Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
May 28th, 2017, 8:50pm


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 99 100 101 102 103  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 48089 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1500 on: Oct 10th, 2010, 7:06pm »

on Oct 10th, 2010, 6:38pm, purr wrote:
Thanks for sharing the vid, WoC! I looked at it with interest, and from the gold contrast shining off the contrails, I would deduce the powerful golden glare effects are in sequence sun lighting up contrails at high altitude, then same on the fuselage, then finally both jet engines, while to the observer/camera the sun already has sunk below the horizon.


purr


Hi Purr!
I couldn't really tell what I was looking at when I saw it on YouTube. I know nothing about jets so can't say what the guy video taped. It was interesting.
Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1501 on: Oct 10th, 2010, 7:12pm »

There are fifteen parts to this. Here is one, and double click to bring yourself to YouTube for the rest.



Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1502 on: Oct 10th, 2010, 7:39pm »

A quick blast from the past



Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1503 on: Oct 11th, 2010, 08:38am »

Good Morning!

User Image

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1504 on: Oct 11th, 2010, 08:41am »

New York Times

October 10, 2010
New Web Code Draws Concern Over Risks to Privacy
By TANZINA VEGA

Worries over Internet privacy have spurred lawsuits, conspiracy theories and consumer anxiety as marketers and others invent new ways to track computer users on the Internet. But the alarmists have not seen anything yet.

In the next few years, a powerful new suite of capabilities will become available to Web developers that could give marketers and advertisers access to many more details about computer users’ online activities. Nearly everyone who uses the Internet will face the privacy risks that come with those capabilities, which are an integral part of the Web language that will soon power the Internet: HTML 5.

The new Web code, the fifth version of Hypertext Markup Language used to create Web pages, is already in limited use, and it promises to usher in a new era of Internet browsing within the next few years. It will make it easier for users to view multimedia content without downloading extra software; check e-mail offline; or find a favorite restaurant or shop on a smartphone.

Most users will clearly welcome the additional features that come with the new Web language.

“It’s going to change everything about the Internet and the way we use it today,” said James Cox, 27, a freelance consultant and software developer at Smokeclouds, a New York City start-up company. “It’s not just HTML 5. It’s the new Web.”

But others, while also enthusiastic about the changes, are more cautious.

Most Web users are familiar with so-called cookies, which make it possible, for example, to log on to Web sites without having to retype user names and passwords, or to keep track of items placed in virtual shopping carts before they are bought.

The new Web language and its additional features present more tracking opportunities because the technology uses a process in which large amounts of data can be collected and stored on the user’s hard drive while online. Because of that process, advertisers and others could, experts say, see weeks or even months of personal data. That could include a user’s location, time zone, photographs, text from blogs, shopping cart contents, e-mails and a history of the Web pages visited.

The new Web language “gives trackers one more bucket to put tracking information into,” said Hakon Wium Lie, the chief technology officer at Opera, a browser company.

Or as Pam Dixon, the executive director of the World Privacy Forum in California, said: “HTML 5 opens Pandora’s box of tracking in the Internet.”

Representatives from the World Wide Web Consortium say they are taking questions about user privacy very seriously. The organization, which oversees the specifications developers turn to for the new Web language, will hold a two-day workshop on Internet technologies and privacy.

Ian Jacobs, head of communications at the consortium, said the development process for the new Web language would include a public review. “There is accountability,” he said. “This is not a secret cabal for global adoption of these core standards.”

The additional capabilities provided by the new Web language are already being put to use by a California programmer who has created what, at first glance, could be a major new threat to online privacy.

Samy Kamkar, a California programmer best known in some circles for creating a virus called the “Samy Worm,” which took down MySpace.com in 2005, has created a cookie that is not easily deleted, even by experts — something he calls an Evercookie.

Some observers call it a “supercookie” because it stores information in at least 10 places on a computer, far more than usually found. It combines traditional tracking tools with new features that come with the new Web language.

In creating the cookie, Mr. Kamkar has drawn comments from bloggers across the Internet whose descriptions of it range from “extremely persistent” to “horrific.”

Mr. Kamkar, however, said he did not create it to violate anyone’s privacy. He said was curious about how advertisers tracked him on the Internet. After cataloging what he found on his computer, he made the Evercookie to demonstrate just how thoroughly people’s computers could be infiltrated by the latest Internet technology.

“I think it’s O.K. for them to say we want to provide better service,” Mr. Kamkar said of advertisers who placed tracking cookies on his computer. “However, I should also be able to opt out because it is my computer.”

Mr. Kamkar, whose 2005 virus circumvented browser safeguards and added more than a million “friends” to his MySpace page in less than 20 hours, said he had no plans to profit from the Evercookie and did not intend to sell it to advertisers.

“That wouldn’t have been difficult,” he said. Instead, he has made the code open to anyone who wants to examine it and says the cookie should be used “as a litmus test for preventing tracking.”

A recent spate of class-action lawsuits have accused large media companies like the Fox Entertainment Group and NBC Universal, and technology companies like Clearspring Technologies and Quantcast, of violating users’ privacy by tracking their online activities even after they took steps to prevent that.

Most people control their online privacy by adjusting settings in today’s most common Web browsers, which include Internet Explorer by Microsoft, Firefox by Mozilla, Safari by Apple and Opera, which is used mostly in Europe and Asia and on mobile devices.

more after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/11/business/media/11privacy.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1505 on: Oct 11th, 2010, 08:52am »

Hollywood Reporter

TRAILER: Jihadist comedy ‘Four Lions’ (video)
By Jay A. Fernandez | October 8th, 2010 at 3:29 pm |

I unfortunately missed "Four Lions" when it debuted at Sundance this year, but I've been curious ever since. Drafthouse Films, the new distribution entity formed by Alamo Drafthouse CEO Tim League, picked up the film last month as its first limited release, November 5.

Since Chris Morris' comedy is about four bumbling British jihadists, it was radioactive, until League stepped up to distribute the controversial material.

Apple has the trailer: http://trailers.apple.com/trailers/independent/fourlions/


http://riskybusiness.hollywoodreporter.com/2010/10/08/trailer-jihadist-comedy-four-lions-video/#more-14843

Crystal


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1506 on: Oct 11th, 2010, 08:55am »

Telegraph

Britain's coping classes at breaking point
Millions of “dutiful, middle-aged” couples who care for their parents and teenage children will be “chronically disadvantaged” by the demands of Britain’s ageing population, a report has found.

By Tim Ross, Social Affairs Editor
Published: 10:06PM BST 10 Oct 2010

The “coping classes” increasingly are struggling with the responsibility of looking after two generations, the equality watchdog says.

Without action now, the “burden” of caring for older relatives will destroy the “bond of affection” at the heart of family life, the Equality and Human Rights Commission says.

The warning comes in a 700-page report that forms the first comprehensive survey of disadvantage and discrimination across Britain. While the country today is more tolerant than in 1970, society is still not fair for many people, it says. The economic crisis and the Government’s proposed spending cuts threaten to make inequality worse, it says. The report, How Fair is Britain?, finds:

• Progress at narrowing the pay gap between men and women has “stalled”. While there has been substantial improvement over the past 30 years, momentum has “ground to a halt”. Women working full-time earn 16.4 per cent less than men.

• The white working classes are missing out on good jobs compared with other ethnic groups, with Chinese and Indian men nearly twice as likely to find professional work.

• Unemployment among ethnic minorities costs the economy almost £8.6 billion a year in benefits and lost revenue from taxes. Half of Muslim men and three quarters of Muslim women are unemployed.

The country has a strong sense of tolerance and fair play. However, racism and religious prejudice are increasing, while hostility towards immigration has grown.

The looming crisis in care for the elderly causes the watchdog the most acute concern. Millions in the “sandwich generation” face having to look after their parents while still caring for their children, it says. Launching the report, Trevor Phillips, the commission chairman, will say today that the “spirit of sacrifice” must not be abused if families are to survive. “For families like my own, care for our elderly is not just second nature, it’s a moral duty,” he will say.

“Unless we adjust to increased longevity and the stresses of modern life we risk turning what could be one of the foundation stones of the Big Society into a burden.

“One in four women and one in five men in their fifties is a carer.

“These are some of the most hard-pressed folk in our society – and they deserve a break. This is not a problem for particular families or for government — it’s one for all of us.”

The number of pensioners and other adults who will need informal care from their families is expected to increase by 90 per cent in the next 30 years. The burden will fall mainly on the middle-aged who are trying to juggle work with raising children, and providing an estimated 1.3 million elderly relatives with informal care. The report calls for people to be given greater financial support by government.

It goes on to identify areas of “segregation” in education and employment. While the gender pay gap has fallen for the past 30 years, progress seems to have “halted”.

The gender pay gap is lowest for the under 30s, rising more than five-fold by the time women reach 40.

An analysis of living standards shows that the total household wealth of the top 10 per cent in society is almost 100 times higher than for the poorest 10 per cent.

Mr Phillips says: “This review holds up the mirror to fairness in Britain. Sixty years on from the Beveridge report and the creation of the welfare state, his five giants of squalor, disease, ignorance, want and idleness have been cut down to size, though they still stalk the land.

“For some, the gateways to opportunity appear permanently closed while others seem to have been issued with an 'access all areas’ pass at birth. Recession, demographic change and new technology all threaten to deepen the fault lines between insiders and outsiders.”


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/8054403/Britains-coping-classes-at-breaking-point.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1507 on: Oct 11th, 2010, 09:05am »

Guardian

US out of step with world on walking, study shows
Report links obesity levels to American car culture, lack of public transport and reluctance to take a daily stroll
Reuters in New York
guardian.co.uk, Monday 11 October 2010 13.03 BST

Americans have got some walking to do if they want to catch up with the rest of the world. They are far outpaced by Australians, Asians and Europeans who walk much more, according to a study.

Adults in western Australia average 9,695 steps a day. The Swiss followed with 9,650, while the Japanese clocked in with 7,168 steps. But Americans straggled far behind with just 5,117 steps.

"We were surprised that the levels of physical activity were that low," said Dr David R Bassett, of the University of Tennessee, the lead author of the study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

"Five thousand steps is really pretty inactive," he added.

Bassett said Americans need to step up for another 30 to 40 minutes a day to shrink the fitness gap. One mile equals about 2,000 steps.

The researchers used pedometers to gather step data from 1,136 US adults, who varied in age, gender and geographic location, and compared the results to similar studies in the other countries. Bassett thinks US car culture and lack of adequate public transportation provide fertile ground for couch potatoes.

"People do have to exercise," he said. "But our overall environment does not lend itself to promoting an active lifestyle."

He attributes the more active lifestyle of adults in other countries to their greater access to mass transit. "In Switzerland you might get enough activity just in the course of doing your errands," he explained.

The drive-not-walk mentality has dismal consequences. In the US, 34% of adults are obese. During the past decade, Australia, Japan and Switzerland have reported obesity rates of 16% , 3% and 8%, respectively.

Bassett said research has shown that just putting one foot in front of the other can help prevent weight gain. "Even modest amounts of walking on a daily basis can help you to maintain a healthy body weight," he said.

Julia Valentour, who developed the walking programme for the American Council on Exercise, said fit people usually take about 10,000 steps a day. But she wants everyone to do more.

"It's low risk, easy to do and does so much to increase health, lower cholesterol and blood pressure, increase energy and reduce the risk of developing diabetes and cancer," she said.

The US Centres for Disease Control guidelines call for 150 minutes a week of a moderate-to-intensive exercise, such as walking. To burn more calories, or ratchet up fitness levels, Valentour recommends variety.

"Try brisk intervals, like one block fast, two blocks slow," she said. "Or walking inclines, like hills."

She urges people to get up and move. "Begin with a stroll that feels comfortable, then increase your time by 10%, or split up your 30-minute walk into 10-minute intervals."

Another good idea is to track progress with a pedometer. She cited a study by VU University Amsterdam Medical Centre in the Netherlands that found that people who lived within 1km (0.62 miles) of a park or green area were healthier.

"In our culture, the way we're set up as far as city planning, you can't always walk," said Valentour. "Housing areas are just not near business areas in a lot of places."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/oct/11/walking-study-us-steps-day

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
philliman
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1298
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1508 on: Oct 11th, 2010, 1:42pm »

on Oct 11th, 2010, 08:52am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Hollywood Reporter

TRAILER: Jihadist comedy ‘Four Lions’ (video)
By Jay A. Fernandez | October 8th, 2010 at 3:29 pm |

I unfortunately missed "Four Lions" when it debuted at Sundance this year, but I've been curious ever since. Drafthouse Films, the new distribution entity formed by Alamo Drafthouse CEO Tim League, picked up the film last month as its first limited release, November 5.

Since Chris Morris' comedy is about four bumbling British jihadists, it was radioactive, until League stepped up to distribute the controversial material.

Apple has the trailer: http://trailers.apple.com/trailers/independent/fourlions/


http://riskybusiness.hollywoodreporter.com/2010/10/08/trailer-jihadist-comedy-four-lions-video/#more-14843

Crystal



Oh, my! grin


Hello to all:

User Image
User IP Logged

Stellar Thoughts
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1509 on: Oct 11th, 2010, 4:40pm »

Hey Phil! cheesy

I wondered about a terrorist comedy? rolleyes

Great photo!

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1510 on: Oct 11th, 2010, 9:15pm »

13 October false flag event



Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1511 on: Oct 12th, 2010, 08:40am »

New York Times

October 12, 2010
U.S. and China Soften Tone Over Disputed Seas
By THOM SHANKER

HANOI, Vietnam — The United States and China sought to defuse tensions over disputed territorial seas on Tuesday, with Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates urging nations to honor historic rights of free transit through international waters and his Chinese counterpart saying the region has nothing to fear from Beijing’s armed forces.

The statement by Mr. Gates to a forum of Asian defense ministers was emphatic in calling on all countries that share the South China Sea to renounce threats or coercion in resolving their competing claims of sovereignty.

But he was equally diplomatic in not specifically naming China as the perceived aggressor in disputes over transit lanes, fishing rights, territory and undersea resources that have roiled relations with several neighbors, in particular Japan and Vietnam. In one recent round of the continuing disagreements, China for the past three weeks has cut off shipments to Japan of rare earth minerals, crucial to that country’s auto, electronics and clean energy industries.

Beijing’s delegation also spoke in measured terms, emphasizing that China’s military growth was not a threat. China’s message, while delivered in broad, nonspecific terms, was interpreted as representing an effort to calm concerns over Beijing’s maritime intentions.

Even so, no fewer than seven nations in attendance raised the issue of how to guarantee maritime security for all nations sharing the South China Sea.

“We have a national interest in freedom of navigation, in unimpeded economic development and commerce, and in respect for international law,” Mr. Gates told the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, which was meeting in an expanded forum that also included China and Russia.

Although Mr. Gates warned that disputes over the oceans and their resources are “a growing challenge to regional stability and prosperity,” he also noted that “the United States does not take sides on competing territorial claims, such as those in the South China Sea.”

The central theme of his comments was that “competing claims should be settled peacefully, without force or coercion, through collaborative diplomatic processes and in keeping with customary international law.” In a balanced tone he has sustained during his three-day visit to Vietnam, Mr. Gates reassured regional partners of U.S. support for international law even as he defused tensions with China. On Monday, officials from China invited Mr. Gates to visit Beijing.

“The United States has always exercised our rights and supported the rights of others to transit through, and operate in, international waters,” Mr. Gates said. “This will not change, nor will our commitment to engage in exercises and activities together with our allies and partners.”

Beijing’s representative to the conference, Gen. Liang Guanglie, the Chinese defense minister, called for “mutual trust” throughout the region, and said neighbors need not fear his nation’s military.

“China’s defense development is not aimed to challenge or threaten anyone, but to ensure its security and promote international and regional peace and stability,” he said. “China pursues a defense policy that is defensive in nature.”

U.S. officials who track Chinese public statements noted that the defense minister did not describe the South China Sea as a region of its “core interests,” as China has in the past. A senior U.S. Defense Department official said following the Chinese statement that the U.S. delegation felt encouraged by the dialogue, and that a sense of crisis over feuding territorial claims had diminished.

“It does appear that the countries that are concerned about this issue are trying to think their way and feel their way towards a more positive approach,” the senior Pentagon official said. The official acknowledged, though, that “very tough questions” remained.

Mr. Gates, in his statement, noted that both long-established practices and the official treaty provide clear guidance on “appropriate use of the maritime domain, and rights of access to it. By adhering to this guidance, we can ensure that all share equal and open access to international waterways.” China has sought through words and actions to extend its territorial claims beyond the 12 nautical mile limit accepted through customary international law and codified by the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

While the Defense Department and, in particular, the Department of the Navy, support ratification of the U.N. Law of the Sea treaty, it remains frozen in Congress, although it has been signed and ratified by about 160 other nations.

Pentagon officials are never anxious for a comparison of the United States to the few other nations that also have not ratified the sea pact — a group that includes North Korea and Iran.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/13/world/asia/13gates.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1512 on: Oct 12th, 2010, 08:45am »

New York Times

October 12, 2010
European Markets Slip as Traders Keep Eye on Fed
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

European indexes declined Tuesday on speculation that China would raise reserve requirements for banks to cool lending and after comments by a Federal Reserve official softened expectations that the central bank was preparing a stimulus package for next month.

In London, the FTSE 100 was down 21.95 points, or 0.39 percent, while the DAX in Frankfurt fell 12.08 points, or 0.19 percent. The CAC-40 in France lost 28.89 points, or 0.77 percent.

Wall Street was poised for a lower opening as trading activity picks up after the Columbus Day holiday, which kept bond markets closed and stocks sluggish.

Bond prices rose Tuesday, driving interest rates lower. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.35 percent from 2.39 percent late Friday.

On Wall Street, traders also prepared for the Federal Reserve to release minutes from its September meeting Tuesday afternoon. The details could provide clues about possible plans by the central bank to further stimulate the economy through bond purchases. A pair of earnings reports from the chipmaker Intel and the railroad company CSX should provide further insight into the health of the economy.

Before the markets opened in New York, Pfizer, the pharmaceutical company, announced that it would buythe pain drug maker King Pharmaceuticals for $3.6 billion in cash. Pfizer will pay $14.25 a share for King, a 40 percent premium over Monday’s closing price.

Stocks have been buoyant for the best part of a week as investors decided it was a near certainty that the Fed would announce a second round of so-called quantitative easing, which would involve the purchase of financial assets from the banks. That would put more dollars into the financial system in an attempt to further drive down rates on mortgages, corporate loans and other debt in the ultimate hope of increasing economic activity and supporting prices.

Though the financial markets have largely priced in further asset purchases, there are question marks hanging over the scale and shape of any such measures. In that context, a run of speeches this week from Fed officials, culminating with one on Friday by the chairman, Ben S. Bernanke, will be closely monitored by the markets.

Comments from Janet L. Yellen, the vice chairman of the Fed, on Monday reined in the most exuberant hopes in the markets.

In remarks to economists in Denver, Ms. Yellen warned that excessively easy monetary policy, involving ultra-low interest rates and an expansion in the Fed’s balance sheet, could create big problems down the line. “It is conceivable that accommodative monetary policy could provide tinder for a buildup of leverage and excessive risk-taking,” she said.

Neil MacKinnon, global macro strategist at VTB Capital, said the speech injected “a note of caution” into the debate about a further monetary stimulus, though he said Mr. Bernanke’s speech was “more important in this regard.”

Investors will also be scrutinizing the minutes to the Fed’s last rate-setting meeting later, though that took place before last week’s weak jobs report reinforced market expectations for more easing.

Though the prospect of more dollars in the financial system has been a boon to stocks lately, the dollar has suffered — last week, the euro pushed back above $1.40 for the first time in eight months while the dollar sank below the level that had prompted the Bank of Japan to intervene in the markets last month to rein in the export-sapping appreciation of the yen.

Ms. Yellen’s comments did help ease the pressure on the dollar, the euro was down 0.4 percent at $1.3814 while the dollar was 0.2 percent lower at 81.93 yen.

Japan’s benchmark Nikkei 225 stock index slid 200.24 points, or 2.1 percent, to close at 9,388.64 after being closed for a holiday Monday. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index declined 0.4 percent to 23,121.70.

In contrast, the benchmark Shanghai Composite Index rose 34.47 points, or 1.2 percent, to 2,841.41. China’s financial markets are largely closed to foreign investment and often follow different cues.


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/13/business/13markets.html?ref=business

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1513 on: Oct 12th, 2010, 08:50am »

Telegraph

User Image
photo by Jay Fine

A lightning bolt appears to strike the Statue of Liberty. The moment was captured by New York photographer Jay Fine who spent the night braving the storm in Battery Park City, Manhattan, in a bid to get the perfect picture

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthpicturegalleries/8058781/Photographers-risk-their-lives-to-take-stunning-images-of-lightning.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11642
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1514 on: Oct 12th, 2010, 08:57am »

Wired Danger Room


Darpa Starts Sleuthing Out Disloyal Troops
By Spencer Ackerman October 11, 2010 | 3:25 pm | Categories: DarpaWatch


User Image


The military is scrambling to identify disgruntled or radicalized troops who pose a threat to themselves or their buddies. So the futurists at Darpa are asking for algorithms to find and pre-empt anyone planning the next Fort Hood massacre, WikiLeaks document dump or suicide-in-uniform.

This counterintelligence-heavy effort isn’t Darpa’s typical push to create flying Humvees or brainwave-powered prosthetic limbs. But the Pentagon’s far-out R&D team has made other moves recently to hunt down threats from within.

The idea behind the Anomaly Detection at Multiple Scales, or Adams, effort is to sift through “massive data sets” to find the warning signs of looming homicide, suicide or other destructive behavior. “The focus is on malevolent insiders that started out as ‘good guys.’ The specific goal of Adams is to detect anomalous behaviors before or shortly after they turn,” the agency writes in its program announcement.

Currently, Darpa says, the Defense Department doesn’t actually know how “a soldier in good mental health” actually comes to pose an “insider threat,” defined as “an already trusted person in a secure environment with access to sensitive information and information systems and sources.” (WikiLeaks, anyone?)

“When we look through the evidence after the fact, we often find a trail –- sometimes even an ‘obvious’ one,” Darpa adds. “The question is can we pick up the trail before the fact, giving us time to intervene and prevent an incident? Why is that so hard?”

Adams is supposed to fill the breach. But what kind of tech would be necessary to detect these anomalies? What sort of data actually represent worrisome anomalies, as opposed to a soldier harmlessly venting steam?

Unclear. The full Adams request for proposal won’t be released until “mid-October.” It’s inviting anyone interested in thinking those questions through to an Oct. 19 “Industry Day” conference at the Arlington, Virginia, offices of the Systems Planning Corporation, a defense-research firm.

Adams isn’t Darpa’s first move into internal military sleuthing. In August, it announced plans to build a system called Cyber Insider Threat, or Cinder, to hunt down patterns of suspicious cyberbehavior on military networks that might indicate internal subversion or outside infiltration.

But even though Cinder is overseen by top hacker Peiter “Mudge” Zatko, it doesn’t sound like Darpa knows precisely what it’s looking for. Anomalous behavior could be “comprised of entirely ‘legitimate’ activities, observables and the data sources they will be derived from,” its August contractor solicitation acknowledged. How to distinguish the real warning signs from the false positives?

Then again, the rest of the Defense Department has been caught off-guard on radicalization. After a shooter — allegedly Army Major Nidal Malik Hasan — killed 13 people at Fort Hood last November, an independent inquiry ripped the department for not giving clear guidance on how to identify the warning signs of radicalization.

And that inquiry came under fire from the House Armed Services Committee for avoiding questions about radical Islam taking hold within the military after it came out that Hasan was in touch with al-Qaeda-aligned preacher Anwar al-Awlaqi.

All this suggests the blind are still leading the blind when it comes to stopping internal military subversion. It’s far from clear what kind of data — troops’ e-mail? web trails? book orders? — Darpa would use to ferret out troops who pose a risk to themselves or others.

Nor is it clear if any such effort can succeed against a soldier who just snaps. But it’s not as if there are clear alternatives to confront an insidious and deadly problem.

Photo: DoD

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/10/darpa-starts-sleuthing-out-disloyal-troops/#ixzz129Wyd1xR

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 99 100 101 102 103  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls