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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 127719 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2280 on: Dec 21st, 2010, 12:25pm »

Reuters

WASHINGTON | Tue Dec 21, 2010 1:17pm EST

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. communications regulators adopted Internet traffic rules on Tuesday that prevent providers from blocking lawful content but still let them ration access to their networks.

The Federal Communications Commission approved the "Open Internet" order after FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski's plan got the support of fellow Democrats Michael Copps and Mignon Clyburn.

The rules aim to strike a balance between the interests of Web service providers, content companies and consumers, but some industry analysts think a court challenge is still likely.

At issue is whether regulators need to guarantee that all stakeholders continue to have reasonable access to the Internet, a principle often called "net neutrality," or whether the Internet is best left to flourish unregulated.

The two Republican commissioners at the agency opposed the measure saying it was unnecessary and would stifle innovation. Robert McDowell and Meredith Attwell Baker told an FCC open meeting that they believed the rules would fail in court.

High-speed Internet providers like Comcast Corp and Verizon Communications can "reasonably" manage their networks under the rules and perhaps charge consumers based on levels of Internet usage.

The rules, to be somewhat looser for wireless Internet, could help cable companies in competition with plans by Microsoft Corp, Google Inc and Amazon.com to deliver competing video content over the same Internet lines the cable companies run to customers' homes.

(Reporting by Jasmin Melvin; Editing by Tim Dobbyn)

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6BJ5DF20101221

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2281 on: Dec 21st, 2010, 1:29pm »

on Dec 20th, 2010, 6:50pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Independent


Soldier risked life to help save Afghan girl
By Kim Sengupta, Defence Correspondent
Monday, 20 December 2010

A British soldier has been commended for putting his life at risk rather than endanger a 10-year-old Afghan girl during a firefight in Helmand. Lance Corporal Craig Murfitt was shot in the head by an insurgent who was using the girl as a "human shield". L/Cpl Murfitt, 25, of the 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, said: "I knew I could take him down but, being a dad myself, I didn't want to run the risk. So I waited, hoping that the child would drop down and give me a clear shot."

However, the gunman opened fire and Lance Corporal Murfitt was hit on the side of his helmet, knocking him over. “I tried to stand but I had disco legs and just had to sit down again for a bit,” he said.

Lance Corporal Murfitt, from Devon, was praised by senior officers for upholding the highest standards of “courageous restraint”, the doctrine which asks service personnel to exercise caution in order to minimise civilian casualties.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/soldier-risked-life-to-help-save-afghan-girl-2164845.html


Crystal

edit to identify photos

This story strikes me to be familiar. Could it be that this incident happened much earlier this year? I could swear that I've already heard that some while ago. User Image
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2282 on: Dec 21st, 2010, 2:38pm »

Hi Phil,
It could have and just hit the news again with his commendation? Or they were re-running the news.
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« Reply #2283 on: Dec 21st, 2010, 2:47pm »

Posted January 2010







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« Reply #2284 on: Dec 21st, 2010, 3:28pm »

American Chronicle

Southwest's Four Corners is region of beauty, mystery, UFOs

Steve Hammons
December 16, 2010
(This article originally appeared on the Transcendent TV & Media site.)

In fiction and fact, the Four Corners region of the American Southwest has long been an area associated with beauty, nature and mysterious phenomena.

The convergence of the states of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah is an arid region of dramatic rock formations, fantastic canyons, vast dry plains as well as the pine-covered mountains of the Colorado's southern Rockies.


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American Indian nations and communities of the Navajo, Hopi, Ute and others are also found in the Four Corners. Many American Indian tribes have beliefs and legends related to unconventional phenomena.

Mysteries in the area are sometimes associated with the American Indian residents, the ancient history of the region as well as secret government activities and even UFOs.

Accounts of a UFO crash in northwestern New Mexico in 1948 continue to be part of UFO lore.

STORIES AND REPORTS

Popular and prolific western novelists and World War II veterans Louis L'Amour and Tony Hillerman are just two writers who explored the cultural, historical, physical and metaphysical landscape of the area. The works of both writers have been adapted for TV and movies.

Both Hillerman and L'Amour had strong connections to the Four Corners. Hillerman's mystery novels about two Navajo Nation tribal police officers set in the region gained tremendous popularity. L'Amour lived part of the time in the Durango, Colorado, area where he did much of his writing.

And, both men delved into unusual and anomalous phenomena associated with the history of the area and the people who live there.

Hillerman's Navajo police characters Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee often faced strange phenomena in their investigations. L'Amour made an interesting departure from his more conventional old West tales in his 1988 novel set near the Four Corners titled "The Haunted Mesa" about a portal into another dimension.

L'Amour's part-time home in Durango plays a part in the ongoing research about UFOs. Some researchers claim that in 1948, the year following the alleged Roswell incident, another unusual flying craft crashed southwest of Durango near the town of Aztec, New Mexico.

According to these reports, secret U.S. government teams responded to the area and flew in scientists to examine the situation. The only nearby airfield at the time was in Durango and these personnel were flown in and then traveled by road the 35 miles to Aztec, according to some researchers.

As part of the clandestine operation, the craft and possibly bodies were obtained and transported to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, a center for analysis of foreign aircraft and technology.

A March 28, 2010, article in the Durango Herald newspaper reported that a former U.S. government "remote viewer" (one of the psychic spies who allegedly used ESP to gather intelligence) spoke about the Aztec incident at the 13th annual Aztec UFO Symposium held last in March 2010.

The individual, Lyn Buchanan, told the audience that his remote viewing consulting and training firm examined the Aztec UFO crash reports and concluded there is truth to the accounts, according to the article.

"In short, there was a crash," Buchanan was quoted in the Durango Herald as saying. "The ETs in that ship weren't dead; they were alive. And negotiations happened between them and the government."

The same newspaper article also reported that Buchanan revealed to the symposium audience that the George Clooney character "Lyn Cassady" in the 2009 movie "The Men Who Stare at Goats" was based on Buchanan.

SECRET SIGNAL

In the second of my two novels, "Light's Hand" (the sequel to "Mission Into Light"), I also take readers into the Four Corners region with three members of the secret 10-person Joint Reconnaissance Study Group (JRSG).

The main character, Mike Green, along with Amy Mella (an Air Force captain) and CIA analyst Jennifer Thorsen are sent from their home base in San Diego to the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona and then on to Durango.

Their first task is to link up with two National Security Agency (NSA) officials who are interviewing a good friend of the Joint Recon Study Group, WWII Marine Code Talker veteran Joe Bear, at his home.

The NSA has picked up signals intelligence (SIGINT) coming from deep space. And, the signals appear to be in two codes – World War II Navajo Code Talker language and Morse code.

Green, Mella and Thorsen are to find out what is involved, assist as needed and report back to their team leaders and the JRSG commanding officer in San Diego, Tom O'Brien, an Air Force colonel. They are authorized to access information from the two NSA agents and from Joe's interpretation of the mysterious message.

From northeastern Arizona, the three JRSG members are sent on to Durango to interview a former Army intelligence officer who is now an instructor at the state college there. He reportedly has knowledge about unconventional topics of interest to the JRSG.

They are also directed to scout around the Durango area to locate a suitable property for a "safehouse." The reason is not immediately clear to them.

In the partial excerpt below from Chapter 7, Mike, Amy and Jennifer arrive in the Navajo Nation after flying from San Diego to Farmington, New Mexico:

By lunchtime they were pulling into the small Navajo town of Kayenta in the northeast corner of Arizona. The village was a jumping off point for trips to Monument Valley and other nearby scenic sites.

Mike drove the final stretch down the highway and turned off on a gravel road. After three or four miles, they spotted Joe's and Maggie's names on a mailbox and drove up the dusty road toward the house, sitting on a small hill. They noticed Joe's pick-up next to the house and a navy blue sedan parked in front. Mike pulled up behind the sedan and the three of them got out.

Joe opened the front door and stepped out on the front porch, raising his hand in greeting and smiling broadly.

"Welcome," he simply said as Amy and Jennifer hugged him. Mike managed to find Joe's hand for a shake. Then, more hugs all around as his wife Maggie came out to the porch.

"Come on inside you three," Maggie said as she led the way.

In the living room, Mike, Amy, and Jennifer saw a woman and a man sitting on one of couches typing on laptop computers. Joe introduced them.

"This is Jane Danski and Mark Jensen from the NSA. They wanted to talk with me about some things. I think O'Brien wants you to talk with them too."

After more handshakes and introductions all around, everyone took a seat, except Maggie, who went out to her kitchen.

Jane Danski explained that they were authorized to fill in the JRSG operatives on the reason they were talking with Joe. She and Jensen spelled out the situation briefly. A Morse code transmission had been detected by NSA signals intelligence.

After a lot of research on the translation from Morse code, someone knew enough about World War Two cryptography to suspect it might be related to the Code Talkers, or something similar.

Joe had confirmed it and had made a preliminary interpretation for them. They were writing their reports, which they would soon transmit via communications equipment in their car that included a satellite uplink connection. They would send their encrypted reports directly to the NSA in Virginia.

Mike, Amy, and Jennifer had become accustomed to unusual events since they joined the JRSG. However, that fact didn't dampen their excitement. Amy posed the obvious question.

"Are you free to tell us what Joe thinks the message says?"

Danski and Jensen both shook their heads in the affirmative.

"Go ahead Joe, if you want," Mark Jensen said.

As calm and steady as ever, Joe gave them his interpretation of the message.

"As you know, back in the war, we used Navajo words for animals and natural things to stand for military meanings, to identify things like aircraft, ships, troops, or military activities."

"Out of the message these folks gave me, and I figure it was translated the right way from Morse code by the NSA, there were some key words."

"I picked up Code Talker words for 'ships,' 'scouts,' 'friendly indigenous forces,' liberation,' which was a term we used back then to mean a few different things. Also, the words 'secret' or 'covert,' 'landing,' such as a plane or marine beach landing, and a word that could mean 'supplies.' There were some other references to 'darkness' or 'night time' and 'light' or 'daylight.' I also think some of the words were trying to say something about a time frame or schedule."

"The basic message, as best as I can figure out, is something like 'scouts will recon a target covertly at night, or during the dark, to liberate the local friendlies. Then, later, a landing will bring supplies in the day or daylight.' Something like that. That's what I make of it anyhow."

They all glanced at one another and it was obvious they all were thinking along similar lines. The NSA people knew, in general terms, that the JRSG was working on usual phenomena, such as UFOs, among other things. Jane Danski posed the question to them.

"So, Mr. Bear, do you have an idea what this might mean? What do you think?"

ON TO DURANGO

After this meeting at Joe Bear's house in northeastern Arizona, Mike, Amy and Jennifer head to Durango where they are to interview a Dr. Ben Westman, an anthropology instructor at Fort Lewis College, a state college there. Westman is reportedly a retired Army intelligence officer.

more after the jump
http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/205654

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« Reply #2285 on: Dec 21st, 2010, 6:17pm »

grin




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« Reply #2286 on: Dec 21st, 2010, 7:19pm »

New Zealand News

UFO files to be made public
Published: 9:36AM Wednesday December 22, 2010
Source: Newstalk ZB/ONE News


The Ministry of Defence is set to release documents it has collected on UFO sightings in New Zealand.

There are more than 2000 pages of material which date back to the 1950s.

They have been held by Archives New Zealand, which was set to make them available in February this year after requests from the public.

However the Defence Force said it needed to remove personal identification from the files in order to comply with the Privacy Act.

UFOCUS Director Suzanne Hansen, who has been investigating UFOs for more than 35 years, has been campaigning for the documents' release.

She said it was a step towards openness on the topic of UFOs.

Hansen expects there will be some information on the Kaikoura lights sightings in the late 1970s.

She said she had witnessed numerous "sightings" in her life.

http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/ufo-files-made-public-3982133#

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« Reply #2287 on: Dec 21st, 2010, 8:26pm »






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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2288 on: Dec 22nd, 2010, 07:41am »

The Green Hornet looks like a winner to me
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« Reply #2289 on: Dec 22nd, 2010, 08:19am »

on Dec 22nd, 2010, 07:41am, murnut wrote:
The Green Hornet looks like a winner to me


Merry Christmas Mur!

It does look like a lot of fun.

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« Reply #2290 on: Dec 22nd, 2010, 08:24am »

New York Times

December 21, 2010
In a Sign of Foreclosure Flaws, Suits Claim Break-Ins by Banks
By ANDREW MARTIN

TRUCKEE, Calif. — When Mimi Ash arrived at her mountain chalet here for a weekend ski trip, she discovered that someone had broken into the home and changed the locks.

When she finally got into the house, it was empty. All of her possessions were gone: furniture, her son’s ski medals, winter clothes and family photos. Also missing was a wooden box, its top inscribed with the words “Together Forever,” that contained the ashes of her late husband, Robert.

The culprit, Ms. Ash soon learned, was not a burglar but her bank. According to a federal lawsuit filed in October by Ms. Ash, Bank of America had wrongfully foreclosed on her house and thrown out her belongings, without alerting Ms. Ash beforehand.

In an era when millions of homes have received foreclosure notices nationwide, lawsuits detailing bank break-ins like the one at Ms. Ash’s house keep surfacing. And in the wake of the scandal involving shoddy, sometimes illegal paperwork that has buffeted the nation’s biggest banks in recent months, critics say these situations reinforce their claims that the foreclosure process is fundamentally flawed.

“Every day, smaller wrongs happen to people trying to save their homes: being charged the wrong amount of money, being wrongly denied a loan modification, being asked to hand over documents four or five times,” said Ira Rheingold, executive director of the National Association of Consumer Advocates.

Identifying the number of homeowners who were locked out illegally is difficult. But banks and their representatives insist that situations like Ms. Ash’s represent just a tiny percentage of foreclosures.

Many of the incidents that have become public appear to have been caused by confusion over whether a house is abandoned, in which case a bank may have the right to break in and make sure the property is secure.

Some of the cases appear to be mistakes involving homeowners who were up to date on their mortgage — or had paid off their home — but who still became targets of a bank.

In Texas, for example, Bank of America had the locks changed and the electricity shut off last year at Alan Schroit’s second home in Galveston, according to court papers. Mr. Schroit, who had paid off the house, had stored 75 pounds of salmon and halibut in his refrigerator and freezer, caught during a recent Alaskan fishing vacation.

“Lacking power, the freezer’s contents melted, spoiled and reeking melt water spread through the property and leaked through the flooring into joists and lower areas,” the lawsuit says. The case was settled for an undisclosed amount.

More common are cases like Ms. Ash’s, in which a homeowner was behind on payments, perhaps trying to work out a modification, when bank crews changed the locks.

In Florida, contractors working for Chase Bank used a screwdriver to enter Debra Fischer’s house in Punta Gorda and helped themselves to a laptop, an iPod, a cordless drill, six bottles of wine and a frosty beer, left half-empty on the counter, according to assertions in a lawsuit filed in August. Ms. Fisher was facing foreclosure, but Chase had not yet obtained a court order, her lawyer says.

The break-in was discovered when a Canadian couple renting the house returned from the beach.

Chase officials said such behavior by its contractors, if determined to be true, would be considered unacceptable and corrective action would be taken.

Banks and their contractors insist that the number of mistakes is minuscule given the hundreds of thousands of new foreclosure cases filed each month. Bank of America, for instance, says it works with third-party contractors to inspect and maintain more than one million properties each month and has enhanced its controls in the last year to prevent mistakes.

Alan Jaffa, chief executive of Safeguard Properties, which inspects and maintains foreclosed properties for mortgage servicers, acknowledged that a handful of mistakes had been made. In most instances, he said, his company provided a valuable service that protected properties and neighborhoods.

“There is a stigma that we go in, kick the door in and throw grandma out head first and board up the windows,” Mr. Jaffa said. “We are doing a lot of good out there.”

But Alan M. White, a consumer law expert at Valparaiso University in Indiana, says: “Volume is not an excuse for violating someone’s rights.”

A clause in most mortgages allows banks that service the loan to enter a home and secure it if it is in default, meaning if the mortgage payment is 45 to 60 days late, and if the house has been abandoned, authorities said.

Banks do so to protect the property from vandalism or damage for which the bank could be liable.

But determining when a house is abandoned is not always easy and is often left to inexperienced contractors, said Carlin Phillips, a Massachusetts lawyer who represents Ms. Ash, who is 45.

“It’s sometimes as little as someone looking through the windows, or knocking on the door of a neighbor and saying, “Where are they?’ ” Mr. Phillips said.

In Washington, Celeste Butler went to check on her father’s house after he spent months in the hospital and ultimately died.

“The house was ransacked,” Ms. Butler said, adding that it had been neatly maintained beforehand. “They had destroyed furniture, broken into china cabinet. They had looted jewelry.”

In her lawsuit, Ms. Butler is accusing Safeguard, a contractor for JP MorganChase, of breaking into her father’s house. Ms. Butler asserts that Chase failed to properly credit payments made when she switched to an automatic system in June 2009, but that she and the bank worked quickly to rectify the problem.

Officials at Chase said its contractors, dispatched to inspect the house when payments were late, found it in disarray. When no one responded to a letter asking if the property had been abandoned, Chase said, its crews went back in the house to put antifreeze in the pipes.

The clearing out of Ms. Ash’s Truckee home, on Ski Slope Way high above Lake Tahoe, came after several horrific years of personal and professional hardships.

During the California real estate boom, Ms. Ash and her husband, Robert, thrived. Mr. Ash bought the house in Truckee in 2003. Two years later, he was stabbed to death in a road-rage incident near Truckee. (The driver was convicted of second-degree murder and is in prison.)

From there, Ms. Ash’s troubles with the Truckee house became tangled in her worsening financial situation and, she claims, the bungling of the bank, originally Countrywide Financial, which was bought by Bank of America in 2008.

She intended to assume the mortgage on the house, which landed in probate court after her husband’s death. The bank required that she catch up on payments and taxes, so she sent a check for $15,000.

Hearing nothing from the bank for many months and not having ownership of the house, she made no more payments, she said. By the time Countrywide reached Ms. Ash, the real estate market was collapsing, so she sought a loan modification.

Months and years of frustration followed. The bank lost documents and rarely returned her e-mails and phone messages, she said.

When Countrywide issued a default notice in 2007, it went to the wrong address, her lawsuit says. Later, Ms. Ash said, the bank assured her it would not foreclose while she pursued the loan modification.

Even so, the bank conducted a foreclosure sale on the property in May 2008. Again, Ms. Ash said she had not been notified and learned of the sale during a summer visit. She said she had been told the sale would be rescinded.

Near Halloween 2008, work crews broke in and cleaned out the place, taking Persian rugs, china, furniture bought on a trip in Peru, skis, photos of her marriage and childhood in Iran. Her husband’s ashes were taken from the couple’s master bedroom.

A bank spokeswoman, Jumana Bauwens, said, “We take the allegations made by Ms. Ash very seriously and are thoroughly researching her claims. Bank of America will work with Ms. Ash and her counsel to determine the extent and cause of her claims and move toward an appropriate resolution of the case.”

Although the original foreclosure was rescinded, as promised, Ms. Ash, who discovered the break-in in January 2009, says it is hard for her to visit the house anymore and she will probably let it lapse into foreclosure. At this point, she said, it is just a “sad reminder that 22 years of my history vanished.”

“This is in essence a burglary,” said Ms. Ash, walking through the vacant home, with its four levels and commanding mountain views. “But when a burglar goes in, they don’t take your photos and your husband’s ashes.”

“This used to be my haven I’d run away to,” she said. “Now I run away from it.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/22/business/22lockout.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #2291 on: Dec 22nd, 2010, 08:33am »

Telegraph

MI6 spy found dead in bag: Gareth Williams visited bondage websites, drag cabaret and gay bars

The MI6 spy Gareth Williams visited a series of bondage websites in the months before he was found dead in a bag in the bath of his London flat, police have revealed.

11:16AM GMT
22 Dec 2010

The 31-year-old codebreaker viewed sites showing people bound and tied, which included do-it-yourself guides.

Detectives also found a £15,000 collection of unworn women's designer clothing, including tops, dresses and shoes in his wardrobe.

They revealed he visited a drag cabaret in east London four days before his death and held tickets to two more.

One witness has also come forward to say he was at a popular gay bar in Vauxhall several months before his death.

Mr Williams's decomposing body was found in a padlocked holdall in the bath of his Pimlico flat on August 23. The keys were inside.

Detective Chief Inspector Jackie Sebire, who is leading the inquiry, said she is convinced someone else helped put him in there.

She said police believe they will get to the bottom of the intensely private spy's death by studying his private life.

Speaking at New Scotland Yard, she said: ''We remain completely open-minded about how he died.

''We are appealing today to someone who is out there to come forward and tell us more.''

The GCHQ codebreaker, who had been on secondment to the MI6, was found dead by police after concerns were raised for his welfare.

The mysterious circumstances of Mr Williams's death sparked an international frenzy of speculation.

No evidence of drugs, alcohol or poisons were found during a battery of tests conducted by toxicologists.

Mrs Sebire revealed that police have forensic evidence that other people were in the flat, whom they have not been able to trace.

She added that an expert, brought in to examine the red North Face holdall Mr Williams was found in, concluded he could not have locked it.

The zip was held shut by a common travel-style Yale padlock through holes in two zip fasteners.

Tests found the temperature inside the bag would have risen to 30C within three minutes.

An expert on survivability in confined spaces from the National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA) said he would have suffocated in 30 minutes.

Mrs Sebire said Mr Williams probably died in the early hours of August 16, one week before he was found.

She said there was no sign of injury, apart from bruising to his elbows, which might have taken place some time before his death.

Police also released two e-fits of a couple who said they were visiting Mr Williams's Alderney Street home in late June or July.

The casually-dressed Mediterranean couple, in their twenties, were buzzed through the communal entrance by another resident.

They suggested they had been given a key by "Pierre Palo" and were on their way to flat four.

Mr Williams, of Anglesey, North Wales, was last seen alive on August 15, eight days before he was found dead in the £400,000 property.

Speaking about his private life, Mrs Sebire said a collection of six boxes of unworn designer clothing were found in a wardrobe.

She said items by Stella McCartney, Christopher Kane, and Louboutin had been bought at London boutiques and online.

The senior detective said the clothing was in various sizes, all small, and a number of women's wigs were also found.

Mrs Sebire said Mr Williams attended two fashion design courses at Central St Martins College, in Clerkenwell, in 2009 and 2010.

She revealed that GCHQ did not know Mr Williams had undertaken the courses or that he had an interest in fashion.

The detectives said it was possible the clothing was linked to the diploma courses for beginners, which Mr Williams had passed.

They were evening or weekend classes which lasted between six and eight weeks.

None of the clothing had been worn or hung up. Buttons were done up and items were still wrapped in paper.

Mrs Sebire said analysis of Mr Williams's phones and laptops revealed he visited no more than five bondage websites.

They included hogtie.com, boundanna.com, artofconstriction.com and bikeRA.com.

The detective said there was evidence that Mr Williams viewed the sites occasionally from the end of last year onwards.

But she added there was no evidence that he was "obsessed" with bondage and no other pornography was found.

Mrs Sebire also said no bondage paraphernalia or equipment was found in the flat.

Describing his online bondage habits, she said Mr Williams spent between 30 minutes and an hour on the sites.

Mrs Sebire said: "It was very limited sections of time. It is not like continual browsing. It was not every evening or weekend."

She added: "The sites primarily feature women and there are guides on how to do certain things."

He last visited an online bondage website in July.

Mrs Sebire said that despite the women's clothing, possible visit to the gay bar and drag act tickets, police do not know for certain that Mr Williams was gay.

She said: "We do not have any evidence to suggest that he was gay. We have not spoken to any past or present sexual partner, whether male or female.

"We know he was intensely private, and however difficult this might be for someone who has any interaction with Gareth, it would really help us if they came forward so we know if that side of his life had any relevance to his death."

Speaking about how Mr Williams ended up in the bag, Mrs Sebire said an expert found it is "quite easy" to fit someone inside.

She said: "If he was alive, he got into it voluntarily or, if not, he was unconscious and placed in the bag."

Speaking about the flat, she added: "There is forensic evidence that indicates the presence of other people that we have not been able to eliminate yet."

Mrs Sebire said there was no evidence Mr Williams was suicidal and he had recently returned from a fly-drive holiday to America's west coast.

Police said there were no signs of forced entry or a struggle at the top-floor flat, which was rented through a letting agency.

None of his possessions were laid out in a "ritualistic" manner, contrary to some reports.

Mr Williams had a laptop and four mobile phones, including at least one pay-as-you go handset.

The death remains suspicious and unexplained and no conclusive cause of death has been found.

An inquest will be held at Westminster Coroner's Court on February 15.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/8219128/MI6-spy-found-dead-in-bag-Gareth-Williams-visited-bondage-websites-drag-cabaret-and-gay-bars.html

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« Reply #2292 on: Dec 22nd, 2010, 08:41am »

Nothing wrong with bondage.
Whatever floats your boat I guess.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2293 on: Dec 22nd, 2010, 08:41am »

Wired

Dec. 22, 1882: Looking at Christmas in a New Light
By Tony Long
December 22, 2009 | 12:00 am
Categories: 19th century, Culture, Inventions


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The 2009 White House Christmas tree in the Blue Room is adorned with LED lights.
J. Scott Applewhite/AP



1882: An inventive New Yorker finds a brilliant application for electric lights and becomes the first person to use them as Christmas tree decorations.

Edward H. Johnson, who toiled for Thomas Edison’s Illumination Company and later became a company vice president, used 80 small red, white and blue electric bulbs, strung together along a single power cord, to light the Christmas tree in his New York home. Some sources credit Edison himself with being the first to use electric lights as Christmas decorations, when he strung them around his laboratory in 1880.

Sticking them on the tree was Johnson’s idea, though. It was a mere three years after Edison had demonstrated that light bulbs were practical at all.

The idea of replacing the Christmas tree’s traditional wax candles — which had been around since the mid-17th century — with electric lights didn’t, umm, catch fire right away. Although the stringed lights enjoyed a vogue with the wealthy and were being mass-produced as early as 1890, they didn’t become popular in humbler homes until a couple of decades into the 20th century.

A general distrust of using electricity for indoor lighting, still widespread in the late 19th century, kept the popularity of Christmas lights low. They were most commonly seen ringing the seasonal display windows of big-city department stores.

In 1895, President Grover Cleveland (a New York stater himself) supposedly ordered the family’s White House tree festooned with multicolored electric lights. If he did, it barely moved the needle on the popularity scale. Even so, General Electric began selling Christmas-light kits in 1903.

Another New Yorker is generally credited with popularizing indoor electric Christmas lights. According to the story, Albert Sadacca, whose family sold ornamental novelties, became a believer in 1917 after reading the account of a bad fire caused by a candlelit tree bursting into flames.

Whether or not that’s the reason, Sadacca began selling colored Christmas lights through the family business. By then, the public’s distrust of electricity had diminished. So the timing was right, and sales took off.

With his brothers, Sadacca later started a company devoted solely to the manufacture of electric Christmas lights. He succeeded in roping a few competitors into a trade association, which proceeded to dominate the Christmas-light industry into the 1960s.

http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2009/12/1222johnson-creates-christmas-lights

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2294 on: Dec 22nd, 2010, 08:45am »

on Dec 22nd, 2010, 08:41am, CA519705950 wrote:
Nothing wrong with bondage.
Whatever floats your boat I guess.


Good morning CA5 cheesy and Merry Christmas to you!

No nothing wrong with bondage as long as you are both consenting adults. I wouldn't care for it.

Strange story. The poor guy was young too.

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