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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 113004 times)
Swamprat
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« Reply #1650 on: Oct 25th, 2010, 5:39pm »

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/n.php?n=retired-general-claims-dogfight-with-an-ufo-2010-10-24

Hurriyet Daily News

Retired Turkish general claims close encounter with UFOs


Sunday, October 24, 2010

Greek jets are not the only aerial adversaries Turkish planes have engaged in the skies, according to a retired general who has claimed he encountered unidentified flying objects over western Turkey while serving as a pilot.

Calling up a live television show Saturday during a heated debate about UFOs, Retired Gen. Erdoğan Karakuş said he and seven other pilots experienced a UFO encounter over the western province of Balıkesir in May 1983.

The UFOs were levitating using an unknown technique, Karakuş said, explaining that he was part of a group of eight pilots flying four Turkish jets to the southern city of Adana for a drill when one of the men spotted something in the air.
“[He] said, ‘I saw some objects, what I should do?’ and I said, ‘It may be a plane signaling for help; I am connecting to the Balıkesir frequency,’” the retired general said. “The flight-control tower in Balıkesir said it did not have any flights [listed]. I thought it might have been a civilian plane.”

The objects accompanied the pilots for 15 minutes as they passed from Balıkesir to the Aegean city of Denizli, Karakuş said, adding that he warned another pilot who wanted to fly toward them not to do so after deciding the objects did not look like planes.

“One of my friends meanwhile turned his [plane’s] lights off. This time [the UFOs] got close to the third plane. They moved on to the second one when the third one also turned its lights off,” Karakuş said, adding that when he looked to his left at that moment, he could not see anything other than a yellow beam of light.

“They moved to my left side when I also turned my [plane’s] lights off, the retired general said, adding that shortly afterwards, four to five lights resembling plane lights appeared. “Then they disappeared with a sudden [maneuver].”

Karakuş said the control towers at airports in Ankara, Istanbul and Konya also detected the UFOs that night. “We reported [the incident] and it was probably sent to NASA.”
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« Reply #1651 on: Oct 25th, 2010, 6:08pm »

grin Hi Swamprat!
Thanks for that article.
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« Reply #1652 on: Oct 25th, 2010, 7:22pm »





Crystal

edit:
the guy pulled this......don't ask me.
« Last Edit: Oct 25th, 2010, 8:02pm by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

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« Reply #1653 on: Oct 25th, 2010, 7:24pm »






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« Reply #1654 on: Oct 25th, 2010, 7:27pm »




description from jtpfreak: October 24, 2010
I was filming the night sky for a time lapse video & while looking through the footage i came across this interesting object. I have no idea what it was but thought it was worth uploading to see what most people think it is. I really can't explain what this was because i wasn't there when it was filmed

~

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« Reply #1655 on: Oct 25th, 2010, 7:32pm »

Another mix of the above posted PA Delaware sighting (reply#1652):




Crystal

edit to add reply#
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« Reply #1656 on: Oct 25th, 2010, 8:41pm »

Aaaaggggghhhhh!!!!!!
Must stay away from the Halloween candy!

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« Reply #1657 on: Oct 26th, 2010, 08:18am »

New York Times

October 26, 2010
Iran Says It Has Begun Loading Fuel at Nuclear Reactor
By WILLIAM YONG and ALAN COWELL

TEHRAN — Iran said on Tuesday that it had begun loading the first of 163 fuel rods into the core of its first nuclear reactor, set to go into operation early next year, and vowed to pursue nuclear activities “in other areas.”

Iran’s nuclear program has spread deep concerns in the West because governments, including the United States, believe Tehran has ambitions to build a nuclear weapon and do not accept its denials.

The United States once opposed the Russian-built Bushehr plant in the south of the country but dropped its objections after Russia provided assurances over the fuel supply and the disposal of spent fuel roads that can be used to makes weapons-grade plutonium. Russia has agreed to take back spent fuel.

The plant is supposed to be supervised by inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency, or I.A.E.A., the United Nations nuclear watchdog based in Vienna. It was not clear if I.A.E.A. inspectors were present when the fuel-loading began.

Ramin Mehmanparast, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, said on Tuesday: “Political pressure and sanctions have not prevented Iran from proceeding with its peaceful nuclear activities according to schedule.”

“The Bushehr power plant is a major project which will help us to take one step toward future alternative energy supplies,” he said, according to the semiofficial IRNA news agency. “We will also pursue our peaceful nuclear activities in other areas.” He did not give details.

The loading of fuel at the reactor was initially supposed to begin soon after fuel was transported there in August, but was delayed by a leak. Iranian officials have denied that the delay was caused by a computer virus on the laptops of several employees at Bushehr.

Speaking to workers at the plant, the head of Iran’s Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, said the Bushehr facility “is the most exceptional power plant in the world and it is right now at the critical stage of transferring fuel into the core of the reactor which is the last stage of the process.”

Mr. Salehi said that the plant would begin to feed the national power grid within three months.

Under its normal procedures, I.A.E.A. inspectors would oversee the final processes of fuel-loading and then seal the core of the reactor to prevent tampering. The reactor is also supposed to be kept under surveillance by closed circuit television cameras that would detect any movement of fuel.

The procedures to load the fuel and carry out tests at the 1,000-megawatt plant could take several weeks before engineers begin to withdraw so-called control roads, allowing nuclear activity to begin, experts said.

The Bushehr reactor, cast by Tehran as a show-case of its peaceful nuclear intentions, is separate from other more contentious operations elsewhere in the country where Iran is seeking to enrich uranium. Iran says it wants the enrichment facilities to provide fuel for future reactor use and for a medical research reactor. But the West and Israel suspect those programs are designed to produce weapons-grade fuel.

The loading at Bushehr came at a delicate diplomatic juncture, with tighter sanctions ordered against Tehran by the United Nations Security Council, the United States and the European Union, coupled with an invitation to Iran to join international powers for talks in Vienna in mid-November.

Iran has not yet formally accepted the invitation.

In response to the sanctions — the harshest yet — Tehran seemed to dig in its heels, refusing to provide international inspectors with information and access to determine the real purpose of Tehran’s nuclear program.

The Obama administration has argued that the sanctions are having an effect, reducing Iran’s access to foreign capital, halting investment in its energy sector and restricting its shipping at some foreign ports.

But, in September, the I.A.E.A. indicated in a report that the international sanctions have failed so far to force Iran to comply with longstanding requests. The agency complained that Iran had barred two of its most experienced inspectors from the country.

The I.A.E.A. report reiterated that, since August 2008, Iran has refused to answer questions “about the possible existence in Iran of past or current undisclosed nuclear-related activities involving military-related organizations, including activities related to the development of a nuclear payload for a missile.” The report said it was “essential that Iran engage with the agency on these issues” because evidence can degrade with “the passage of time.”

The Bushehr reactor, costing around $1 billion, has a long and tangled history. Construction began in 1975 under a contract signed with Germany, the state-run Press TV reported on Tuesday, but Germany withdrew from the project after the Islamic revolution in 1979. An agreement with Russia in 1995 should have been completed in 1999 but the plan fell prey to long delays.

William Yong reported from Tehran, and Alan Cowell from London.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/27/world/middleeast/27nuke.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #1658 on: Oct 26th, 2010, 08:22am »

New York Times

October 25, 2010
Chinese Telecom Giant in Push for U.S. Market
By JOHN MARKOFF and DAVID BARBOZA

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — This spring, an executive from a Chinese telecommunications equipment company made an intriguing job offer to a Silicon Valley software engineer. The Chinese company, Huawei Technologies, wanted to get into the booming market for Internet-based computing, and it had just moved its United States research headquarters here to capture some of the best local talent.

“How many engineers would you like for your team? Several hundred? That’s not a problem,” the recruiter said, according to the engineer.

When the software manager turned down the offer, the Chinese executive was undeterred and asked for the name of the engineer working under him.

The exchange underscores Huawei’s bold entrance onto the world’s technology stage. In the span of a decade, it has gone from imitating others’ products to taking on international rivals with its own innovative computing and communications gear. But Huawei has largely been locked out of the United States — until now.

Sprint Nextel, the nation’s third-largest wireless carrier, is preparing to make a decision on buying $3 billion in advanced wireless equipment, and Huawei is considered to be a front-runner for the deal.

Huawei is one of many Chinese companies that are pushing into more sophisticated and lucrative businesses. But security concerns make telecommunications a particularly delicate industry in this country, and even the hint of a Huawei deal with Sprint has generated worries in Washington.

Some in Congress and the national security establishment fear that Huawei’s close ties to the Chinese military might allow China to tamper with American communications gear.

Last week, Senator Joseph I. Lieberman, independent of Connecticut, and three other members of Congress wrote a letter to Julius Genachowski, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, raising the specter that an equipment sale might permit the Chinese government to manipulate parts of the communications network, making it possible to disrupt or intercept phone calls and Internet messages.

Anticipating these hurdles, Huawei has hired a remarkable array of Washington lobbyists, lawyers, consultants and public relations firms to help it win business in the United States. It has also helped create Amerilink Telecom, an American distributor of Huawei products whose high-powered board includes former Representative Richard A. Gephardt, the former World Bank president James D. Wolfensohn and the one-time chief executive of Nortel Networks, William A. Owens.

Amerilink executives say they are primarily interested in helping Huawei overcome objections that its entry into the American market could jeopardize national security.

“We take the accusations very seriously,” said Kevin Packingham, who recently left Sprint to become chief executive of Amerilink. “But regardless of the accusations, we have a model in place that ensures the security” of the network should Huawei win American contracts, he said.

The effort is beginning to pay off. This fall, the American Internet communications firm Clearwire will begin testing a system based on Huawei’s 4G, or fourth-generation, network technology.

The Sprint contract would be Huawei’s largest American deal by far. A Sprint spokesman, Scott Sloat, declined to discuss any potential deal. Sprint bought its last round of network equipment from Motorola, Nortel Networks and Lucent, now part of Alcatel-Lucent.

Huawei’s American drive is significant because it is China’s first truly home-grown multinational corporation. And some analysts say they believe its spectacular rise will serve as a model for other Chinese companies seeking to compete internationally.

Huawei is now the world’s second-largest telecom equipment supplier behind Ericsson of Sweden, and with Chinese government backing, it has sewn up major deals in Asia, Africa and Latin America. In Europe, Huawei has outmaneuvered Ericsson to supply equipment to big carriers.

Despite those successes, Huawei has struggled to break into the United States market, largely because of the security concerns and accusations of intellectual property theft and corporate espionage.

The company has repeatedly been linked to the People’s Liberation Army of China. And over the last decade, Huawei has been sued in the United States by two of its major competitors, Cisco Systems and Motorola, over accusations that it stole software designs and infringed on patents.

Cisco settled its suit with Huawei soon after filing it. But in court documents filed in a lawsuit last summer, Motorola claimed that a group of Chinese-born Motorola engineers developed contacts with Huawei’s founder and then, between about 2003 and 2007, conspired to steal technology from Motorola by way of a dummy corporation they had set up outside the company.

The national security issue has been bubbling up for some time. In a letter in August, a group of Republican senators wrote to the heads of four federal agencies asking questions about the risks of Huawei’s entering a deal with Sprint, whose customers include the United States military and law enforcement agencies.

The senators, who are seeking a stringent government review of Huawei, said they were troubled by the company’s history, including evidence it had supplied communications equipment to Iran and Iraq during Saddam Hussein’s regime, possibly in violation of United Nations sanctions.

“We are concerned,” the senators wrote, “that Huawei’s position as a supplier of Sprint Nextel could create substantial risk for U.S. corporations and possibly undermine U.S. national security.”

The reservations about Huawei extend to other countries. In Europe, some competitors are now complaining about so-called subsidies that Huawei receives from the Chinese government. And in India, there are worries that Huawei networks could pose security risks.

Huawei denies it has ties to the Chinese military and disputes accusations of intellectual property theft. Ross Gan, a company spokesman, says that Huawei is employee-owned and that it has grown by developing its own technology.

“We’re an innovative company driven by the business needs of customers,” he said. In a statement, the company added: “Huawei has never researched, developed, manufactured or sold technologies or products for military purposes in any country.”

Industry analysts say Huawei, based in Shenzhen, has quickly matured into a fierce competitor in one of the most important and hotly contested technology arenas: sophisticated equipment that enhances the delivery of voice and video over the Internet and through wireless devices.

They say Huawei is gaining, in part, because of heavy spending on research and development. Chinese companies are generally weak in R.&D., but Huawei has 17 research centers around the world, including in Dallas, Moscow and Bangalore, India, and most recently in Santa Clara.

Indeed, of the company’s 96,000 employees, nearly half are engaged in research and development. In May, Huawei opened a stunning $340 million research center in Shanghai that it says will eventually house 8,000 engineers.

Huawei’s rush to become multinational has not been entirely smooth. “It was a huge challenge for the company,” said Geoff Arnold, a veteran Silicon Valley software designer who spent several years helping the company develop a cloud computing product.

more after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/26/technology/26telecom.html?ref=technology

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« Reply #1659 on: Oct 26th, 2010, 08:28am »

Telegraph

Tokyo film festival 'becomes shouting match between China, Taiwan and Japan'
The Tokyo International Film Festival descended into farce following a shouting match between the Chinese delegation, the Taiwanese and Japanese organisers over the use of the name "Taiwan".

By Julian Ryall in Tokyo
Published: 1:58PM BST 26 Oct 2010

Representatives of the Chinese film industry reportedly triggered the dispute on Saturday evening by demanding the Japanese organisers of the event change the name "Taiwan" to "China Taiwan" or "Chinese Taipei."

When the Taiwanese delegation refused to back down and the Japanese organisers declined to change the name, the Chinese said they would boycott the festival and withdraw the nine films that had been scheduled to be screened.

Jiang Qing, head of the Chinese delegation, reportedly shouted "Taiwan is Chinese" during the argument.

Wu Den-yih, the Taiwanese premier, said the Chinese had been arrogant and "made a serious mistake, reverting to the rudeness and irrationality of the past."

In a statement, Taiwan's Presidential Office said China must change its attitude towards Taiwan's participation in international cultural events and said the protest had hurt the feelings of the island's people and will damage the development of relations.

The incident may have been equally designed to embarrass the Japanese hosts of the annual film festival.

The relationship between Tokyo and Beijing has sunk to new lows in recent weeks after the arrest of a Chinese fisherman and his crew for intruding into Japanese territorial waters close to the Senkaku Islands, off southern Japan.

Japan controls the uninhabited islands, but both China and Taiwan claim sovereignty over the territory and the natural resources that lie beneath the seabed.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/japan/8087532/Tokyo-film-festival-becomes-shouting-match-between-China-Taiwan-and-Japan.html

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« Reply #1660 on: Oct 26th, 2010, 08:40am »

Wired


Follow the Money: Pork-Powered Pig Preps for Flight
By David Kravets October 26, 2010 | 7:00 am | Categories: Elections, politics

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Whenever Marine One lifts off from the south lawn of the White House, identical decoy helicopters go with it, quickly trading places in a complex, evasive maneuver known as the presidential shell game.

The shifting formation is aimed at confusing potential attackers, a concern that reached a fever pitch after 9/11. It could just as easily apply to the corporations jockeying to replace the aging Marine One fleet — a boondoggle that’s wasted billions and fattened politicians’ war chests for years, as a short list of well-connected players maneuver to the build a custom rotary aircraft deemed safe enough to fly the president through almost any crisis, even a nuclear blast.

The Marine One upgrade has played out from the start as classic pork-barrel politics. Portrayed as urgent, it has been bedeviled by delays and cost overruns, with contractors playing musical chairs for a seat at the table all the while.

“The president’s helicopter should be based on national security and sensible budgeting. Instead, it is being decided on who’s funding which politicians to stay in power, and about jobs in one district versus jobs in another,” said Daniel Newman, executive director of MAPLight.org, nonpartisan money-tracking organization. “Basically, we have a broken system where paying for politicians to be elected and stay in office is what it takes to win favorable contracts.”

Net neutrality, intellectual property, wireless spectrum, export laws and pollution regulations might rise to the top of any list of key tech-lobbying issues. Less scrutinized are the daily battles for pork that grease the wheels of government spending everywhere, and prove the adage that politics is the art of legally transferring wealth from one group of interests to another.

Build Your Own Marine One Helicopter

In case you have a hangar-sized garage, and a “Yankee-white security clearance“, here’s some specs the military says it wants in its newest Marine One presidential helicopter fleet:

•14-passenger capacity.
•Continued flight with one-engine failure.
•Up to 275-nautical mile range
•Transportable on C-17 and C-5 aircraft.
•Operable in urban environment “without damage to the landing environment or injury to nearby personnel.”
•Two communication systems, one for the president one for crew “capable of supporting secure and nonsecure voice, video, VTC and data communications using both narrow-band and wide-band communications with an integrated ICS system.”
•Survive “perceivable threats and continue operations.”
•Maintain cabin temperature between 68 and 76 degrees.
•“Commode with a flush capability.”
•How much does it cost?
•How long will it last?

You’ll need plenty of grease, elbow or otherwise, to produce this modern wonder. Start by greasing the halls of Congress. To help recoup your costs, buy a $10 toilet seat from Home Depot, and charge the government $10,000.
In this, the first in an occasional series examining tech influence in politics using MAPLight’s nonpartisan political-finance–analysis tools, the trail leads to a mind boggling, 10-year campaign in which three key defense contractors have funneled more than $18 million to the pockets of federal lawmakers, to win various military contracts, including one for what can best be described as the government equivalent of the Bat-copter.

Last year, under pressure from politicians citing spiraling expenses, the Pentagon backed out of a $6.5 billion deal with Lockheed Martin and AgustaWestland to provide 28 new, state-of-the-art birds. President Barack Obama described the procurement process as gone amok,” with the choppers projected to reach $400 million each, almost double the original price.

Now a detailed look at campaign finance records connected to the Marine One contracts, undertaken for the first time by Wired.com and MAPLight.org, shows a flurry of corporate contributions from Lockheed rivals to lawmakers involved in the decision-making immediately before and after the deal was grounded. And with a government call for new proposals for a revised contract expected next year, pay-to-play contributions to win the coveted deal continue to flow unabated, records show.

MAPLight is a 5-year-old nonprofit based in Berkeley, California. Thanks to MAPLight’s tools, which are fueled by data from the Center for Responsive Politics of Washington, D.C., we can not only track the amount of money spent, but see the timing of payments related to legislative work, such as votes, or pressure from politicians to kill an existing contract and hand it to a friend.

In addition to keeping tabs on tech-related pork and lobbying, we are unveiling today a new campaign-finance–tracking widget, in conjunction with MAPLight and based on CRP data, to help shine a general spotlight on politicians and their contributors. (See related story).

Hail to the Chief
The jockeying for the Marine One contract began in earnest a decade ago after the 2001 terror attacks. Capt. Cate Mueller, a spokeswoman for the Navy, which is supervising the stalled project, said a new Marine One fleet was “critical” to the nation’s security. Some choppers in the current fleet are more than three decades old.

Specifications for the new Marine One chopper are classified. But public documents show the new craft must at minimum carry a sort of miniature Oval Office, with two independent communications systems, including encrypted video conferencing; have at least two engines, and be capable of flying with a failed engine; and be equipped with a missile-defense system and nuclear-fallout reflector capabilities. Together, these enhancements will make it the most advanced flying machine of its type in the world, should it ever arrive.

Sikorsky Aircraft was believed to be the leading contender, having already produced the current presidential fleet, consisting of 11 Sikorsky VH-3D Sea Kings and eight Sikorsky VH-60N Black Hawks.

But in 2005, it lost out to Lockheed, of Bethesda, Maryland, and AgustaWestland, a European company that was building the craft along with Lockheed and dozens of subcontractors. The Lockheed Martin and AgustaWestland three-engine craft, the EH101, beat out the two-engine design of Sikorsky’s VH-92, an offshoot of its H92 SuperHawk.

At the time, Navy acquisition chief John Young said Lockheed Martin and AgustaWestland prevailed because they were deemed more likely “to meet government requirements on schedule, with lesser risk, and at lower cost.”

more after the jump
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/10/marine-one-pork-powered-pig/#ixzz13TIzrvEc

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« Reply #1661 on: Oct 26th, 2010, 08:49am »

Wired

Wired.com, MAPLight.org Launch Political-Influence Tracker
By Wired Staff October 26, 2010 | 6:59 am | Categories: Elections, Fed Blotter Build your own Influence Tracker by selecting a senator or representative.
Then copy and paste the embed code into your own site.

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At Wired.com, we love data and the possibilities that arise when big public datasets are combined in creative ways. Now we’re jumping in with our own modest contribution, just in time for a last-minute gut check before the Nov. 3 balloting: the Influence Tracker, a widget that follows the money in Washington.

It’s no exaggeration to say that algorithms will write much of the news for us in the future, as indeed they already do today.

Take politics.

If you’re interested in learning about the special interests that direct the votes of elected officials in the U.S., there is plenty of data for that.

Campaign-finance disclosure laws require that certain forms get filed, eventually. Organizations such as the Center for Responsive Politics make sure accurate data is collected, analyzed and distributed as widely as possible. If you are motivated, you can get a pretty good grip on the amounts and sources of money changing hands.

Similarly, if you’re interested in learning about the voting records of your legislators, there is plenty of data for that, too. Yeas, nays and abstentions — and the dates of the votes — are widely available.

Individually, these datasets are useful and necessary tools for transparency. Put them together, however, and you get something even more powerful: A road map to cash and votes in Congress and state legislatures across the country.

About a year ago, I saw a great demonstration of how these correlations can be teased out, from Daniel Newman, executive director of nonprofit MAPLight.org: http://mpalight.org/

The nonpartisan Berkeley, California, group takes raw contribution data from CRP and the National Institute on Money in State Politics, and then mashes it with voting records and corporate statements of support and opposition to legislative initiatives.

Correlation does not imply causation, of course. Nevertheless the picture that emerges when you systematically compare contributions to voting records is telling. (See related story: “Follow the Money: Pork-Powered Pig Preps for Flight.”)

Once you’ve experienced this, it’s hard to be satisfied with the old, disconnected data. It’s like getting a first taste of salt.

Dan and I started talking about ways to collaborate, and the result is the Influence Tracker — a simple widget that anyone can embed in any webpage, covering top contributors for all 535 members of Congress, plus four additional nonvoting delegates. We’ve also added corporate logos of top contributors, displayed in a NASCAR-style sponsor silhouette accompanying each lawmaker.

The underlying data is provided by CRP, and updated every 24 hours, reflecting the most recent available numbers.

This is not a deep research tool — it is primarily promotional. Our goal is to get people to share more information about special interests in politics, and to react and think more deeply about the influences and agendas that may be behind the people they elect to represent them. Hopefully, people who see it will get a laugh or a surprise out of it that will make them curious and start to educate themselves, and talk about the role of money in politics.

The widget is available immediately to embed on your own website. Take it, share it, use it.

—Evan Hansen, Editor-in-Chief

Acknowledgments: This project would not have been possible without the talents and contributions of Hernan Silberman, Dennis Crothers, Michael Mertens, Daniel Newman and the staff of MAPLight.org, the Center for Responsive Politics, and David Kravets.

www.wired.com/threatlevel/category/fed-blotter/#ixzz13TLZEzL8

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« Reply #1662 on: Oct 26th, 2010, 08:54am »

Hollywood Reporter

Google CEO's Controversial Anti-Privacy Statements Edited From CNN Show
8:42 AM 10/26/2010 by Lindsay Powers

Eric Schmidt told those who didn't like snooping Street View cars, which have been found to illegally steal e-mails and passwords, to just "move."

Google CEO Eric Schmidt's blase advice for people who don't want their privacy violated by his site's Street View cars -- just "move" -- was edited out of a CNN broadcast.

Schmidt defended the Google Street View cars, which have been found to illegally swipe e-mails and passwords, on CNN's Parker Spitzer: "Street View, we drive exactly once. So, you can just move, right?"

When pressed by co-host Kathleen Parker, Schmidt laughed, which made it unclear if he was joking. The exchange was shown in a preview clip on CNN.com, but edited out of the show broadcast last Friday.

Said CNN in a statement to the Wall Street Journal's All Things D, "Producers routinely make editorial decisions about what sound bites to include in their shows. In this case, the clip was posted on cnn.com and disseminated to other media outlets and was widely available."

The network said Google did not ask that the clip be edited out.

A Google rep said, "The point Eric was making is that our Street View service provides only a static picture in time, and doesn't provide real-time imagery or provide any information about where people are. Of course, we also allow users to request that their home be removed from Street View."

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/google-ceos-controversial-anti-privacy-32515

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1663 on: Oct 26th, 2010, 09:35am »

Afternoon all;
Finding it fairly difficult to pull those pictures off my sister's phone. I need to install drivers but haven't gotten around to it yet. I'll get onto it as soon as I get some homework out of the way.
How's everyone doing? This site is quieter than I remember. I'm going to be active again now... I've had a change of priorities wink.
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"Death does not concern us, because as long as we exist, death is not here. And when it does come, we no longer exist."
Epicurus.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1664 on: Oct 26th, 2010, 10:37am »

on Oct 26th, 2010, 09:35am, CA519705950 wrote:
Afternoon all;
Finding it fairly difficult to pull those pictures off my sister's phone. I need to install drivers but haven't gotten around to it yet. I'll get onto it as soon as I get some homework out of the way.
How's everyone doing? This site is quieter than I remember. I'm going to be active again now... I've had a change of priorities wink.


So make some noise! grin
Crystal
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