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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 13339 times)
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Your Lack Of Cash Is Disturbing


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14370 on: Mar 7th, 2016, 9:37pm »

on Mar 7th, 2016, 5:57pm, ZETAR wrote:
SYS,

TO WIT:

"And here's the punchline: According to AFP, Chinese hackers have been blamed and
the money was stolen from accounts held at the New York Fed..."

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Grateful Dead - Shakedown Street (Studio Version)

https://youtu.be/8lCMUkqpI7o


'Shakedown Street' ~ Grateful Dead

"You tell me this town ain't got no heart. Well, well, well, you can never tell.
The sunny side of the street is dark. Well, well, well, you can never tell.
Maybe that's cause it's midnight, in the dark of the moon besides."

"Maybe the dark is from your eyes, Maybe the dark is from your eyes,
Maybe the dark is from your eyes, Maybe the dark is from your eyes,
Maybe the dark is from your eyes, Maybe the dark is from your eyes,
You know you got such dark eyes!"

SHALOM....Z

lol yeah grin
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Breaking the Matrix ..More than UFO related..Its Life Related
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14371 on: Mar 7th, 2016, 9:42pm »

SYS,

WE FEED THE PASSION ~ THE DESIRE ~ THE IMAGINATION ~ BUT TAKE SPECIAL CARE ~ TO FEED THE FELINES wink

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GOOD THINGS COME TO THOSE WHOM HUSTLE ~ AND THOSE WHOM HUSTLE GET THE...

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ONLY ~ A LA CASEBOOK CAFE'

SHALOM...Z
« Last Edit: Mar 7th, 2016, 9:44pm by ZETAR » User IP Logged

GREAT SPIRITS ALWAYS ENCOUNTER THE MOST VIOLENT OPPOSITION FROM MEDIOCRE MINDS E=MC2
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14372 on: Mar 7th, 2016, 10:12pm »

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14373 on: Mar 8th, 2016, 06:06am »

GOOD MORNING FELLOW UFOCASEBOOKERS grin

Free Beacon

Hypersonic Arms Race Heats Up as U.S. Builds High-Speed Missiles

BY: Bill Gertz
March 8, 2016

Defense Secretary Ash Carter disclosed last week that the Pentagon’s new high-technology weapons to deal with threats from China and Russia will include ultra-high speed missiles.

more after the jump:
http://freebeacon.com/national-security/hypersonic-arms-race-heats-up-as-u-s-builds-high-speed-missiles/

Crystal

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14374 on: Mar 8th, 2016, 06:12am »







Published on Mar 7, 2016

~

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14375 on: Mar 8th, 2016, 07:05am »







Crystal


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14376 on: Mar 8th, 2016, 08:48am »

GOOD MORNING CRYSTAL ~ CASEBOOK cool

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SHALOM...Z
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14377 on: Mar 8th, 2016, 11:21am »

Boy, That Area 51 video is the height of stupidity!! Those "Camo Dudes" are authorized to use lethal force and one wrong move and they would blow you away. Reminds me of a saying they have in Saudia Arabia, "It is very easy to bury your mistakes in the Desert" And no body would know what happened to them.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14378 on: Mar 8th, 2016, 3:12pm »

on Mar 8th, 2016, 11:21am, oldprofessor wrote:
Boy, That Area 51 video is the height of stupidity!! Those "Camo Dudes" are authorized to use lethal force and one wrong move and they would blow you away. Reminds me of a saying they have in Saudia Arabia, "It is very easy to bury your mistakes in the Desert" And no body would know what happened to them.


I know! shocked

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14379 on: Mar 8th, 2016, 3:12pm »







Crystal


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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14380 on: Mar 8th, 2016, 3:13pm »

on Mar 8th, 2016, 08:48am, ZETAR wrote:
GOOD MORNING CRYSTAL ~ CASEBOOK cool

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SHALOM...Z


LOVE THIS Z! I'M STEALING IT.

CRYSTAL

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14381 on: Mar 8th, 2016, 3:16pm »

Free Beacon

Israeli Man Pulls Terrorist’s Knife From His Neck, Stabs Terrorist to Death

by Stephen Gutowski
8 March 2016

An Israeli man was able to stab his terrorist attacker to death after retrieving the terrorist’s knife from his own neck on Tuesday.

The attack occurred in the Israeli city of Petah Tikva. An Arab man followed the Israeli man into a store and began stabbing him in the upper body, the Times of Israel reports. The Israeli, with help from the store owner, was able to fight back against the assailant.

more after the jump:
http://freebeacon.com/national-security/israeli-man-pulls-terrorists-knife-from-his-neck-stabs-terrorist-to-death/

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« Reply #14382 on: Mar 9th, 2016, 07:58am »

GOOD MORNIN' cheesy

Scientific American

The U.S. Government Launches a $100-Million "Apollo Project of the Brain"

By Jordana Cepelewicz on March 8, 2016

Three decades ago, the U.S. government launched the Human Genome Project, a 13-year endeavor to sequence and map all the genes of the human species. Although initially met with skepticism and even opposition, the project has since transformed the field of genetics and is today considered one of the most successful scientific enterprises in history.

Now the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), a research organization for the intelligence community modeled after the defense department’s famed DARPA, has dedicated $100 million to a similarly ambitious project. The Machine Intelligence from Cortical Networks program, or MICrONS, aims to reverse-engineer one cubic millimeter of the brain, study the way it makes computations, and use those findings to better inform algorithms in machine learning and artificial intelligence. IARPA has recruited three teams, led by David Cox, a biologist and computer scientist at Harvard University, Tai Sing Lee, a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University, and Andreas Tolias, a neuroscientist at the Baylor College of Medicine. Each team has proposed its own five-year approach to the problem.

“It’s a substantial investment because we think it’s a critical challenge, and [it’ll have a] transformative impact for the intelligence community as well as the world more broadly,” says Jacob Vogelstein at IARPA, who manages the MICrONS program.

MICrONS, as a part of President Obama’s BRAIN Initiative, is an attempt to push forward the status quo in brain-inspired computing. A great deal of technology today already relies on a class of algorithms called artificial neural networks, which, as their name would suggest, are inspired by the architecture (or at least what we know about the architecture) of the brain. Thanks to significant increases in computing power and the availability of vast amounts of data on the Internet, Facebook can identify faces, Siri can recognize voices, cars can self-navigate, and computers can beat humans at games like chess. These algorithms, however, are still primitive, relying on a highly simplified process of analyzing information for patterns. Based on models dating back to the 1980s, neural networks tend to perform poorly in cluttered environments, where the object the computer is trying to identify is hidden among a large number of objects, many of which are overlapping or ambiguous. These algorithms do not generalize well, either. Seeing one or two examples of a dog, for instance, does not teach the computer how to identify all dogs.

Humans, on the other hand, seem to overcome these challenges effortlessly. We can make out a friend in a crowd, focus on a familiar voice in a noisy setting, and deduce patterns in sounds or an image based on just one or a handful of examples. We are constantly learning to generalize without the need for any instructions. And so the MICrONS researchers have turned to the brain to find what these models are missing. “That’s the smoking gun,” Cox says.

While neural networks retain elements of the architecture found in the brain, the computations they use are not copied directly from any algorithms that neurons use to process information. In other words, the ways in which current algorithms represent, transform, and learn from data are engineering solutions, determined largely by trial and error. They work, but scientists do not really know why—certainly not well enough to define a way to design a neural network. Whether this neural processing is similar to or different from corresponding operations in the brain remains unknown. “So if we go one level deeper and take information from the brain at the computational level and not just the architectural level, we can enhance those algorithms and get them closer to brain-like performance,” Vogelstein says.

The various teams will attempt to map the complete circuitry between all the neurons of a cubic millimeter of a rodent’s cortex. This volume, which constitutes less than one millionth the size of the human brain, may seem tiny. But to date, scientists have only been able to measure the activity of either a few neurons at a time or millions of neurons contained in the composite pictures obtained through functional magnetic resonance imaging. Now, the members of MICrONS plan to record the activity and connectivity of 100,000 neurons while the rodent is engaged in visual perception and learning tasks—a relatively enormous feat, since it requires imaging, with nanometer resolution, the twists and turn of wires whose full length is a few millimeters. “That’s like creating a road map of the U.S. by measuring every inch,” Vogelstein says.

Still, Vogelstein is optimistic because of recent support given for large-scale neuroscience research. “With the advent of the BRAIN Initiative, an enormous number of new tools have come online for interrogating the brain both at the resolution and scale that’s required for recovering a detailed circuit diagram,” he says. “So it’s a unique point in history, where we have the right tools, techniques, and technologies for the first time ever to reveal the wiring diagram of the brain at the level of every single neuron and every single synapse.”

Each team plans to record the brain’s road map differently. Cox’s team will use a technique called two-photon microscopy to measure brain activity in rats as they are trained to recognize objects on a computer screen. The researchers will introduce a modified fluorescent protein, which is sensitive to calcium, into the rodents. When a neuron fires, calcium ions rush into the cell, causing the protein to glow brighter—so using a laser scanning microscope, the researchers will be able to watch the neurons as they’re firing. “That’s a little bit like wire tapping the brain,” Cox says. “The way you might listen in on a phone call to see what’s going on, we can listen in on important internal aspects of the brain while the animal is alive and doing something.”

Then one cubic millimeter of the rat’s brain will be sent to Jeffrey Lichtman, a biologist and neuroscientist also at Harvard University. In Lichtman’s lab, it will be cut into incredibly thin slices and imaged under a state-of-the-art electron microscope at enough resolution to see all the wire-like extensions of brain cells that connect to each other. Tolias’s team is taking a similar approach, called three-photon microscopy, to look into the deeper layers of a mouse’s brain, and not just the top layers examined by Cox and his colleagues.

Meanwhile, Lee’s team plans to take a far more radical path toward mapping the connectome. Partnered with George Church, a geneticist at Harvard Medical School, they plan to use DNA barcoding: they will label every neuron with a unique sequence of nucleotides (barcode) and chemically connect barcodes across synapses to reconstruct circuits. While this method would not provide the same level of spatial information as microscopy, Lee hopes it will be faster and more accurate—provided it works at all, that is. This technology has never been successfully used before. “But if this barcoding technology works, it will revolutionize neuroscience and connectomics,” Lee says.

And all that only constitutes the first half of the MICrONS project. The scientists next have to find a way to make all this information useful for algorithms in machine learning. They have some ideas about how to do this. For one, many researchers believe the brain is Bayesian—that neurons represent sensory information in the form of probability distributions, calculating the most likely interpretation of an event based on previous experience. This hypothesis is based primarily on the idea of feedback loops in the brain—that information does not only flow forward, but that there are even more connections flowing back. In other words, researchers hypothesize that perception is not simply a mapping from some input to some output. Rather, a constructive process, “analysis by synthesis,” exists, in which the brain maintains and creates an internal representation of the world, generating expectation and prediction that allows it to explain incoming data and plan how to use it. “This is a guiding principle we’re looking at very closely—the hallmarks of this synthetic process,” Cox says, “where we confabulate what might be in the world and test that against what we actually see, and use that to drive our perception.”

For instance, the retina, which reacts to light by generating electrical impulses that are relayed to the optic nerve and then the brain, is actually a two-dimensional structure. So when a person sees an object, perhaps the brain uses such a probabilistic model to infer a three-dimensional world from the light hitting the retina’s two-dimensional surface. If that’s the case, though, then the brain has found a much better way of approximating and inferring variables than we are capable of with our current set of mathematical models. After all, if you’re observing a scene with 100 objects, consider only the forward and backward orientations the objects may have, just two of the many. That’s 2100 possible patterns right there. Getting answers by computing all those probabilities is not feasible, and yet the brain does it effortlessly with an infinite number of possible orientations: different distances, with different rotations, in different lighting conditions. “What the brain does is unfold this manifold [of data points] and make it easily separable,” Tolias explains.

more after the jump:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-u-s-government-launches-a-100-million-apollo-project-of-the-brain/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14383 on: Mar 9th, 2016, 08:27am »

GOOD MORNING CRYSTAL ~ CASEBOOK ~ cool

WHERE THAT JOURNEY ~ IN SEARCH FOR THAT NECTAR OF KNOWLEDGE ~ FINDS IT'S WAY ~ A LA CASEBOOK CAFE'

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SHALOM...Z

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IF YA THINK YA TIRE OF CASEBOOK...NEVER! ~ WE WAKE YOU UP... grin

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« Last Edit: Mar 9th, 2016, 08:54am by ZETAR » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #14384 on: Mar 10th, 2016, 08:36am »

GOOD MORNING ALL YOU LOVELY UFOCASEBOOKERS cheesy

Daily Mail

Great-grandmother who lived her whole life in the same cottage dies aged 104 in the home she cherished so dearly

By Flora Drury
9 March 2016

A great-grandmother who lived her whole life in the same cottage - refusing to move even when the village flooded around her - has died aged 104.

Ena Brown spent her entire life in the same cherished three-bedroom cottage where her mother Mary Westbrook gave birth to her in 1912, and where generations of her family have lived since 1850.

And it was here, at Forge Cottage in the village of Hambledon, Hampshire, that Mrs Brown died last Thursday, surrounded by her family.

Speaking on her 100th birthday four years ago, Mrs Brown said: ‘I was born here and I will never leave.

‘I have so many happy memories here. It is a perfect little village and I know almost everyone here.’

The mother-of-two, who had two great-grandchildren aged 14 and 17, was born on January 13, 1912, in the village a few miles from Southampton, where the Titanic left for its ill-fated maiden voyage that April.

more after the jump:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3484536/Great-grandmother-lived-life-cottage-refused-village-flooded-dies-aged-104.html

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