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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 15161 times)
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« Reply #2025 on: Nov 29th, 2010, 1:02pm »

Army

Communications-Electronics recognized as three of the top 10 Army's greatest inventions for 2009
Nov 28, 2010

By RDECOM CERDEC Public Affairs


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Duke V3 is a counter radio-controlled improvised explosive device (RCIED) electronic
warfare (CREW) system that was developed to provide U.S. forces critical, life-saving
Photo Credit: Author.



Three U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command's communications-electronics center technologies proven useful in the field by U.S. Soldiers will be recognized as part of the Top Ten 2009 Army's Greatest Inventions during an awards ceremony at the Army Science Conference Nov. 28 in Orlando, Fla.

"There are several ground-breaking capabilities that come out of our Army labs and centers, but what makes this recognition significant is that these technologies were specifically selected by our Soldiers for the value provided in the field," said Jill Smith, CERDEC CERDEC director.

CERDEC's three AGI recipients include a portable power system, a threat warning system and counter radio controlled-improvised explosive device electronic warfare, or CREW, system.

The Rucksack Enhanced Portable Power System, or REPPS, is a lightweight, portable power system capable of recharging batteries and/or acting as a continuous power source. This system from the CERDEC Command and Control Directorate, combines anti-glint solar panels, connectors and adaptors for increased charging options, and can charge most common military battery types in five to six hours.

"Our goal in CERDEC C2D is to increase the Soldier's energy independence on the battlefield while reducing his physical and logistical burden. We're focusing on renewable energy as part of this solution, and the Soldier's feedback has been critical throughout. It's helped REPPS evolve significantly, and we will continue to work closely with the Warfighter to develop durable, light-weight, low-cost systems that will better fit his needs," said Pete Glikerdas, C2D acting director.

Soldiers can capitalize on REPPS renewable energy abilities by daisy-chaining several of the systems together if devices with higher power need to be charged.

The pass-thru assembly cable allows simultaneous battery recharging while delivering power to an end item enabling the Warfighter to complete their longer operations missions and extending the usage time for their equipment. REPPS, which has been used for surveillance and reconnaissance missions, is designed for silent watch operations and operations in remote areas.

Wolfhound Handheld Threat Warning System is another CERDEC technology intended to assist the Warfighter with missions. Wolfhound targets command and control nodes of the enemy.

Wolfhound, from the CERDEC Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate, is a hand-held, radio frequency threat warning and direction finding system that is intended to fill the coverage gaps and limitations of traditional systems.

"The Wolfhound system was developed in response to Soldiers saying 'We can hear them-we need to be able to locate them,'" said John Lynch, Wolfhound product manager.

This system provides mission support and force protection, aids in combat search and rescue, can identify and geolocate spotter positions and observation posts, and can be used in both static and mobile operations.

"It helps Soldiers with their missions; but it is lightweight, and Soldiers can master the 'buttonology' of Wolfhound in about 20 minutes and can learn use and concept of operation in about 16 hours," said Lynch.

Achieving optimal size, weight and power requirements are essential for most CERDEC technologies. The third AGI recipient, CREW Duke V3 , is a field-deployable, single-unit system that was also designed to have minimal size, weight and power requirements while providing simple operation and optimal performance in order to provide force protection against radio controlled-IEDs.

The CREW Duke V3 was developed by the CERDEC I2WD in conjunction with Product Manager CREW to provide electronic, life-saving protection in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, according to John Masco, I2WD Electronic Warfare Air/Ground Survivability EW Systems Ground Branch DukeV3 lead electronics engineer.

The first generation of the CREW system was previously recognized in 2006 as a 2005 U.S. Army's Greatest Invention, and more than 25,000 Duke systems have been fielded to date. Duke V3 has played a role in reducing insurgents' employment of radio controlled IEDs.

"These are the sixth and seventh Army Greatest Invention award I2WD has received and are exceptional accomplishments for our organization and the Army," said Anthony Lisuzzo, I2WD director. "This recognition demonstrates that CERDEC I2WD works very closely with the Army team to ensure that the Warfighter gets the best technology and capabilities that are available to contribute to their mission success and their safety."

In total, CERDEC has received 11 Army Greatest Invention awards since the Army started recognizing these technologies in 2002.

"The consistent recognition of CERDEC technologies by Soldiers is a true testament to the effort and ingenuity of our workforce," said Smith. "This acknowledgment reminds us all that our work has a direct effect on the men and women serving our country."

http://www.army.mil/-news/2010/11/28/48620-communications-electronics-recognized-as-three-of-the-top-10-armys-greatest-inventions-for-2009/index.html

Crystal

edit to add note: I didn't leave that sentence hanging under the photo, the author did.
« Last Edit: Nov 29th, 2010, 1:07pm by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

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« Reply #2026 on: Nov 29th, 2010, 3:59pm »

Country magazine contest winner Photo of the year 2010:

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by Kristy Lazanoff of San Luis Obispo, California


Results of the 2010 Rural Photography Contest

Kristy Lazanoff of San Luis Obispo, California, has won the grand prize in our 2010 Rural Photography Contest.

Kristy’s photo of her husband, Aaron, and son Ethan heading out to gather cattle on a very foggy morning outpolled three other amusing, heartwarming and scenic reader photos to become Best Country Photo of the Year.

“I really prefer candid pictures of kids just doing what they do,” Kristy says. “So I try to remember to keep my camera with me at all times.”

That strategy really paid off for Kristy, who was out on the range with camera in hand when the opportunity for this winning picture arose.

“It was just one of those great father-son moments,” she says. “They’re so much alike! I’ll ask Ethan why he did something, and he’ll tell me in this matter-of-fact voice, ‘Mom, that’s what cowboys do.’”

http://www.country-magazine.com/2011/DJ11/rural.asp?RefURL=&KeyCode=&tdate=&PMCode=&OrgURL=

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« Reply #2027 on: Nov 29th, 2010, 5:29pm »




description with video:

Antes de mais nada, não me importa o que os ceticos acham. Eu estou expondo este video para aqueles que acreditam e ninguem mais.

Before anything. I dont care for what sckeptics think of. I am exposing this video for those who believe like once I did. I mean I once did because now I know they exist.

~

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« Reply #2028 on: Nov 29th, 2010, 7:45pm »

Wikileaks Twitter feed



WikiLeaks
Ecuador offers WikiLeaks save haven http://is.gd/hY73U
21 minutes ago

http://twitter.com/#!/Wikileaks

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« Reply #2029 on: Nov 29th, 2010, 8:33pm »

"Type of Work: Text
Registration Number / Date: TXu001690005 / 2009-04-24
Application Title: God’s Tree House.
Title: God’s Tree House.
Description: Print Material.
Copyright Claimant: Crystal L. Berger, 1954- "



CONGRATULATIONS, Crystal!! cheesy
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« Reply #2030 on: Nov 30th, 2010, 07:38am »

Thanks Swampy! cheesy
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« Reply #2031 on: Nov 30th, 2010, 07:47am »

New York Times

U.S. and South Korea Balk at Talks With North
30 November 2010
By HELENE COOPER AND SHARON LaFRANIERE


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A control room on the aircraft carrier George Washington on Monday during joint exercises with South Korea in the Yellow Sea.
Pool photo by Yonhap



WASHINGTON — The United States, South Korea and Japan are all balking at China’s request for emergency talks with North Korea over the crisis on the Korean Peninsula, as high-profile military exercises between South Korea and the United States in the Yellow Sea continued on Monday in a show of force.

Obama administration officials said that a return to the table with North Korea, as China sought this weekend, would be rewarding the North for provocative behavior over the past week, including its deadly artillery attack on a South Korean island and its disclosure of a uranium enrichment plant. Beijing called for emergency talks with North Korea, the United States, Japan, South Korea and Russia, participants in the six-party nuclear talks, which have been suspended indefinitely.

“The United States and a host of others, I don’t think, are not interested in stabilizing the region through a series of P.R. activities,” said Robert Gibbs, the White House spokesman.

He said that the talks “without an understanding and agreement from the North Koreans to both end their behavior as they exhibited last week, but also to come to the table with a seriousness of purpose on the denuclearization issue — without that seriousness of purpose, they’re just a P.R. activity.”

Rejecting the emergency talks amounts to a pointed rebuke to China. The United States wanted China to signal clearly that North Korea’s aggressive behavior would not be tolerated. Instead, Beijing remained neutral about who was responsible for the recent flare-up, and offered only to provide a venue for all sides to air their differences.

Yet turning down China’s offer may also reveal the limited options available to the Obama administration and the South Korean leadership. Aside from a show of military solidarity, the two countries have based their response largely on hopes that China, as the North’s main economic and diplomatic supporter, might punish the reclusive government for its series of provocations.

Mr. Gibbs and other administration officials said that the United States also wanted to see North Korea take steps to denuclearize, which most Asia analysts said might be a tall order for the North at a time when its government is undergoing a leadership crisis.

South Korea and Japan are also clearly skeptical of whether the consultations, as suggested by the Chinese, are worth a try. President Lee Myung-bak of South Korea and Prime Minister Naoto Kan of Japan on Monday both denounced what they called North Korea’s brutality.

President Lee pointedly said nothing about the Chinese proposal; analysts in Seoul described it as disappointingly familiar. A spokesman for the Japanese prime minister said that while Japan is cautiously reviewing China’s offer, talks hinge on whether North Korea changes it behavior.

It remains unclear just what the United States would actually accept from North Korea to return to talks. One Obama administration official said that the United States wanted a clear sign that the North “will stop provocative behavior.”

“We’re trying to get out of this cycle where they act up and we talk,” the official said. He spoke on grounds of anonymity under diplomatic rules.

Emotions continued to run high on Tuesday in both Seoul and Pyongyang. In an editorial in the government-run newspaper, the Rodong Sinmun, North Korea threatened to step its uranium enrichment program. North Korean officials last week unveiled a surprisingly sophisticated enrichment plant north of the capital to an American scientist.

The editorial said the uranium development “will be pushed harder” to meet North Korea’s energy needs, according to a report by the North’s official Korean Central News Agency. But scientists say the plant with 2,000 centrifuges could be quickly converted to produce highly enriched uranium for bomb fuel and South Korean analysts interpreted the editorial as a not-so-veiled threat.

In Seoul, police officials said up to 10,000 protesters gathered in two plazas to demand that their government take a stronger stand against the North. Military veterans, retired police officers and activists carried pickets and banners calling for retaliation against the North during the three-hour protests.

“We came to show our commitment to overthrow Kim Jong-il. We have to show it in action,” said Lee Jae-myung. 63, a retired police officer who traveled with about 100 former officers two hours by train to participate in the rally.

On the diplomatic front, two North Korean envoys arrived in Beijing for four days of talks. Choe Thae-bok, secretary of the Workers’ Party of North Korea’s Central Committee, and Kim Yong-il, director of the party’s international department.

Separately, South Korea’s military appeared to step back from one confrontational stance on Monday , canceling live-fire artillery drills on the island in the Yellow Sea attacked by the North a week ago.

While the military exercises continued, the prospect of the South Korean live-fire drills — scheduled for Tuesday but canceled within four hours of the announcement — had been sharpening tensions on a peninsula on tenterhooks after the North’s artillery attack last week on a garrison island that is also home to about 1,350 civilians, mainly fishermen. The attack killed two South Korean marines and two civilians, and wounded 18 people.

North Korea blamed the South for provoking the attack by firing at it from the island, Yeonpyeong, which lies in waters disputed by the two sides. The South, which returned fire, insisted it had been firing only test shots and that none were in territory it recognized as the North’s.

The United States announced the date of the joint exercises as an immediate response. China — which the United States, South Korea and other countries hoped would act to calm the North — responded by warning the United States not to operate in waters it claims as a sovereign zone.

In Washington, the Pentagon cited security concerns and declined to say precisely where in the Yellow Sea the exercises were taking place. But a military official who spoke on the condition of anonymity acknowledged that some of the exercises might be within 200 nautical miles of the Chinese coast. China defines that zone as within its exclusive sovereignty, but the United States and many other nations do not recognize its claim. “We have a large operating area and some of it may be, and some of it may not be” within 200 miles of China’s eastern border, the official said.

South Korea naval authorities on Yeonpyeong warned residents by loudspeaker on Monday afternoon that they should move to bomb shelters by 9:30 a.m. Tuesday morning because live-fire drills would take place at 10 a.m.

But Monday night, they announced that no firing would take place. A South Korean military official declined to explain the shift, saying only that the exercise “will be conducted at an appropriate time.”

At the United Nations, the Obama administration called for tighter enforcement of sanctions against North Korea. The Security Council met on Monday to discuss the crisis, but did not emerge with any new plans for what to do next, further reflecting the mounting frustration in the international community over how to rein in North Korea.

Diplomats said that at the moment, the most they could do was to try to make sure countries enforce existing sanctions against North Korea, including an arms embargo and a travel ban against people linked to the country’s nuclear weapons program.

Susan E. Rice, the United States ambassador to the United Nations, told reporters that the United States looked “to China to play a responsible leadership role in working to maintain peace and security in that region.”

White House officials said last week that Mr. Obama planned to call President Hu Jintao of China to discuss the crisis in the Korean Peninsula. Mr. Gibbs said Monday afternoon that the call had not happened yet.

Helene Cooper reported from Washington, and Sharon LaFraniere from Seoul, South Korea. Elisabeth Bumiller contributed reporting from Washington.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/01/world/asia/01seoul.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #2032 on: Nov 30th, 2010, 07:52am »

New York Times

November 29, 2010
A Witness Lies, the Court Shrugs and Veterans Are Outraged
By ADAM LIPTAK
WASHINGTON

Elven J. Swisher wore a replica of a Purple Heart on the witness stand when he testified that the defendant had tried to hire him to kill three federal officials.

Asked about the medal, Mr. Swisher pulled a document from his pocket to show that he was entitled to it and many others for his service in combat in the Korean War.

Mr. Swisher said the defendant, David R. Hinkson, an armchair constitutionalist with eccentric views about the tax code, had asked him how many men he had killed. “Too many,” Mr. Swisher recalled saying.

All lies. Mr. Swisher had never seen combat, had killed no one and had served without distinction. The document was a forgery. Mr. Swisher has since been convicted of lying to federal officials, wearing fake medals and defrauding the Department of Veterans Affairs of benefits for combat injuries.

But the jury knew none of this, and with Mr. Swisher’s testimony it convicted Mr. Hinkson of soliciting three murders. He was sentenced to 33 years for those crimes, along with 10 years for tax evasion, and he is serving his sentence in the maximum-security prison in Florence, Colo.

When Mr. Swisher’s lies came to light, Mr. Hinkson challenged his convictions for soliciting the murders. The jury had believed him guilty of more than loose talk, he said, only because Mr. Swisher had falsely presented himself as a battle-hardened killer.

But the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, in San Francisco, ruled against him last year by a 7-to-4 vote.

Mr. Swisher’s lies, the majority said, were no big deal. There was no reason to think the jury would have come out differently had it known of “Swisher’s routine, rather than heroic, military history,” Judge Carlos T. Bea wrote.

That decision has outraged veterans.

William F. Mac Swain, the national president of the Korean War Veterans Association, told the appeals court in a brief filed after the decision that “its reasoning and language are a slap in the face to veterans and jurors alike.”

The majority opinion implied “that the average American no longer attaches any significance to a veteran’s wartime service,” Mr. Mac Swain continued.

In fact, he said, jurors are likely to believe those who have sacrificed to defend them and are likely to reject the testimony of those who have falsely claimed entitlement to honors for which others have bled and died.

That was not just speculation. One of the jurors at Mr. Hinkson’s trial, in Boise, Idaho, in 2005, later said he would have voted to acquit had he known the truth.

“I was surprised to hear that Mr. Swisher was allowed to tell such lies which created the misimpression that he would be a good ‘hit man’ candidate based on having been a decorated combat veteran,” the juror, Ben S. Casey, said in a sworn statement. “These lies discredit him as a witness and therefore discredit the rest of his testimony.”

Mr. Mac Swain’s brief was prepared by John W. Keker, a prominent San Francisco lawyer who earned a Purple Heart in Vietnam. In an interview, Mr. Keker said the majority’s “dismissive and even supercilious attitude” about military service “drove me out of my mind.”

“The idea that jurors wouldn’t be tremendously affected if they knew someone had lied about getting their war decorations was just astonishing,” Mr. Keker said.

After reading Mr. Keker’s brief, Chief Judge Alex Kozinski switched his vote. He said the brief and a recent Supreme Court decision had made him realize he had “underestimated the trust some jurors would have placed in Swisher if they thought he was a decorated combat veteran, and the likely backlash if they learned he was a fraud.”

But the tally the second time around, in July, was still 6 to 5 against Mr. Hinkson.

Dennis P. Riordan, one of Mr. Hinkson’s lawyers, said he was working on an appeal to the Supreme Court, where the justices have lately been quite engaged with the meaning of military service.

The decision Chief Judge Kozinski referred to, for instance, granted a new sentencing hearing to a death row inmate, George Porter Jr. In an unsigned unanimous opinion, the justices chastised Mr. Porter’s trial lawyer for failing to tell the jury about “Porter’s heroic military service in two of the most critical — and horrific — battles of the Korean War,” service for which he earned two Purple Hearts and other distinctions.

On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in another case about a Korean War veteran. It concerns David L. Henderson, who missed a filing deadline for veterans’ benefits because he was bedridden from the very disability for which he sought help.

At the argument in Mr. Hinkson’s case in the Ninth Circuit, there was much discussion of medals and their meaning.

Judge Harry Pregerson, who would end up in dissent, said he and his father had both earned Purple Hearts. “So I know what it’s about,” he said.

A lawyer for the government, on the other hand, argued that Mr. Swisher’s lies had been inconsequential.

Judge Pregerson asked the lawyer, John F. DePue, what he was wearing on his lapel. It turned out to be a Distinguished Service Medal.

“I honor you for your service,” Judge Pregerson said. “When I look at you, I say, ‘This guy’s got credibility standing there.’ ”

“You’re impressing us,” Judge Pregerson said, and then he seemed to refer to Mr. Swisher. “And if a guy is wearing a Purple Heart medal, that’s going to impress some people, too.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/30/us/30bar.html?ref=us

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« Reply #2033 on: Nov 30th, 2010, 07:56am »

New York Times

November 29, 2010
Iran Calls Leaked Documents a U.S. Plot
By WILLIAM YONG and ALAN COWELL

TEHRAN — In Iran’s first official reaction to leaked State Department cables quoting Arab leaders as urging the United States to bomb Tehran’s nuclear facilities, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad dismissed the documents as American psychological warfare that would not affect his country’s relations with other nations, news reports said.

The documents seemed to show several Arab nations, notably Saudi Arabia, Iran’s rival for influence in the Persian Gulf, displaying such hostility that King Abdullah repeatedly implored Washington to “cut off the head of the snake” while there was still time.

Nonetheless, Mr. Ahmadinejad said at a news conference on Monday that Iran’s relations with its neighbors would not be damaged by the reports.

“Regional countries are all friends with each other. Such mischief will have no impact on the relations of countries,” he said, according to Reuters.

“Some part of the American government produced these documents,” he said. “We don’t think this information was leaked. We think it was organized to be released on a regular basis and they are pursuing political goals.”

News reports quoted Mr. Ahmadinejad as calling the documents “worthless” and without “legal value.”

Mr. Ahmadinejad’s news conference was scheduled before the leaked cables were published on Sunday and had been expected to focus on such issues as Iran’s scheduled negotiations on Dec. 5 with world powers over its nuclear program and plans at home to drastically reduce energy and food subsidies. Mr. Ahmadinejad said on Monday that while Iran and the world powers had agreed on a date, the site of the talks was still under discussion.

Iran says its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes but many Western powers say it is designed to build nuclear weapons. That issue was one of the overarching themes of the first batch of leaked documents published Sunday in The New York Times and four European newspapers.

With steadily increasing sanctions, outside powers have been seeking to persuade Iran to curb its uranium enrichment, a process that can lead to the production of weapons-grade nuclear fuel.

Mr. Ahmadinejad reiterated that Tehran’s enrichment program was legal and “nonnegotiable,” Reuters said.

“The complete enrichment cycle and the production of fuel are basic rights” of member states of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog, and “are nonnegotiable,” Mr. Ahmadinejad was quoted as saying.

William Yong reported from Tehran, and Alan Cowell from Paris.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/30/world/middleeast/30iran.html?ref=world

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« Reply #2034 on: Nov 30th, 2010, 07:59am »

Telegraph

WikiLeaks: Gordon Brown's personal plea for hacker Gary McKinnon to serve sentence in Britain rejected by US.

The US rebuffed a direct appeal by Gordon Brown for computer hacker Gary McKinnon to be allowed to serve any sentence in Britain, cables obtained by WikiLeaks show.

By Steven Swinford
11:16AM GMT
30 Nov 2010

In August 2009 when he was prime minister, Mr Brown attempted to strike a deal during a face-to-face meeting with the US ambassador, arguing that Mr McKinnon's medical condition meant he would commit suicide if he was extradited.

Mr McKinnon, 44, suffers from Asperger's syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder.

His appeal was rejected by the Obama administration, which demanded that Mr McKinnon should be tried and serve any sentence in the US, where he faces up to 60 years in prison.

David Cameron, the prime minister, has yet to say whether he will agree to the demands.

The US government alleges that between February 2001 and March 2002 Mr McKinnon hacked into dozens of US Army, Navy, Air Force, and Department of Defence computers, as well as 16 Nasa computers.

It says his hacking caused some $700,000 dollars damage to government systems, and alleges that he altered and deleted files at a US Naval Air Station not long after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

They say his attack rendered critical systems inoperable.

Mr McKinnon claims he only hacked into US systems in 2001-2002 to search for evidence of UFOs. His mother, Janis Sharp, is due to testify before the home affair's select committee this morning as it launches a hearing on the extradition demands.

According to a secret cable from the Louis Susman, US ambassador in the UK, to Hilary Clinton, the Secretary of State, Mr Brown made his unsuccessful direct intervention in August 2009.

Susman wrote: "PM Brown, in a one-on-one meeting with the ambassador, proposed a deal: that McKinnon plead guilty, make a statement of contrition, but serve any sentence of incarceration in the UK.

Brown cited deep public concern that McKinnon, with his medical condition, would commit suicide or suffer injury if imprisoned in a US facility."

The ambassador says he raised Mr Brown's request in Washington with President Obama's newly appointed attorney general, Eric Holder. The plea, however, was unsuccessful.

In October last year, the ambassador warned Mrs Clinton that the prime minister was likely to raise the issue again during her visit to the UK.

"McKinnon has gained enormous popular sympathy in his appeal against extradition; the UK's final decision is pending." he wrote.

"The case has also caused public criticism of the US-UK extradition treaty."

Mr Brown's failure to convince the US may have been because of barely contained US anger, spelled out in other secret cables at the same time, that the UK was releasing Ali Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, the convicted Lockerbie bomber.

In December, Mr Cameron, then leader of the opposition, joined Brown in making representations. In another cable, Susman wrote: "Cameron said he had raised the extradition with the ambassador in an earlier conversation because the case was a matter of concern for many in the British public.

British people generally feel McKinnon is guilty 'but they are sympathetic'." The ambassador added, however, that Mr Cameron said that "neither McKinnon's lawyers nor his mother had been in touch with him".

Since becoming Prime Minister, Mr Cameron has taken a more direct role in Mr McKinnon's case. In July he publicly raised the issue with President Obama on a visit to the White House.

Theresa May, the Home Secretary, will take a final decision whether or not to comply with continued US extradition demands. Mr Cameron has also launched a review of the US-UK extradition treaty.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/wikileaks/8170195/WikiLeaks-Gordon-Browns-personal-plea-for-hacker-Gary-McKinnon-to-serve-sentence-in-Britain-rejected-by-US.html

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« Reply #2035 on: Nov 30th, 2010, 08:06am »

Wired

Nov. 30: A St. Andrew’s Day Salute to Scottish Inventors
By Lewis Wallace
November 30, 2009 | 12:00 am | Categories: Culture, Inventions, People

Nov. 30: It’s St. Andrew’s Day, the national day of Scotland. So we offer a toast to the great inventors who have applied Scottish ingenuity to their work over the years, helping craft the modern world in the process.

Some, like Alexander Graham Bell and James Watt, are well-known.

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Alexander Graham Bell


Others, like Arthur James Arnot — a Scot who moved to Australia, where he patented the electric drill — are less so.

In the wake of the Scottish Enlightenment, an 18th-century period during which the country achieved great intellectual and scientific accomplishments, emigrants such as Arnot spread what writer Arthur Herman calls the “Scottish mentality” well beyond the United Kingdom.

“When we gaze out on a contemporary world shaped by technology, capitalism and modern democracy, and struggle to find our own place in it, we are in effect viewing the world through the same lens as the Scots did,” writes Herman in his 2001 book, How the Scots Invented the Modern World.

Here are some of the great Scottish inventors who helped change the world:

•John Aitken: Inventor of the koniscope, or dust counter, an instrument designed to measure the content of particles in the atmosphere.

•Alexander Bain: Inventor of the electric clock.

•Patrick Bell: This Church of Scotland minister invented the reaping machine, but refused to patent his horse-powered agricultural device, because he wanted mankind to benefit freely.

•James Blyth: An electrical engineer, his pioneering windmill became the world’s first structure to generate electricity from wind.

•Dugald Clerk: Designer of the first two-stroke engine.

•Robert Davidson: Builder of the first electric locomotive.

•James Dewar: Inventor of the Dewar flask (the first vacuum flask, progenitor of the Thermos bottle).

•William Kennedy Dickson: Creator of the Kinetoscope, an early movie-projection device. (Dickson developed the machine based on an idea by his employer, Thomas Edison.)

•Patrick Ferguson: Inventor of the Ferguson rifle.

•Sir William Fergusson: Inventor of several surgical tools, including bone forceps, lion forceps and the vaginal speculum.

•William Ged: Inventor of stereotype printing.

•Barbara Gilmour Creator of Dunlop cheese, made from the unskimmed milk of Ayrshire cows.

•James Goodfellow: Invented the automatic teller machine and patented personal-identification-number tech.

•Fleeming Jenkin: Inventor of telpherage, the system for moving an aerial tram using one fixed cable and another that pulls the car.

•Charles Macintosh: Inventor of waterproof fabrics (the Mackintosh raincoat is named after him).

•John Loudon McAdam: Inventor of the road-building process called “macadamization,” which used layers of gravel and a cambered surface to improve drainage and reduce wear. When tar was added to the materials list, the “tar-macadam” or “tarmac” paved the way for today’s modern roads.

•John Napier: Creator of logarithms and an abacus known as “Napier’s bones.”

•James Nasmyth: Inventor of the steam hammer.

•William Nicol: Inventor of the Nicol prism, the first-ever device for obtaining plane-polarized light.

•James Porteous: Inventor of the Fresno scraper, a revolutionary agricultural implement that greatly influenced modern earth movers.

•Thomas Stevenson: Creator of the Stevenson screen, an enclosure for protecting meteorological gear. He also designed dozens of lighthouses.

•Robert Stirling: Inventor of the Stirling engine.

•William Symington: Builder of the “first practical steamboat.”

•Robert Watson-Watt: Patented radar.

•Robert Wauchope: Inventor of the time ball, a shore-based device that lets mariners synchronize and check the accuracy of their marine chronometers while at sea.

Quite a list, eh, laddie?

One final note: The issue of who, exactly, invented whisky — the Scots or their neighbors, the Irish — remains a highly debatable subject (especially in British pubs).

At a recent San Francisco tasting of The Macallan, whisky ambassador Eden Algie attempted to put the touchy subject to rest with a distinctly Scottish take on the flap.

The Irish invented whisky, he said — but the Scots perfected it. Slainte!

http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2009/11/1130scottish-inventors/

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« Reply #2036 on: Nov 30th, 2010, 09:59am »


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Obama after his meeting with Republican leaders at the White House Tuesday

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« Reply #2037 on: Nov 30th, 2010, 2:09pm »

Wired

Iran: Computer Malware Sabotaged Uranium Centrifuges
By Kim Zetter
November 29, 2010 | 4:18 pm
Categories: Cybersecurity

In what appears to be the first confirmation that the Stuxnet malware hit Iran’s Natanz nuclear facility, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said Monday that malicious computer code launched by “enemies” of the state had sabotaged centrifuges used in Iran’s nuclear-enrichment program.


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Photo: A security man stands next to an anti-aircraft gun as he scans Iran’s nuclear enrichment facility in Natanz, 300 kilometers [186 miles] south of Tehran, Iran, in April 2007.
Hasan Sarbakhshian/AP



The surprise announcement at a press conference coincided with news that two of Iran’s top nuclear scientists had been ambushed Monday by assassins who killed one scientist and seriously injured the other.

Iran had previously acknowledged that Stuxnet infected the personal computers of workers at its Bushehr nuclear power plant but had insisted that the malware had not infected work systems involved in the nuclear program, and that the program itself had not been harmed. Officials did not mention then whether any computers at its nuclear facility at Natanz had been infected.

Natanz is engaged in enriching uranium that could be used to manufacture weapons. It was therefore believed by various computer security experts to have been Stuxnet’s likely target.

Ahmadinejad did not mention Natanz by name at Monday’s press conference but admitted that malware had “succeeded in creating problems for a limited number of our centrifuges.”

According to a recent report from the United Nations’ International Atomic Energy Agency, Iran had temporarily halted uranium enrichment at its Natanz plant for unknown reasons earlier this month. Thousands of centrifuges reportedly stopped production as a result.

Iran has had various problems over the years with equipment used in its nuclear facilities. The problems have delayed progress in both the country’s nuclear power plants and the uranium-enrichment program, which Iran has insisted is for peaceful purposes only.

Ahmadinejad said the malware that caused problems with its centrifuges was in software that the attackers had “installed in electronic parts.” He said the infection had been halted.

“Our specialists stopped that and they will not be able to do it again,” he said, according to the BBC. Ahmadinejad blamed Israel and “the West” for spreading the malware.

The Stuxnet worm was discovered on computers in Iran in June by a Belarusian security firm and has infected more than 100,000 computer systems worldwide, most of them in Iran. The targeted code was designed to attack Siemens Simatic WinCC SCADA systems. The Siemens system is used in various facilities to manage pipelines, nuclear plants and various utility and manufacturing equipment.

But speculation has focused on Iran’s nuclear facilities — at Bushehr, Natanz and other locations — being the most likely target. The sophisticated malware is believed to have been created by a well-financed nation state, with speculation focusing on Israel and/or the United States.

Security firm Symantec recently determined that the malware specifically targets Siemens systems that are used with frequency-converter drives made by two firms, one based in Iran and one in Finland. Even more specifically, Stuxnet targets only frequency drives from these two companies that are also running at high speeds — between 807 Hz and 1210 Hz.

Frequency-converter drives are used to control the speed of a device. Although it’s not known what device Stuxnet aimed to control, it was designed to vary the speed of the device wildly but intermittently over a span of weeks, suggesting the aim was subtle sabotage meant to ruin a process over time but not in a way that would attract suspicion.

“Using nuclear enrichment as an example, the centrifuges need to spin at a precise speed for long periods of time in order to extract the pure uranium,” Symantec’s Liam O Murchu told Threat Level earlier this month. “If those centrifuges stop to spin at that high speed, then it can disrupt the process of isolating the heavier isotopes in those centrifuges … and the final grade of uranium you would get out would be a lower quality.”

Iran’s confirmation this week that malware was behind recent problems with its centrifuges suggests that Stuxnet may indeed have been designed specifically to target Iran’s nuclear program. But if this is the case, the assassinations on Monday could indicate that whoever targeted Iran felt the malware was insufficient to halt Iran’s nuclear program.

According to news reports, the scientists were targeted in separate but nearly simultaneous car bomb attacks near Shahid Beheshti University. Majid Shahriari and Fereydoun Abbasi, along with their wives, were driving to work when assailants on motorcycles zipped by their vehicles and slapped magnetized explosives to the cars, which were detonated within seconds.

Shahriari, who was head of an unnamed Iranian nuclear program, was killed. Abbasi, a high-ranking Ministry of Defense official who reportedly holds a Ph.D. in nuclear physics, was wounded. Both wives were wounded in the attacks.

Two other Iranian nuclear scientists have been killed in recent years. A senior physics professor at Tehran University was killed in January, when a bomb attached to a motorcycle exploded near his car as he was leaving for work. A second nuclear scientist died in 2007 from gas poisoning.

Ahmadinejad blamed Monday’s assassination attacks on Israel and the West.

“Undoubtedly, the hand of the Zionist regime and Western governments is involved in the assassination,” he said, according to an Associated Press account of the news conference.

Sunday’s disclosure of U.S. State Department documents also show that Arab nations share the same concerns that Israel and the United States have about Iran’s nuclear programs. The documents, given to various media outlets by the secret-spilling site WikiLeaks, reveal that King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia pleaded with the United States to stop Iran before it could develop an atomic weapon. Other Arab leaders were equally urgent that Iran had to be stopped.

There have been suggestions, however, that the Iranian government itself could have been responsible for the attacks on the two nuclear scientists.

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/11/stuxnet-sabotage-centrifuges/

Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2038 on: Nov 30th, 2010, 4:04pm »

on Nov 29th, 2010, 8:33pm, Swamprat wrote:
"Type of Work: Text
Registration Number / Date: TXu001690005 / 2009-04-24
Application Title: God’s Tree House.
Title: God’s Tree House.
Description: Print Material.
Copyright Claimant: Crystal L. Berger, 1954- "



CONGRATULATIONS, Crystal!! cheesy

Wow! Crystal, you're an author? shocked That's great!! smiley

on Nov 28th, 2010, 9:40pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Hollywood Reporter

9:17 PM 11/28/2010
by Kimberly Nordyke


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R.I.P., Leslie Nielsen. Thank you for all those funny movies which made us laugh and being happy and forget about all those sorrows we have for a moment! You certainly will be missed.



@swampy
My...! That is a scary kind of gun. shocked
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« Reply #2039 on: Nov 30th, 2010, 6:45pm »

Hey Phil! cheesy

It's a children's book. I'm proud of it. Thank you!

I was sorry to hear about Leslie Nielson, he was something else.

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