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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 47705 times)
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #1965 on: Nov 23rd, 2010, 7:14pm »

Crystal, I haven't found anything on the "cell phone turn off" comments. I'll keep looking!

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« Reply #1966 on: Nov 23rd, 2010, 8:49pm »

on Nov 23rd, 2010, 7:14pm, Swamprat wrote:
Crystal, I haven't found anything on the "cell phone turn off" comments. I'll keep looking!

Swamp


Thanks Swamp, no worries, I'm sure it will surface again.
Thank you for looking!
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« Reply #1967 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 08:52am »

New York Times


November 24, 2010
U.S. to Send Carrier for Joint Exercises Off Korea
By DAVID E. SANGER and MARK McDONALD

WASHINGTON — President Obama and South Korea’s president agreed Tuesday night to hold joint military exercises as a first response to North Korea’s deadly shelling of a South Korean military installation, as both countries struggled for the second time this year to keep a North Korean provocation from escalating into war.


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Firefighters searched through destroyed houses on Yeonpyeong Island on Wednesday.


The exercise will include sending the aircraft carrier George Washington and a number of accompanying ships into the region, both to deter further attacks by the North and to signal to China that unless it reins in its unruly ally it will see an even larger American presence in the vicinity.

The decision came after Mr. Obama attended the end of an emergency session in the White House Situation Room and then emerged to call President Lee Myung-bak of South Korea to express American solidarity and talk about a coordinated response.

But as a former national security official who dealt frequently with North Korea in the Bush administration, Victor Cha, said just a few hours before the attack began, North Korea is “the land of lousy options.”

Mr. Obama is once again forced to choose among unpalatable choices: responding with verbal condemnations and a modest tightening of sanctions, which has done little to halt new attacks; starting military exercises that are largely symbolic; or reacting strongly, which could risk a broad war in which South Korea’s capital, Seoul, would be the first target.

The decision to send the aircraft carrier came as the South Korean military went into what it termed “crisis status.” President Lee said he would order strikes on a North Korean base if there were indications of new attacks.

North Korea’s artillery shells fell on Yeonpyeong Island, a fishing village whose residents fled by ferry to the mainland city of Inchon — where Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s troops landed 60 years ago this fall, three months after the outbreak of the Korean War.

Today, Inchon is the site of South Korea’s main international airport, symbolizing the vulnerability of one of the world’s most vibrant economies to the artillery of one of the world’s poorest and most isolated nations.

A senior American official said that an early American assessment indicated that a total of about 175 artillery shells were fired by the North and by the South in response on Tuesday.

But an American official who had looked at satellite images said there was no visible evidence of preparations for a general war. Historically, the North’s attacks have been lightning raids, after which the North Koreans have backed off to watch the world’s reaction. This one came just hours after the South Koreans had completed a long-planned set of military exercises, suggesting that the North Korean attack was “premeditated,” a senior American official said.

Television reports showed large plumes of black smoke spiraling from the island, as dozens of houses caught fire. The shelling killed two marines and two civilians who lived on the island. The South put its fighter planes on alert — but, tellingly, did not put them in the air or strike at the North’s artillery bases. Mr. Obama was awakened at 3:55 a.m. by his new national security adviser, Thomas E. Donilon, who told him of the attack.

Just 11 days before, North Korea had invited a Stanford nuclear scientist to Yongbyon, its primary nuclear site, and showed him what was described as a just-completed centrifuge plant that, if it becomes fully operational, should enable North Korea to enrich uranium into nuclear fuel and add to its arsenal of 8 to 12 nuclear weapons.

Taken together, the nuclear demonstration and the attack were widely interpreted as an effort to bolster the credentials of Kim Jong-un, the heir apparent as the country’s leader, and the son and grandson of the only two men who have run the country. When his father, Kim Jong-il, North Korea’s ailing leader, was establishing his credentials, the North conducted a similar series of attacks.

“They have a 60-year history of military provocations — it’s in their DNA,” said a senior administration official. “What we are trying to do is break the cycle,” a cycle, he said, that has North Korea’s bad behavior rewarded with “talks, inducements and rewards.” He said that the shelling would delay any effort to resume the six-nation talks about the North’s nuclear program.

While Mr. Obama was elected on a promise of diplomatic engagement, his strategy toward the North for the past two years, called “strategic patience,” has been to demonstrate that Washington would not engage until the North ceased provocations and demonstrated that it was living up to past commitments to dismantle, and ultimately give up, its nuclear capacity.

The provocations have now increased markedly, and it is not clear what new options are available. Beijing’s first reaction on Tuesday was to call for a resumption of the six-nation talks involving North and South Korea, Russia, Japan, China and the United States. The last meeting was two years ago, at the end of the Bush administration.

Mr. Obama’s aides made it clear in interviews that the United States had no intention of returning to those talks soon. But its leverage is limited.

When North Korea set off a nuclear test last year just months after Mr. Obama took office, the United States won passage of a United Nations Security Council resolution that imposed far harsher sanctions. The sanctions gave countries the right, and responsibility, to board North Korean ships and planes that landed at ports around the world and to inspect them for weapons. The effort seemed partly successful — but the equipment in the centrifuge plant is so new that it is clear that the trade restrictions did not stop the North from building what Siegfried S. Hecker, the visiting scientist, called an “ultramodern” nuclear complex.

By far the biggest recent disruption of relations came in March, when a sudden explosion sank a South Korean warship, killing 46 sailors. South Korean and international investigators said the blast was caused by a North Korean torpedo. The North has vehemently denied it. If the North was responsible for the sinking, it would be the most lethal military attack since the end of the Korean War in 1953.

President Lee of South Korea decided not to respond militarily to the sinking and was praised by Washington for his restraint. To make North Korea pay a price, he imposed new food restrictions on the North and ended trade worth several hundred million dollars that had been intended to induce the desperately poor North Koreans to choose income over military strikes. But some analysts believe that the cutoff in food aid was an excuse, if not a motivation, for Tuesday’s attack.

Choi Jin-wook, a North Korea expert at the Korea Institute for National Unification, a research institute in Seoul, said, “It’s a sign of North Korea’s increasing frustration.”

“Washington has turned a deaf ear to Pyongyang, and North Korea is saying: ‘Look here. We’re still alive. We can cause trouble. You can’t ignore us.’”

Yet for Mr. Obama, much stronger responses, including a naval quarantine of the North, carry huge risks. A face-off on the Korean Peninsula would require tens of thousands of troops, air power and the possibility of a resumption of the Korean War, a battle that American officials believe would not last long, but might end in the destruction of Seoul if the North unleashed artillery batteries near the border.

Pressing against a precipitous reaction is that the North’s attacks have a choreographed character, even a back-to-the-future feel. The last time North Korea engaged in acts this destructive was in the 1980s, when it blew up a South Korean airliner and also detonated a bomb in Myanmar in a botched attempt to assassinate the visiting South Korean president. Both attacks were said to be ordered by Kim Jong-il, who was then the heir to Kim Il-sung, his father and North Korea’s founder.

Now Mr. Kim’s youngest son, Kim Jong-un, is in that position. He was promoted on Sept. 28 to the rank of four-star general, a prerequisite for his ascendancy to power. Many see these attacks as the effort of a man the Chinese now say is 25 years old to establish his military credentials.


David E. Sanger reported from Washington, and Mark McDonald from Seoul, South Korea. Mark Landler and Thom Shanker contributed reporting from Washington, and Martin Fackler from Tokyo.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/25/world/asia/25korea.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #1968 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 09:01am »

New York Times

November 23, 2010, 9:00 pm
Wallets Out, Wall St. Dares to Indulge
By SUSANNE CRAIG AND KEVIN ROOSE


Exuberance made a comeback this year at Josh Koplewicz’s annual Halloween party. More than 1,000 people packed into a 6,000-square-foot space at the Good Units night club in Manhattan, a substantially larger crowd than in the last several years.

The open bar was sponsored by Russian Standard vodka, and Mr. Koplewicz, an investment analyst at Goldman Sachs, was able to snag a big headliner: the hip-hop star Lil’ Kim, who performed dressed in a black cat costume.

The scene was more extravagant in September, at a 50th birthday party in Hong Kong for Brian Brille, the head of Bank of America Asia Pacific. Mr. Brille, who is well known on the New York social scene, wore a gray Hugh Hefner-esque jacket. Women dressed like Playmates, with feather boas and satin ears, danced behind a pink silk screen.

Two years after the onset of the financial crisis, the stock market is recovering and Wall Street’s moneyed elite are breathing easier again. And this means in some cases they are spending again — at times cautiously, but sometimes with a familiar swagger.

It’s true that firms scaled back the corporate excesses, like fancy retreats and private jets, for which they were vilified as a brutal recession gripped the country. Many of those constraints remain in place, like flying commercial on business trips, or more limited private car service for employees.

But when it comes to personal indulgences, there are signs that the wallets are beginning to open up. Traders and executives say that jobs seem much more secure. Businesses whose fortunes ebb and flow with the financial markets are thriving again.

“Wall Street is back spending as much if not more than before,” said the New York dermatologic surgeon Dr. Francesca J. Fusco, whose business is booming again after a difficult few years.

Christie’s auction house says investors from the financial world who fell out of the bidding market during the 2008 credit crisis are “pouring” back in.

Expensive restaurants report a pickup in bookings. At the Porter House restaurant in the Time Warner Center across from Central Park, the head chef, Michael Lomonaco, says business is up about 10 percent over a year ago and “people are starting to shake off what happened.” The restaurant is a favorite of A-list Wall Street executives, including Goldman Sachs’s chief executive, Lloyd C. Blankfein.

Real estate agents say Wall Street executives have already begun lining up rentals in the Hamptons for next summer. Dolly Lenz of Prudential Douglas Elliman said the bidding this year was “hotter and heavier” than previous years. “There is a passion now in the market I haven’t seen in a while,” she said.

She said her clients, almost exclusively from Wall Street, were afraid to lose out. Just recently, Ms. Lenz said, she had three people bidding more than $400,000 for a summer rental in Southampton.

Compensation on Wall Street this year will not be much higher than 2009, and may even be lower. So the change in attitude appears more a matter of confidence and security than income.

“The mood is absolutely better, much better than even a year ago,” said David M. Gildea, a health care trader at the Wall Street firm Cowen & Company. Mr. Gildea was a trader at Bear Stearns before it was sold to JPMorgan Chase at a fire-sale price. He then moved to another big firm, which went through a similar near-death experience.

In 2008, even on a good trading day, he said, he and other traders were reluctant to even go out for a drink after work, uncertain if they were going to keep their jobs.

Now, Mr. Gildea said, people are stepping out more, and firms like Cowen are more optimistic about the future. “Are we back to where we were? Absolutely not,” he said. “Many people in our industry have learned to live more responsibly, but there is a definite buzz on the Street that hasn’t been there in some time.”

J.T. Cacciabaudo, head of equity trading and sales trading at the regional brokerage firm Sterne Agee agrees, saying while there is some concern in the market about the fourth quarter and how it will end, optimism about the longer term “has come back” and firms like his are in growth mode.

“Going into the third quarter, there was chatter about layoffs and most of that didn’t come to fruition because firms seem more optimistic about 2011 than the past two years,” he said.

This despite the fact that bonuses on Wall Street are not likely to be up much from last year, though they will still be strong. Over all, Goldman, Morgan Stanley, Citigroup, Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase have set aside $89.54 billion this year to pay employees, 2.8 percent less than a year ago, according to data from Nomura.

Total revenue for the five firms, meanwhile, has fallen about 4 percent this year. A study by the influential compensation expert Alan Johnson says broadly that bonuses will be up 5 percent this year across all financial services companies, with employees in some businesses like asset management getting increases of 15 percent.

This is a far cry from 2007, when some firms on Wall Street set records for compensation payouts. That year Goldman Sachs set aside $20.19 billion in compensation and benefits; in 2008, it set aside just half of that amount, $10.93 billion for pay. In 2009, that number climbed to $16.19 billion.

In the years leading up to the credit crisis some executives became famous for their expenditures, like L. Dennis Kozlowski, the former chief executive of Tyco International, whose $6,000 shower curtain became a symbol of unnecessary extravagance.

Some of that excess remains. A Morgan Stanley trader recently tried to hire a dwarf for a bachelor party in Miami, asking the dwarf to meet him at the airport in a “Men in Black” style suit, according to e-mail exchanges. The trader, who wanted to handcuff the dwarf to the bachelor, was recently fired.

Most expenditures, however, are for more mainstream indulgences. Marc B. Porter, a senior executive at Christie’s, says Wall Street workers for whom the auction market was recently seen as “out of range” are pouring back in. This resurgence of activity, he says, has followed the recovery of different economies, be it Hong Kong or the United States.

In recent months, Deborah Killoran, a client of Dr. Fusco’s, has been more willing to open the purse strings for cosmetic surgery. This month she is scheduled for an ulthera, a nonsurgical face-lift that costs $3,000 and upward.

Ms. Killoran, who runs a Brooklyn-based insurance company, says that over the last two years she cut her annual spending on cosmetic surgery in half, to about $3,000. She is now spending at pre-2008 levels. “I have to meet a lot of people, and this is part of investing in myself,” she said.

For a restaurant like Porter House, a pickup in business means a customer may spend an extra $8 for the Prime Cowboy Rib Steak rather than the Prime New York Strip Steak and eat out twice a month, instead of just once every four weeks. Mr. Lomonaco, the chef, says bookings for private rooms have increased. “At some point, firms want to reward their people, and they seem more willing to do so this year,” he said.

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2010/11/23/signs-of-swagger-wallets-out-wall-st-dares-to-celebrate/?hp

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« Reply #1969 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 09:08am »

Telegraph


The prime minister of New Zealand has said that
the whole country is in mourning for the 29 men
who are believed to be dead following a second
devastating explosion at the Pike River mine.

By Bonnie Malkin
Greymouth 10:25AM GMT
24 Nov 2010

The miners have been missing in a labyrinth of roadways at the end of the 1.4 mile main tunnel of the Pike River Coal mine since last Friday night when methane gas caused a massive explosion inside the mine on a mountain on New Zealand's south island.

Earlier today robots and cameras had been sent into the mine to search for signs of the missing men, but at 2.37pm rescue attempts were halted when a second large explosion suddenly ripped through the mine.

Mine bosses have said that the blast, which occurred deep within the mountain, would not have been survivable.

"Today all New Zealanders grieve for these men. We are a nation in mourning," said John Key said in an address to the nation in which he announced an inquiry would be held into the disaster.

"New Zealand is a small country... where we are our brothers keepers. To lose so many brothers at once strikes an agonising blow."

In a message from the Queen, sent to Mr Key, she said: ''I am deeply saddened by today's news that there is now no hope for the men trapped in the Pike River mine."

Deadly toxic gas and fears of further explosions stopped rescuers entering the mine, despite desperate pleas by the miners' relatives that rescue teams enter the mine to find their husbands and sons, including two Britons.

After news the second explosion was delivered, some families questioned whether more could have been done to bring the men out.

Lawrie Drew, the father of 21-year-old Zen Drew, said rescue teams should have entered the mine in the hours following the first blast, when the dangerous methane and carbon monoxide gases would have been sucked out of the mine.

"There was a window of opportunity on Friday, why didn't they take it?" he said.

Tony Kokshoorn, the mayor of Grey District, said there were a lot of angry and grieving families in the town.

"This is the west coast's darkest hour," he said.

The second, more powerful explosion, was believed to have been caused by a build up of poisonous gases within the mine, although it is not known what triggered the blast, which took place as rescue teams were poised to enter the mine.

Among the men believed to have perished in the mine are Britons Peter Rodger, 40, and Malcolm Campbell, 29, who was due to marry his fiancee Amanda Shields next month.

William Hague, the foreign secretary, issued a statement, saying that the British High Commissioner would travel to Greymouth on Thursday.

"It is with immense sadness that we have learned of the tragic loss of life at the Pike River Mine in New Zealand," he said.

"Our thoughts are with the families and friends of the 29 miners and all those whose lives have been marked by this tragedy.

"Many British citizens have made their home in New Zealand and the loss of Mr Rodger, Mr Campbell and their colleagues will have touched the hearts of many in the UK. "

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/australiaandthepacific/newzealand/8156290/New-Zealand-mine-explosion-prime-minister-says-whole-country-is-in-mourning-as-29-men-killed.html

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« Reply #1970 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 09:18am »

Wired Danger Room

Secret Insignias From the ‘Black Ops’ World
By Spencer Ackerman
November 24, 2010 | 7:00 am
Categories: Military Life

Whatever impulse drives soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines to commemorate their units with insanely random, over-the-top, or awesomely bad patches, we say: Cultivate it.

Trevor Paglen, a bi-coastal artist and author based in Oakland and New York City, brought bad military patches to new heights of glory with his 2007 book I Could Tell You But Then You Would Have to Be Destroyed by Me. It's a collection of more than 100 insignias from the most secret of military units. The following are some of the best patches from a new edition of his book coming out.

Paglen's first book got coverage in a lot of newspapers and on The Colbert Report. So, any satellite operator or drone pilot wanting to immortalize their units would send along a patch for the next edition.

That didn't always thrill higher-ups. "I heard that one commander started a little witch hunt to find out who'd leaked a space-related patch to me," Paglen says. "None of these patches are 'classified' per se, but some were produced with an informal understanding that they wouldn’t be made public. I hope nobody got into trouble."

Paglen knows about some white-whale patches that he hasn't gotten his hands on yet. Know anything about Ibis Dawn, Scarecrow, Sundowner, or something that says Invisus cum libertas et iustitia omnibus? "If you have one of these," Paglen says, "I'd love to trade something cool for it, or even get a nice scan." Until he puts out yet another edition, these 10 designs have to stand as a high-water mark in awesomely bad military patches.


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You don't know how many Freedom of Information Act requests we've filed in the hope of finding the Alien Technology Exploitation Division, the intrepid souls who'll soon announce a sources-sought contract to develop the Hyperspace Blaster. Alas, they don't exist.

A former officer at Air Force Space Command tells Paglen that he and his friends had the patches made at their own expense after getting endlessly ribbed for working in a secure vault "where they kept the alien bodies." They wore them on their flight suits for months before a one-star general asked where he could get one of his own.

Oh, and the barely-decipherable legend on the bottom? It's Klingon for "Don't Ask." Paglen got it in the mail from its creator after mentioning that he knew about its existence on the Colbert Report.

Image: Courtesy Trevor Paglen



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Space Spies Are Ready to Breach Your Borders
Paglen won't be able to find the origins of every patch he comes across. But rarely is a mystery more appropriate than in the case of the Sensor Hunters, whoever they are. Illustrated by one of MAD Magazine's spies, their brief(cases) include spying on the entire world, with swaggering disregard for nations' claims to control their own internal affairs.

The twinkling stars probably suggest these guys have something to do with space, but all Paglen writes is that they "devoted to reconnaissance and intelligence operations."

Image: Courtesy Trevor Paglen


many more examples after the jump
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/11/secret-insignias-from-the-black-ops-world?pid=145

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« Reply #1971 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 09:27am »

Seattle Times

Wednesday, November 24, 2010
Air Force reassigns 2 in tanker-bid mix-up
By CHRISTOPHER DREW
The New York Times

WASHINGTON
The top Air Force general said Tuesday he had reassigned two officials who had mistakenly sent confidential data to the companies bidding for a $40 billion tanker contract.

Gen. Norton Schwartz, the Air Force chief of staff, said he could not identify the pair given privacy rules.

But he said they were involved in sending each bidder Boeing and EADS (European Aeronautic Defence & Space) compact discs that contained data about the other's proposal.

Other officials said each company, instead of receiving information about how the Air Force evaluated the fuel-carrying capabilities of its plane, got similar data on its rival.

Schwartz called the mix-up a "profound disappointment," but said he saw no reason for it to derail the bid process.

The lucrative contract will be awarded early next year.

The Air Force has been trying for nearly a decade to replace hundreds of tankers that date from the Eisenhower era, and the problem-riddled process has repeatedly embarrassed it.

Its first effort collapsed after corruption charges involving a leasing proposal with Boeing.

Northrop Grumman and EADS, the parent of Boeing rival Airbus, then won the contract in 2008, only to have the government block the award after Boeing protested and a federal audit followed.

Northrop dropped out of the contest this year, leaving EADS to bid alone.

Sean O'Keefe, the chief executive of EADS North America, told reporters Monday he thought the mistake had been properly handled by both companies, which promptly returned the discs to the Air Force.

But O'Keefe said he could not rule out filing a protest.

Boeing has declined to comment on the error.

Some analysts said the mistake could increase the odds the Air Force might divide the contract between two companies rather than risk another time-consuming protest.

Schwartz said the Pentagon was opposed to splitting the work.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2013507540_tankermixup24.html

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« Reply #1972 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 12:51pm »



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« Reply #1973 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 1:35pm »

Thank you Phil for this link.
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« Reply #1974 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 2:28pm »

After Disclosure

Why The Event Hasn't Quite Become One...
by Bryce Zabel
24 November 2010


It's an eventful time for "The Event." Last month NBC ordered up a full-season of episodes, only to watch the ratings slide, with the most recent airing coming in fourth in its time slot (5.2 million viewers, 1.7 rating). I've worked as a writer/producer on a lot of series in their first seasons and I know these must be tough times over at the show, despite the fact that there are some extremely talented people with great reputations and lots of credits working on it.

It's hard to make great TV. In actual fact, it's hard to make even modestly okay TV because of crushing schedule challenges, contradictory executive notes, turf wars, budget constraints, and network dictated concept changes. If history is a guide, everybody connected with "The Event" probably has their own idea about what should be done to "fix" the show and most of these ideas are mutually contradictory.

Here's what "The Event" has going for it: lots of action (more bullets per minute than most series), plenty of intrigue (everybody lies and manipulates), some great actors (Blair Underwood, Hal Holbrook). There's just one thing I wish it had more of -- UFOs.

The series doesn't seem to take UFO/ET reality seriously. Its point-of-view feels like they may think UFO researchers are "buffs" on the same level as sci-fi fans -- and it's your basic aliens-are-here concept that exists in a vacuum isolated from any authentic UFO reality.

"The Event" seems to take place in a parallel universe where there was no Kenneth Arnold sighting, no UFOs over Washington, D.C. in 1952, no military interceptions, no abductees, no Twining Memo, no Project Blue Book, no Condon Report, no Grays, and, basically, no on-going public interest in the UFO issue.

In the world of "The Event," the only brush with "The Others" was a crash, not at Roswell in July 1947, but in Alaska in November 1944. No character in "The Event" has ever so much as uttered the word UFO or connected these alien visitors held at the Inostranka Facility into a larger picture of actual continuing contact and secrecy stretching over six decades. In the world of this series, they crashed up north, they got swept under the ice, and most people just forgot about them.

So, in their pilot, the President of the United States is about to disclose that we've been keeping dozens of youthful human-looking aliens up in cold storage for sixty years -- like he's outing a cosmic Gitmo -- but he's making no connection to the UFO issue that really does exist in the real world.

I'm not saying this was the wrong decision, only that it carries certain risks, given the core audience they may have been going for. Examples:

"The X-Files" lived in a world where their episodes and the series mythology were woven into the paranoia and conspiracy that real UFO investigators have had for decades. So did the NBC UFO conspiracy I created with Brent Friedman in the 1990s, "Dark Skies." We embraced the reality of the phenomenon and went from there, bending and twisting for dramatic purposes. But neither "The X-Files" nor "Dark Skies" simply cast aside all the mysterious, documented UFO knowledge gained over six plus decades by tens of thousands of witnesses. We dug around in it, and used it to make our stories deeper and more troubling, because our audiences wondered if we were presenting some version of the truth as fiction. Nobody believes that human-looking aliens are being kept up in Alaska under armed guard. That's just a story, even if it is a good one.

Not every sci-fi show with aliens need be held to this standard, by the way. ABC's "V," for example, is clearly a hyperventilated "what if?" about covert alien invasion. There is no connection between it and our current understanding of ET/UFO reality. But "The Event" adopts all the trimmings -- that somebody must be manipulating events from behind-the-curtain of power, that there is a decades long cover-up, and that the stakes of maintaining the secrecy are life-and-death -- but never embraces the meal that people have been seeing UFOs for decades and telling stories of contact, for real.

I guess I could be wrong. Supposedly, before they run out of time or network patience, the actual "Event" itself will be revealed. Maybe the true mystery of "The Event" will connect their dramatic world with the real one we live in where UFOs are real, chronic and a part of our civilization.

I hope NBC doesn't draw the wrong conclusion here, thinking that audiences don't want anything to do with alien conspiracy stories. In my view, what would have excited the audience, generated coverage and made people talk at those proverbial water coolers would have been something that was at least modestly informed about the real thing.

Imagine a peek behind-the-curtain of a real-life, sixty years on, global conspiracy to keep the biggest news humankind has ever known a secret. Now that would be dramatic must-see TV!

http://www.afterdisclosure.com/2010/11/why-the-event-doesnt-quite-work.html

Crystal
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« Reply #1975 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 3:35pm »

Sasquatch tee shirt. Great picture of Sasquatch but for some d*mn reason I can't capture it. They also have a Yeti.


http://www.whatonearthcatalog.com/cgi-bin/hazel.cgi?randomizer=2054104320&action=detail&item=CE8462T

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« Reply #1976 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 7:26pm »

Einstein's 'Biggest Blunder' Turns Out to Be Right

By Clara Moskowitz
Published November 24, 2010

Space.com

What Einstein called his worst mistake, scientists are now depending on to help explain the universe.

In 1917, Albert Einstein inserted a term called the cosmological constant into his theory of general relativity to force the equations to predict a stationary universe in keeping with physicists' thinking at the time. When it became clear that the universe wasn't actually static, but was expanding instead, Einstein abandoned the constant, calling it the '"biggest blunder" of his life.

But lately scientists have revived Einstein's cosmological constant (denoted by the Greek capital letter lambda) to explain a mysterious force called dark energy that seems to be counteracting gravity — causing the universe to expand at an accelerating pace.

A new study confirms that the cosmological constant is the best fit for dark energy, and offers the most precise and accurate estimate yet of its value, researchers said. The finding comes from a measurement of the universe's geometry that suggests our universe is flat, rather than spherical or curved.

Geometry of the universe


Physicists Christian Marinoni and Adeline Buzzi of the Universite de Provence in France found a new way to test the dark energy model that is completely independent of previous studies. Their method relies on distant observations of pairs of galaxies to measure the curvature of space.

"The most exciting aspect of the work is that there is no external data that we plug in," Marinoni told SPACE.com, meaning that their findings aren't dependent on other calculations that could be flawed

The researchers probed dark energy by studying the geometry of the universe. The shape of space depends on what's in it — that was one of the revelations of Einstein's general relativity, which showed that mass and energy (two sides of the same coin) bend space-time with their gravitational force.

Marinoni and Buzzi set out to calculate the contents of the universe — i.e. how much mass and energy, including dark energy, it holds — by measuring its shape.

There were three main options for the outcome.
Physics says the universe can either be flat like a plane, spherical like a globe, or hyperbolically curved like a saddle. Previous studies have favored the flat universe model, and this new calculation agreed

Flat universe

The geometry of space-time can distort structures within it. The researchers studied observations of pairs of distant galaxies orbiting each other for evidence of this distortion, and used the magnitude of the distortion as a way to trace the shape of space-time.

To discover how much the galaxy pairs' shapes were being distorted, the researchers measured how much each galaxy's light was red-shifted — that is, budged toward the red end of the visual spectrum by a process called the Doppler shift, which affects moving light or sound waves.

The redshift measurements offered a way to plot the orientation and position of the orbiting pairs of galaxies. The result of these calculations pointed toward a flat universe.
Marinoni and Buzzi detail their findings in the Nov. 25 issue of the journal Nature.

Understanding dark energy


By providing more evidence that the universe is flat, the findings bolster the cosmological constant model for dark energy over competing theories such as the idea that the general relativity equations for gravity are flawed.

"We have at this moment the most precise measurements of lambda that a single technique can give," Marinoni said. "Our data points towards a cosmological constant because the value of lambda we measure is close to minus one, which is the value predicted if dark energy is the cosmological constant."

Unfortunately, knowing that the cosmological constant is the best mathematical explanation for how dark energy is stretching out our universe doesn't help much in understanding why it exists at all.

"Many cosmologists regard determining the nature of dark energy and dark matter as the most important scientific question of the decade," wrote Alan Heavens of Scotland's University of Edinburgh in an accompanying essay in the same issue of Nature. "Our picture of the universe involves putting together a number of pieces of evidence, so it is appealing to hear of Marinoni and Buzzi's novel technique for testing the cosmological model, not least because it provides a very direct and simple measurement of the geometry of the universe."


Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2010/11/24/study-backs-einstein-notion-expanding-universe/#ixzz16FjCzfjs
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« Reply #1977 on: Nov 24th, 2010, 9:19pm »

"Einstein's 'Biggest Blunder' Turns Out to Be Right"

Thank you Swampy, great article.
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« Reply #1978 on: Nov 25th, 2010, 07:58am »



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« Reply #1979 on: Nov 25th, 2010, 08:01am »

New York Times

November 25, 2010
South Korea’s Defense Chief Resigns in Wake of Attack
By MARK McDONALD

SEOUL, South Korea — President Lee Myung-bak accepted the resignation of Defense Minister Kim Tae-young on Thursday amid intense criticism over the South’s response to an artillery attack by North Korea two days earlier and the sinking of a warship in March.

“There was a need to revamp the military landscape,” a senior government official said Thursday night. “It was time.”

The government official said Mr. Kim offered his resignation on May 1, after a South Korean Navy vessel, the Cheonan, was sunk off the coast of North Korea in the Yellow Sea. Mr. Lee deferred the resignation and asked Mr. Kim to stay on. It was expected that his replacement would be named on Friday.

Earlier Thursday, , the government said it would bolster its island defenses in the Yellow Sea and make its rules of engagement more muscular. Mr. Lee held a security meeting Thursday morning at the Blue House, the presidential compound in Seoul, where the new strategies were drafted.

Seoul also said it would press China to use its considerable diplomatic leverage with the North to avoid an escalation of tensions on the Korean peninsula.

Mr. Kim’s departure followed one of the most violent clashes as the North and South exchanged artillery barrages on Tuesday afternoon. The battle killed two marines and two civilians on the small South Korean island of Yeonpyeong, about nine miles off the North Korean coast.

A commentary in the conservative South Korean daily Chosun Ilbo assailed Mr. Kim, saying the military had been outgunned and underprepared.

“The minister practically admitted that the military failed to respond to a new type of North Korean threat” in the Yellow Sea, the newspaper said, charging that “the military has been implementing reforms that weaken defense capabilities” on the islands.

Beijing’s response has so far been muted, and a senior government official in Seoul said privately on Thursday that South Korea was going to “pull out all the stops and make every diplomatic effort with China.”

It was unclear whether the arrival of a United States aircraft carrier group off North Korea’s coast would be seen as a provocation. The carrier George Washington — with 5,700 personnel and about 85 fighter planes — was headed Thursday to the Yellow Sea. The carrier group will join with South Korean forces for a four-day series of military exercises that are scheduled to start Sunday.

A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman said Thursday that China had expressed its concern over the exercises and would be paying “close attention” to American naval movements.

The spokesman also reiterated that China supported resumption of the so-called six-party talks on the dismantling of North Korea’s nuclear programs. The talks involve the two Koreas, China, Russia, Japan and the United States. They broke down when North Korea withdrew last year, although in recent months Pyongyang has sought to renew the process.

The American general who heads the United Nations Command in South Korea, Gen. Walter L. Sharp, has called for military talks with senior officers of the North Korean People’s Army “in order to initiate an exchange of information and de-escalate the situation.” The North rejected that idea on Thursday.

Through its official news agency, Pyongyang also warned of further military retaliation if provoked by South Korea.

At the Blue House meeting, Mr. Lee said, “We should not drop our guard in preparation for the possibility of another provocation by North Korea,” according to his chief spokesman, Hong Sang-pyo. “A provocation like this can recur any time.”

South Korean defenses on its five coastal islands in the Yellow Sea had been set up primarily to guard against possible amphibious landings by North Korean troops. Critics said on Thursday that the military had not anticipated the possibility of an attack by North Korean artillery batteries, which are reportedly situated in caves along the North’s coastline.

“Now an artillery battle has become the new threat, so we’re reassessing the need to strengthen defenses,” Mr. Kim told lawmakers. The new measures he outlined include doubling the number of howitzers and upgrading other weaponry.

New rules of engagement will be based on whether military or civilian targets are targeted, said Mr. Hong, the presidential spokesman, adding that the move was to “change the paradigm of responding to North Korea’s provocations.”

The sinking a Korean naval vessel on March 26 killed 46 sailors, and Mr. Kim was widely criticized for the navy’s lack of preparedness. The South has blamed the incident on a North Korean torpedo attack. The North has denied any involvement and has refused a South Korean demand for an apology.

An internal government probe into the Cheonan incident “revealed a series of problems in the Defense Ministry’s and the military’s handling of the incident, including the lack of a combat-ready posture, reporting system, crisis-response measures and management of military confidential information,” the Audit Board said in announcing its findings in June.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/26/world/asia/26korea.html?_r=1&hp

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