply #1312 on: Sep 26th, 2010, 08:34am »

Telegraph

Soldier wins Military Cross after saving wounded Afghan child
A British soldier has won the Military Cross after sprinting 100 yards while under enemy fire to rescue a critically injured Afghan child who had been deliberately shot by the Taliban.

By Sean Rayment, Defence Correspondent
Published: 7:30AM BST 26 Sep 2010

Lance Corporal Andrew Wardle, 22, watched in horror as the five-year-old boy wandered into the middle of a fire fight between British troops and insurgents in Helmand, southern Afghanistan.

A Taliban bullet struck the child in the middle of the back before exiting from the neck leaving him with life threatening wounds.

With complete disregard for his own safety, LCpl Wardle, 22, of the 2nd battalion the Yorkshire Regiment (The Green Howards), leapt from his position and raced across open ground to collect the injured boy.

LCpl Wardle, told The Sunday Telegraph: "We were assaulting a Taliban firing position when another group of insurgents opened up on us from the right.

"I saw a young child about 50 metres away right in the middle of enemy fire. He was only about five or six and he was heading towards us for safety."

LCpl Wardle, who was helping to train the Afghan Army at the time of the attack, said that the Taliban switched their direction of fire towards the child as soon as they saw the boy heading towards the British and Afghan troops.

He continued: "The Taliban wanted to kill him rather than let him fall into our hands. I have got a niece at home who was about this lad's size although she is a bit older than him.

"I just thought, 'This wouldn't be allowed to happen in England – and it shouldn't be allowed to happen here. I had tunnel vision. I was shocked. The lad had wandered onto the battlefield because he was confused more than anything.

"I just ran out and grabbed the child. I lifted him into my arms. I looked at my left arm and there was a lot of blood on it. It wasn't mine. I looked to my right and there was blood on that too, I knew the boy was badly hurt.

"I ran back with him. I knew I was being shot at but I did not really register the fact. I was just concentrating on getting the boy to safety."

L Cpl Wardle dived behind a low wall for cover and called for a medic to attend to the boy as bullets struck a wall above their heads

He said: "He was crying out for his 'mama' and I think the name of his father. We pulled off his coat which was covered in blood.

"We cut open the back of his shirt and put field dressing bandages on the entry and exit wounds. That stopped the bleeding.

"The medic needed to get a drip into him but we couldn't find a vein in his arm he was such a skinny little lad.

"I grabbed his wrist with both hands to make a vein stand out and the medic was able to get a needle into his arm and start getting fluids into him to replace the blood he'd lost.

"We got him on a stretcher and he was carried back to our aid point about 800 metres to our rear. From there, a helicopter came in and took him away to the field hospital at Camp Bastion. I never saw him again, I never found out his name.

"We just hoped he would survive and got on with the fighting."

LCpl Wardle and his patrol of Afghan National Army soldiers stormed the enemy position and won the firefight bringing four days of heavy fighting to a close.

Before rescuing the boy, LCpl Wardle had been almost killed twice during battles with insurgents near Musa Qal'eh in Helmand Province.

In one attack on his compound building a bullet tore through the rifle strap of the weapon slung over his shoulder, missing his body by millimetres.

A few hours later one of his Afghan colleagues fired a rocket-propelled grenade at the enemy and the back blast from weapon hit him straight in the face.

He said: "There was a flash and a bang. I couldn't hear anything, my ears were ringing. All I could think about was getting my fire down on the enemy."

LCpl Wardle ignored his own minor injuries to attack the enemy positions with his Minimi light machine gun.

He was awarded the Military Cross for his bravery throughout the four day battle which happened in January. He also discovered 17 Improvised explosive devices during the tour and treated five casualties.

His citation was among several read out at a ceremony at Wellington barracks in central London to announce Operational Honours won in Afghanistan during Operation Herrick 11.

It read: "He has displayed selfless and repeated acts of exemplary gallantry in the face of the enemy."

LCpl Wardle, who joined up aged 16, said: "At the time you don't really want to tell your family stuff that happens. You just say 'It's all quiet, everything's OK'.

"When I got back I told my mum all about it and she was shocked but she is very proud of what I did. Now when I think of my niece Meg, I can't help thinking about that boy in Afghanistan. I just hope he's OK."

Lt Gen Mark Mans, the Army's Adjutant General, said he was 'humbled' by the courage of the medal winners.

He said: "I am humbled by their bravery and selfless commitment. Some of them are very young and are outstanding examples of their generation. I salute them all."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/afghanistan/8024932/Soldier-wins-Military-Cross-after-saving-wounded-Afghan-child.html

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« Reply #1313 on: Sep 26th, 2010, 08:39am »

Telegraph video

Grandmother celebrates 90th birthday by sky-diving
Published: 1:58PM BST 24 Sep 2010

Joan Harding has celebrated a milestone birthday with a major adrenalin rush.

Video after the jump
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newsvideo/weirdnewsvideo/8022696/Grandmother-celebrates-90th-birthday-by-sky-diving.html

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« Reply #1314 on: Sep 26th, 2010, 08:45am »

LA Times

September 24, 2010 | 4:14 pm

While there was constant speculation that Jon Klein's days as president of CNN's U.S. operation were numbered, the executive himself was caught off-guard by his dismissal.

In an interview, Klein revealed that he had recently renewed his contract with CNN and has "quite a bit of time left" on his deal. Furthermore, just last April his boss -- CNN Worldwide President Jim Walton -- said he wasn't worried about CNN's poor ratings.

"It's not as dire as maybe some people say," Walton said, adding that while he wasn't satisfied with the performance, he also wasn't "concerned." At that time, CNN had seen its prime-time ratings drop by more than 41% from a year ago.

That doesn't sound like someone getting ready to make a big executive change. On Friday, Walton said CNN's performance was the reason for replacing Klein with HLN chief Ken Jautz.

"We're not satisfied with the low ratings," Walton told reporters on a conference call, but did not elaborate on what specifically had changed from a few months ago to lead him to do make the move to replace Klein.

Klein had been with CNN for almost seven years and Walton was very patient and supportive of him, leading some in the industry to wonder whether the decision to make a change came from CNN parents Turner Broadcasting and Time Warner Inc.

A spokeswoman for Phil Kent, chairman and CEO of Turner Broadcasting, denied that Kent pressured Walton to get rid of Klein and offered a statement from Kent issued to Company Town praising the restructuring of CNN. Kent said -- in very corporate speak -- that he is "in full support of his [Walton's] newly announced organizational structure and leadership team." A person close to Time Warner Chief Executive Jeff Bewkes said the change came from within CNN.

Klein, who had been working on putting the finishing touches on a new prime-time lineup, said, "I don't really understand the timing." Noting that he was being shoved out before his new shows had premiered, Klein said he feels like a baseball manager who is "fired right before the playoffs."

While Klein wouldn't be the first person to be let go after signing a relatively new deal, in his case given all the talk about his long-term future at the network, it seems unusual that he would be given an extension and continued support from his boss only to be dropped a few months later.

The two big moves Klein made in the last few months were sealing a deal for Piers Morgan to succeed Larry King in the 9 p.m. hour and hiring Eliot Spitzer, the disgraced former New York governor, to co-host a political chat show.

Piers, the British TV personality who moonlights in the U.S. as a judge on NBC's "America's Got Talent," will succeed King in January. Spitzer, who resigned as governor in the wake of a sex scandal, is being teamed with Kathleen Parker, a conservative columnist, for a political talk show starting next month.

Now it will be up to Jautz to make those moves pay off. A CNN veteran who has had stints working overseas for the company and who also ran the now-defunct business channel CNNfn, is credited with revitalizing HLN, which was formerly known as CNN Headline News.

But while Jautz has boosted ratings at HLN, his methods -- which included giving shows to fire-cracker lawyer Nancy Grace and Glenn Beck (who has since left for Fox News) -- have some wondering if CNN might soon have a more tabloid and over-the-top approach to programming.

In an interview, Jautz said CNN will “stick to its nonpartisan programming philosophy,” but he was quick to add that the network needs a shot of adrenaline.

“We have to be more exciting … in order to engage the prime-time audience you need to provide them something more,” he said. That means, he said, that CNN will start to have more opinion trickling into its content, but the network will do it in an “inclusive manner.”

Replacing Jautz at HLN will be Scot Safon, who had served as chief marketing officer of CNN Worldwide. While not a journalist by trade, Walton said Safon is a "strategic thinker" who has been "involved in and contributed to all the big decisions that have been made here over the last few years."

While Fox News doesn't mind tweaking its rivals about how they are performing, Roger Ailes, the chairman of the top-rated news channel, praised Klein.

“We’ve enjoyed competing with CNN during his tenure and I’m confident he’ll be an asset to any news organization he joins in the future," Ailes said, adding that he looks forward "to continuing our personal dialogue.”

-- Joe Flint


http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/entertainmentnewsbuzz/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1315 on: Sep 26th, 2010, 08:55am »

Wired

Looxcie Bluetooth Headset/ Camera Combo
Reviewed by Steven Leckart • September 24, 2010

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Photo by Jon Snyder For Wired.com

Wearable Camera Not Quite Ready For Its Close-Up
Warhol was only half-right. Sure everyone is famous these days, but only for 15 seconds and in 15 fps.

At least that's what the Looxcie, a wearable video camera, presumes. Integrated into a flashy Bluetooth headset, the device is meant for capturing happenstance moments where whipping out a phone or cheap portable camcorder may not suffice. It also pairs with a mobile app that transforms your cell phone into a viewfinder, in case you want to frame specific shots. Still, it's not for documentary films, just quick clips (up to 4-GB of 'em). Which is supposedly why Looxcie only shoots HVGA in 15 fps, instead of anything even close to HD.

In theory, it makes sense. With a quick double-tap of an easy-to-find button on top of the headset, we were able to record almost five hours of random footage from a variety of places: buses, trains, crosswalks, the office (the bathroom!). It's particularly solid for driving or other hands-free tasks you might want to document like, say, deconstructing and fixing a gadget (hat tip: @Alanwordguy ). In all of these instances, 15 fps is perfectly "good enough."

Outdoor clips are noticeably grainy and pixilated, the sensor adjusts to bright sunlight very slowly, and the color contrast is pretty disappointing. However, it's worth noting we found our indoor footage comparable, more or less, when tested side-by-side with an iPhone 3GS.

http://www.wired.com/reviews/product/pr_looxcie

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1316 on: Sep 26th, 2010, 1:58pm »

on Sep 25th, 2010, 3:36pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
My 83 year old Mom wears the ugliest hats! I tease her about them all the time. I found her Christmas present. I wonder if she will wear it?

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Crystal
I might get myself one for Christmas

Hello, Crystal. Please keep us updated. grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1317 on: Sep 26th, 2010, 2:06pm »

Hi Phil,
I wish I could be there when she opens it! I'll let you know what she does. grin
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1318 on: Sep 26th, 2010, 2:08pm »

The Blue Angels

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Blue Angels at Kaneohe Bay
by Dennis Oda


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« Reply #1319 on: Sep 26th, 2010, 7:22pm »


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