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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 127663 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #13260 on: Aug 16th, 2015, 08:03am »

Good morning Sys,

She really is an arrogant woman.

Crystal


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #13261 on: Aug 16th, 2015, 08:05am »

GOOD MORNING ALL cheesy

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Free Beacon

Sci-Fi on the Mall

Review: Fantastic Worlds, Science and Fiction 1780-1910 at the National Museum of American History in Washington through February 2017

BY: James Braid
August 16, 2015 5:00 am


The National Museum of American History, located in a brutalist bunker writ large, has a reputation for exhibits that are either incomprehensible or boring. For most of the years since its founding, its curators have subscribed to a modish view of a national museum as a place for “social history,” which in practice involves combing the collection for the most quotidian objects available, trotting them out, and imbuing them with deep, politically correct significance. The public has not found these conditions attractive, and attendance has long lagged behind the other “Big Three” museums on the Mall—Air and Space and Natural History.

More recently, things have been looking up. A renovation allows the occasional ray of light into the lobby, and interested philanthropists have been semi-successful at establishing the notion that a good exhibit is not one that requires an undergraduate degree to understand and a postgraduate degree to enjoy.

In the Museum’s newly renovated ground floor West Wing is a new exhibit: Fantastic Worlds: Science and Fiction 1780-1910, a look at the Victorian era’s impact on the development of genre fiction. The exhibit room is cramped, dimly lit, U-shaped and tricked out in 1970s earth tones. The effect is reminiscent of a well-funded suburban library recently fallen on hard times. The principal visual attractions are a scale model of an aerodrome (an aircraft that flaps its wings), built by the Smithsonian, that crashed a few days before the Wright brothers’ successful flight at Kitty Hawk, along with a mechanical proto-computer. Arranged around the walls in seven displays are themes from Victorian-era society that correspond with forerunner concepts of genre fiction: Terra Incognita, The Age of the Aeronaut, Infinite Worlds, Rise of the Machines, Sea Change, and Underworlds.

Books, maps and drawings make up the majority of each display, which is sponsored by the NMAH library. There are nonfiction volumes, like travelogues or scientific treatises, arranged with fiction on a similar topic. For example, Terra Incognita juxtaposes Dr. Livingstone’s personal narrative of his time in Africa with H. Rider Haggard’s King Solomon’s Mines. The editions the Museum displays dispel any notion that non-textual inclusions are a modern innovation. In fact, older books are richer in maps, props, and other narrative aids than trade volumes today, in spite of enormous advances in printing technology. Narrations of strange countries, some of them exaggerated, others rigorously accurate, prepared the popular imagination to accept other secondary worlds, beyond the already rich mythology of the West.

For an exhibition on the Victorian Era, which was as rife with crackpots, pseudoscience, and wild speculation as any other period in history, the textual explanation is curiously anodyne. This description of the artistic development of Mary Shelley, whose novel Frankenstein is a gut-shot criticism of untrammeled scientific exploration, is a representative example: “Her association with Percy Shelley and their literary circle further enriched her exposure to the thoughts and issues of the day, both literary and scientific.” A-plus work from the high school yearbook team, to be sure.

The studied blandness is all the more surprising when you consider that the spirit of the era was so colorful, not to say alien to our own. Language for a handbill advertising a talk by Dr. Livingstone is a hint of the pathology of the age: “…the Christian philanthropist cannot but lament amidst this GRANDEUR OF NATURE humanity should be sunk in wretchedness and degradation and must look forward with hope for a better and brighter future time for the benighted children of Africa.” More than anything else in the exhibit, that line encapsulates the spirit of the time and the people, the full measure of their optimism and self-righteousness.

Old books in bad light are a thin gruel for press-ganged middle-school-aged tourists. Even so, readers interested in the roots of science fiction and fantasy will find a great deal on which to reflect.

http://freebeacon.com/culture/sci-fi-on-the-mall/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #13262 on: Aug 16th, 2015, 11:03am »

NEVER A DULL MOMENT A LA CASEBOOK CAFE' cool

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #13263 on: Aug 16th, 2015, 12:24pm »

Free Beacon

Sci-Fi on the Mall

Review: Fantastic Worlds, Science and Fiction 1780-1910 at the National Museum of American History in Washington through February 2017

BY: James Braid
August 16, 2015 5:00 am


As to this post. I don't know what the hell this guy thinks he seeing at that museum but I have spent countless hours in the building and I completely disagree. It's true that there are not hordes of people there all the time like in the other two mentioned but the quality of information and the quality of the exhibits are very well done!

I would be more inclined believe that the IQ of those that take the time to actually see what's there is far and above what we are creating in the dumbing down of our students. The majority I saw there were student groups from other countries and older members of society! You have to actually have a decent vocabulary and ability to read to enjoy the exhibits!


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #13264 on: Aug 16th, 2015, 2:52pm »

on Aug 16th, 2015, 12:24pm, LoneGunMan wrote:
Free Beacon

Sci-Fi on the Mall

Review: Fantastic Worlds, Science and Fiction 1780-1910 at the National Museum of American History in Washington through February 2017

BY: James Braid
August 16, 2015 5:00 am


As to this post. I don't know what the hell this guy thinks he seeing at that museum but I have spent countless hours in the building and I completely disagree. It's true that there are not hordes of people there all the time like in the other two mentioned but the quality of information and the quality of the exhibits are very well done!

I would be more inclined believe that the IQ of those that take the time to actually see what's there is far and above what we are creating in the dumbing down of our students. The majority I saw there were student groups from other countries and older members of society! You have to actually have a decent vocabulary and ability to read to enjoy the exhibits!


Lone


I agree and this time unlike the last time (sniper Story)I would not give them a pass..from where the author is sitting..one can well understand the urge to revise if not erase history..


James Braid Email | Full Bio | RSS
James Braid is a staffer at a conservative public policy organization in Washington, D.C. He graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2013, and currently resides on Capitol Hill. Even some conservatives feel a need to forget history as an inconvenient annoyance. smiley

we can see that bitterness show itself from underneath the veneer of repectability and objectivity

His reviews speak for themselves and speak well of what happens when you give a keyboard to certain to these types and unleash them onto the world...
http://freebeacon.com/author/james-braid/

snippets
Joe Abercrombie pins the hopes of his second novel, Half the World, on just such a character and the result is uninspiring.


n the age of the fantasy blockbuster, it’s easy to forget the ubiquity of science fiction during the postwar era. During the Cold War and the Space Race, the perception was that Arthur C. Clarke, Robert Heinlein, and Isaac Asimov were predicting the future one story at a time. (This is no exaggeration. Reader’s Digest, then the most popular magazine in America, called Clarke “The Prophet of the Space Age” in 1969.) But, in this century, automation and advances in computer processing have eliminated swathes of middle class jobs and, as a result, major portions of the reading public, liberal and conservative, have lost their faith in the redemptive power of technology.


Predictions being what they are, which is to say nearly always wrong, near-future science fiction must navigate a narrow passage between two fatal hazards. Get too specific, and in a few years your book will take on the characteristic irrelevancy of an old newspaper article. Too broad, and things start to feel generic. Persona, Genevieve Valentine’s third novel, smashes squarely into the latter extreme, and fails as a result.




happy man isn't hesmiley
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #13265 on: Aug 16th, 2015, 8:25pm »

IT APPEARS I RECEIVED A >>> MOTION TO COMPELL <<< BY SIR 'SYS' AND THOUGHT I WOULD COMPLY... grin

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #13266 on: Aug 16th, 2015, 11:02pm »

cool grin cool,

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« Reply #13267 on: Aug 17th, 2015, 12:26am »

Indeed a battle for the hearts and memes of UCB!

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #13268 on: Aug 17th, 2015, 07:21am »

on Aug 16th, 2015, 12:24pm, LoneGunMan wrote:
Free Beacon

Sci-Fi on the Mall

Review: Fantastic Worlds, Science and Fiction 1780-1910 at the National Museum of American History in Washington through February 2017

BY: James Braid
August 16, 2015 5:00 am


As to this post. I don't know what the hell this guy thinks he seeing at that museum but I have spent countless hours in the building and I completely disagree. It's true that there are not hordes of people there all the time like in the other two mentioned but the quality of information and the quality of the exhibits are very well done!

I would be more inclined believe that the IQ of those that take the time to actually see what's there is far and above what we are creating in the dumbing down of our students. The majority I saw there were student groups from other countries and older members of society! You have to actually have a decent vocabulary and ability to read to enjoy the exhibits!


Lone


Good morning Lone,

I was there years ago when we lived in Maryland and loved it.

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #13269 on: Aug 17th, 2015, 07:24am »

GOOD MORNING ALL grin


Telegraph

DNA could be used to store data more efficiently than computers, scientists find

Scientists exploring archiving potential of DNA conduct test to cope with threat of 'digital dark age' find potential solution

11:24AM BST 17 Aug 2015

DNA could be used to store digital information and preserve essential knowledge for thousands of years, research has shown.

Scientists exploring the archiving potential of DNA conducted a test in which error-free data was downloaded after the equivalent of 2,000 years.

The next challenge is to find a way of searching for information encoded in strands of DNA floating in a drop of liquid.

Lead researcher Dr Robert Grass, from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), said: "If you go back to medieval times in Europe, we had monks writing in books to transmit information for the future, and some of those books still exist. Now, we save information on hard drives, which wear out in a few decades."

DNA has a "language" not unlike the binary code used in computers, said Dr Grass. While a hard drive uses zeros and ones to represent data, the DNA code is written in sequences of four chemical nucleotides, known as A,C,T and G.

But DNA can pack more information into a smaller space, and also has the advantage of durability.

In theory, a fraction of an ounce of DNA could store more than 300,000 terabytes of data, said Dr Grass. And archaeological finds had shown that DNA dating back hundreds of thousands of years can still be sequenced today.

Dr Grass's team managed to encode DNA with 83 kilobytes of text from the 1921 Swiss Federal Charter, and a copy of Archimedes' famous work The Method dating from the 10th century.

The DNA was encapsulated in silica spheres and warmed to nearly 71C for a week - the equivalent of keeping it for 2,000 years at 10C. When decoded, it was found to be error-free.

The scientists are now working on ways to label specific pieces of information on DNA strands to make them searchable.

"In DNA storage, you have a drop of liquid containing floating molecules encoded with information," said Dr Grass. "Right now, we can read everything that's in that drop. But I can't point to a specific place within the drop and read only one file."

DNA storage could be used to preserve troves of historical texts, government documents or entire archives of private companies - all in a single droplet, he added.

The main drawback of the technology was cost. Encoding and saving just a few megabytes of data in DNA currently cost "thousands of dollars", so personal DNA hard drives were unlikely to be within reach of ordinary consumers any time soon.

Internet pioneer Vint Cerf has warned of a "digital dark age" descending as computer hardware and software becomes obsolete.

Speaking at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in February, he said: "We are nonchalantly throwing all of our data into what could become an information black hole without realising it."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/11807184/DNA-could-be-used-to-store-data-more-efficiently-than-computers-scientists-find.html

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« Reply #13270 on: Aug 17th, 2015, 08:00am »

GOOD MORNING CRYSTAL ~ CASEBOOK ~ AND THE EXPONENTIALLY CURIOUS cool

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« Reply #13271 on: Aug 18th, 2015, 05:36am »

GOOD MORNING CRYSTAL ~ CASEBOOK cool

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« Reply #13272 on: Aug 18th, 2015, 08:33am »

GOOD MORNING Z & ALL OF OUR CASEBOOKERS cheesy


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Wired

Author: Kevin Montgomery
Date of Publication: 08.18.15.

Here Comes the World’s First International Drone Film Fest

Independent films have Sundance. Foreign films, Cannes. And for the ascending field of unmanned aerial filmmaking, there is now San Francisco’s forthcoming Flying Robot International Film Festival.

Scheduled for November 19, FRiFF will be the first global festival to “celebrate aerial cinema from the perspective of drones.” But the festival will be more than just the stunning landscape cinematography and dronies commonly associated with aerial film—Flying Robot is making a point to highlight short films in categories that often go unnoticed. “[Flying Robot] isn’t so much about the beauty of the films,” event organizer Eddie Codel says. “The stories around some of the categories are just as important as the quality of the shots.”

One such category is “Drones for Good,” which will feature the best shorts about how unmanned aircraft are being used to help humanity and tackle global issues. Drones already have been used to help anti-poaching efforts, drop medical supplies in war zones, fight fires, and even find missing people. “These stories of good don’t get much attention,” says Codel. “So many people just assume the worst. With Drones for Good, I hope to offer another narrative as to why we should carefully consider drones as lawmakers start banning them everywhere.”

While FRiFF will be the first international drone-focused film festival, it’s got regional precedent. March’s debut of the New York City Drone Film Festival, which brought over 400 film buffs to the Director’s Guild Theater in Manhattan, secured the title of first-ever drone festival. But beyond the scope of the events, Codel expects the two events to look very different. The NYC drone festival targeted the traditional filmmaking community, even rolling out a red carpet flanked by photographers. Whereas New York’s promoters say they see their festival becoming drone’s version of Sundance, Flying Robot wants to be more like Slamdance.

Codel says he’s taking a big tent approach, keeping admission low ($15) and setting the film submission fee at just $5 (students get their fees waved entirely). And in the spirit of the event, the festival will be held at the Roxie Theater in San Francisco’s Mission District–an independent neighborhood theater that also happens to the longest continuously operated cinema in the country. Flying Robot already has begun signing on some big sponsors, with 3DR joining on as a platinum sponsor. And the festival has brought together a diverse panel of judges, including MakerBot co-founder Bre Pettis and Engadget’s Veronica Belmont.

Despite the big names behind the event, Codel says attendees don’t have to worry about a royal red carpet outside the venue.

“We will likely have a small one, more like a red area rug.”

http://www.wired.com/2015/08/comes-worlds-first-international-drone-film-fest/?mbid=social_twitter

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« Reply #13273 on: Aug 18th, 2015, 08:36am »






UFO over Buckingham fountain United States | 12 August 2015

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« Reply #13274 on: Aug 18th, 2015, 09:06am »








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