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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 110969 times)
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« Reply #2310 on: Dec 22nd, 2010, 8:13pm »



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Raw Story

Top US spy hadn’t heard of London terror arrests

By Agence France-Presse
Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010 -- 7:10 pm


WASHINGTON — The White House mounted a firm defense of America's top spy on Wednesday after he admitted on television he did not know about a purported terrorism plot foiled by Britain.

US Director of National Intelligence James Clapper was asked about the alleged plot, with ABC News's Diane Sawyer posing the questions: "First of all, London. How serious is it? Any implication that it was coming here?"

After a long pause, Clapper replied, "London?" and admitted he had not heard about the arrests of 12 men accused of planning an Al-Qaeda-inspired attack.

President Barack Obama's top counter-terrorism advisor John Brennan said Clapper was the "consummate" DNI and had been focused on a sheaf of classified issues, including current tensions on the Korean peninsula.

Brennan added, however, that Clapper should have been briefed by his staff on the arrests and said steps had been taken to make sure it would not happen again.

"I'm glad that Jim Clapper is not sitting in front of the TV 24 hours a day and monitoring what's coming out of the media," Brennan told reporters.

"What he is doing is focusing on those intelligence issues that the president expects him to focus on and to make sure that we don't have conflict in different parts of the world. He continues to focus on those."

After his appearance, Clapper's office issued a statement saying that the DNI's knowledge of "threat streams in Europe is profound and multi-dimensional, and any suggestion otherwise is inaccurate."

Clapper is tasked with giving Obama daily briefings on timely intelligence assessments.

Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron discussed the arrests by telephone on Tuesday.

The detention of the 12 men, aged between 17 and 28, came amid heightened tensions following last week's Stockholm suicide bombing, which was carried out by a man who lived and was allegedly radicalized in Britain.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2010/12/top-spy-london-terror-arrests/

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« Reply #2311 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 07:48am »

New York Times

December 23, 2010
Parcel Bomb Explodes at Swiss Embassy in Rome
By RACHEL DONADIO and J. DAVID GOODMAN

ROME — A parcel bomb exploded in the Swiss Embassy here on Thursday, seriously injuring a diplomatic employee, the police and embassy officials said. The attack, which the Italian foreign minister called a “deplorable act of violence,” rattled a city already on edge after violent student protests last week and ongoing security alerts across Europe this month.

The embassy said in a statement that a package containing a hidden explosive device detonated around noon when an embassy employee opened it, causing injuries to both of his hands. Those injuries appeared serious, said a spokesman for the Carabinieri, Italy’s paramilitary police. The employee was taken to a local hospital.

Foreign Minister Franco Frattini of Italy quickly condemned what he called a “deplorable act of violence” and wished the employee a speedy recovery.

Italian news media said the employee was a 53-year-old Swiss man. Counterterrorism officials have opened up an investigation into the explosion, Italy’s ANSA news agency reported.

It was not immediately clear who had sent the package or why the embassy had been the target. The embassy said that no one had claimed responsibility for the bomb.

After the explosion, bomb disposal experts checked the embassy, located in the leafy Rome neighborhood of Parioli, but the building was not evacuated, Reuters reported. “The ambassador is still on site,” Maurizio Mezzavilla, a police spokesman, told reporters at the scene.

The parcel explosion comes two days after Rome police discovered a defective explosive device under a subway seat. That package — containing tubes, wiring and a small amount of explosive powder — “was too rudimentary” to work, the police said.

Europe remains in the grip of heightened terror alerts after a botched suicide attack in Sweden by a British resident, terrorism arrests in Britain, Spain and France, and alarms in Germany.

In October, the State Department cautioned American citizens about traveling to Europe, warning of a possible attack.


Rachel Donadio reported from Rome and J. David Goodman from New York.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/24/world/europe/24italy.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #2312 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 07:51am »

New York Times

December 23, 2010
North Korea Resumes War Threats
By KEVIN DREW

HONG KONG — North Korea broke dramatically on Thursday from its restraint this week during military exercises held by the South, saying it was prepared to use its nuclear weapons if it is attacked.

The North is “fully prepared to launch a sacred war,” Minister of the People’s Armed Forces Kim Young-chun said in comments carried by the North’s official Korean Central News Agency and quoted by Western media. North Korea’s comments are typically bellicose, but have been low-key this week as South Korea staged multiple military exercises across its territory.

On Monday the South staged live-fire artillery drills on Yeonpyeong Island, which was shelled by the North’s artillery on Nov. 23. Four South Koreans were killed. North Korea claims the waters around Yeonpyeong and disputes the maritime border known as the Northern Limit Line. After the drills, the North’s official news agency said it was “not worth reacting” to the exercise. The restraint from the North left analysts puzzling over Pyongyang’s motivations.

South Korea followed those drills with three days of naval exercises. On Thursday, the South held large-scale military exercises between its capital, Seoul, and the border with the North.

South Korean President Lee Myung-bak on Thursday vowed a quick counterattack if its territory is attacked again.

“I thought patience would bring peace to this land,” Mr. Lee was quoted by the Yonhap news service during a visit to a front-line army unit in Yanggu, Gangwon Province.

The outburst from North Korea followed comments by Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico warning that continued military exercises by the South threatened to ignite violence between the two Koreas. Mr. Richardson, a former ambassador to the United Nations, returned to the United States earlier this week after spending five days in North Korea as an unofficial envoy to discuss the North’s nuclear program.

In an interview with The Associated Press, Mr. Richardson said the large-scale military drills by South Korea were another test for the North.

“The situation is still a tinderbox. There’s still enormous tension, enormous mistrust and I believe diplomacy is what is needed to get us out of this tinderbox,” Mr. Richardson told The A.P. He called the situation “the worst I have ever seen on the peninsula.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/24/world/asia/24korea.html?ref=world

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« Reply #2313 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 07:54am »

Telegraph

New Zealand releases UFO files

The New Zealand military have released hundreds of previously classified reports detailing claims of UFO sightings and alien encounters.

10:37AM GMT
23 Dec 2010

The reports, dating from 1954 to 2009, were released under freedom of information laws after the New Zealand Defence Force removed names and other identifying material.

In about 2,000 pages of documents, members of the public, military personnel and commercial pilots outline close encounters, mostly involving moving lights in the sky.

Some of the accounts include drawings of flying saucers, descriptions of aliens wearing "pharaoh masks" and alleged examples of extraterrestrial writing.

One of the most comprehensive files concerns two sightings of strange lights off the South Island town of Kaikoura in 1978, one of which was captured by a television crew aboard a plane in the area.

The incident made international headlines at the time but a contemporary Air Force report found it could be explained by natural phenomena such as lights from boats being reflected off clouds or an unusual view of the planet Venus.

Video after the jump
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/ufo/8221227/New-Zealand-releases-UFO-files.html

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« Reply #2314 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 08:01am »

Wired

Pentagon Wants to Give Troops Terminator Vision
By Spencer Ackerman
December 22, 2010 | 1:35 pm
Categories: DarpaWatch


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Photo: Noah Shachtman


No more will soldiers’ vision be limited to the socket-embedded spheres that God intended. The Pentagon now wants troops to see dangers lurking behind them in real time, and be able to tell if an object a kilometer away is a walking stick or an AK-47.

In a solicitation released today, Darpa, the Pentagon’s far-out research branch, unveiled the Soldier Centric Imaging via Computational Cameras effort, or SCENICC. Imagine a suite of cameras that digitally capture a kilometer-wide, 360-degree sphere, representing the image in 3-D (!) onto a wearable eyepiece.

You’d be able to literally see all around you, including behind yourself, and zooming in at will, creating a “stereoscopic/binocular system, simultaneously providing 10x zoom to both eyes.” And you would do this all hands-free, apparently by barking out or pre-programming a command (the solicitation leaves it up to a designer’s imagination) to adjust focus.

Then comes the Terminator-vision. Darpa wants the eyepiece to include “high-resolution computer-enhanced imagery as well as task-specific non-image data products such as mission data overlays, threat warnings/alerts, targeting assistance, etc.” Target identified: Sarah Connor… The “Full Sphere Awareness” tool will provide soldiers with “muzzle flash detection,” “projectile tracking” and “object recognition/labeling,” basically pointing key information out to them.

And an “integrated weapon sighting” function locks your gun on your target when acquired. That’s far beyond an app mounted on your rifle that keeps track of where your friendlies and enemies are.

The imaging wouldn’t just be limited to what any individual soldier sees. SCENICC envisions a “networked optical sensing capability” that fuses images taken from nodes worn by “collections of soldiers and/or unmanned vehicles.” The Warrior-Alpha drone overhead? Its full-motion video and still images would be sent into your eyepiece.

It also has to be ridiculously lightweight, weighing less than 700 grams for the entire system — including a battery powerful enough to “exceed 24 hours [usage] under normal conditions.” That’s about a pound and a half, maximum. The Army’s experimental ensemble of wearable gadgets weighs about eight pounds. And it is to SCENICC what your Roomba is to the T-1000.

Here’s how far advanced SCENICC is compared to bleeding-edge imaging and networking capabilities that the Army is currently developing. Right now, the Army’s asking three different companies — Raytheon, Rockwell Collins and General Dynamics — to build a wearable platform of digital maps, computers and radios, networked with one another. Soldiers would have warzone maps beamed onto helmet-mounted eyepieces.

The system, known as Nett Warrior, needs to weigh less than eight pounds, and it builds on a years-long and ultimately fruitless effort called Land Warrior. (One of the problems with Land Warrior is it was heavy and cumbersome, owing in part to battery weight.) The Army hopes to choose one of the Nett Warrior designs by March.

By the time it’ll actually roll out Nett Warrior after testing, production and deployment — a few years, optimistically — SCENICC will already be hard at work on its replacement. Darpa wants a hands-free zooming function within two years of work on the contract. By year three, the computer-enhanced vision tool needs to be ready. Year four is for 360-degree vision. Then it’s on to development.

The Army is generally hot for combat-ready smartphones to keep soldiers linked up with each other. And the buzz-generating tool for the soldier of the near future is mapping technology, delivered onto a smartphone or some other handheld mobile device, at least judging from this year’s Association of the U.S. Army confab.

But all of these representation tools are two-dimensional, and require soldiers to look away from their patrols in order to use them. Textron’s SoldierEyes Common Operating Picture, for instance, lets soldiers see icons on a tablet-mounted map telling them where their friends, enemies and neutrals are. It can’t put those icons onto a 3-D picture sent to a soldier’s eyes, let alone allow a 10x zoom for a kilo-wide 360-degree field of vision. Why would anyone use a map on a smartphone when they could have SCENICC?

Even with all the advances in digital imaging, it’ll be a tall order to put together 360-degree vision and 10x zoom and mapping software and integration with weapons systems and lightweight miniaturization and network connectivity.

Darpa doesn’t really address how the system’s networked optics would work in low-bandwidth areas like, say, eastern Afghanistan (though maybe drone-borne cell towers can help).

Indeed, judging from the solicitation, while SCENICC is supposed to be networked, it doesn’t seem to have any communications requirements for soldiers to talk through what their optics are sharing with each other. Maybe there’s a role for those new soldier smartphones after all.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/12/pentagon-wants-to-give-troops-terminator-vision/

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« Reply #2315 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 08:04am »

Reuters

ROME | Thu Dec 23, 2010 8:52am EST

(Reuters) - An explosion occurred at the Chilean embassy in Rome, police said on Thursday. There were no further details.

The explosion occurred hours after a package exploded at the Swiss embassy in Rome, injuring one person seriously.

(Reporting by Roberto Landucci)

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6BM1DP20101223

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« Reply #2316 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 08:06am »

LA Times

Orange County, Inland Empire bore brunt of storms

The worst effects did not occur where they had been expected: down slope from Los Angeles County burn areas.

By Louis Sahagun and Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
December 23, 2010

In the run-up to what became one of the worst storm systems to hit Southern California in five years, all the concern was focused on the Los Angeles foothill communities scarred by the Station fire.

But when the wildest weather arrived Wednesday, the worst-hit areas were not La Cañada Flintridge or La Crescenta in the San Gabriel Mountains.

Instead, by the luck of the draw, the heart of the storm plunged straight into Orange County and the Inland Empire, giving those areas a soaking that residents said was the worst in recent memory.

The storms were one of the most powerful systems to strike Southern California since the memorable El Niño storms of the winter of 2004-05. And they seemingly embarrassed weather forecasters and climatologists who had earlier predicted that because of La Niña, this winter would be drier than average.

Laguna Beach was doused with 4.29 inches of rain in just 24 hours — nearly half of what the city has received all week. A storm drain channel that normally diverts excess water underneath downtown and into the ocean surged over its barriers, bursting onto Beach Street, pulling down a chain-link fence and sending water spraying up to 15 feet in the air.

The storms reduced Laguna Gardens Nursery to a field of broken pottery, strewn bricks and toppled stonework, pushing over statues of Buddha weighing several hundred pounds.

"There have been three floods here since 1981, but this one was by far the most violent .... Everything's gone," said Kevin Naughton, 57.

"There are rivers coming through town," said Jeff Grubert, 48, an entertainment distribution company manager who has an office in Laguna Beach.

At sunrise, heavy, knee-high muck caked downtown streets, miring cars up to their doors. High tides collided with rivers of water gushing down Broadway and Pacific Coast Highway, wiping out much of the main beach downtown and washing away the sand beneath the popular boardwalk.

The floors of many of the restaurants, rug galleries, bars and clothing boutiques were covered in water, with mounds of sand piled up on their doorsteps.

"This is not good," said Kelly Boyd, a Laguna Beach city councilman and owner of the popular local watering hole the Marine Room. Its wood floors were soaked and buckling. "We cannot get flood insurance in town because it is on a flood plain."

The flotsam on one stretch of downtown sidewalks included patio furniture, CDs and uprooted vegetation.

What was Orange County's misfortune offered L.A. County a reprieve. L.A. County officials had feared a repeat of the Feb. 6 floods, when a slow-moving storm cell parked itself near La Cañada Flintridge, unleashing a torrent that tossed a huge boulder into a storm drain, clogging it and then pushing muddy rapids into 40 homes.

But on Wednesday, debris basins remained 70% to 75% empty, said Bob Spencer, spokesman for the county Department of Public Works.

"There wasn't a lot of material that came down the hills this time around," he said.

At first glance, the result was somewhat surprising because La Cañada Flintridge received more rainfall over the last seven days than the region did before the Feb. 6 storms, said Bill Patzert, climatologist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

But there were key differences. For one thing, much of the loose debris had already washed away, Patzert said. And before the Feb. 6 floods, county crews were still struggling to clear debris basins of the products of previous storms.

Spencer cautioned that the lack of disaster this time should not encourage residents who ignored evacuation orders issued Tuesday night. Because topsoil has eroded from the slopes since the fires, more boulders are now exposed and are even more likely to tumble.

"We really, really dodged a bullet," said meteorologist Jamie Meier of the National Weather Service.

The weather service said 8.35 inches of rain had fallen on downtown L.A. so far this December, making it possible that this month will break the record for the second-wettest December — 8.77 inches during the El Niño storms of December 2004. But it is unlikely to break the all-time record of December rains, when more than 15 inches fell in December 1889.

Normal December rainfall for downtown L.A. is 1.9 inches.

The heavy rainfall has raised questions about whether this year really will be drier than average. Perhaps not surprisingly, Meier said climatologists are now predicting "equal chances of a drier or wetter than normal year."

"Who would have ever thought that we would be reaching the second-wettest December during a La Niña year?" she said.

Unlike El Niño years, which result from a warming of the tropical Pacific Ocean and can cause heavier rainfall here, a La Niña event is caused by a cooling of the same waters and usually brings less rainfall.

Patzert said that since 1949, there have been 22 La Niña events; 18 of those years brought below-average rainfall to the region.

A reprieve from the rain is expected to last through early Christmas Day. A new but far weaker storm was expected to land Saturday night and last into Sunday.


http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-1223-rain-storms-20101223,0,7411236.story

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« Reply #2317 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 08:43am »

It started last Christmas, when Bennett and Vivian Levin were overwhelmed by sadness while listening to radio reports of injured American troops. "We have to let them know we care," Vivian told Bennett. So they organized a trip to bring soldiers from Walter Reed Army Medical Center and Bethesda Naval Hospital to the annual Army-Navy football game in Philly, on Dec. 3.

The cool part is, they created their own train line to do it. Yes, there are people in this country who actually own real trains. Bennett Levin - native Philly guy, self-made millionaire and irascible former L&I commish - is one of them.

He has three luxury rail cars. Think mahogany paneling, plush seating and white-linen dining areas. He also has two locomotives, which he stores at his Juniata Park train yard. One car, the elegant Pennsylvania , carried John F. Kennedy to the Army-Navy game in 1961 and '62. Later, it carried his brother Bobby's body to D. C. for burial. "That's a lot of history for one car," says Bennett.

He and Vivian wanted to revive a tradition that endured from 1936 to 1975, during which trains carried Army-Navy spectators from around the country directly to the stadium where the annual game is played. The Levins could think of no better passengers to reinstate the ceremonial ride than the wounded men and women recovering at Walter Reed in D. C. and Bethesda , in Maryland . "We wanted to give them a first-class experience," says Bennett. "Gourmet meals on board, private transportation from the train to the stadium, perfect seats - real hero treatment."

Through the Army War College Foundation, of which he is a trustee, Bennett met with Walter Reed's commanding general, who loved the idea. But Bennett had some ground rules first, all designed to keep the focus on the troops alone:

No press on the trip, lest the soldiers' day of pampering devolve into a media circus.

No politicians either, because, says Bennett, "I didn't want some idiot making this trip into a campaign photo op"

And no Pentagon suits on board, otherwise the soldiers would be too busy saluting superiors to relax.

The general agreed to the conditions, and Bennett realized he had a problem on his hands. "I had to actually make this thing happen," he laughs.

Over the next months, he recruited owners of 15 other sumptuous rail cars from around the country - these people tend to know each other - into lending their vehicles for the day. The name of their temporary train? The Liberty Limited.

Amtrak volunteered to transport the cars to D. C. - where they'd be coupled together for the round-trip ride to Philly - then back to their owners later.

Conrail offered to service the Liberty while it was in Philly. And SEPTA drivers would bus the disabled soldiers 200 yards from the train to Lincoln Financial Field, for the game.

A benefactor from the War College ponied up 100 seats to the game - on the 50-yard line - and lunch in a hospitality suite.

And corporate donors filled, for free and without asking for publicity, goodie bags for attendees:

From Woolrich, stadium blankets. From Wal-Mart, digital cameras. From Nikon, field glasses. From GEAR, down jackets.

There was booty not just for the soldiers, but for their guests, too, since each was allowed to bring a friend or family member.

The Marines, though, declined the offer. "They voted not to take guests with them, so they could take more Marines," says Levin, choking up at the memory.

Bennett's an emotional guy, so he was worried about how he'd react to meeting the 88 troops and guests at D. C.'s Union Station, where the trip originated. Some GIs were missing limbs. Others were wheelchair-bound or accompanied by medical personnel for the day. "They made it easy to be with them," he says. "They were all smiles on the ride to Philly. Not an ounce of self-pity from any of them. They're so full of life and determination."

At the stadium, the troops reveled in the game, recalls Bennett. Not even Army's lopsided loss to Navy could deflate the group's rollicking mood.

Afterward, it was back to the train and yet another gourmet meal - heroes get hungry, says Levin - before returning to Walter Reed and Bethesda . "The day was spectacular," says Levin. "It was all about these kids. It was awesome to be part of it."

The most poignant moment for the Levins was when 11 Marines hugged them goodbye, then sang them the Marine Hymn on the platform at Union Station.

"One of the guys was blind, but he said, 'I can't see you, but man, you must be f---ing beautiful!' " says Bennett. "I got a lump so big in my throat, I couldn't even answer him."

It's been three weeks, but the Levins and their guests are still feeling the day's love. "My Christmas came early," says Levin, who is Jewish and who loves the Christmas season. "I can't describe the feeling in the air." Maybe it was hope.

As one guest wrote in a thank-you note to Bennett and Vivian, "The fond memories generated last Saturday will sustain us all - whatever the future may bring."

God bless the Levins.

And bless the troops, every one.
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« Reply #2318 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 11:59am »

"God bless the Levins.

And bless the troops, every one."

Amen.

Thank you Swamp for that. It makes your heart feel a little better knowing there are good people out there giving a wee bit back. And in the above case they sure did it in style! God bless them!

I have a new soldier, she's at TF Slugger, FOB Airborne, which I translate into "she's in the line of fire". Please put her in your prayers.

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« Reply #2319 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 12:31pm »

Yea! I found an article on my soldiers' FOB. cheesy

Leesville Daily Leader

Route-clearance soldiers help to keep Afghan roads safe, build relationships
Leesville Daily Leader
Posted Dec 08, 2010 @ 11:00 AM


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WARDAK PROVINCE, Afghanistan - U.S. Army Pfc. Matthew Morris, a cavalry scout
from Orlando, Fla., assigned to 3rd Squadron, 89th Cavalry Regiment's Task Force Slugger,
provides security during a route-reconnaissance mission in the Maiden Shahr District of Wardak Province Nov. 18.



Afghanistan — For Afghan civilians, Afghan National Security Forces and International Security Assistance Force personnel traveling throughout Afghanistan, clearing routes of improvised explosive devices is necessary to keep everyone safe and alive.

Soldiers assigned to Task Force Slugger's "Apache" Troop, 3rd Squadron, 89th Cavalry Regiment, conducted route clearance and route reconnaissance in the Maiden Shahr and Nerkh districts of Wardak Province Nov. 18.

Nothing was unique about that day's mission; these soldiers clear Afghan roads of insurgent-emplaced IEDs day in and day out.

"(For) overall mission success, I believe route clearance is very important. If we weren't out there doing it every day, there would obviously be more IED attacks," said U.S. Army Pfc. Matthew Morris, a cavalry scout from Orlando, Fla., assigned to Apache Troop. "(Insurgents) would see that we are not out there checking that stuff, so they could hit us anytime. It keeps us soldiers safe, keeps our convoys safe and we get our job done. It's extremely necessary."

During the mission, Apache soldiers searched the routes for suspicious items that might be cause for concern. The soldiers, who spend hours in full combat gear while looking for anything suspicious, are ready and confident in their abilities.

The searching could take countless hours without traveling much distance. U.S. Army Spc. Jeffrey Bryant, a cavalry scout from Phoenix
assigned to TF Slugger's Troop A, said he understands that taking more time means missions are more successful.
"(Soldiers performing route clearance) are definitely trying to take their time," Bryant said. "They have to be careful because they don't
want any casualties, (and) they want to make sure the entire route is clear."

On Troop A's Nov. 18 route-clearing mission, the cavalry soldiers escorted an engineer who conducted a quality assurance-quality control
mission, checking culverts for damage and proper craftsmanship. The engineer said damage to culverts along Afghan roads mostly results from substandard work or insurgents' attempts to emplace IEDs in them.
"(We check) to ensure our troops can still pass on that road," Bryant said. "If the culvert is about to give way, you're not going to drive
down that road."

In addition to clearing routes and escorting engineers, TF Slugger soldiers interact with Afghan villagers along their routes. Nearing the
end of their mission Nov. 18, the soldiers passed through a village and made headway in relationship building with villagers who live around
Forward Operating Base Airborne.

"Something that inspired me yesterday is a lot of the kids came up and talked to us," said Capt. Jason Gilchrist of Dallas, Troop A commander. "A lot of them are asking for pens and paper and stuff like that. We do have opportunities to help aid in schools.
"When the kids come up and talk to us like that, it is a positive. It shows that we are not a negative influence," Gilchrist said. "We still
have to (change) a lot of minds (about why we are here), but I think we are getting there."

Along with making an impression on the children, the soldiers spoke with leaders in the village. When questioned about the Provincial Development Fund, the elder told Gilchrist he was not involved but would like to be.
"That gives me an opportunity, because he's close to the Maiden Shahr district; and I can make sure he's pulled into the PDF process, which
ultimately brings him into the (Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan)," Gilchrist explained. "Interaction with all people is
important. Elders are really important, because we see it is where he goes, the village goes."

At the end of the mission, the soldiers got in their vehicles and returned to FOB Airborne. With another mission in the books, Apache
Troop soldiers could rest easier knowing they performed their jobs well and civilians and military personnel alike can travel safely with less
fear of being hurt.

"I'm really proud of our guys..." Gilchrist said.

http://www.leesvilledailyleader.com/lifestyle/x1499819754/Route-clearance-soldiers-help-to-keep-Afghan-roads-safe-build-relationships

Crystal

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« Reply #2320 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 2:19pm »

The same guy did one this year:

http://gawker.com/5717079/watch-a-tv-weathermans-insane-christmas-human-tuba

~

December 2008



Crystal
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Swamprat
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2321 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 2:32pm »

3d Bn. /5th Marines, Afghanistan

May they rest in peace:

Everyone should say a prayer for “Darkhorse" 3rd Battalion 5th Marines and their families.

They are fighting it out in Afghanistan & they have lost 9 marines in 4 days.

Semper Fi, God Bless America and God Bless the United States Marine Corps...

Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever.

Justin Allen, 23,

Brett Linley, 29,

Matthew Weikert, 29,

Justus Bartett, 27,

Dave Santos, 21,

Chase Stanley, 21,

Jesse Reed, 26,

Matthew Johnson, 21,

Zachary Fisher, 24,

Brandon King, 23,

Christopher Goeke, 23,

Sheldon Tate, 27,


All are Marines that gave their lives for YOU recently.

Honor THEM this Christmas season.

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WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2322 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 3:19pm »

r.i.p.

And they are so young, it really breaks your heart. I wish we would bring our troops home to their families. God bless and comfort the families that have lost a loved one. Thank you Swamp.
Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2323 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 6:19pm »

cheesy




Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2324 on: Dec 23rd, 2010, 6:39pm »






Crystal
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