Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
May 24th, 2017, 8:19pm


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 172 173 174 175 176  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 44937 times)
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 3731
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2595 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 08:59am »

User Image
COPYRIGHT 2011 UNIVERSAL UCLICK. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise without the written permission of Universal UClick.
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2596 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 09:05am »

"This Intergalactic incident will not go unreported!" grin
Thanks for that Swamp! And a good Sunday morning to you.
Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2597 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 09:17am »

New York Times

Tourists Mimic Polar Pioneers, Except With Planes and Blogs


User Image
Participants in a previous race sponsored by Extreme World Races.



January 15, 2011
By JENNIFER A. KINGSON

When the British explorer Robert Falcon Scott arrived at the South Pole only to find that he had been beaten there by Roald Amundsen and his team of Norwegians, he was despondent. “Great God! This is an awful place,” he lamented in his diary.

Awful as it may be, it is about to get a lot of foot traffic. Hundreds of people — tourists, adventurers and history buffs — are lining up to visit the South Pole in honor of the 100th anniversaries of Amundsen’s arrival (on Dec. 14, 1911) and Scott’s (Jan. 17, 1912). The preparations are already speeding along.

Some people intend to ski the exact routes of Amundsen and Scott, reading the explorers’ diaries daily and blogging about the experience. Others will drive to the pole by truck. For those seeking less exertion, there will be catered flights to the pole, including several that will let passengers off a few miles away so they can ski the remaining stretch and feel the thrill of victory.

One of the many tour operators trying to cash in on the fervor is Polar Explorers, a company in suburban Chicago that is charging $40,500 for a flight to the pole on either anniversary (weather permitting). People who want to be dropped off a degree or two away so they can ski in will pay up to $57,500.

“We’re going to have lots of Champagne toasts and take a lot of pictures, and you can call home to your loved ones from the pole,” said Annie Aggens of Polar Explorers. “It’s super exciting just to walk in the footsteps of these early explorers.”

Needless to say, people will not want to replicate Scott’s entire expedition. He and his men died in a blizzard during the 800-mile trek back from the pole, huddled in a tent that was, famously, just 11 miles from a vital cache of supplies.

Instead, many people plan to ski to the pole, then fly back. One of them is Matt Elliott, a 28-year-old Briton, who will compete in a 440-mile ski race, pulling 200 pounds of gear the whole way. A resident of Windsor, he works for his family’s paper wholesaling business and calls himself “a complete polar novice.”

He has never tried cross-country skiing, and he is not a big fan of cold weather, but he has been practicing by dragging two car tires on a rope for several hours at a time.

“I want to know how far, physically, I can go,” said Mr. Elliott, who is paying about $95,000 to enter the competition, sponsored by a London-based company called Extreme World Races. “It would be great to get there first and run the Union Jack at the South Pole before the Norwegians get there,” he said.

Davis Nelsen, who is 52 and runs a steel manufacturing company in Chicago, will have a less stressful trip. He plans to be on one of the Amundsen flights run by Polar Explorers, in honor of his Norwegian heritage. This will be his second polar adventure: in 2009, he flew to the North Pole to mark the centenary of Robert Peary’s expedition.

In polar travel, “you have to be prepared to be uncomfortable,” said Mr. Nelsen, who plans to ski the last 30 or so miles.

The crowds going to the South Pole are not expected to amount to more than a blip in overall tourism numbers to Antarctica, which peaked at 46,000 in the 2007-8 season and have dropped off because of the global recession. But because most people who visit Antarctica go by cruise ship and do not venture beyond the coast, a spike in tourism to the pole itself is expected.

The National Science Foundation, which runs the Amundsen-Scott research station at the South Pole, is not amused. It has a message for all these potential visitors: do not expect a warm welcome.

“Those people who do arrive, we don’t really have a process for them other than letting them know that they are at the pole, that this is a U.S. station, and we’re not able to provide them with any amenities,” said Peter West of the National Science Foundation’s Office of Polar Programs.

Yes, there is a small gift shop — make that, “commissary” — where people can buy T-shirts and the like, and visitors can drop off letters that will get a South Pole postmark. But the research station is “really not set up for tourism,” said Evan Bloom of the State Department. “We want other governments to get the word out that people should not simply show up at the South Pole.”

Most of the time, visitors will be spread across Antarctica. The biggest ski race, the one set up by Extreme World Races, will take place far away from the routes taken by Scott and Amundsen, approaching from the opposite side of the continent. Fifty-one competitors, in teams of three, will ski to the pole, said Tony Martin, founder of the company. Training for the race, which includes jumping into ice holes and learning to negotiate crevasses, will take place at a camp in Norway; space is still available.

“We don’t give cash prizes or cars,” said Mr. Martin, in an interview by satellite phone from Antarctica, where he was in a truck setting a course for the race. He described his clients as “just ordinary people” who wanted to “push themselves psychologically and physically.” Each will wear a GPS device, and airplanes will be on call in case someone needs to be evacuated.

Among other adventure travelers, Henry Worsley, a lieutenant colonel in the British Army, may have the best historical pedigree. He is distantly related to Frank Worsley, the captain of Ernest Shackleton’s ship, the Endurance. He is staging his own race to the pole in two teams of three men.

“The intention is to rerun the Scott-Amundsen race from the two start points,” he said. “I’m leading the Norwegian route up the Axel Heiberg glacier from the Bay of Whales, and a friend of mine is going to do the Scott route, which I did a few years ago.”

Some people are trying to play down the competitive angle and play up the historical one. Jan-Gunnar Winther, director of the Norwegian Polar Institute, plans to be at the pole the day Amundsen reached it, part of a four-man team that will re-enact Amundsen’s journey then fly home in time for Christmas. On the British side, Ben Saunders, a 33-year-old London resident, who is a long-distance skier and motivational speaker, plans to follow in the footsteps of Scott — and to complete the return trip that Scott could not finish.

David Wilson, a great-nephew of Edward Wilson, the naturalist and sketch artist who marched to the pole with Scott and died beside him, will join other descendants of Scott’s polar party in Antarctica next Jan. 17 in the vicinity of the tent, where they will hold a memorial service.

He echoes the Scott party line: that the British expedition went to Antarctica to do science, not to race to the pole. The people planning competitions are “completely misunderstanding what happened 100 years ago,” Dr. Wilson said.

Despite the potential circus atmosphere, some veterans insist that Antarctica is not for novices.

“It’s a place that wants you dead,” said Robert Swan, an environmentalist who walked Scott’s route to the South Pole in 1985. “Scott found that out 100 years ago.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/16/world/16pole.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2598 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 09:20am »

New York Times

January 15, 2011
In Tunisia, Clashes Continue as Power Shifts a Second Time
By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

TUNIS — Tanks, police officers and gangs of newly deputized young men wielding guns held the deserted streets of Tunis Saturday night after a day of sporadic rioting and gunfire. Power changed hands for the second time in 24 hours, and the swift turnabout raised new questions about what kind of government might emerge from the chaos engulfing Tunisia.

The interim government named Friday had hoped that the toppling of President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, who fled the country, would satisfy protesters, but continued unrest Saturday made clear that they were determined to chase his allies from power as well.

Bursts of gunfire rang out through the capital all day Saturday, and a patient discharged from a major hospital here reported that the emergency room was packed with people suffering gunshot wounds.

After a hail of machine-gun fire in the late afternoon in downtown Tunis, snipers were visible on the rooftop of the Interior Ministry, aiming down at the Boulevard Bourguiba. Human rights groups said that they had confirmed dozens of deaths at the hands of security forces even before the biggest street battle began Friday, and on Saturday residents huddled in their homes for fear of the police.

The tumbling political succession started Friday when Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi announced on state television that the president was gone and that he was taking over. Then, on Saturday morning, Mr. Ghannouchi, an ally of Mr. Ben Ali, abruptly announced that he was surrendering the reins of government to the speaker of Parliament, complying with succession rules spelled out in the Tunisian Constitution. Now the speaker, Fouad Mebazaa, is expected to hold elections to form a new government within 60 days.

The shake-up underscored the power vacuum left here after the end of Mr. Ben Ali’s 23 years of authoritarian rule — a transition of dizzying speed that Tunisians view with both hope and fear.

With Tunisia’s relatively large middle class, high level of education and secular culture, some here argue that their country is poised to become the first true Arab democracy. And commentators around the Middle East pondered the potential regional implications of the success of Tunisia’s protests; Mr. Ben Ali’s fall marked the first time that street demonstrations had overcome an Arab autocrat. “Will Tunisia be the first domino to fall?” asked a headline on the Web site of the news channel Al Jazeera.

But others at home and abroad worried that Tunisia could slide into chaos, laying the groundwork for a new strongman to emerge. Mr. Ben Ali was viewed in the West as a reliable ally in the fight against the Islamic extremism flourishing in other parts of North Africa, and in Washington, national security experts said extremist groups like Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb could capitalize on the disorder to find a new foothold.

For now, though, the political field remains conspicuously empty. Mr. Ben Ali’s pervasive network of secret police had succeeded in effectively eliminating or co-opting any truly viable opposition or political institution. The former president also long ago wiped away the Islamist groups that form the main grass-roots opposition in most Arab countries.

“There are very few players to keep track of,” said Michael Koplow, an expert on Tunisia who has written about the uprising for Foreign Policy magazine. “If there were new free elections, it is unclear whether there is anyone qualified to run who the people would accept. It is wide open.”

There is also no apparent leader or spokesman for the four-week-old protest against joblessness and government corruption that forced Mr. Ben Ali from power. The protests erupted spontaneously after the Dec. 17 suicide by self-immolation of a college-educated street vendor in the Western city of Sidi Bouzid frustrated by the lack of opportunity (the police had confiscated his wares because he did not have a permit). They spread through online social networks like Facebook and Twitter. And they accelerated as demonstrators shared homemade digital videos of each confrontation with the police.

“There are no leaders, that is the good thing,” one protester declared Friday as thousands crowded around the Interior Ministry just before the police imposed martial law and Mr. Ben Ali left the country.

Protesters immediately turned against the unconstitutional ascension of Mr. Ghannouchi, arguing that he was a crony of Mr. Ben Ali who came from the same hometown of Sousse. It remains unclear if critics will be satisfied with the switch in power to Mr. Mebazaa, who has presided over a Parliament dominated exclusively by Mr. Ben Ali’s ruling party and like almost every other Tunisian elected official, owes his career to the former president.

There were reports in Arabic news outlets this weekend that it was the Tunisian military that finally triggered the unwinding of Mr. Ben Ali’s government. As the demonstrations escalated on Thursday afternoon, the country’s top military official, Gen. Rachid Ammar, is said to have refused to shoot protesters.

That afternoon, the military began pulling its tanks and personnel out of downtown Tunis, leaving the police and other security forces loyal to the ruling party to take their place as President Ben Ali delivered his final speech pleading, in effect, for another chance. The tanks returned after Mr. Ben Ali left the country.

On Saturday afternoon, there were some signs that General Ammar himself may now have an eye on politics. On Facebook, a staging ground of the street revolt, almost 1,700 people had clicked that they “like” a Web page named “General Rachid Ammar President” and emblazoned with his official photographs.

Still, the Tunisian military is relatively small compared with the armies of most countries in the region and is far less pervasive here than internal security forces, and so far neither General Ammar nor any other military figure has publicly stepped forward to try to lead the country.

Meanwhile, Tunisians abroad and exiled opposition leaders reveled in the chance for a change. Several thousand Tunisians demonstrated in Paris on Saturday at the Place de la République calling for real democracy and celebrating Mr. Ben Ali’s downfall.

Exiled opposition leaders, many of whom have lived abroad for decades in France or Britain, prepared to return in the hope of rekindling their movements. Perhaps foremost among them was Rachid al-Ghannouchi, a progressive Islamic leader who founded the Hizb al-Nahdah, or Renaissance Party. He was imprisoned twice in the 1980s and granted asylum in Britain in 1993.

“The dictatorship has fallen,” Mr. Ghannouchi told Reuters. “There is nothing to stop me returning to my country after 22 years of exile.”

In Egypt, critics of President Hosni Mubarak rushed to embrace the Tunisian example, noting that their country shared the combination of an autocratic ruler, rampant corruption and a large population of frustrated youth. Egyptians traded phone messages like “Mubarak, oh, Mubarak, your plane is waiting for you!” and posted images of the Tunisian flag to their Facebook pages. A major opposition group, led by Mohamed El Baradei, the former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, merged the Egyptian and Tunisian flags into one on its Web site.

One group of young Egyptians set up a Facebook page calling on their fellow citizens to make January 25 “The day of revolution against torture, poverty, corruption and unemployment.”

“If you care about Egypt, if you want your rights, join us and participate and enough silence,” the page said.

Still, many commentators around the Arab world wondered if it might be too soon to celebrate, given the continuing violence in Tunisia and the lack of an obvious leader. “We don’t know if the Tunisia of yesterday has opened up, or is about to plunge into a deep sea of the unknown and be added to the series of Arab disasters that don’t end,” Tarek al-Hamid wrote in Asharq al-Awsat, a paper with a Saudi owner. “No one will cry over Ben Ali, but the prayer is for Tunisia not to fall into a quagmire of crises with a bleak future.”

Saudi Arabia said Saturday that it had welcomed Mr. Ben Ali and his family. France, the former colonial power in Tunisia, made it clear that it did not want to risk inflaming its large Tunisian immigrant population by accepting the former president. And on Saturday, the French government said that members of Mr. Ben Ali’s family who had taken refuge at a hotel at Disneyland Paris were not welcome either.

“Ben Ali’s family members on French soil have no reason to stay,” a government spokesman said. “They are going to leave it.” French media said the family members were later seen leaving the hotel.

Meanwhile, reports of unrest continued Saturday in Tunisia, with the Arab news media reporting that hundreds of prisoners were freed after a jailhouse riot in a resort town and that more than 40 were killed in a fire at another prison set by an inmate hoping to escape amid the country’s chaos.

But the Tunisian airport reopened at least partially Saturday, and some in Tunis said things were looking up. Huddled in the doorway of a darkened apartment building downtown Saturday, a man in his late 20s was smoking cigarettes and watching security forces patrol the square outside. He would give only his first name, Faisal, and he said that he had been unemployed for the seven years since he graduated from college, in part because he could not afford the bribes necessary to secure a job.

He had nothing good to say about Mr. Ben Ali, but when asked about what would come out of the chaos, he shrugged and smiled.

“Look,” he said, “everything is going to be O.K.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/16/world/africa/16tunis.html?ref=world
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2599 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 09:24am »

My better half is awake...........................be back later...............
Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2600 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 10:57am »

Telegraph

Mark Kennedy: 15 other undercover police infiltrated green movement

An undercover policeman who spent seven years living as an environmental activist has claimed that at least 15 other agents had infiltrated the movement and disclosed that sexual entanglements with them were commonplace.

By John Bingham
3:45PM GMT 16 Jan 2011

Mark Kennedy, 41, a former Metropolitan Police officer who posed as a climate change protester known as "Mark Stone", spoke out about the “grey and murky” world of undercover policing in which he said “really bad stuff” was secretly going on.

Last week the £1 million trial of six environmental activists accused of plotting to break into the Ratcliffe-on-Soar coal-fired power station in Nottinghamshire collapsed amid questions over Mr Kennedy’s involvement.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission is now investigating whether Nottinghamshire Police withheld secret recordings made by Mr Kennedy showing that those accused were innocent of conspiracy from the prosecution.

Lawyers for 20 others who have already been found guilty over the planned sabotage said last night that Mr Kennedy’s disclosures suggested they had been the victims of a miscarriage of justice.

Mr Kennedy, whose estranged wife Edel and two British-born children live in the west of Ireland, fled to the United States after his double life was exposed by green activists.

He is now understood to have private security officers keeping a “discrete” watch on him after he voiced fears for his life and is being represented by Max Clifford, the public relations specialist.

In an interview with the Mail on Sunday: http://go.telegraph.co.uk/?id=296X467&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailymail.co.uk%2Fnews%2Farticle-1347478%2FUndercover-policeman-tells-amazing-story-years-eco-warriors-I-fear-life.html
the former policeman said he had been “hung out to dry” by his former handlers in the National Public Order Intelligence Unit (NPOIU) which sent him to infiltrate radical environmental groups in 2003.

He insisted that he had been instrumental in preventing “bloodshed” amid clashes between police and protesters and claimed that key intelligence he had gathered had been passed to Tony Blair and other European leaders.

He acknowledged for the first time that during his time undercover he had been sexual relationships with two activist women, admitting that what he had done was "wrong".

Fellow protesters have questioned whether the women truly gave their consent as they did not know his true identity.

But Mr Kennedy said other undercover police had also become sexually entangled with their subjects in a promiscuous environment in which some people had up to six lovers at a time.

“I was offered sex repeatedly,” he told the newspaper.

“And I was not the only undercover operator having a relationship but our handlers never asked.”

He added: “That is the problem about this whole undercover police operation. There seem to be no guidelines, no rules – I was pretty much left to fend for myself.”

Mr Kennedy also disclosed that he knew of at least 15 other undercover police who had infiltrated the movement and said that by the time he left in 2009 there were at least four others.

“The world of undercover policing is grey and murky," he said.

“There is some bad stuff going on, really bad stuff.”

The scale of public money invested in such operations was also laid bare as he disclosed that in addition to his £50,000-a-year salary, his handlers paid up to £200,000 a year into a secret bank account to help him maintain his cover.

Mike Schwarz, the lawyer who represented the Ratcliffe-on-Soar protesters said that the convictions of the 20 people already found guilty of conspiring to take over the plant might now be unsafe.

“Potentially it looks like a miscarriage of justice and a lot depends on the prosecution doing what they should have done at the beginning and establishing what Kennedy’s wider role was and making the information available.”

He is calling for a judicial inquiry into the affair.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/8262746/Mark-Kennedy-15-other-undercover-police-infiltrated-green-movement.html

Crystal
edit for spacing
« Last Edit: Jan 16th, 2011, 10:58am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2601 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 11:05am »

LA Times

A Jesse James impostor took truth for a ride

John William James, who showed up in Los Angeles in 1933, was just one of several men who impersonated the infamous outlaw over the years. Ten intact fingers was one indication he was lying about his identity.


User Image
An undated artist's sketch of Jesse James, who was killed in St. Joseph, Mo., in 1882.
(Associated Press / January 16, 2011)



By Steve Harvey, Los Angeles Times
January 16, 2011

When outgoing New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson turned down a petition to pardon Billy the Kid (1859?-1881) last month, he obviously didn't have to deliver the bad news to the Kid's face.

But when the subject of forgiving another 19th century outlaw arose in Los Angeles in 1933, the suspect claimed to be present.

"I'm the original Jesse James," a white-haired gent confessed to officers at the old Central Police Station.

The notion that he had been killed in 1882 by fellow gang member Bob Ford (known thereafter in Missouri as the Dirty Little Coward) was all a hoax, he said.

The mystery man told police that brothers Bob and Charles Ford "and myself planned the murder of another gang member for double-crossing us. He was murdered and buried under my name. Why, I was present at my own funeral!"

The would-be desperado declared he had recently hitchhiked to Los Angeles from Missouri, quite a trip for a fellow who would be 86 if he were James.

He intimated that after "40 years of wandering," he "might lecture on the folly of crime for pay," if all charges against him were dropped, The Times said.

The fellow had come to the attention of L.A. authorities because he allegedly threatened a local resident, Stella James, the daughter-in-law of the real Jesse James.

The bad feelings between the two dated to a confrontation in Missouri, where she had exposed him as an impostor by producing one of her father-in-law's wedding shoes. It was size 6½, far too small for the would-be Jesse, author Ted Yeatman wrote in his book, "Frank and Jesse James."

Rather than lock him up, Los Angeles police turned him over to authorities for a sanity hearing.

There, a judge allowed Frank Wickheiser, an old friend of the family, to cross-examine the pretender.

The handlebar-mustachioed Wickheiser, who previously went by the name of Billy Judson for reasons he did not specify, said Jesse James had "raised me up from a kid."

Wickheiser eyeballed the subject.

"Hold your hands up," he ordered.

The self-described James raised his hands "for probably the first time in his life, if it was his life," The Times said.

"Where is your finger off?" Wickheiser asked him.

"My finger was never off," the subject answered.

"Goodnight!" Wickheiser said in disgust.

Asked for an explanation, Wickheiser told the judge that the real Jesse James, as a youth, had accidentally chopped off the tip of a finger on his left hand with a hatchet. (Other accounts say James lost it in a gun accident.)

"His third finger was off," Wickheiser repeated.

"To where?" the Jesse wannabe joked, perhaps to divert attention from the fact that he had held up 10 intact fingers.

The inquiry found the defendant to be sane.

"You're either the notorious bandit or else you are a notorious liar," the judge added.

"For a moment the old man turned his watery eyes, no hint of steely glint in them now, to the perplexed face of the jurist," The Times wrote. "A faint smile formed on his thin lips, which hid his toothless gums.... 'I'm Jesse James,' he said."

He disappeared from the news until a year later, when he was arrested on a charge of impersonation and obtaining money under false pretenses. He was in a sideshow on the old Ocean Park pier, where he gave "lectures about himself as the historic bandit," The Times said.

Research revealed the man to be one John William James.

The outcome of the Ocean Park case has been lost to history. But, according to Yeatman, the ersatz James died in a Little Rock, Ark., mental hospital in 1947.

Jesse James, however, had several real-life links to Southern California.

His son, also named Jesse, and daughter-in-law Stella retired to Los Angeles in their later years. The younger Jesse, who died in 1951, was a lawyer.

He was briefly in show business, playing his father in a 1921 movie, "Jesse James Under the Black Flag." He reportedly fainted twice during the scene in which the Dirty Little Coward shoots James in the back of the head as the latter is adjusting a painting on a wall.

A granddaughter of the outlaw worked as an escrow officer in a Culver City bank. Another granddaughter worked as a secretary in a Los Angeles bank.

And a great-grandson, James Ross, was an Orange County Superior Court judge who wrote the book "I, Jesse James," a collection of family stories. He died in 2007.

John William James was just one of several Jesse James impersonators over the years.

To clear up remaining doubts, descendants consented to a 1995 DNA analysis of the remains in Jesse James' casket. The verdict: It was probably Jesse.

Oddly enough, when he was unearthed, he was lying face down.

Biographer Yeatman wrote that some wondered if all of the "impostor stories, bad fiction and movies had caused Jesse James to turn over in his grave."


http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-0116-then-20110116,0,3089072.story

Crystal


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2602 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 11:07am »

Defense News

Smarter Somali Pirates Thwarting Navies, NATO Admits
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Published: 14 Jan 2011 11:59

MOMBASA, Kenya - Somali pirates' use of "mother ships" to attack their prey is complicating foreign navies' efforts to improve safety in the Indian Ocean, a senior anti-piracy commander said Jan. 14.

Somalia's expanding army of pirates are increasingly launching their attacks from large, already hijacked vessels that offer greater physical protection during boarding and whose kidnapped crews act as human shields.

Speaking to reporters in the Kenyan port of Mombasa where his NATO flagship was docked, Commodore Michiel Hijmans said few pirates were still using their rudimentary skiffs to board vessels.

"Pirates have gone high tech and few use speed boats. They have switched to usage of motherships," said Hijmans, who currently commands NATO's Ocean Shield anti-piracy mission.

"We cannot attack mother ships without proper planning since most of them have hostages on board," said the Dutch navy commander.

Hijmans also explained that pirates operating on large hijacked vessels were able to extend their area of operation when on the prowl and were no longer confined to their coastal hideouts during monsoon seasons.

"The pirates can operate in the sea for long as they load the mother ships with enough food, fuel and militant weapons ready for a hijacking spree," he said.

"Pirates are getting smarter every hour... Pirates do not give up unless they cannot board or are threatened. I'm afraid that the war on piracy might not be won until there is a stable government in Somalia," he said.

Hijmans said Somali pirates were currently holding 28 ships and 654 crew members.

Ecoterra International, an environmental and human rights NGO monitoring maritime activity in the region, says at least 45 foreign vessels are hijacked and 800 seamen held hostage.

http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=5457801&c=MID&s=SEA

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2603 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 11:12am »

UFO terms have saturated the language in the last couple of years.
Crystal
« Last Edit: Jan 16th, 2011, 11:38am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
philliman
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1298
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2604 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 2:30pm »

on Jan 15th, 2011, 2:38pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
My question is if I send the doubles to my soldier will she have a resource in Afghanistan to watch these? All I know is she's at TF Slugger, FOB Airborne. I would hate to send them and find out she couldn't watch them.

Anyone know if it's a waste of time and room in her package? anyone? anyone? Beuller? grin

Crystal

That would be very kind of you. I am sure that they've got a dvd-player somewhere. smiley

@swampy
grin
« Last Edit: Jan 16th, 2011, 2:31pm by philliman » User IP Logged

Stellar Thoughts
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2605 on: Jan 16th, 2011, 2:47pm »

on Jan 16th, 2011, 2:30pm, philliman wrote:
That would be very kind of you. I am sure that they've got a dvd-player somewhere. smiley

@swampy
grin


Hey Phil!

I thought about it and as you said, "...they've got a dvd-player somewhere." Someone must have one on a laptop.

Hope you are having a good Sunday. Beautiful here. Windy though. I saw Bruce the eagle and he was hanging on for dear life. His butt feathers were flapping in the wind. He sits up in a big cedar that overlooks the bay. But it was blustery for him. grin

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2606 on: Jan 17th, 2011, 08:33am »

New York Times

January 17, 2011
Israel’s Defense Minister Quits Party
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Filed at 8:54 a.m. EST

JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak abruptly announced Monday that he was leaving the Labor Party — dividing the movement that dominated Israeli politics for decades and setting off a chain reaction that cast new doubts over already troubled peace efforts with the Palestinians.

The split in the iconic party that led Israel to independence did not appear to threaten the majority of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition. Barak, a former prime minister and military chief, will stay in the ruling coalition with four followers who joined him.

But Labor's eight remaining members, who had been pushing him to leave the government because of the impasse in peace talks, were expected to withdraw. With a smaller but more unified majority and rid of these dissenting voices, the government could find it easier to dig in on hard-line positions.

Labor has been the sole moderate party in Netanyahu's coalition, which is otherwise dominated by religious and nationalist parties that oppose major concessions to the Palestinians.

By mid-afternoon, three Labor Cabinet ministers had announced their resignations.

Barak, one of the most powerful members of the government, said he was tired of the infighting within Labor. He accused his former partners of moving too far to the dovish end of the political spectrum.

"We are embarking on a new path," he said during a news conference at Israel's parliament. "We want to wake up without having to compromise, apologize and explain."

He said the faction — to be called Independence — would be "centrist, Zionist and democratic." He did not take any questions.

Netanyahu said the Labor shake up made his government stronger by dashing any hopes the Palestinians might have that his coalition would fall.

"The whole world knows and the Palestinians also know this government will be here in the coming years and this is the government they must negotiate with for peace," he told a meeting of lawmakers from his ruling Likud Party.

Peace talks broke down in late September, just three weeks after they were launched, over Israel's refusal to renew an expiring settlement freeze in the West Bank and east Jerusalem. Since then, Israel has announced plans to build hundreds of homes in the West Bank and east Jerusalem.

The Palestinians refuse to negotiate until Israel freezes construction in those areas, captured by Israel in 1967 and claimed by the Palestinians for a future independent state.

The chief Palestinian negotiator, Saeb Erekat, called Barak's decision a domestic affair, but appeared skeptical of the current government's commitment to peace.

"Unfortunately, the current Israeli government has chosen settlements over peace," he said. "We call on the U.S. to hold Israel responsible for the failure of the peace process."

Erekat said the Palestinians this week would ask the U.N. Security Council to condemn settlements — a long-planned move aimed at raising international pressure on Israel.

Opposition leader Tzipi Livni called on Netanyahu to dissolve his government and hold a new election. "The Netanyahu government is falling apart from the inside because of political rot and a lack of vision," she said.

Barak and Netanyahu have had a mutually beneficial relationship. The men have known each other for decades, back to the time that Barak was Netanyahu's commander in an elite commando unit in the army.

As a former prime minister who offered a peace plan to the Palestinians a decade ago that called for uprooting settlements and sharing Jerusalem, Barak has given the governing coalition a well-known and relatively moderate face to deal with the international community.

At times, particularly with the U.S., Barak has served as a de facto foreign minister, replacing Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman, an ultranationalist who is often scorned in the West.

Netanyahu, meanwhile, has given Barak extra influence in decision-making out of proportion to the relatively small size of Labor.

But Labor members have grown increasingly unhappy with Barak, accusing him of enabling Netanyahu to stall in peace efforts. Although Barak is an outspoken advocate of peace with the Palestinians, he also takes a tough line on security matters and has moved slower than his critics would like on making concessions.

The Labor rebels also were uncomfortable about sitting in the same government with Lieberman, who has ridiculed the notion of reaching a peace deal and openly questions the loyalty of Israel's Arab minority.

Barak's decision took other Labor lawmakers by surprise, and Israeli radio commentators said he orchestrated the move in tandem with Netanyahu. The prime minister's office refused to comment.

Cabinet Ministers Isaac Herzog, Avishai Braverman and Binyamin Ben-Eliezer quit the government just hours after Barak's announcement.

Barak "spit in the face of the party that elected him," Ben-Eliezer said.

Labor dominated Israeli politics for the country's first three decades, producing a string of prime ministers that included Israel's founding father, David Ben-Gurion, and the slain prime minister, Yitzhak Rabin. Barak himself briefly served as prime minister in 1999-2000.

But in recent years, Labor has been reduced to a midsize party, with just 13 seats in the current parliament. Many party members hold Barak responsible for the party's demise, and accuse him of abandoning its socialist and dovish ideals to remain in power.

Barak's departure from Labor resembled Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's departure from Likud in 2005 to form the centrist Kadima Party in the wake of his pullout from the Gaza Strip. Sharon suffered a stroke shortly after, but his successor, Ehud Olmert, led the party to victory in a 2006 election.

Yohanan Plesner, a Kadima lawmaker, said it was a sad day for Israel. "This is the day the Labor Party was buried for good," he said.

Associated Press writer Matti Friedman contributed to this report.

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2011/01/17/world/middleeast/AP-ML-Israel-Politics.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2607 on: Jan 17th, 2011, 08:35am »

New York Times

January 16, 2011
Hezbollah Vows Defense in Inquiry
By ANTHONY SHADID and NADA BAKRI

BEIRUT, Lebanon — Hezbollah’s leader warned Sunday that his Shiite Muslim movement would defend itself against indictments, expected soon from an international tribunal, naming its members in the assassination of a former prime minister, whose death plunged the country into the most prolonged crisis since the end of its 15-year civil war.

But in a speech that seemed aimed at defusing tension — or at least not escalating it — the leader, Hassan Nasrallah, defended the decision of Hezbollah and its allies to resign from a 14-month-old national unity government last week, leading to its collapse. And he insisted that the movement would adhere to the Constitution in forming a new government, a process that could take months and, as is often the case here, has already attracted the attention of opposing camps’ foreign patrons, the United States and Syria among them.

“We will not allow our reputation and our dignity to be tarnished, nor will we allow anyone to conspire against us,” Mr. Nasrallah said in an hourlong speech broadcast Sunday night. “We will act to defend our dignity, our existence and our reputation.”

For days, the speech was eagerly anticipated in a country facing a renewed confrontation between camps locked in a struggle that cuts across questions far outstripping its small size: the influence of the United States, Syria, Iran and others here; the power of Hezbollah; and the country’s posture toward Israel. The contest has simmered and flared since February 2005, when a bombing along Beirut’s seafront killed Rafik Hariri, a former prime minister, and 22 others.

Last week marked another surge in tension when Hezbollah and its Christian allies withdrew from a government led by Mr. Hariri’s son, Saad, in a dispute over the international tribunal, which has divided the nation. Hezbollah supporters believe it is hopelessly compromised, little more than an American-Israeli tool to bludgeon the movement. Mr. Hariri’s supporters believe the vehemence of Hezbollah’s reaction only underlines its guilt in the assassination.

On Monday, prosecutors are expected to turn the indictments over to a judge at The Hague, though the charges may not be made public for two months or more.

Mr. Nasrallah, who appeared relaxed, rarely raising his voice as he does in more fiery speeches, said the movement would not be drenched “in Rafik Hariri’s blood.”

The crisis has played out in seemingly contradictory ways. In the streets of Beirut, many residents seem to look at the latest confrontation as theater, managed by a political elite that reaches consensus only after months of deadlock, the eruption of violence or the decisive intervention of foreign powers.

But the elite itself seemed frantic at times over the weekend, as talks began about the next government and, in particular, who would lead it — Mr. Hariri, backed by the United States, or a candidate backed by Hezbollah.

Mr. Nasrallah himself sent mixed messages, saying in the speech on Sunday that “Hariri and his team have established the fact that they cannot be trusted and are not reliable to help Lebanon or lead the country out of any impasse.” Then, at the end, he pointedly did not rule out Mr. Hariri’s return.

“Things are changing all the time,” said an adviser to Nabih Berri, the Parliament speaker and an ally of Hezbollah, speaking on condition of anonymity. “There are consultations, meetings, phone calls, and the situation is changing every hour.”

American officials have come out strongly in support of the tribunal, backing that Hezbollah’s leadership has cited as a reason for suspicion. They have urged Mr. Hariri not to back down, and on Sunday the American ambassador, Maura Connelly, met Mr. Hariri and another Lebanese lawmaker in what critics portrayed as aggressive American intervention in the formation of the next government.

The United States is not alone. To varying degrees, at various times, France, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Egypt, Iran, Qatar and Turkey have all played a role in a country whose competing factions and tendency to deadlock have made it vulnerable to foreign meddling. (Syrian, Turkish and Qatari leaders are meeting in Damascus, Syria, on Monday for talks about the crisis.)

“The tribunal is an independent, international judicial process whose work is not subject to political influence — either from inside Lebanon or from outside,” Ms. Connelly said.

For months now, Hezbollah has sought to discredit the tribunal, pointing out that it took testimony from witnesses whose accounts later proved false. It has suggested that Israeli spy rings uncovered since 2008 — in particular, a cell blamed for espionage in the telecommunications sector — could have falsified records investigators used as evidence.

“We describe the tribunal as an American and Israeli tool,” Mr. Nasrallah said.

President Michel Suleiman will begin consultations on the new government on Monday, a sideshow to the spectacle that riveted much of the country Sunday night. For the second day, an opposition television station broadcast leaked testimony from the tribunal that, in the first segment, caught Mr. Hariri in a lie over his knowledge of witnesses who turned out to have lied. The second amounted to a freewheeling take by Mr. Hariri on everyone from President Bashar al-Assad of Syria to his father’s aides.

He called Lebanese officials “stooges” and the Syrian president an “idiot.” He casually talked about his father bribing Syrian officials in Lebanon.

The disclosures will probably do little to shift opinion about Mr. Hariri. Lebanon’s crises tend to deepen sentiments rather than change them. Even if it opposes Mr. Hariri, Hezbollah may have difficulty in finding an alternative, given his support within Lebanon’s Sunni Muslim community, one of the country’s largest.

“There is an attempt to bring Hariri back because whether we want it or not, whether some like it or hate it, he represents the majority,” said Boutros Harb, a lawmaker allied with Mr. Hariri.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/17/world/middleeast/17lebanon.html?ref=world

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2608 on: Jan 17th, 2011, 08:39am »

Telegraph

WikiLeaks to target wealthy individuals

Wealthy individuals who have avoided tax by storing their cash in offshore bank accounts are in the sights of WikiLeaks after the website's founder Julian Assange was given a disc reportedly containing confidential bank account details.

12:24PM GMT 17 Jan 2011

Details on up to 2,000 wealthy individuals and corporations, including politicians and celebrities, are thought to be included on the CD which was produced by Rudolf Elmer, a former employee at a Swiss bank.

Mr Elmer said he wanted to disclose details of potential mass tax evasion before he flies back to Switzerland to stand trial accused of stealing information from a bank.

He said those named in the documents are from Britain, America, Germany, Austria, Asia and ''all over''.

At the Frontline Club in London, Mr Elmer gave Mr Assange two CDs allegedly containing the offshore bank account details of the "high net worth" individuals and businesses.

Mr Elmer, a former executive at Julius Baer Bank, one of Switzerland's top private banks, said he was releasing the information to educate society.

"I do think as banker I have the right to stand up if something is wrong," he said.

"I am against the system. I know how the system works and I know the day to day business. From that point of view, I wanted to let society know what I know. It is damaging our society."

Mr Assange, who is currently fighting an extradition battle to Sweden where he faces sexual offences allegations, said the names could be published on the WikiLeaks website in two weeks' time, once they have been verified.

In what is thought to be his first public engagement since he was given bail, Mr Assange said: "We dealt with the Bank Julius Baer issue in 2008 - that's when it had its peak of prominence - it is not a new issue for us.

"I have read some of Mr Elmer's writings. He is clearly a bonafide whistleblower and therefore I feel, given the past involvement in the case, that we have some duty to support him on that matter."

Mr Assange said WikiLeaks could hand some of the information from Mr Elmer to the Serious Fraud Office in London

He said that had been done before, with information about the Icelandic banking industry.

"Mr Elmer has been fighting his case for some five years to in one way or another, draw attention to this data," Mr Assange said.

"He certainly has had something very important to say about this matter. I understand that he is in a position to have more to say and more to give to the world to help them understand these corrupt practices."

Mr Assange said that data would all be verified before it was published.

He said the whistle-blowing website, which champions information transparency, was not yet open for public business.

"We are not open yet for public business. The volume of material that we would receive is too high for our internal mechanisms, but we are receiving in other ways, like this, in this manner," he said.

At the press conference, which was packed with members of the international media, Mr Assange said that WikiLeaks has so far released 2.3% of the 250,000 US diplomatic cables and the website was also working on other releases.

Mr Elmer was dismissed from Julius Baer Bank in 2002 after working for eight years as the chief operating officer of Julius Baer Bank and Trust Company in the Cayman Islands.

The bank claims he launched an "intimidation campaign and vendetta" against it and spread "baseless" rumours.

It said he falsified documents and made threats against employees.

A statement released by the bank said: "Evidently disgruntled and frustrated about unfulfilled career aspirations, Mr Elmer exhibited behaviour that was detrimental and unacceptable for the Bank, which led to termination of the employment relationship.

"After his demands, including financial compensation, in connection with the dismissal could not be satisfied, Mr Elmer embarked in 2004 on a personal intimidation campaign and vendetta against Julius Baer.

"The aim of his activities was and is to discredit Julius Baer as well as clients in the eyes of the public."

The statement went on: "In 2005 the Swiss press reported on a CD containing data that reputedly related to Bank Julius Baer and was leaked to the media.

"Based on these reports, Julius Baer notified the regulatory authorities and filed a legal complaint against persons unknown.

"The official investigation also covered subsequent threats against the Bank and certain employees.

"The extensive inquiries eventually led to the indictment by the district attorney that will go to trial on 19 January 2011 in the District Court of Zurich."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/wikileaks/8264179/WikiLeaks-to-target-wealthy-individuals.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11629
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2609 on: Jan 17th, 2011, 08:45am »

Defense News

Iran Fuel Ban Targets NATO But Hurts Afghans
By SARDAR AHMAD, AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Published: 17 Jan 2011 09:31

KABUL - Iran's ban on fuel tankers crossing into Afghanistan over claims they are supplying NATO troops is snaring ordinary Afghans in a complex power game as winter living costs rise, experts say.

Some 2,000 trucks are stranded on the Iranian-Afghan border, Afghanistan's commerce ministry says, in a standoff which has run since early December, heaping more misery on civilians in the war-torn, impoverished country.

Behind it all is Iran's desire to strike out at the international community over its disputed nuclear weapons program and at Afghanistan over efforts to make peace with the Taliban, according to some analysts.

NATO insists it does not use fuel which has passed through Iran and that the operations of its troops in Afghanistan are not being affected.

But that is cold comfort to ordinary Afghans who, with the first snows of winter on the ground, face paying 40 percent more for fuel than before, plus extra for other day-to-day essentials.

The situation has caused a wave of protests outside the Iranian embassy in Kabul, including one last week when angry demonstrators reportedly pelted the building with tomatoes and eggs.

Afghanistan's Commerce Minister Anwarulhaq Ahadi voiced his frustration at a press conference Sunday, saying: "Iran's reasons and excuses about this problem are not acceptable for us at all."

Explaining the problems ordinary Afghans face, Ali Agha, a 50-year-old dried-fruit seller in Kabul, said: "Dried fruit is one of the main needs for people in the winter and people are bargaining while buying it. All I can tell them is that the fuel has become expensive."

A young chemist, Rahmatullah, added: "Every day, we argue with customers regarding the price of medicine... the medicines are mainly coming from Iran and Pakistan and the fuel price rise has affected prices directly."

Iran first blocked fuel trucks from crossing into Afghanistan last month because, according to Kabul's deputy commerce minister, it believed their cargo was going to supply U.S. and other international troops fighting the Taliban.

Afghan Vice President Mohammad Qasim Fahim said last month he had secured an agreement to lift the ban during a visit to Tehran, and the Iranian government insists the question has been settled.

But Faridullah Sherzai, a spokesman for the commerce ministry in Kabul, said only 40 trucks per day were being allowed through from Iran to Afghanistan, while local drivers put the figure at around half that.

Sherzai stressed that other routes were available for fuel coming into Afghanistan, through Pakistan and central Asian countries. But it is thought that around 30 percent of Afghanistan's fuel comes through Iran.

Afghanistan has now submitted details to Iran of how much fuel is needed for its civilian population in a bid to resolve the situation.

An Iranian official blamed Kabul for the crisis.

"The transport of fuel is happening from the Dogharoun border crossing without any problem," Mohammad Aref Arefi, deputy governor of Taybad province bordering Afghanistan, was quoted as saying on the Iranian state television website.

"If the fuel is not reaching the Afghans, the problem is then with the government of that country."

He said from the start of current Iranian year in March 2010 until now, "7,024 tankers with 168.5 million liters of fuel crossed from this border point into Afghanistan."

Gran Hewad, a political researcher at think-tank the Afghan Analysts Network, said Iran was pursuing two strategies by implementing the fuel blockade - one international and one regional.

"From an international point of view, it's reacting to the recent pressure which the international community brings on it regarding nuclear weapons and some other transactions," Hewad said.

"In the regional dimension, it's going to react to the peace process in Afghanistan which it opposes."

Iran has faced four rounds of U.N. sanctions over its disputed nuclear program, which major world powers fear is disguising weapons ambitions but Tehran insists is for civilian purposes.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai has in recent months made peace negotiations with the Taliban a top priority, despite few signs of success so far.

Iran is seen as hostile to the Taliban for religious reasons but some reports have accused it of supporting the militants as a counterweight to the U.S., sometimes described by Tehran as the "Great Satan."

Other political analysts say relations between Afghanistan and Iran would also likely be affected by the situation.

Expert Razaq Mamoon said that Iran's blockade could seriously harm relations between the Islamic "brothers", highlighted in October when Karzai admitted receiving bags of money from Tehran.

"After standing up for Iran against the West, the U.S. and NATO, and defending its relations with it, the banning of the fuel trucks I think has badly hurt Afghanistan's government," he told AFP.

"It's totally possible that some circles in the government, if not the government itself, turn against Iran."

http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=5473854&c=MID&s=LAN

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 172 173 174 175 176  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls