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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 25552 times)
philliman
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2445 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 12:37pm »

on Jan 3rd, 2011, 08:55am, Luvey wrote:
Good morning Crystal smiley



This is true, and 7 of the worlds deadliest snakes live in Queensland. But they don't only have snakes to worry about they have crocodiles too. The area of the flooding is bigger than France and Germany put together. Its huge...! And to add to their worries they also have looters.... sad

Luvey

Yes, very tragic. My thoughts are with these people. undecided

Thought I put this in here rather than in GForce's thread wink:

on Dec 29th, 2010, 11:42am, CA519705950 wrote:
Prince is awesome.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2446 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 1:28pm »

on Jan 3rd, 2011, 09:12am, Luvey wrote:
Hi Crystal

I lived in Qld for 5 years and the snakes are dreadful there.... my poor cat got bitten by a brown snake and nearly died, my husband nearly got bitten by a brown snake while cleaning the pool, and he came inside shocked and sat down and saw another snake fall off the roof of the house. Another time he nearly got bitten by a King Brown in the garden. And I nearly got bitten by a Taipan in the garden shed, it was so close my whole life flashed before my eyes! When they have a plague of mice and frogs there the snakes multiply because there is plenty of food... Folks in Rockhampton would often wake to find crocodiles in their carports... and with the river flooded, they must be anywhere and everywhere. Very scary!
During floods the mud washes into homes and when the water finally recedes they are going to face a massive cleanup.
What an awful thing to have to face....

Luvey


Wow! Talk about living in the wild!
Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2447 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 1:29pm »

Hey Phil!
Crystal
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« Reply #2448 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 1:30pm »





http://www.latest-ufo-sightings.net/2011/01/new-ufo-video-of-multiple-unknown.html

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« Reply #2449 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 1:35pm »





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« Reply #2450 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 5:52pm »

Reuters

BEIJING
Mon Jan 3, 2011
2:54pm EST

BEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese scientists have made a breakthrough in spent fuel reprocessing technology that could potentially solve China's uranium supply problem, state television reported on Monday.

The technology, developed and tested at the No.404 Factory of China National Nuclear Corp in the Gobi desert in remote Gansu province, enables the re-use of irradiated fuel and is able to boost the usage rate of uranium materials at nuclear plants by 60 folds.

"With the new technology, China's existing detected uranium resources can be used for 3,000 years," Chinese Central Television reported.

China, as well as France, the United Kingdom and Russia, actively supports reprocessing as a means for the management of highly radioactive spent fuel and as a source of fissile material for future nuclear fuel supply.

But independent scientists argued that commercial application of nuclear fuel reprocessing has always been hindered by cost, technology, proliferation risk and safety challenges.

China has 171,400 tons of proven uranium resources spread mainly in eight provinces -- Jiangxi, Guangdong, Hunan, Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, Shaanxi, Liaoning and Yunnan.

China is planning a massive push into nuclear power in an effort to wean itself off coal, the dirtiest fossil fuel. It now has 12 working reactors with 10.15 gigawatt of total generating capacity.

China has set an official target of 40 gigawatts (GW) of installed nuclear generating capacity by 2020, but the government indicated it could double the goal to about 80 GW as faster expansion was one of the more feasible solutions for achieving emissions reduction goals.

As such, China will need to source more than 60 percent of the uranium needed for its nuclear power plants from overseas by 2020, even if the country moves forward with a modest nuclear expansion plan, Chinese researchers say.

(Reporting by Zhou Xin and Benjamin Kang Lim; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani)

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE7020DB20110103

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« Reply #2451 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 5:55pm »

Defense News

U.S. To Deploy New Intelligence Drone In Afghanistan
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Published: 2 Jan 2011 10:18

WASHINGTON - The U.S. military plans to deploy a new intelligence drone in Afghanistan, which military experts say will allow U.S. troops to monitor much larger operational theaters than before, The Washington Post reported Jan. 2.

The newspaper said the airborne surveillance system is called Gorgon Stare and will be able to transmit live video images of physical movement across an entire town.

In 2010, a total of 711 international troops were killed in Afghanistan, according to independent website iCasualties - the highest annual death toll since the war began in 2001.

The system consists of nine video cameras mounted on a remotely piloted aircraft, which can transmit up to 65 live images to soldiers on the ground or to analysts tracking enemy movements, the paper said.

By contrast, current Air Force drones today shoot video from a single camera over a narrow area the size of a building or two, The Post noted.

"Gorgon Stare will be looking at a whole city, so there will be no way for the adversary to know what we're looking at, and we can see everything," the paper quoted Maj. Gen. James Poss, the Air Force's assistant deputy chief of staff for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, as saying.

There are around 140,000 international troops fighting the Taliban-led insurgency in Afghanistan, around two-thirds of them from the United States.

http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=5358837&c=AME&s=AIR

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« Reply #2452 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 6:21pm »

Raw Story

Update: 100,000 dead fish join thousands of dead birds in Arkansas

By The Associated Press
Monday, January 3rd, 2011 -- 10:58 am

UPDATE II: As officials worked to figure out the cause of death of some 5,000 blackbirds that fell from the Arkansas sky this weekend, some 100 miles away another disaster was unfolding: The discovery of 100,000 dead drum fish in the Arkansas River.

According to news reports, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission found 20 miles of the river littered with dead fish on Thursday, and are conducting tests to determine what killed them.

Observers are wondering whether the two mass die-offs are related, given the timing, but so far officials have found no links between the two events. Fish experts suspect disease to be behind the fish deaths, because they are limited to one species.

Meanwhile, officials said Monday that fright likely killed the birds that began falling on the town of Beebe shortly before midnight on New Year's Eve.

A local resident reported hearing about 20 loud booms Saturday night -- which could have been fireworks or a cannon to get rid of nuisance birds -- and saw a huge flock of frantic birds when he went outside.

"He could hear the blackbirds fluttering around -- he could hear their wings and he could hear them hitting into things," state veterinarian George Badley told AFP.

Blackbirds have poor night vision and they were likely killed because they banged into houses, trees and each other in their fright.

However, the state is conducting further tests to make sure the birds were not poisoned or diseased, Badley said.

Update: Arkansas officials now estimate total bird die-off near 5,000

Environmental service workers finished picking up the carcasses on Sunday of about 2,000 red-winged blackbirds that fell dead from the sky in a central Arkansas town.

Mike Robertson, the mayor in Beebe, told The Associated Press the last dead bird was removed about 11 a.m. Sunday in the town about 40 miles northeast of Little Rock. He said 12 to 15 workers, hired by the city to do the cleanup, wore environmental-protection suits for the task.

The birds had fallen Friday night over a 1-mile area of Beebe, and an aerial survey indicated that no other dead birds were found outside of that area. The workers from U.S. Environmental Services started the cleanup Saturday.

Robertson said the workers wore the suits as a matter of routine and not out of fear that the birds might be contaminated. He said speculation on the cause is not focusing on disease or poisoning.

Several hundred thousand red-winged blackbirds have used a wooded area in the town as a roost for the past several years, he said. Robertson and other officials went to the roost area over the weekend and found no dead birds on the ground.

"That pretty much rules out an illness" or poisoning, the mayor said.

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission ornithologist Karen Rowe said Saturday the birds showed physical trauma, and speculated that "the flock could have been hit by lightning or high-altitude hail."

The commission said that New Year's Eve revelers shooting off fireworks could have startled the birds from their roost and caused them to die from stress.

Robby King, a wildlife officer for the commission, collected about 65 dead birds, which will be sent for testing to the state Livestock and Poultry Commission lab and the National Wildlife Health Center lab in Madison, Wis.

Rowe said similar events have occurred elsewhere and that test results "usually were inconclusive." She said she doubted the birds were poisoned.

Source: AP News

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/01/2000-dead-birds-fall-sky-arkansas/

Crystal

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« Reply #2453 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 6:32pm »

Wired

A Year in, Amnesty Deal Lures Only 3 Percent of Taliban
By Spencer Ackerman
January 3, 2011 | 10:36 am
Categories: Af/Pak


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The White House says the best chance to end the Afghanistan war is to compel low-ranking insurgents to lay down their guns, one at a time. But at the rate this so-called reintegration project is going, it could take as long as a decade to bring the fighters in from the cold.

Fewer than 800 insurgents have signed up in the year since Afghan president Hamid Karzai announced the plan. That’s less than 3 percent of an estimated 30,000 or so militants. And most of those fighters come from the calmer parts of the country, says British Maj. Gen. Phil Jones, the NATO official in charge of enticing low-ranking insurgents not to fight. Very few of them have actually finished a 90-day “demobilization” process — after which the hard work of keeping them out of the war begins.

The Afghan Peace and Reintegration Program is straightforward: Insurgents volunteer to stop fighting in exchange for amnesty, something that U.S. military leaders have championed for years. The hope is to mimic the “Anbar Awakening” in Iraq that saw thousands of former insurgents switch to the government’s side. But that effort is now showing decidedly mixed results, four years later. Previous reintegration efforts in Afghanistan over the past decade have failed.

“This program has got risks all over the place,” Jones concedes in an interview with Danger Room. “We’ll only judge success over time if the vast bulk of fighters don’t go back to the fight.”

Of the 800 fighters who’ve signed up for the program, most aren’t hardcore Taliban, Jones says, but “low-level community-defense forces.” They’re from the north and west, far from the Taliban’s southern and eastern strongholds. (Although the north is getting increasingly dangerous.) And they don’t particularly trust the government to make good on its pledges.

Most credible observers believe that there’s no purely military solution to the Afghanistan conflict. Instead, the war will end with a series of political deals. In theory, there should be two tracks to these political efforts: bottom-up “reintegration” of foot soldiers and top-down “reconciliation” with the insurgent leaders.

But the Obama administration hasn’t shown much interest in negotiating a deal with the Taliban’s chiefs. None of Jones’ approximately 30 staffers work on reconciliation. The priority is peeling off insurgent foot soldiers with job offers or reconstruction projects.

After insurgents sign up, a 90-day “demobilization” process is supposed to build confidence between the Afghan government and the community vouching for the fighters that the ex-insurgents are serious about peace. They have to register their weapons with the government. Then comes years’ worth of jobs and rebuilding programs. Unless entire villages see community recovery as a peace dividend, Jones says, reintegration isn’t likely to take root.

To tell who qualifies for special government assistance, NATO helps the Afghan government register ex-insurgents’ iris scans and thumbprints, using the Handheld Interagency Identity Detection System, the mobile scanner that U.S. troops use to register detainees’ facial features and fingerprints.

But like other aspects of reintegration, the government’s effort at compiling biometric databases — like issuing a national ID card — moves slowly.

“The aspiration was always at the start that by now, the government national ID-card process would be up and running,” says Jones, “but the simple fact of the matter is that putting together the mechanics and the politics of the national ID card are somewhat problematic.”

And the Taliban are killing defectors. In the northern province of Baghlan, they assassinated a dozen reintegrating fighters within three weeks of the demobilization process beginning. “We’re seeing other communities and elders who are pro-peace attacked,” Jones says. “It matters very much to the Taliban.”

The program begins amidst a “huge deficit of trust,” Jones continues. After years of war, insurgents are just looking to see if the government can offer them “honor and dignity,” with protection from the Taliban being a minimal requirement. If that doesn’t happen, the government’s promises of jobs, education and rebuilding for areas that make peace with Karzai won’t mean anything. In part, that’s what hobbled previous efforts at reconciliation, like the Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups or the Peace Through Strength program.

All eyes will be on the first groups demobilized: “Is their honor intact? Does the community receive a peace dividend from this?”

That’ll be a major challenge. Karzai declared last January that reintegration and reconciliation were his 2010 priorities. But his government has had all kinds of problems getting its act together to support that promise. The reintegration program has only been up and running since August, and the High Peace Council, in charge of the effort, didn’t meet until October. Only 15 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces have reintegration committees in place. Kandahar, arguably the center of Petraeus’ war plan, isn’t one of them.

And that frustrates Afghans. They don’t necessarily understand why NATO distinguishes between “reconciliation” and “reintegration,” terms that Jones observes don’t easily translate into Dari and Pashto. They want a peace deal, and Jones has some sympathy.

His goal for reintegration is to “build up into something that pressures [Taliban] leadership, so more of the strategic reconciliation sparks off.” By the time he leaves Afghanistan in October, Jones wants to see reintegration “start to develop into a wider peace process.”

There’s an “absolutely inextricable link” between the war and that larger peace effort, Jones says. But he adds that it’ll be impossible to judge the reintegration program until the middle of the year, around when the first wave of U.S. troops are scheduled to withdraw. Unless Karzai steps up reintegration, insurgents won’t have any incentive but to fight till the bitter end.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/01/a-year-in-amnesty-deal-lures-only-3-percent-of-taliban/

Crystal


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« Reply #2454 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 9:13pm »

National Geographic Channel has an Explorer documentary called "Talibanistan" on tonight and it repeats on 10 January 2011.

Description from NatGeo website:

"For eight years the Taliban and Al-Qaeda have bogged down US and NATO troops in Afghanistan-all the while seizing territory and creating chaos in nuclear-armed Pakistan. In mid October, under pressure from the US, Pakistan announced that it would launch a military campaign designed to destroy the Taliban, The Taliban responded with a series of brazen attacks against the Pakistani Army, the police, and civilians, leaving the US in doubt over Pakistans ability to secure its nuclear weapons, and its own ability to fight the agile Taliban in Afghanistan. National Geographic Explorer was in Pakistan and Afghanistan during these explosive days documenting the fight on the ground and in the skies above this territory controlled by the Taliban, known as "Talibanistan." Explorer asks the question: who is winning this war and is this Obamas Vietnam or will he be the first to pacify Afghanistan?"

http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/explorer/4822/Overview#ixzz1A250NsMu

It's very interesting.
Crystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2455 on: Jan 3rd, 2011, 11:48pm »

The scariest part is that the flooding will take crocodiles further inland where they are not normally. shocked

There is no let up in sight for those poor souls...

My mind drifted to an old member here who hasn't posted in ages.... who lives in Rockhampton. (member - Diamond).... I hope he is OK.

Heavy rain to hit flood-drenched Qld

As parts of southeast and southwest Queensland either brace for flooding or begin the clean-up after already going through the ordeal, the Bureau of Meteorology is forecasting the worst possible news - more heavy rain.

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/8191795/heavy-rain-to-hit-flood-drenched-qld
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« Reply #2456 on: Jan 4th, 2011, 08:25am »

Oh no!! It's time to go BACK TO WORK!! cry
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« Reply #2457 on: Jan 4th, 2011, 08:35am »

on Jan 3rd, 2011, 11:48pm, Luvey wrote:
The scariest part is that the flooding will take crocodiles further inland where they are not normally. shocked

There is no let up in sight for those poor souls...

My mind drifted to an old member here who hasn't posted in ages.... who lives in Rockhampton. (member - Diamond).... I hope he is OK.

Heavy rain to hit flood-drenched Qld

As parts of southeast and southwest Queensland either brace for flooding or begin the clean-up after already going through the ordeal, the Bureau of Meteorology is forecasting the worst possible news - more heavy rain.

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/national/8191795/heavy-rain-to-hit-flood-drenched-qld


Good evening Luvey,
I saw one poor woman on the news. She was my age, about 56 or 57. Wiped out, everything she had was gone. It broke my heart. And now more rain.
Crystal
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« Reply #2458 on: Jan 4th, 2011, 08:35am »

on Jan 4th, 2011, 08:25am, Swamprat wrote:
Oh no!! It's time to go BACK TO WORK!! cry


You are a nut! Good morning Swamp! grin
Crystal
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« Reply #2459 on: Jan 4th, 2011, 08:38am »

New York Times

January 4, 2011
Floods Take Toll on Australia Economy
By AUBREY BELFORD

MELBOURNE, Australia — Churning floodwaters continued to rise across a vast swath of northeastern Australia on Tuesday as authorities worked to grapple with the multibillion dollar economic toll from record inundations that have killed at least nine people.

Rain predicted for Wednesday is expected to worsen flooding that has struck an area of the state of Queensland larger than France and Germany combined, said Jimmy Stuart, a senior hydrologist at the state branch of the Bureau of Meteorology. At least 200,000 people have been affected since heavy rains and floods struck in late December.

Queensland’s government is expected to hold an emergency cabinet meeting on Wednesday to come up with a strategy to deal with the cost of the disaster to the sprawling tropical state’s agricultural and mining sectors, said Kimberley Gardiner, a spokeswoman for the state premier, Anna Bligh. Prime Minister Julia Gillard has pledged assistance to flood victims.

“To be frank there aren’t many industries that haven’t been affected in Queensland,” Ms. Bligh’s spokeswoman said. State authorities and private aircraft had been carrying out air drops of feed to livestock stranded in flooded fields, she said.

Of particular concern is damage to fruit crops and cotton, which supply both the domestic and export market, and Queensland’s production of coking coal, which is used in the production of steel. Queensland produces just under half the world’s supply of the commodity.

Flooded mines and transport disruptions, which have left export stocks dwindling at the port of Gladstone, mean the coal industry could take months to recover, pushing up global prices, the spokeswoman said.

Helen Lau, an analyst for the Hong Kong offices of UOB-Kay Hian, said prices of Australian coking coal exports on Tuesday were at $230 a ton, and may peak at up to $270 a ton in the coming weeks. Australian exports of thermal coal, used for power plants, were at $130 a ton and could peak at $140 a ton, she said.

“The blue-sky scenario is prices and shipments will be affected for six weeks,” Ms. Lau said. “The worst case would be up to three months.”

The chief executive of the Queensland Resources Council, Michael Roche, said the damage bill from the floods to the state’s coal industry has already reached about $1 billion. About a dozen mines have been flooded while others are running at reduced capacity, he said.

“It’s going to be hard work to get that back into full production,” Mr. Roche told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. “Mines have a lot of water to deal with and so we’ll be talking to the Queensland government about some practical measures to safely get rid of excess water.”

Howard Au, chairman of Hong Kong-based Petrocom Energy Limited, was optimistic the impact on coal shipments from Australia would last for weeks, rather than months.

“If these floods happened in other developed countries, I would say it would take longer to return to normal production,” Mr. Au said.

Floodwaters have still not reached expected peaks in some areas, including the city of Rockhampton, where water more than 30 feet high in some places has cut off all but one road out of town and the military has been called in to help with supplies, Acting Queensland Police Assistant Commissioner Alistair Dawson said.

“This is a prolonged flooding event in Queensland and it is unlikely to recede in the very near future and we expect that once the peaks have been reached in and around a lot of these centers that the waters will remain high, that is about major flood levels, for some days after that event,” he said.

Authorities have warned residents against venturing into the muddy waters that have swamped farms and 22 towns and cities across the sparsely populated tropical state, warning against the risk of both raging currents and dangerous animals such as snakes and crocodiles.

Tony Higgins, the owner of the Fitzroy Hotel pub in Rockhampton, said he has stayed open serving beer and soft drinks despite floodwaters that have reached his front veranda and a lack of electricity since Sunday.

“I’ve had about four or five boats here most of the time. They come up to the veranda and off they get — police, journalists, that sort of thing,” Mr. Higgins said. Local residents were a “resilient mob” who had long anticipated the flood damage, he said.

Dozens of snakes had taken over the backyard beer garden of the hotel, Mr. Higgins said.

“I reckon the snakes are using it as a lap pool to get ready for the next stage of their journey,” he said. “You wouldn’t know what’s in the water, you really wouldn’t know. It’s a bad place to be.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/05/world/asia/05australia.html?_r=1&ref=world

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