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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 78351 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1545 on: Oct 14th, 2010, 7:08pm »





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« Reply #1546 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 08:30am »

New York Times

From a Maine House, a National Foreclosure Freeze

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By DAVID STREITFELD
DENMARK, Me. — The house that set off the national furor over faulty foreclosures is blue-gray and weathered. The porch is piled with furniture and knickknacks awaiting the next yard sale. In the driveway is a busted pickup truck. No one who lives there is going anywhere anytime soon.

Nicolle Bradbury bought this house seven years ago for $75,000, a major step up from the trailer she had been living in with her family. But she lost her job and the $474 monthly mortgage payment became difficult, then impossible.

It should have been a routine foreclosure, with Mrs. Bradbury joining the anonymous millions quietly dispossessed since the recession began. But she was savvy enough to contact a nonprofit group, Pine Tree Legal Assistance, where for once in her 38 years, she caught a break.

Her file was pulled, more or less at random, by Thomas A. Cox, a retired lawyer who volunteers at Pine Tree. He happened to know something about foreclosures because when he worked for a bank he did them all the time. Twenty years later, he had switched sides and, he says, was trying to make amends.

Suddenly, there is a frenzy over foreclosures. Every attorney general in the country is participating in an investigation into the flawed paperwork and questionable methods behind many of them. A Senate hearing is scheduled, and federal inquiries have begun. The housing market, which runs on foreclosure sales, is in turmoil. Bank stocks fell on Thursday as analysts tried to gauge the impact on lenders’ bottom lines.

All of this is largely because Mr. Cox realized almost immediately that Mrs. Bradbury’s foreclosure file did not look right. The documents from the lender, GMAC Mortgage, were approved by an employee whose title was “limited signing officer,” an indication to the lawyer that his knowledge of the case was effectively nonexistent.

Mr. Cox eventually won the right to depose the employee, who casually acknowledged that he had prepared 400 foreclosures a day for GMAC and that contrary to his sworn statements, they had not been reviewed by him or anyone else.

GMAC, the country’s fourth-largest mortgage lender, called this omission a technicality but was forced last month to halt foreclosures in the 23 states, including Maine, where they must be approved by a court. Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase and other lenders that used robo-signers — the term caught on instantly — have enacted their own freezes.

The tragedy of foreclosure is that some homeowners may be able to stay where they are if their lenders are more interested in modification than eviction. Without a job, Mrs. Bradbury is not one of them. Her family, including her 14-year-old daughter and 16-year-old son, lives on welfare and food stamps.

“A lot of people say we just want a free ride,” Mrs. Bradbury said. “That’s not it. I’ve worked since I was 14. I’m not lazy. I’m just trying to keep us together. If we lost the house, my family would have to break up.”

It has been two years since she last paid the mortgage, which surprises even her lawyers.

“Had GMAC followed the legal requirements, she would have lost her home a long time ago,” acknowledged Geoffrey S. Lewis, another lawyer handling her case.

GMAC, which began as the financing arm of General Motors, has received $17 billion from taxpayers in an effort to keep it from failing and is now majority-owned by the federal government. A spokeswoman for the lender declined to comment on Mrs. Bradbury’s case because it was still being litigated.

John J. Aromando of the firm of Pierce Atwood in Portland, Me., the lawyer for GMAC and Fannie Mae, the mortgage holding company that owns Mrs. Bradbury’s loan, did not return calls for comment on Thursday.

Fannie Mae and GMAC, which serviced the loan for Fannie, have now most likely spent more to dislodge Mrs. Bradbury than her house is worth. Yet for all their efforts, they are not only losing this case, but also potentially laying the groundwork for foreclosure challenges nationwide.

“This ammunition will be front and center in thousands of foreclosure cases,” said Don Saunders of the National Legal Aid and Defender Association.

Just a few miles from the New Hampshire border, this slice of Maine does not have much in the way of industry or, for that matter, people. Mrs. Bradbury grew up around here, married and had her children here, and married for a second time here. Her parents still live nearby.

In 2003, her brother-in-law at the time offered to sell her a house on property adjacent to his. It was across from a noisy construction supply site. But it was ringed by maple, evergreen and willow trees, and who does not want to be a homeowner, especially when GMAC Mortgage will give you a loan for the entire purchase price and then another loan to improve the property?

“I was very happy,” she remembered. “It was a new beginning.”

But Mrs. Bradbury lost her job as an employment counselor in 2006 and did part-time work after that. Her husband, Scott, was in poor health and had other problems. He could not work as a roofer. She fell behind and got a modification from GMAC. It increased her monthly payments and provided no relief.

Finally, in late 2008, she stopped paying altogether, and GMAC asked a court to approve her eviction without a trial. By the summer of 2009, this removal was well under way when Mr. Cox picked up her file.

Mr. Cox, 66, worked in the late 1980s and early 1990s for Maine National Bank, a subsidiary of the Bank of New England, which went under. His job was to call in small-business loans. The borrowers had often pledged their houses as collateral, which meant foreclosure.

“It was extraordinarily unpleasant, but it paid well,” he said. “I had a family to support.”

The work exacted its cost: his marriage ended and a serious depression began. He gave up law and found solace in building houses. By April 2008, he said, he was sufficiently recovered and started volunteering at Pine Tree Legal.

By the time Mr. Cox saw Mrs. Bradbury’s case, it was just about over. Last January, Judge Keith A. Powers of the Ninth District Court of Maine approved the foreclosure, leaving the case alive only to establish exactly how much Mrs. Bradbury owed.

Mr. Cox vowed to a colleague that he would expose GMAC’s process and its limited signing officer, Jeffrey Stephan. A lawyer in another foreclosure case had already deposed Mr. Stephan, but Mr. Cox wanted to take the questioning much further. In June, he got his chance. A few weeks later, he spelled out in a court filing what he had learned from the robo-signer:

“When Stephan says in an affidavit that he has personal knowledge of the facts stated in his affidavits, he doesn’t. When he says that he has custody and control of the loan documents, he doesn’t. When he says that he is attaching ‘a true and accurate’ copy of a note or a mortgage, he has no idea if that is so, because he does not look at the exhibits. When he makes any other statement of fact, he has no idea if it is true. When the notary says that Stephan appeared before him or her, he didn’t.”

GMAC’s reaction to the deposition was to hire two new law firms, including Mr. Aromando’s firm, among the most prominent in the state. They argued that what Mrs. Bradbury and her lawyers were doing was simply a “dodge”: she had not paid her mortgage and should be evicted.

They also said that Mr. Cox, despite working pro bono, had taken the deposition “to prejudice and influence the public” against GMAC for his own commercial benefit. They asked that the transcript be deleted from any blog that had posted it and that it be put under court seal.

In a ruling late last month, Judge Powers said that GMAC, despite its expensive legal talent and the fact that it got “a second bite of the apple” by filing amended foreclosure papers, still could not get this eviction right.

Even the amended documents did not bother to include the actual street address of the property it was trying to seize — reason enough, the judge wrote, to reject the request for immediate foreclosure without a trial.

But Judge Powers went further than that, saying that GMAC had been admonished in a Florida court for using robo-signers four years ago but had persisted. “It is well past the time for such practices to end,” he wrote, adding that GMAC had acted “in bad faith” by submitting Mr. Stephan’s material:

more after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/15/business/15maine.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #1547 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 08:35am »

LA Times

Seven Western troops killed in Afghanistan
NATO offers little information about the deaths; the nationalities of the troops are unknown. The fatalities bring the two-day toll for the NATO force to 13.

By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
October 15, 2010
Reporting from Kabul, Afghanistan

Seven Western troops were killed Thursday in attacks across Afghanistan, military officials said, bringing the two-day toll for the NATO force to 13 and illustrating the war's widening reach.

Combat deaths this year are running at the highest level of the 9-year-old war, making 2010 the most lethal for Western troops' since the United States-led invasion that toppled the Taliban movement.

NATO's International Security Assistance Force released few details about the latest fatalities. It did not disclose the nationalities of those killed and provided only general details about where the deaths occurred.

The largest single fatal incident Thursday was reported in the west of the country, where three troops were killed in a roadside bombing. Contingents serving in the west, near the Iranian border, include Americans and Italians.

Three more deaths occurred in the south, two in an insurgent attack and another in a roadside bombing. Yet another fatality occurred in Afghanistan's east, where insurgents often infiltrate from Pakistan's lawless tribal areas. The majority of the troops in the east are American, but several other North Atlantic Treaty Organization nations have forces there as well.

A day earlier, four service members were killed by a roadside bomb in the south, considered the insurgency's heartland. The makeshift bombs — low-tech, but sometimes effective even against well-armored vehicles — are the No. 1 killer of Western troops in Afghanistan.

The other two deaths Wednesday occurred in a separate explosion in the south and an attack in the east.

U.S. troop strength is now about 100,000, bolstered by a buildup ordered in December by President Obama. The bulk of the American forces are in the south, where NATO is attempting to rout Taliban fighters in volatile Kandahar and Helmand provinces.

Even as the fighting pushes ahead, so do efforts by the government of President Hamid Karzai to broker some kind of political settlement with the Taliban. While no formal negotiations have begun, contacts have been taking place for months.

NATO officials say the Western military is helping to facilitate the informal talks by granting a measure of freedom of movement to Taliban leaders involved.

Meanwhile, the head of a newly formed government council to oversee any negotiations with the Taliban and other insurgent groups said he believed the reconciliation effort would move forward.

"We are taking our first steps," former Afghan President Burhanuddin Rabbani said at a news conference in Kabul.


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-afghan-troop-deaths-20101015,0,1049739.story

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« Reply #1548 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 08:41am »

Telegraph

China warns US against making yuan dispute a 'scapegoat' for a flagging economy
China has again warned the US not to use the dispute over the value of the Chinese currency, the yuan, as a “scapegoat” for its high unemployment and flagging growth prospects.

By Peter Foster in Beijing
Published: 6:30AM BST 15 Oct 2010

The remarks from China’s ministry of commerce came hours before the US was due to release a report on whether it considers China a “currency manipulator” as fears grow that tensions over the currency could lead to a protectionist trade war.

The report has been repeatedly delayed despite a growing chorus of demands from US legislators and union bosses for the Obama administration to take tougher action against China’s alleged trade distortions.

However Yao Jian, a Chinese Ministry of Commerce spokesman, rejected US complaints as unfair. “It's totally wrong to blame the yuan for the Sino-U.S. trade imbalance,” he said, “The Chinese yuan shouldn't be a scapegoat for the U.S.' domestic economic problems.”

The artificially weak Chinese currency, which some analysts say is trading up to 25pc below its true market rate, has become a growing political issue in the US where it is blamed for giving Chinese exporters and unfair advantage at the cost of millions of US jobs.

However China has repeatedly said it cannot afford the costs of substantially re-valuing the yuan at a time when global demand for its exports remains weak and the recovery from the global recession remains fragile.

“Job losses would hurt the Chinese economy and domestic consumption. A relatively large yuan appreciation would definitely hurt Chinese exports, so a stable yuan exchange rate is needed for domestic consumption and the stability of the world economy," Mr Yao added.

China has also said that legislation currently being formulated in the US to impose trade tariffs as a result of the yuan’s under-valuation would be in breach of World Trade Organisation regulations.

China has allowed the yuan to appreciate by 2.65pc against the dollar since June when the country’s central bank pledged to allow the currency to rise gradually. However the appreciation has been insufficient to quiet concerns in the US.

The international row over the yuan is the headline dispute in a growing global battle over currency valuations, as many countries seek to maintain flagging growth by weakening their own currencies to prop up exports.

The issue of currency manipulation is expected to be the central theme of a meeting of Group of 20 finance ministers meet in South Korea on October 22-23 ahead of a heads of state meeting in early November.

On Monday South Korea’s President Lee Myung-Bak, himself under pressure from Japan for the South’s own currency interventions, warned that failure to settle currency disputes could fuel protectionism and damage the world economic recovery.

“If the world fails to reach agreement on matters such as foreign exchange policy and insists on its own interests at a time when the global economy is in recovery phase, it will bring about trade protectionism and cause very difficult problems to the global economy," Mr Lee said.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/currency/8065529/China-warns-US-against-making-yuan-dispute-a-scapegoat-for-a-flagging-economy.html

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« Reply #1549 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 08:47am »

Good morning Crystal.... grin I hope you have a wonderful day...
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« Reply #1550 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 08:47am »

Telegraph

Campaign launched to build Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine
A steam-powered computer designed by the 19th century mathematician Charles Babbage could finally be built after a campaign was launched to bring his dream to life.

By Murray Wardrop
Published: 6:22PM BST 14 Oct 2010

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A section of Charles Babbage's difference engine,
assembled after his death by his son, using parts found in his laboratory


The Analytical Engine – conceived in 1837 – remains one of the greatest inventions that never was as Babbage died before he could see out its construction.

However, John Graham-Cumming, a programmer and science blogger, now hopes to realise Babbage’s vision by raising £400,000 to build the giant brass and iron contraption.

He plans to use Babbage’s original blueprints for the device, which are contained in a collection of the inventor’s notebooks held at the Science Museum in London.

The campaign has already attracted 1,600 supporters who have pledged funds to kick-start the project.

Elements of the engine have been built over the last 173 years, but this would be the first complete working model of the machine.

"It's an inspirational piece of equipment," said Mr Graham-Cumming, author of the Geek Atlas.

"A hundred years ago, before computers were available, Babbage had envisaged this machine.

"What you realise when you read Babbage's papers is that this was the first real computer.

"It had expandable memory, a CPU, microcode, a printer, a plotter and was programmable with punch cards.

"It was the size of a small lorry and powered by steam but it was recognisable as a computer."

Computer historian Dr Doron Swade said that rebuilding the machine could answer "profound historical questions".

"Could there have been an information age in Victorian times? That is a very interesting question," he told BBC News.

Mr Graham-Cumming aims to recreate a design known as Plan 28 if his campaign is successful.

However, before any building work can be done, the team would first have to digitise Babbage’s designs and decipher the annotations.

The next step would then be to build a three-dimensional simulation of the gadget on a computer before attempting the operation in the flesh.

Babbage is regarded as the father of computing having pioneered the concept a century before the creation of the world’s first general purpose computers.

He began work on the analytical engine after creating a calculator, called the difference engine, and continued honing the design until his death in 1871.

Due to the complexity of the device and protracted wrangles over government funding for the project, the contraption was never built.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/8064569/Campaign-launched-to-build-Charles-Babbages-Analytical-Engine.html

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« Reply #1551 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 08:53am »

Wired Danger Room


Superbombs and Secret Jails: What to Look for in WikiLeaks’ Iraq Docs
By Spencer Ackerman October 15, 2010 | 7:00 am | Categories: Iraq


The Afghanistan war logs were just the beginning. Coming as early as next week, WikiLeaks plans to disclose a new trove of military documents, this time covering some of the toughest years of the Iraq war. Up to 400,000 reports from 2004 to 2009 could be revealed this time — five times the size of the Afghan document dump.

It’s a perilous time in Iraq. Politicians are stitching together a new government. U.S. troops are supposed to leave by next December.

Pentagon leaders were furious over the Afghanistan documents, but the American public largely greeted them with yawns. Iraqis might not be so sanguine.

It’s hard to imagine Iraq will fall back into widespread chaos over the disclosures. But they can’t be good for the United States, as it tries to create a new postwar relationship with Iraq, or for the 50,000 U.S. troops and diplomats still over there.

We don’t know what’s in the documents. But here’s what we’ll be looking to find in the trove — and some unanswered questions that the documents might address.

The Rise of Roadside Bombs
Iraq is more a war. It was a proving ground for today’s signature weapon: the improvised explosive device. Insurgents raided Iraq’s military weapons silos to jury-rig devices set off by a simple cellphone.

Later, they bent bomb casings into cones to form the deadlier Explosively Formed Projectile, essentially a bomb that shoots a jet of molten metal into and through an armored vehicle.

Conflicting reports credited the “superbombs” to Iran, or not. Look to the WikiLeaked documents for supporting evidence either way.

Early on, the military found that its jammers — devices emitting frequencies to block those believed to detonate bombs — didn’t work. Worse, rumor was was the jammers actually set the bombs off themselves.

We could be about to learn a lot more about how U.S. forces endured the first new bomb threat of the 21st century.

Abu Ghraib and Missing Jails
The Abu Ghraib detainee-abuse scandal was one of the worst strategic debacles in recent U.S. history. Aides to Gen. David Petraeus candidly said it inspired foreign fighters to join the Iraq insurgency.

Only one prison scandal came to light after Abu Ghraib: torture at the Special Ops facility known as “Camp Nama.” But journalists lost visibility into how the United States ran its detention complex in Iraq. Only in 2007, when Petraeus put Maj. Gen. Doug Stone in charge of rehabbing captured insurgents, did any sunlight return.

What happened for three years in the U.S. jails where tens of thousands of Iraqis were held?

Lost U.S. Guns
The Government Accountability Office reported in 2007 that the military had simply lost nearly 200,000 AK-47s and pistols it intended for Iraqi soldiers and police. Its documentation was a mess in 2004 and ‘05, when Petraeus ran the training mission. Many of those guns are believed to have made their way to the black market and to insurgents.

The leaks may shed some light on how thousands of guns fell off the back of a truck.

Ethnic Cleansing of Baghdad
Shiite death squads and Sunni insurgents each preyed on the other side’s civilians in 2005 and 2006. More than a million Baghdadis were displaced from their homes in a massive demographic shift between March 2006 and July 2007.

It’s never been clear how much the U.S. military knew about the cleansing. Low-level units watched it happen. And American psychological-operations troops certainly played on the religious splits to win local support.

But Gen. George Casey, then the top general in Iraq and now the Army’s chief of staff, has never answered questions about it. If the logs document the cleansing, he may have to speak up.

Drones
As much as the air war in Iraq became defined by the “Shock and Awe” bombing raids of its opening salvo, from the start there were at least ten types of unmanned planes the United States used for surveillance — from the Marines’ Dragon Eye to the Air Force’s iconic Predator.


more after the jump
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/10/superbombs-and-secret-jails-what-to-look-for-in-wikileaks-iraq-docs#ixzz12R2om56q

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« Reply #1552 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 08:58am »

Wired Threat Level


Will 400,000 Secret Iraq War Documents Restore WikiLeaks’ Sheen?
By Kevin Poulsen and Kim Zetter October 15, 2010 | 7:00 am | Categories: Bradley Manning, Sunshine and Secrecy, Wikileaks


After a brief quiescence, the secret-spilling website WikiLeaks is about to explode again onto the global stage with the impending release of almost 400,000 secret U.S. Army reports from the Iraq War, marking the largest military leak in U.S. history.

Measured by size, the database will dwarf the 92,000-entry Afghan war log WikiLeaks partially published last July. “It will be huge,” says a source familiar with WikiLeaks’ operations, who spoke on condition of anonymity. Former WikiLeaks staffers say the document dump was at one time scheduled for Monday, October 18, though the publication date may well have been moved since then. Some large media outlets were provided an embargoed copy of the database in August.

In Washington, the Pentagon is bracing for the impact. The Defense Department believes the leak is a compilation of the “Significant Activities,” or SIGACTS, reports from the Iraq War, and officials have assembled a 120-person taskforce that’s been scouring the database to prepare for the leak, according to spokesman Col. Dave Lapan.

“They’ve been doing that analysis for some time and have been providing information to Central Command and to our allies, so that they could prepare for a possible impact of the release [and] could take appropriate steps,” says Lapan. “There are … things that could be contained in the documents that could be harmful to operations, to sources and methods.”

The Iraq release comes at a crucial time for the 4-year-old WikiLeaks, which has been rankled by internal conflict, shaken by outside criticism and knocked off-message by a lingering sex-crime investigation of its founder, Julian Assange, in Sweden. At least half-a-dozen staffers have resigned from the organization in recent weeks, including key technical staff, according to four ex-staffers interviewed by Wired.com. A “scheduled maintenance” of the WikiLeaks website that began September 29 has stretched to more than two weeks.

The beleaguered Assange was cautious in a Sept. 30 public debate at City University in London, where he asked organizers to bar attending journalists and students from recording, photographing or videotaping his appearance.

The controversies dogging the site followed a string of triumphs: a series of high-profile leaks aimed at U.S. and NATO war efforts. In April, the site published a highly controversial classified video of a 2007 Army helicopter attack in Baghdad.

The attack killed two Reuters employees and an unarmed Iraqi man who stumbled onto the scene and tried to rescue one of the wounded. The man’s two children suffered serious injuries in the hail of gunfire. WikiLeaks titled the video “Collateral Murder,” and raised $150,000 from supporters in two days following its release.

Then in July, the site published the Afghan logs, generating headlines around the world. But WikiLeaks’ handling of that release garnered its first widespread criticism from ideological allies. Although the organization withheld 15,000 records from publication to redact the names of Afghan informants who might be at risk of Taliban reprisal, names of some collaborators were still found in the thousands of documents that were published.

Although there’s no evidence that anyone has suffered harm as a result of the names being exposed, WikiLeaks’ handling of the matter drew criticism from human rights organizations and the international free press group Reporters Without Borders, which accused the site of being reckless. Not surprisingly, the Pentagon was also displeased and issued formal demands that WikiLeaks “return” all classified documents in its possession.

Undaunted, Assange secretly inked deals with media outlets in several countries in August to provide them with embargoed access to the much larger database of Iraq War documents, according to ex-staffers. The agreements created strife inside WikiLeaks.

Former Icelandic WikiLeaks volunteer Herbert Snorrason told Wired.com last month that he was alarmed by the aggressive timetable for the release, which provided WikiLeaks’ volunteers too little time to redact the names of U.S. collaborators and informants in Iraq.

“The release date which was established was completely unrealistic,” said 25-year-old Snorrason. “We found out that the level of redactions performed on the Afghanistan documents was not sufficient. I announced that if the next batch did not receive full attention, I would not be willing to cooperate.”

Wired.com was not able to determine what, if any, portion of the Iraq database WikiLeaks plans to withhold from its website.

Another criticism behind the recent resignations from WikiLeaks is the charge that Assange has neglected hundreds or thousands of small, regionally important leaks submitted from around the world, in favor of headline-making leaks targeting the U.S. government. The Iraq War log, says former WikiLeaks spokesman Daniel Domscheit-Berg, would continue that focus. Although publication of the documents will likely garner praise from WikiLeaks supporters, it won’t fix the problems that are endemic to the organization, he says.

“It might distract from the issues at hand for a bit if it happens,” says Domscheit-Berg. “But it doesn’t change a thing about the situation. WikiLeaks is supposed to be more than those releases. I think it might rejuvenate WikiLeaks if WikiLeaks started to pump out all those others docs that are waiting.”

In addition to the potential impact publication of the war log will have on the U.S., NATO allies and the nascent Iraqi government, it could also jolt the pending court martial case against Army Pfc. Bradley Manning.

more after the jump
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/10/wikileaks-iraq/#ixzz12R4Oi7AP

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« Reply #1553 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 09:02am »

on Oct 15th, 2010, 08:47am, Luvey wrote:
Good morning Crystal.... grin I hope you have a wonderful day...


Good morning Luvey!
Every day alive is a good day! grin
I hope you had a nice day. Is it still getting warm in your neck of the woods? Hopefully it's nice weather for you.
Crystal
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« Reply #1554 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 09:07am »

Geek Tyrant

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Seth McFarlane and the rest of the Family Guy gang are taking on Return of the Jedi in their next Star Wars spoof, and this is our first look at it. I'm sure it will be just as funny as the first two Family Guy Star Wars spoofs.

The final chapter in the Family Guy Star Wars spoof is called Family Guy: It's a Trap!, and "it will follow Luke Skywalker and Princess Leia who must travel to Tatooine to free Han Solo (Peter) by infiltrating the wretched stronghold of Jabba the Hutt (Joe), the galaxy's most loathsome and dreadful gangster. Once reunited, the Rebels team up with a tribe of Ewoks to combat the Imperial forces on the forest moon of Endor.

Meanwhile the Emperor (Carter Pewterschmidt) and Darth Vader (Stewie) conspire to turn Luke to the dark side, and young Skywalker is determined to rekindle the spirit of the Jedi within his father. The Galactic Civil War has never been more outrageous, as the Rebel forces gather to attack the seemingly defenseless and incomplete second Death Star in the battle that will determine the fate of the galaxy."

The DVD version of the show will hit stores on December 21st, and the broadcast version is expected to air later this season on FOX.


http://geektyrant.com/news/2010/10/14/first-look-at-lois-as-slave-leia-in-new-family-guy-star-wars.html

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« Reply #1555 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 09:33am »

on Oct 15th, 2010, 09:02am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Good morning Luvey!
Every day alive is a good day! grin
I hope you had a nice day. Is it still getting warm in your neck of the woods? Hopefully it's nice weather for you.
Crystal


Your not wrong Crystal, any day above ground is a great day!! grin

The days have been wonderful here... not hot, not cold, just right... but the nights are still quite cool.... won't be long and we will be cooking though.... Thank God for air conditioning!!
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1556 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 11:38am »

on Oct 15th, 2010, 09:33am, Luvey wrote:
Your not wrong Crystal, any day above ground is a great day!! grin

The days have been wonderful here... not hot, not cold, just right... but the nights are still quite cool.... won't be long and we will be cooking though.... Thank God for air conditioning!!


It sounds lovely. Enjoy these perfect days. Air Conditioning is a good thing! We had a swamp cooler for years, I don't know how we survived.
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« Reply #1557 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 2:27pm »

Albany Marine killed by roadside bomb in southern Afghanistan
Published: Thursday, October 14, 2010, 10:24 PM
Michael Russell, The Oregonian


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Lance Cpl. Joseph Rodewald
r.i.p.



Lance Cpl. Joseph Rodewald wanted to enlist for as long as anyone can remember, even asking his father if he could attend a military school as a boy, family and friends said Thursday.

Rodewald's family couldn't afford to send him to the expensive school, so the energetic young man waited until after his graduation from South Albany High School in 2007 to sign up with the U.S. Marine Corps.

The former high school football player and wrestler, who would have turned 22 next Tuesday, was killed Wednesday by a roadside bomb in southern Afghanistan.

He is the 29th service member with Oregon or Southwest Washington ties to die in Afghanistan, and the 142nd to die in the combined Iraq-Afghanistan conflicts.

Rodewald's father, John Rodewald, described Joseph as a rambunctious kid who grew into a natural leader while playing sports in high school.

"He was a very strong-willed person, very confident," John Rodewald said, surrounded by supporters at the family's Albany home. "I had no doubts that he was going to go and defend our freedoms, and come home and start a normal life."

Lori Vigna, the wife of the family's pastor, remembered Rodewald as a strong young man who took pride in serving his country.

"He had the curliest hair," she said. "You could tell how curly it was even after he had his military haircut."

Asked why his son wanted to join the military, John Rodewald, 46, said the answer was complicated, though he never doubted the young man's commitment.

more after the jump
http://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/index.ssf/2010/10/albany_marine_killed_by_roadside_bomb_in_southern_afghanistan.html

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« Reply #1558 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 3:09pm »

Steve Hammons article

Many factors in UFO reports, including 'jellyfish' appearance
Steve Hammons
October 15, 2010 (This article originally appeared on the Joint Recon Study Group site.)

People who have sightings of unidentified flying objects (UFOs) sometimes report discs or saucers, V-shaped craft, glowing orbs and many other kinds of unusual things in the skies.

Sometimes the objects are said to appear metallic and other times an anomalous energy or light is reported.

One of the more unusual kinds of descriptions includes witness reports of something that appears like a "jellyfish."

In recent days, this description has been used, and there have been other incidents when witnesses said a UFO looked like a "jellyfish," "octopus" or appearing to be something with "tentacles."

What are UFOs and why would they have such diverse appearance? Are they different kinds of technology or different kinds of phenomena altogether?

And, could any of these possibly advanced craft and the equally possible intelligent beings who might be associated with them help humanity and Earth?

DIFFERENT OBJECTS REPORTED

In the 1997 Phoenix lights case, at least one huge V-shaped or boomerang-shaped object with a dark surface and several bright lights was seen cruising slowly and silently over the city on the evening of March 13.

A gray-colored metallic disc-shaped object reportedly hovered at about 1,900 feet above Chicago's O'Hare International Airport on Nov. 7, 2006.

And in other cases, a glowing "jellyfish" effect is seen by some witnesses.

A 2009 incident in Conisholme, England included an object hovering near a wind turbine farm that the witness described as having "tentacles of light." One witness stated it looked like a "massive ball of light with tentacles going right down to the ground. It was huge. With the tentacles it looked just like an octopus."

In a separate 2009 sighting, a Wimbleton, UK, witness said he saw something that appeared like "a large bright pink jelly-fish looking object surrounded by a pink haze."

During the multiple sightings in Stephenville, Texas, during 2008, a local peace officer viewed a UFO on police video and described it as looking like a "jellyfish."

This seemingly unusual jellyfish appearance has a logical and scientific explanation, according to researcher Ray Stanford. He says it is related to the propulsion system of certain advanced and exotic spacecraft that we call UFOs and Stanford calls "anomalous aerial objects (AAOs)."

Stanford is known as a pioneer in the study of UFOs using optical and electronic instrument systems and has been investigating this subject for decades.

He theorizes that the "jellyfish" visual effect could be a "magnetoplasmadynamic" or "magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)" field. The jellyfish appearance is not the actual object, Stanford says.

Additionally, Stanford says the tentacle-like appearance is "most often and readily visible when a craft is either slowing down or moving very slowly over an uneven surface" and indicates "constantly changing, torque-generating plasma beams."

More detailed information on his views about some of these specific issues are found in the Oct. 15, 2010, article 'Jellyfish' witness description of UFO significant?

DEFENSE AND DISCLOSURE

Many researchers and possibly people in the defense community may have more knowledge about what UFOs are, how they appear and behave, and who might be involved with them.

But for average people, it may be unclear what the details are surrounding this mysterious though interesting subject.

more after the jump
http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/192904

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« Reply #1559 on: Oct 15th, 2010, 6:34pm »





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