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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 45166 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #135 on: Jul 18th, 2010, 07:28am »

LA Times

There's a hole in this possible earthquake pattern
The Mogi doughnut hypothesis, developed by a Japanese seismologist, holds that earthquakes occur in a circular pattern over decades, building up to one very large temblor in the doughnut hole.
By Rong-Gong Lin II and Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times

July 18, 2010

As UC Davis physicist and geologist John Rundle ponders the map of recent California earthquakes, he sees visions of a doughnut even Homer J. Simpson wouldn't like.

The doughnut is formed by pinpointing the recent quakes near Eureka, Mexicali and Palm Springs.

Seismologists call the possible pattern a Mogi doughnut. It's the outgrowth of a concept, developed in Japan, which holds that earthquakes sometimes occur in a circular pattern over decades —building up to one very large quake in the doughnut hole. Rundle and his colleagues believe that the recent quakes, combined with larger seismic events including the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge temblors, could be precursors to a far larger rupture.

They just don't know exactly when.

The idea of predicting earthquakes remains controversial and much debated among California's many seismologists. But as technology improves and the understanding of how earthquakes distribute energy grows, experts are gingerly offering improved "forecasts," some of which have been surprisingly prescient.

For example, Southern California was hit earlier this month by a 5.4 quake that struck in the mountains about 30 miles south of Palm Springs — several weeks after seismologists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and elsewhere warned that pressure was building in the San Jacinto fault zone, which is where the temblor occurred.

That forecast underscores new thinking by seismologists about how earthquakes occur.

In the past, experts paid less attention to how one fault was connected to another and how one earthquake could increase the chances of a quake on another fault. But now they believe that these connections are extremely important and that this year's temblors along the Mexican border and near Palm Springs seem to support the concept.

"Previously we would identify a fault, map it and name it," said Lisa Grant Ludwig, a UC Irvine earthquake expert. "What we've really got here is a network of faults. Maybe that's what we need to be thinking: more big-picture."

Seismologists made the forecast about the quake risk south of the Palm Springs area after seeing signs that the 7.2 Mexicali temblor in April had placed more pressure on the San Jacinto fault system, which extends from the border northwest 100 miles toward Riverside and San Bernardino. They were particularly concerned because the San Jacinto fault system connects to the massive 800-mile-long San Andreas fault, which last triggered the "Big One" in Southern California in 1857, leaving a trail of destruction from Central California to the Cajon Pass in the Inland Empire.

David Bowman, a geology professor at Cal State Fullerton, said his research indicates that the Mexicali quake — the largest to strike the region in nearly two decades — was actually triggered by a much smaller quake on a unnamed fault line. The small quake's energy "jumped on another fault and kept on going," causing the much larger Mexicali temblor that was felt all the way to Fresno.

"That fault the earthquake started on is so small, we don't even really know where it is. Yet that small earthquake — that would not have made the news at all — was able to jump onto another fault and become a magnitude 7.2 event," he said.

The big question is whether the Mexicali quake has made a destructive temblor in the L.A. area more likely. Experts see strong evidence that there is more pressure now on the San Jacinto and nearby Elsinore fault networks to the east of Los Angeles. The Elsinore fault zone is connected to the Whittier fault, which runs through densely populated sections of the L.A. area, including the San Gabriel Valley. As a result, there's a concern that a quake on the Whittier fault might be more likely.

The Mexicali quake has also turned into a treasure trove of data for earthquake experts. It comes at a time when quake technology has advanced in major ways. Sophisticated satellite images are being used to study creeping ground movement caused by tectonic pressure in advance of an earthquake.

New GPS ground monitoring equipment is tracking how far the ground has moved after a quake, allowing scientists to calculate locations of greater seismic stress. And research in the mountains west of Bakersfield, examining the tracks of earthquakes hundreds of years ago, is showing that catastrophic earthquakes — those as large as magnitude 8 — have occurred in Southern California more frequently than previously believed.

That brings experts back to the Mogi doughnut.

The idea behind the doughnut is relatively straightforward: Earthquakes in California are basically caused by tectonic movements in which the Pacific plate slides northwest relative to the North American plate. As the plates move, stress builds up along both sides of cracks in the Earth's crust, as if a giant sheet of peanut brittle were being shoved in two directions.

Tectonic stress will first cause ruptures on the smaller faults, because they need less pressure before they break and thus produce small earthquakes. When they do rupture, the tectonic pressure gets transferred somewhere else, moving along like a crack in a windshield.

Ultimately, the stress moves closer to bigger faults that need more pressure to erupt, thus creating larger and larger earthquakes until the "Big One" happens.

"It's a matter of looking at the major earthquakes in California over the last 20, 30, 40 years," said UC Davis' Rundle. "They seem to be occurring everywhere except the major faults — the San Andreas, the Elsinore and the San Jacinto."

Those three faults would be enclosed in Southern California's doughnut hole. Northern California's doughnut hole includes the San Andreas and Hayward faults.

The Mogi doughnut hypothesis was developed in 1969 by Japanese seismologist Kiyoo Mogi, who observed a pattern in which smaller earthquakes seemed to precede larger ones.

Experts stress that the hypothesis is still unproven and not universally accepted. Skeptics say the concept could be applied to seemingly random earthquakes.

Whether the doughnut concept proves true, there is a consensus that California is shaking more than in recent years.

That greater activity could presage a larger quake. But the history of earthquake forecasting is littered with bold predictions that prompted more fear than actual earth movement, said Susan Hough, a seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Pasadena. A case in point was the prediction in the 1980s of a devastating quake in Peru.

"The prediction was based on a number of ideas, some more wild-eyed than others," Hough said. "The prediction caused an international incident and a whole lot of real anxiety in Peru."

Perhaps the boldest recent prediction occurred in 2004, when an international research team led by then-83-year-old UCLA professor Vladimir Keilis-Borok said a moderate quake would rattle the California desert during a certain time frame.

more after the jump
http://www.latimes.com/news/custom/scimedemail/la-me-earthquake-forecast-20100718,0,1789070.story

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #136 on: Jul 18th, 2010, 12:01pm »

Happy Birthday to a lovely lady!!! grin

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« Reply #137 on: Jul 18th, 2010, 2:14pm »

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Crystal! cheesy

Nice to have you here!

Have a great day with your hubby and friends and enjoy it! smiley

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #138 on: Jul 18th, 2010, 5:50pm »

on Jul 13th, 2010, 06:31am, DrDil wrote:
And I just wanted to say welcome Oboe!!

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Cheers. grin


That seems to be how the world is now, upside down and bass-ackwards. Go ask Alice.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #139 on: Jul 18th, 2010, 6:00pm »

Happy Birthday to you,
Happy Birthday to you,
Happy Birthday dear Crystallllll,
Happy Birthday to youu!

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #140 on: Jul 18th, 2010, 9:09pm »

Oboe!! Great to see you!

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« Reply #141 on: Jul 18th, 2010, 9:34pm »

Thank you All!!! I just checked in and there were all of these lovely birthday wishes. cheesy
Nice surprise laugh It was a good day, we all had a lazy sunny day.
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« Reply #142 on: Jul 18th, 2010, 9:39pm »



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Just add hubby, dogs and water and you have our day today


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« Reply #143 on: Jul 19th, 2010, 07:48am »

Washington Post

A hidden world, growing beyond control

The top-secret world the government created in response to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, has become so large, so unwieldy and so secretive that no one knows how much money it costs, how many people it employs, how many programs exist within it or exactly how many agencies do the same work.

These are some of the findings of a two-year investigation by The Washington Post that discovered what amounts to an alternative geography of the United States, a Top Secret America hidden from public view and lacking in thorough oversight. After nine years of unprecedented spending and growth, the result is that the system put in place to keep the United States safe is so massive that its effectiveness is impossible to determine.

The investigation's other findings include:

* Some 1,271 government organizations and 1,931 private companies work on programs related to counterterrorism, homeland security and intelligence in about 10,000 locations across the United States.

* An estimated 854,000 people, nearly 1.5 times as many people as live in Washington, D.C., hold top-secret security clearances.

* In Washington and the surrounding area, 33 building complexes for top-secret intelligence work are under construction or have been built since September 2001. Together they occupy the equivalent of almost three Pentagons or 22 U.S. Capitol buildings - about 17 million square feet of space.

several more pages after the jump
http://projects.washingtonpost.com/top-secret-america/articles/a-hidden-world-growing-beyond-control/

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« Reply #144 on: Jul 19th, 2010, 07:55am »

Washington Post

Louisiana constructing islands in the gulf to aid in oil cleanup

By David A. Fahrenthold
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, July 19, 2010; A10

ON SAND BERM E-4 IN THE GULF OF MEXICO -- In theory, Louisiana's plan to hold back the BP oil spill sounds awe-inspiring, like an ancient myth made possible with oil-company money: To keep out an offshore invader, the state wants to make new land rise from the sea.

In reality, it looks slightly less impressive.

Here, more than 15 miles offshore, a dredging company is building an island about as wide as an interstate highway. This sandy strip is slowly getting bigger, as dredged-up mud gurgles and creaks down its spine in a rusty pipe and shoots out to form new land at its end.

But this island is still less than a mile long: a spot, not a wall, in a vast sea tainted by oil.

Officially called Sand Berm E-4, it is part of this state's most ambitious plan to combat the oil and at the same time help stave off long-term coastal erosion. It is at the heart of a politically touchy spat between Louisiana and the federal government, and between Louisiana and some of its scientists, over how to fight the oil that has leaked from the Macondo well.

Louisiana officials say the most reliable way to stop the oil from reaching sensitive marshes is to put solid land -- built from sandbags, sand piles or plain old rocks -- in its way. But many scientists and environmentalists say they are not convinced that these efforts will do much good.

"They are going to cost a lot of money, and their ultimate value is very much in question," said Aaron Viles, of the nonprofit Gulf Restoration Network. In some places, he said, the state's land-building "may be doing more harm than good."

Louisiana is the closest land to the blown-out BP well, and its salt marshes are far harder to clean than the sandy beaches that dominate the coast in Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Louisiana, led by Gov. Bobby Jindal (R), has reacted with furious work to keep oil out of those marshes -- and with criticism of the Obama administration for holding its efforts up.

State officials say they chose to build land barriers because they extend to the ocean floor, unlike the floating "containment boom." They can also stay put in a storm, unlike the barges used to block marsh inlets. The state says the land-building plan will still be necessary, even if the BP well remains capped.

There is already far too much oil in the water, Louisiana officials say, for skimming and controlled burns to eradicate it.

"There's not enough assets in this world right now to skim this thing offshore," said Deano Bonano, an official in Jefferson Parish who is overseeing efforts to protect the parish's marshes. "You're talking about an ocean of oil."

The state has already filled in 14 inlets that connected the marshes with the Gulf of Mexico, using mounds of dirt and giant sandbags in metal frames. But this man-made island is part of a far more ambitious effort: The state has proposed building 128 miles of islands in arcs off the coast, based on existing plans to rebuild lost barrier islands to fight erosion.

In May, the federal government issued permits for the construction of 45 miles of islands. BP agreed to foot the bill of $360 million.

This island, situated at the north end of a fading barrier island chain east of the Mississippi River mouth, is one result. One day last week, Jindal flew out in a National Guard Black Hawk helicopter, roaring out of urban New Orleans, over green mazes of coastal marsh and then open water. Finally, the island appeared. With its bulldozers and workers in safety vests, it looked like a road-construction project, dropped in the middle of the gulf.

Jindal climbed to the island's highest point, a mound of soft dirt perhaps eight feet high, and surveyed the scene.

"That's what I like to see," he told reporters as bulldozers behind him moved the dirt spewing out the pipe. "A couple of weeks ago, this was all open water."

Asked about the size of the island, Jindal said work had slowed because the federal government had taken a month to approve the initial permit and then delayed dredging for a week last month. Federal officials did not renew a temporary permit to dredge in an ecologically sensitive spot, saying Louisiana had agreed not to dredge there.

Jindal said the island was already stopping oil. Its back side was spattered with tar balls the size of sidewalk gum wads. "This shows that the sand berms are doing their jobs," he said. A 2.5-mile island is being built on the other side of the Mississippi River mouth.

But state officials say that even this first 45 miles won't be done until around Halloween, which would give oil months to float past. Some scientists in Louisiana are also questioning whether berms such as this one will survive the gulf's pounding waves.

A natural barrier island is "a beach, and a dune, and a marsh at the back. And this was really just a pile of sand," said Denise Reed, a scientist at the University of New Orleans.

That makes the sand-berm islands more susceptible to erosion. One scientist here posted pictures online that seemed to show one nearly submerged in a storm. State officials said it reemerged after the high seas.

Now the state is pushing a plan that, although smaller in scope, is even more controversial. Jefferson Parish, with the state's support, wants to pile lines of rock partway across a pair of passes that connect marshes to the gulf. If oily water hits the rocks, officials think, it will be pushed away from the opening and toward a confined area where skimmers can suck it up.

A number of Louisiana scientists, including a panel appointed by the state, have expressed reservations about the rock dams. Some have said it is dangerous to change this kind of natural plumbing: The same amount of tide will now be forced through a smaller opening. The result could be powerful currents that speed up the marsh's erosion or that drive floating oil deeper inland.

"It's the simple physics of a garden hose. You put your finger over the nozzle of the hose, you make the water spray out with more velocity," said Leonard Bahr, a coastal scientist who served as an adviser to Louisiana governors for 18 years, until he said he was "asked to retire" when Jindal took over in 2008. "You're going to increase the erosive power of the tidal flow."

more after the jump
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/18/AR2010071802838.html?hpid=topnews

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« Reply #145 on: Jul 19th, 2010, 07:58am »

New York Times

July 18, 2010
French Heiress vs. Daughter and Political Intrigue
By STEVEN ERLANGER

PARIS — An aging heiress. An angry daughter. A society photographer. A renegade butler and an embittered accountant. Secret tapes. A famous company with a nasty past and long political connections. An unpopular president and a cabinet minister with a taste for money, and tales of illegal cash donations in envelopes.

This romantic stew is known as the “Bettencourt affair,” after the elderly heiress of the L’Oréal fortune, Liliane Bettencourt, 87. What began as a fierce family fight, with her daughter charging that Mrs. Bettencourt’s entourage has been manipulating her to steal her fortune, has shaken the office of President Nicolas Sarkozy of France.

The affair has captivated France even as it enters the long summer holiday, with daily headlines, detentions and constant leaks. Mr. Sarkozy’s sometimes clumsy efforts to contain the scandal are similar to BP’s in the gulf — the flow of crude appears contained but the problem is far from over.

His approval ratings, already low from France’s economic problems, have fallen further with the Bettencourt skullduggery.

While Mr. Sarkozy himself seems insulated so far from charges of illegality, his labor minister, Éric Woerth, remains subject to investigations involving illegal political contributions and tax evasion. Mr. Woerth was budget minister, in charge of tax collection, until March, while also working as the treasurer of the ruling party, the Union for a Popular Movement, for the last eight years. He has quit, on Mr. Sarkozy’s orders, effective Aug. 1.

L’Oréal is a global cosmetics leader with brands that include Maybelline and the Body Shop. It is a champion of French industry but also has a complicated political history with both the right and the left.

Its founder in 1909, Eugéne Schueller, Mrs. Bettencourt’s father, supported the Nazis; Mrs. Bettencourt’s husband, André, wrote for a Nazi-sponsored, anti-Semitic weekly in the early years of the war.

But André Bettencourt later joined the French Resistance and was a youthful friend of François Mitterrand, the future Socialist president. After the war, Mr. Mitterrand helped protect the Bettencourt family and L’Oréal from anti-Nazi campaigns and even considered making Mr. Bettencourt prime minister in 1986.

Mrs. Bettencourt, like her late husband, is considered to have been closer to the Socialist Party than to the Union for a Popular Movement. Shy and regal, she is the richest woman in Europe, with a fortune estimated at $20 billion and a 31 percent stake in L’Oréal.

She joined the company at 15, as an apprentice. But as she aged, she grew estranged from her own daughter, Françoise Bettencourt-Meyers, 57, who suspected that members of her mother’s entourage, including a society photographer, François-Marie Banier, 63, were manipulating her to enrich themselves. Mrs. Bettencourt has given Mr. Banier, for example, about 1 billion euros’ worth of annuities, paintings and other gifts, including, it seems, an island in the Seychelles.

L’Oréal has always played politics, backing the parties in power and courting important personalities. Mrs. Bettencourt, for instance, had a private meeting with Mr. Sarkozy in the Élysée Palace to discuss the impact of the scandal on L’Oréal. And Mr. Woerth’s wife, Florence, was hired by Mrs. Bettencourt to help manage her money — after Mr. Woerth asked Mrs. Bettencourt’s wealth manager, Patrice de Maistre, to give her “career advice.” This conflict of interest ended only when Mrs. Woerth quit her job in the midst of the scandal.

Mr. Woerth has been officially cleared of interfering in Mrs. Bettencourt’s taxes, but others who have worked in the ministry have said that it is inconceivable that he would be unaware of the file of France’s wealthiest woman or that his subordinates would be unaware of his wife’s employment.

Suggestions that Mr. Sarkozy took envelopes of cash from Mrs. Bettencourt have been put to rest, but the police are pursuing an allegation from a disgruntled former Bettencourt accountant, Claire Thibout, that Mr. Woerth was illicitly given 150,000 euros in cash for Mr. Sarkozy’s 2007 presidential campaign. Money, she said, was not just for Mr. Woerth. Without being specific, Ms. Thibout said many politicians arrived for tea and envelopes. “These gentlemen often came to get money,” she told the police, in leaked testimony.

At least three criminal inquiries are now under way, all under Philippe Courroye, the public prosecutor of Nanterre, who has been criticized as too close to Mr. Sarkozy. A fourth, by an independent investigating judge, Isabelle Prévost-Desprez, is soon to begin, despite Mr. Courroye’s objections.

Mr. Banier, who like Mr. de Maistre and two others was detained for 36 hours last week for questioning by the tax police, testified that he did not want the island, “because of the mosquitoes and the sharks,” according to testimony leaked to the French press. Mr. Banier, who has a history of friendships with wealthy elderly women, said his relationship with Mrs. Bettencourt could not be reduced to money. “What she gave me is nothing alongside what she taught me,” he said.

The saga began in 2007, with a lawsuit by Ms. Bettencourt-Meyers, an only child, against Mr. Banier. A trial this summer was delayed when Mrs. Bettencourt’s former butler, Pascal Bonnefoy, who shared many of the daughter’s concerns, surrendered more than 21 hours of recordings he had secretly made from May 2009 to May 2010.

The tapes, made in Mrs. Bettencourt’s home, capture her advisers and others — including Mr. Banier — talking to her about tax havens, tax evasion, Swiss bank accounts, the Woerths, Mr. Sarkozy, and political contacts and contributions. The tapes have been authenticated by the police, and portions have been leaked, mostly to anti-Sarkozy media.

On the tapes, Mrs. Bettencourt often seems bored and forgetful of details, like the Seychelles island. But she has resisted court efforts to submit to an examination of her mental state.

Everyone has denied wrongdoing. Mrs. Bettencourt has promised to provide the police all requested information — though they have not yet, it seems, formally questioned her. She says that she has ordered an “independent audit” of her finances and that she will pay any taxes owed.

But she has been scathing about her daughter and her “vile doggedness” in two television interviews. “My daughter could have waited patiently for my death instead of doing all she can to precipitate it,” she said.

more after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/19/world/europe/19france.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #146 on: Jul 19th, 2010, 08:01am »

New York Times

July 16, 2010, 12:30 pm
Speak No Evil: A Post-McChrystal Press Clampdown
By TIM ARANGO

BAGHDAD – On Tuesday night at an air base in Baghdad a unit of soldiers from the Second Brigade of the 10th Mountain Division waited for a flight that would take them first to Anbar Province, then to Germany, then to Fort Drum in upstate New York.

The soldiers were going home, this time for good.

Reporters were invited to visit, to speak to soldiers and take pictures of packed rucksacks and troops boarding the plane, images that would convey the military’s message that the United States is leaving Iraq. The press was told that the waiting area was theirs to work in.

So I started to chat up soldiers. Just as I had finished the formalities of name, age, rank and hometown with a young private from Michigan, I was interrupted by an officer who explained that a handful of soldiers had been chosen to speak to the press, and that the remainder of the group was off limits.

He pointed to a group of four or five soldiers, who awaited media interviews.

The Pentagon’s new dictum to control news coverage, issued in the wake of the controversy over a Rolling Stone article that resulted in the dismissal of Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal as the top NATO commander in Afghanistan, seems to have reached the lower levels of the chain of command in Iraq.

The United States military is drawing down its forces in Iraq and is still eager to engage with the press to show that President Obama’s promise to reach 50,000 troops by the end of August will be met. Gen. Ray Odierno, the top commander in Iraq, held a briefing with reporters this week. The military opened a prison transfer ceremony to reporters on Thursday. And embeds with units are still available.

But there appears to be a clamping-down on spontaneous interactions between soldiers and the news media.

Recently my colleague Steven Lee Myers visited Forward Operating Base Mahmudiya, which the Americans transferred to Iraqi control on Thursday, and was told he could not interview soldiers during his visit because the chain of command had not authorized “formal interviews” with the soldiers there, part of the First Brigade of the Third Infantry Division.

The company commander at the base explained that his superiors wanted the focus of the visit to be on the process of the transfer — principally with only photographs and video — and not on the soldiers. (An Iraqi lieutenant colonel who showed up with trucks to haul away the detritus of KBR’s operations there also declined to be interviewed or to allow photographs.)

A civilian spokesman for the brigade, Tom Conning, later apologized, saying that the visit to the troops at Mahmudiya had not been properly organized.

In June I was embedded with a unit in northern Iraq when the McChrystal news broke. The soldiers who I was encamped with in the desert, on a mission to search for insurgents, were eager to talk about most anything: the war, the vicious fighting in prior tours, buddies killed, women back home.

But a question about the Rolling Stone article that resulted in President Obama firing General McChrystal was met with silence.

“How about the World Cup?” said an officer with the Third Squadron, Seventh Cavalry Regiment of the Third Infantry Division’s Second Brigade.

The reason for the reticence: a gag order had come down from division headquarters, the soldiers said, forbidding them from speaking about General McChrystal.

http://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/07/16/speak-no-evil-a-post-mcchrystal-press-clampdown/?ref=world

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« Reply #147 on: Jul 19th, 2010, 08:07am »

Hollywood Reporter

John Edwards film may unearth new details on scandal

By Andrew Wallenstein

July 18, 2010, 11:00 PM ET

Aaron Sorkin's upcoming film adaptation of a book about John Edwards' downfall could contain new information about the sordid saga, says the book's author, Andrew Young.

In an interview with THR, Young said he could provide Sorkin with heretofore-unknown details he kept out of "The Politician: An Insider's Account of John Edwards's Pursuit of the Presidency and the Scandal That Brought Him Down."

"There was a ton of stories I could have put in there but didn't because I couldn't prove it," Young said. "That's something we're going to work through. There's a whole other side of the story that's never been told."

Young wouldn't elaborate on the untold stories, nor would he comment on whether the Rielle Hunter sex tapes he's being sued over could make an appearance in the film. Hunter's attorneys claim Young stole the tapes and that their client should share in profits from the book.

Young said he hasn't heard anything yet about potential casting for Edwards or any of the other principal characters in the film, though he's getting plenty of suggestions. He recalled with amusement a blog that recommended Young himself be played by "Mad Men" hunk Jon Hamm. "I said, 'I think that guy should be very insulted,'" he joked.

Young said he turned down as many as eight different offers to adapt his book from "reputable" writers and filmmakers he declined to name, until Sorkin won him over with his intent not to focus the film entirely on the tawdrier aspects of his story.

The writer-director wooed him and his wife, Cheri, by drawing parallels between Young's book and his previous politically themed projects, including "The West Wing," "An American President" and "A Few Good Men."

"He was the last thing I expected: very genuine, very down to earth and very unlike anyone else we worked with in Hollywood," Young said. "He was very caring and we have a couple of issues with trusting people with what we've been through."

Young hooked up with Sorkin through their mutual agent, William Morris Endeavor Entertainment chief Ari Emanuel. Emanuel himself pitched Young as his representative before the book came out, according to Young, after reading a book review of "Politician."

Young admits he's a neophyte when it comes to the movie business, but said his contract allows him to have "significant input" in the script; he says Sorkin told him to expect lots of e-mails. He declined to discuss what he's making off of the deal.

"All they've told me is that it will be fast-tracked," said Young, who declined to divulge how much he's making from the book being optioned. "This is going to be his (Sorkin's) primary focus now."

Now Young is bracing for a big-screen depiction that he realizes won't be terribly flattering. Though he pines for some degree of normalcy to return to his life, he knows that won't happen anytime soon.

As Young recounted, Sorkin told him, "Andrew, I'm going to do a lot of things for you, but I'm sure your life isn't going to go back to normal," he said. "If you think the book was a big deal, the movie is going to be 100 times bigger than that."

link:
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/content_display/news/e3i70816729b031dfa8c99e3ee566cabd10

Ari Emanuel is Rahm's brother. The gossip is that when he came to the agency he walked in and fired the whole office. Sounds like quite a turd. Guess he will fit in there and Washington. grin
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« Reply #148 on: Jul 19th, 2010, 08:11am »

Telegraph

South African photographer Hannes Lochner shoots the wildlife of the Kalahari desert in black and white.

These photos are gorgeous!

link:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthpicturegalleries/7898348/South-African-photographer-Hannes-Lochner-shoots-the-wildlife-of-the-Kalahari-desert-in-black-and-white.html

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« Reply #149 on: Jul 19th, 2010, 08:17am »

Telegraph

Nasa 'elated' after new telescope uncovers 'previously invisible space objects'

An array of previously “invisible” space objects have been discovered by one of Nasa's newest space telescopes, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), in just six months, officials said.

By Andrew Hough
Published: 8:00PM BST 18 Jul 2010

The telescope has for the first time been able to identify previously unseen stars, asteroids, dust clouds and comets.
The telescope's discoveries have left scientists at the space agency thrilled.
The Messier 83 Southern Pinwheel Galaxy was pictured by the telescope. Nasa will disclose its full findings next year.
In what has left scientists at the space agency “elated”, the $320m (£195m) sky-mapping spacecraft has for the first time identified previously thousands of unseen space objects including stars, asteroids, dust clouds, comets and even a new galaxy.

Using technology to photograph the entire night sky one and a half times in infra-red light, Nasa said the telescope detected more than 25,000 new asteroids since beginning operations late last year.

Astronomy experts said almost 100 were considered "near Earth”, or within 30 million miles (48 million km). None, they added, posed any real threat to Earth.

The telescope also sighted 15 new comets and hundreds of potential brown dwarfs, or failed stars. It also confirmed the existence of 20 "dwars", including some of the coldest ever known.

WISE also detected what Nasa scientists believe is an ultra luminous galaxy, more than 10 billion light years away that formed from other colliding galaxies.

The findings, released late last week, have left the space agency thrilled. Most of the objects have been invisible to most other telescopes before now.

Nasa hopes that by discovering near-Earth asteroids that are on average larger than what's found by existing telescopes, it could help scientists better calculate their potential threat to the earth.

WISE completed its first full scan of the sky on Saturday before beginning another round of imaging in what Nasa hopes will pick up even more objects.

By the end of the year, researchers expect to have a cosmic census of millions of new-found objects that should help answer questions about how planets, stars and galaxies form.

"We're filling in the blanks on everything in the universe from near-Earth objects to forming galaxies," said project scientist Dr Peter Eisenhardt of the Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is managing the mission.

"There's quite a zoo."

Richard Binzel, a scientist with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said the telescope was able to “see through” almost impenetrable veils of dust, picking up the heat glow of objects that are invisible to regular telescopes.

“Most telescopes focus on the hottest and brightest objects in the universe,” he said.

“WISE is especially sensitive to seeing what's cool and dark, what you could call the stealth objects of the universe."

WISE’s 16-inch telescope, built by Utah State University's Space Dynamics Laboratory, circles the Earth 300 miles high and takes snapshots every 11 seconds over the whole sky.

Since the sky survey began, the JPL team has reported the new near-Earth objects to the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center, which keeps track of all small solar system objects.

It comes a quarter century after the Infrared Astronomy Satellite made the first all-sky map in infrared wavelength in 1983 but unlike its predecessor, WISE is far more powerful.

It is expected to keep taking images covering half of the sky until October when it will begin to run out of coolant.

While Nasa has released a picture a week of its myriad finds, the full celestial catalogue of what's out there will not be released to the public until next year


more after the jump
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/7894247/Nasa-elated-after-new-telescope-uncovers-previously-invisible-space-objects.html

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