Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Dec 11th, 2017, 09:13am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 183 184 185 186 187  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 24947 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2760 on: Jan 31st, 2011, 6:45pm »

New York Times

January 31, 2011
Businesses Take Flight, With Help From NASA
By KENNETH CHANG

BOULDER, Colo. — Sitting in a testing facility at the University of Colorado, the inner shell of the Dream Chaser space plane looks like the fuselage of an old DC-3.

The test structure has been pushed and pulled to see how it holds up to the stresses and strains of spaceflight. With an additional infusion of money from NASA, the company that makes the Dream Chaser, Sierra Nevada Space Systems, hopes to complete the rest of the structure and eventually take astronauts to orbit.

“Our view is if we could stop buying from the Russians, if we could make life cheaper for NASA, and if we could build a few vehicles that do other things in low-Earth orbit that are valuable, isn’t that, at the end of the day, a good thing?” said Mark N. Sirangelo, the company’s chairman.

The Dream Chaser is one of several new spacecraft that companies are hoping to launch into space with help from the government. Last year, the Obama administration pushed through an ambitious transformation for NASA: canceling the Ares I rocket, which was to be the successor to the current generation of space shuttles, and turning to the commercial sector for astronaut transportation.

User Image
ASTRONAUT TRANSIT
NASA provided $20 million for the development of the Dream Chaser, illustrated here docking at the International Space Station.





User Image
YEARS AWAY
Orbital Sciences says the development of Prometheus, background, would cost $3.5 billion to $4 billion



So far, most of the attention in this new commercial space race has focused on Boeing, which has five decades of experience building spacecraft, and Space Exploration Technologies Corporation — SpaceX, for short — a brash upstart that gained credibility last year with two launchings of its Falcon 9 rocket.

SpaceX, led by Elon Musk, a founder of PayPal and chief executive of Tesla Motors, already has a NASA contract for delivering cargo to the space station, and says that it can easily add up to seven seats to its Dragon cargo capsule to make it suitable for passengers. Boeing is also designing a capsule, capable of carrying six passengers, under the corporate-sounding designation of CST-100.

But Boeing and SpaceX are not the only competitors seeking to provide space taxi services, a program that NASA calls commercial crew. Last year, in the first-round financing provided for preliminary development, Sierra Nevada Space Systems won the largest award: $20 million out of a total of $50 million.

In December, another space company, Orbital Sciences Corporation, announced it had submitted a similar bid for a space plane it wants financed during the second round. NASA is to announce the winners by the end of March, and they will divide $200 million.

About half of NASA’s $19 billion budget goes toward human spaceflight — the space shuttles, the International Space Station — and $200 million this year is just a small slice.

“If this is indeed the path to do this work, it’s probably not what they should be putting into it,” said Mr. Sirangelo, who is also chairman emeritus of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation, a trade group. “But on the other hand, it’s a lot more than we had before. And it’s an acknowledgment there’s momentum in the industry and what we’re trying to accomplish. So that’s good.”

After the second round, NASA would like narrow its choices down to two, maybe three, systems to finance.

“We think this is in effect a one-year race to see who gets the furthest,” Mr. Sirangelo said, “and at the end of that, presumably the next two years of the authorization bill gets funded, and then you compete for that pot of money.”

The blueprint for NASA, passed by Congress last year and signed into law by President Obama, calls for spending on commercial crew to rise to $500 million each year in 2012 and 2013.

Senator Bill Nelson, the Florida Democrat who was one of the primary architects of the blueprint, as the authorization act was called, has said the intent was to provide $6 billion over six years.

But what Congress puts into the budget could be far less.

“They’re not getting $6 billion over six years for commercial crew,” said a Senate aide who was not authorized to speak for attribution. “That’s never going to happen.”

The aide estimated commercial crew might receive half that much.

In addition, Congress has not passed the final 2011 budget, and Mr. Obama wants to freeze spending at many federal agencies. Whether the freeze includes NASA will not be known until the president’s 2012 budget request is released in two weeks.

While Sierra Nevada has the lowest profile of the companies seeking commercial crew business, it is not new. The parent company, the Sierra Nevada Corporation, is a privately held defense electronics firm founded in 1963, and a few years ago, it bought several space companies and rolled them into the space systems subsidiary.

The space systems subsidiary, located outside Denver, is the largest manufacturer in the United States of small satellites, Mr. Sirangelo said. The satellites, used for communications and other purposes, cannot do everything that large ones can do, but what they can do, they do more cheaply and more efficiently.

The Dream Chaser embodies the same philosophy. “There are some tasks that can be done by smaller, cheaper vehicles that used to be done by very expensive vehicles,” Mr. Sirangelo said.

Mr. Sirangelo said the company had invested its own money into the Dream Chaser — indeed, more than the $20 million that NASA has provided. Over the past year, the company has done a test-firing of the engines it plans to use on the Dream Chaser, and it dropped a scale model of the spacecraft from a helicopter to verify the aerodynamics.

But it is a jump from making spacecraft components and small satellites to building a crew-carrying space plane, and where Sierra Nevada lacks in skills and experience, it has brought in other companies and institutions. Its Dream Chaser partners include Draper Laboratory, which has been designing spacecraft guidance systems since Apollo; NASA’s Langley Research Center, which did much of the development that the Dream Chaser is based on; Boeing, which has also worked on space planes; and United Launch Alliance, a joint venture of Boeing and Lockheed Martin that builds the Atlas V rocket that the Dream Chaser would ride atop.

Virgin Galactic, the spacecraft division of Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin empire, signed on as a strategic partner in December. Among the possible roles that Virgin could play is selling seats on the Dream Chaser. (Virgin signed a similar agreement with Orbital.)

The design of the Dream Chaser also has a long lineage, inspired by a Soviet spacecraft. In 1982, an Australian reconnaissance airplane photographed a Russian trawler pulling something with stubby wings out of the Indian Ocean. It turned out to be a test flight of a space plane called the Bor-4, and the craft captured enough curiosity that engineers at NASA Langley copied it.

NASA called its version the HL-20, and for a while in 1991, it looked to be the low-cost choice for taking astronauts to and from the space station. Then the NASA administrator who liked it, Vice Adm. Richard Truly of the Navy, left, and the man who replaced him, Daniel S. Goldin, thought it was not cheap enough and ended the work.

The Dream Chaser design keeps the exact outer shape from the HL-20 — a decision that allows Sierra Nevada to take advantage of years of wind tunnel tests that Langley had performed — while modifying the design within. The biggest change is the addition of two engines, which reduces the number of passengers to seven from 10, but adds maneuverability. To finish developing the Dream Chaser would require less than $1 billion, Mr. Sirangelo said, and it could be ready to fly an orbital test flight in three years.

He imagines that one flight could combine a number of tasks — taking astronauts to the space station and then stopping on the return trip to repair or refuel a satellite. “This vehicle is perfectly designed to do all that,” Mr. Sirangelo said.

Officials at Orbital Sciences — a company in Dulles, Va., that builds and launches rockets and satellites for everything from television broadcasts to scientific research — say they are excited by the possibilities of commercial crew, but they are more cautious. Orbital, founded in 1982, was a survivor from the last boom-and-bust in commercial space.

Its space plane design is a refinement of the HL-20. Following in the pattern of tapping Greek mythology for the names of its spacecraft, Orbital calls its plane Prometheus. Orbital says development of Prometheus would cost $3.5 billion to $4 billion, which would include the cost of upgrading the Atlas V rocket and two test flights.

With enough financial support, David W. Thompson, chief executive of Orbital, is sure that his company can build and operate Prometheus. But he is less sure that his industry is at a tipping point for spaceflight to become much more common, driving down prices and opening up space to new businesses.

“I think it depends on what the demand curve really is,” Mr. Thompson said. “I would say I’m highly skeptical.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/01/science/space/01private.html?ref=science

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2761 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 08:54am »

New York Times

February 1, 2011
Jordan’s King Dismisses Cabinet
By ETHAN BRONNER

RAMALLAH, West Bank — King Abdullah II of Jordan fired his government in a surprise move on Tuesday, in the face of a wave of demands of public accountability sweeping the Arab world and bringing throngs of demonstrators in the streets of Egypt.

The Jordanian news agency Petra announced that following recent protests in Jordan itself, the king had sacked Prime Minister Samir Rifai and replaced him with Marouf al-Bakhit, a former general and ambassador both to Israel and Turkey. He is widely viewed as clean of corruption.

The official announcement said Mr. Bakhit would have the task of “taking practical, swift and tangible steps to launch a real political reform process, in line with the king’s version of comprehensive reform, modernization and development.” It added that the king asked Mr. Bakhit and the new cabinet to “bolster democracy” and proceed “with nation building that opens the scope for broad accomplishment to al dear sons or our country and secure them the safe and dignified life they deserve.”

Recent demonstrations in Jordan marked the first serious challenge to the decade-old rule of King Abdullah, a critical American ally in the region who is contending with his country’s worst economic crisis in years,

Last Friday, thousands took to the streets in the capital Amman as well as several other cities shouting “We want change.” Because direct criticism of the king is banned, the focus has been on his government. Banners decried high food and fuel prices and demanded the resignation of the prime minister, appointed by the king.

On Saturday there was a sit-in of about 400 people in front of the prime minister’s office calling for his resignation. He has been criticized for lack of accountability.

In recent months, journalists, former generals and students have attacked corruption, lowered subsidies and lack of democracy in Jordan, especially recent reductions in freedom of expression. The marchers have been a mix of Islamists, trade unionists and leftists. To counter the criticism, recently the king announced an increase in civil service pay and $125 million in subsidies for basic goods and fuel.

After Tuesday’s announcement of a new prime minister, reactions among protest leaders were cautiously positive.

Nahed Hattar, a leftist activist, said in a telephone interview that he considered the change a good move but he wanted to see the government program before rendering judgment.

Ali Habashneh, a retired general who had participated in public protests, said the appointment was “wise. He is the right man to lead the country at this time.”

The new prime minister, Mr. Bakhit, served briefly in the post once before in 2006 after Amman hotels were attacked by terrorists. He is close to the king and has been closely involved in the peace treaty with Israel.

While King Abdullah has detractors in Jordan, there seems at the moment to be little push to end the monarchy. The pressure has been focused on economic issues and government accountability.

Meanwhile, also in response to the mood sweeping the region, in the West Bank, the Palestinian Authority announced it would hold local elections, postponed last year, “as soon as possible.” Prime Minister Salam Fayyad’s government said it would set the election date next week.


Ranya Kadri contributed reporting from Amman, Jordan.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/02/world/middleeast/02jordan.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2762 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 08:56am »

New York Times

January 31, 2011
Wary of Egypt Unrest, China Censors Web
By EDWARD WONG and DAVID BARBOZA

BEIJING — In another era, China’s leaders might have been content to let discussion of the protests in Egypt float around among private citizens, then fizzle out.

But challenges in recent years to authoritarian governments around the globe and violent uprisings in parts of China itself have made Chinese officials increasingly wary of leaving such talk unchecked, especially on the Internet, the medium some officials see as central to fanning the flames of unrest.

So the arbiters of speech sprang into action over the weekend. Sina.com and Netease.com — two of the nation’s biggest online portals — blocked keyword searches of the word “Egypt,” though the mass protests were being discussed on some Internet chat rooms on Monday. Searching for “Egypt” has also been blocked on Weibo, the Chinese equivalent of Twitter.

Censoring the Internet is not the only approach. The Chinese government has also tried to get out ahead of the discussion, framing the Egyptian protests in a few editorials and articles in state-controlled news publications as a chaotic affair that embodies the pitfalls of trying to plant democracy in countries that are not quite ready for it — a line China’s leaders have long held.

The English-language edition of Global Times, a populist newspaper, ran an editorial on Sunday about the Tunisian and Egyptian protests with the headline “Color revolutions will not bring about real democracy.” Though Global Times is not the official mouthpiece of the Communist Party, the message of the editorial was consistent with official thinking, saying bluntly that whether democracy “is applicable in other countries is in question, as more and more unsuccessful examples arise.”

“The official Chinese media is reporting the Egypt events — it’s no longer possible for Xinhua and other official media to remain credible if they hide international news that people can learn from the Internet,” said Susan L. Shirk, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, who served as assistant deputy secretary of state during the Clinton administration. “But they reduce the risk that some Chinese might want to emulate them by describing them as 'anti-government riots.'"

Some Chinese news organizations have also seized on the ambivalent American reaction to the Egyptian unrest to underscore the hypocrisy of the United States in sometimes backing dictators over democracy. They argued that those who appear to be the greatest advocates of democracy sometimes have conflicted feelings about its spread, especially in the Middle East, where the United States fears the proliferation of populist radical Islam. China Youth Daily noted in an editorial on Sunday that “the increasing turmoil in Egypt is causing a ‘headache’ for the decision makers in Washington.”

Some of the news coverage of Egypt that has appeared in People’s Daily, the Communist Party’s main newspaper, and Xinhua, the official news agency, has focused on attempts by China to evacuate its citizens, simply leaving out the political discontent at the root of the unrest. Xiao Qiang, an adjunct professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and an expert on Internet censorship in China, said propaganda officials had recently ordered Chinese news organizations and Web sites to strictly follow Xinhua reports on Egypt.

But Mr. Xiao said some Internet forums were closely tracking the events in Egypt. “I can see the Egypt story being followed and discussed by active netizens everywhere — blogs, forums, social networking services like Kaixin and Renren,” he said. “It’s just not on the front page of major Web sites.”

The Chinese authorities’ efforts to censor and shape news on the Internet have evolved over the past few years, as they grappled with unrest during the Tibet riots in 2008 and protests against the Olympic torch relay. The authorities initiated a crackdown on pornography and other “harmful information,” including shuttering a popular liberal forum, soon after the release of Charter 08, an online manifesto calling for gradual democratic reforms that gathered thousands of signatures through e-mail.

Internet controls ramped up in late 2009, when officials observed how social networking sites and other forums helped inflame unrelated outbursts of protests and rioting in Iran and Xinjiang, the restive region in China’s west.

In an August 2009 article on the Iran protests, a monthly journal published by the central propaganda department warned of the challenge posed by sites like Twitter and Facebook, which the authorities had blocked days after riots in Xinjiang. In January 2010, after Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced a new United States policy to counter online censorship abroad, an editorial published by People’s Daily charged that the United States had used the Internet — YouTube and Twitter in particular — to stir up “online warfare” against Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Iranian president.

The Internet’s influence on the volatile events in Iran and Xinjiang “impacted the leadership like an earthquake,” said one media investor with high-level ties to China’s regulators who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of damaging that relationship.

The fact that social networking sites have fueled the protests in Egypt will no doubt spur Chinese officials to further scrutinize such sites. And they may be right to pay attention: Zhao Jing, a liberal Chinese blogger who goes by the name of Michael Anti, said that “it was amazing netizens on Twitter cared about Egypt so much” that they had begun drawing parallels between China and Egypt. President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt was being called Mu Xiaoping, a reference to Deng Xiaoping, who quashed the 1989 popular protests in Beijing, while Tahrir Square in Cairo was being compared to Tiananmen Square.

Yet, there are intellectuals in Beijing skeptical of any similar protests arising in China, mainly because this nation’s dynamic economy has given many Chinese hope for a better life.

“I don’t think dissemination of such news would cause unrest in China,” said Jia Qingguo, associate dean of international relations at Peking University. “Egypt is a different type of political regime from China. They are also not a socialist country. They have their own particular problems.”


Edward Wong reported from Beijing, and David Barboza from Shanghai. Jonathan Ansfield contributed reporting from Beijing. Chen Xiaoduan contributed research in Shanghai.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/01/world/asia/01beijing.html?ref=world

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2763 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 09:01am »

Wired Danger Room

Torturers, Jailers, Spies Lead Egypt’s ‘New’ Government
By Spencer Ackerman
January 31, 2011 | 11:45 am
Categories: Spies, Secrecy and Surveillance


User Image
Photo: Monasosh/Flickr


Dissidents demanding the end of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s regime had better hope they don’t end up under arrest. The first members of Mubarak’s new cabinet — a face-lift so he can stay in power — are heavily involved in the apparatus of state repression, including a spymaster who worked with the U.S. to torture terrorist suspects.

New prime minister Ahmed Shafik is a long-time deputy of Mubarak with a reputation for toughness. (Title of a 2005 profile: “With an Iron Fist.”) The new interior minister was the top jailer. And the new vice president is the Middle East’s most powerful intelligence chief. That looks less like the kind of government demanded by the protesters and more like a government designed to crack down on them.

Let’s start with the new internal-security chief, Gen. Mahmoud Wagdy, the former head of prisons. What happens in an Egyptian prison? The U.S. State Department’s annual human rights report explains: “[P]rison cells were overcrowded, with a lack of medical care, proper hygiene, food, clean water and proper ventilation. Tuberculosis was widespread; abuse was common, especially of juveniles in adult facilities; and guards brutalized prisoners.”

As interior minister, Wagdy will run the police forces responsible for keeping the regime in power. After a brief disappearance over the weekend, when several cities saw riots break out amidst the protests, the police returned to the streets Sunday. That prompted many Egyptians to wonder if Mubarak pulled the police back to tell the country that the alternative to his regime is chaos. Wegdy’s ascension would place someone familiar with crackdowns at the helm of those forces.

The most striking appointment is the new vice president: Omar Suleiman, Egypt’s top spy. Egypt’s intelligence services are considered the most robust in the Arab world — and a crucial asset to the west. When the Clinton and Bush administrations sought to hold terror suspects in foreign countries — where the United States could turn a blind eye to how they were treated — Egypt was the “obvious choice,” according to Jane Mayer’s 2008 book The Dark Side.

Torture against dissidents is widespread in Egypt, especially against the country’s Islamic militants — several of which joined al-Qaeda, including its deputy leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri. Suleiman “negotiated directly with top [CIA] officials,” Meyer reports, to take control of captured terrorists. The first, an Egyptian named Talaat Fouad Qassem, was captured by the United States in 1995 in Croatia and simply “disappeared” after the Egyptians took custody of him. The then-U.S. ambassador to Egypt described Suleiman as “very bright, very realistic” about “the negative things that the Egyptians were engaged in, of torture and so on. But he was not squeamish.”

That lack of squeamishness has yet to characterize Mubarak’s response to the protests. Mubarak wants to hold on to power, and so he’s not yet engaged in a bloodletting. But dissidents are calling for a general strike and a million-strong protest march Tuesday to force Mubarak out. With his new security officials in place, Mubarak would be well-positioned to crack down.

A journalist in Alexandria, Sharif Kouddous of the “Democracy Now” radio program, reported Sunday that protesters chanted against Suleiman and Shafik, “calling them collaborators with the U.S.” So much for mollifying the reform movement with a new cabinet.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/01/torturers-jailers-spies-lead-egypts-new-government/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2764 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 09:05am »

Telegraph

Wikileaks: Libyan 'frogman' sent to train in Rome couldn't swim

In Libya, where corruption and nepotism are often stitched into the fabric of society, it is often not a case of what you know, but who you know.

User Image


By Christopher Hope
1:55PM GMT
01 Feb 2011

One of the dispatches from Feb 17 2009 and titled “The frogman who couldn’t swim: a co-operation cautionary tale”, recounts how the Italian Government funded a Libyan to attend “a training program in Rome on underwater explosives detection and demolition”.

It continues: “After several days of classroom instruction, the candidates - it was a regional course and included students from several countries - were taken to the pool for their first practical session in the water.

“The instructor directed the students to don their masks and regulators and enter the deep end of the pool; however, after several minutes, the Libyan student had still not entered the water.

“The instructor walked up to the student, put his mask on, shoved the regulator in his mouth and pushed him into the pool. The Libyan student sank like a stone, spit [sic] out his regulator and swallowed a great deal of water.

“After pulling him out and pumping the water out of lungs, the Italians learned that the Libyan student could not swim and was not a member of the Libyan GPC for Public Security or any GOL [Government of Libya] entity.

“He was the cousin of an official tasked with selecting participants for training programs and had simply wanted a vacation in Rome.”

Italy’s interior minister Roberto Maroni contacted Tripoli “straight away to pre-empt any Libyan accusations of mistreatment of their man”.

Italian officials also verbally protested that Tripoli “had sent an unqualified candidate to participate in a program paid for by the Italian government.

“The next day, the Italian Embassy received a formal written reply in which the GOL [Government of Libya] frostily averred that it was the responsibility of the Italian governnment to ensure that candidates for its training programs were properly qualified, and that the Italians should have taught him how to swim.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/wikileaks/8296172/Wikileaks-Libyan-frogman-sent-to-train-in-Rome-couldnt-swim.html

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2765 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 09:09am »

Telegraph

Top 10 uncracked codes

Although the internet has spawned a multi-billion dollar industry in creating and cracking codes, crypologists have yet to solve some of the oldest riddles. Below are ten of the most notable:

By Nick Britten
8:30AM GMT
01 Feb 2011


1. The Phaistos Disk is considered the most important example of hieroglyphic inscription from Crete. Discovered in 1903, both sides of the clay disc are covered with hieroglyphs arranged in a spiral zone, impressed on the clay when it was damp. Forty five different types of signs have been distinguished, of which a few can be identified with the hieroglyphs in use in the Proto- palatial period.

2. Linear A is one of two linear scripts used in ancient Crete discovered and named by Arthur Evans. Linear B was deciphered in 1952 by Michael Ventris and was used to write Mycenaean Greek. Linear A is partially understood but parts of it produce works unrelated to any known language.

3. Kryptos is a sculpture by the American artist James Sanborn, located on the grounds of the Central Intelligence Agency in Langley, Virginia. Since its dedication in 1990, there has been much speculation about the meaning of the encrypted messages it bears.

4. Chinese Gold Bar Cipher. In 1933, seven gold bars allegedly issued to a General Wang in Shanghai, China. These gold bars, which contain pictures, Chinese writing, some form of script writing, and cryptograms in Latin letters, appear to represent metal certificates related to a bank deposit with a U.S. Bank and the Chinese writing has been translated, and discusses a transaction in excess of $300,000,000.

5. Beale Ciphers are said to be three encrypted messages which pinpoint where a man named Beale buried two wagons-full of treasure at a secret location in Bedford County in the 1820s. It is claimed one of the messages has been solved, which detailed the tons of gold, silver and jewels that were buried, along with a general location. The still unsolved messages supposedly give exact directions, and a list of who the treasure belongs to.

6. Voynich Manuscript is at least 400 years old and is a 232-page illuminated manuscript entirely written in a secret script. It is filled with copious drawings of unidentified plants, herbal recipes of some sort, astrological diagrams, and many small human figures in strange plumbing-like contraptions. In 2004 there were some compelling arguments which described a technique that would seemingly prove that the manuscript was a hoax, but to date, none of the described techniques have been able to replicate a single section of the Manuscript, so speculations continue.

7. The Dorabella Cipher was written by the composer Elgar in 1897. He sent a letter to a young friend, Miss Dora Penny, the 22 year-old daughter of the Rev. Alfred Penny, Rector of St Peter’s, Wolverhampton, and with it a cipher which to this day has remained unsolved.

8. Chaocipher. John F. Byrne invented Chaocipher in 1918 and tried unsuccessfully for almost 40 years to interest the U.S. government in his cipher system. He offered a reward to anyone who could break his cipher but the reward was never claimed. It has latterly been re-examined by members of his family to determine whether there is any commercial value in it.

9. The D’Agapeyeff cipher is an as-yet unbroken cipher that appears in the first edition of Codes and Ciphers, an elementary book on cryptography published by the Russian-born English cartographer Alexander D’Agapeyeff in 1939. Offered as a “challenge cipher” at the end of the book, it was not included in later editions, and D’Agapeyeff is said to have admitted later to having forgotten how he had encrypted it. It has been argued that the failure of all attempts at decryption is due to D’Agapeyeff incorrectly encrypting the original text. However, it has been argued that the cipher may still be successfully attacked using computational methods such as genetic algorithms.

10. Taman Shud. An unidentified male body was found on Somerton Beach in Adelaide, Australia in 1948 wearing a sweater and coat despite the hot day, carrying no identification. There were no clues as to his identity and dental records and fingerprints matched no living person. An autopsy discovered bizarre congestion, blood in the stomach and enlarged organs but no foreign substances. A suitcase found at the train station that may have belonged to the man contained a pair of trousers with a secret hidden pocket, which held a piece of paper torn from a book imprinted with the words “Taman Shud”. The paper was matched to a very rare copy of Omar Khayyam’s ‘The Rubaiyat’ that was found in the backseat of an unlocked vehicle and on the back of the book was scrawled five lines of capital letters that seem to be a code. To this day, the entire case remains one of Australia’s most bizarre mysteries.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/8293375/Top-10-uncracked-codes.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4284
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2766 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 09:36am »

Fox News

Astonishing Photos of One of Earth's Last Uncontacted Tribes


Published February 01, 2011

User Image
Gleison Miranda/FUNAI/Survival International
Tribe members painted with red and black vegetable dye watch a Brazilian government plane overhead.


Stunning new photos taken over a jungle in Brazil reveal new images of one of the last uncontacted tribal groups on the planet.

The photos reveal a thriving, healthy community living in Brazil near the Peruvian border, with baskets full of manioc and papaya fresh from their gardens, said Survival International, a rights organization working to preserve tribal communities and organizations worldwide.

Survival International created a stir in 2008, when it released similar images of the same tribal groups -- images that sparked widespread allegations that the pictures were a hoax. Peru’s President Garcia has publicly suggested uncontacted tribes have been 'invented' by 'environmentalists' opposed to oil exploration in the Amazon, while another spokesperson compared them to the Loch Ness monster, the group explains on its site.

Survival International strongly disputes those allegations, however. A spokeswoman for the group told FoxNews.com that the Brazilian government has an entire division dedicated to helping out uncontacted tribes.

"In fact, there are more than one hundred uncontacted tribes around the world," the group explains.

Peru has yet to make a statement about the newly released pictures, which were taken by Brazil’s Indian Affairs Department, the group said. Survival International is using them as part of its campaign to protect the tribe’s survival -- they are in serious jeopardy, the organization argues, due to an influx of illegal loggers invading the Peru side of the border.

Brazilian authorities believe the influx of loggers is pushing isolated Indians from Peru into Brazil, and the two groups are likely to come into conflict. Marcos Apurina, coordinator of Brazil's Amazon Indian organization COIAB said in a statement that releasing the images was necessary to prove the logging was going on -- and to protect the native groups.
"It is necessary to reaffirm that these peoples exist, so we support the use of images that prove these facts. These peoples have had their most fundamental rights, particularly their right to life, ignored … it is therefore crucial that we protect them," he said.

"The illegal loggers will destroy this tribe," agreed Survival International’s director Stephen Corry. "It's vital that the Peruvian government stop them before time runs out. The people in these photos are self-evidently healthy and thriving. What they need from us is their territory protected, so that they can make their own choices about their future."

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/02/01/astonishing-photos-reveal-earths-uncontacted-tribes/#ixzz1Cin2rcDI

User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2767 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 12:06pm »

Amazing! Thanks Swamprat.
Good morning. grin
Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2768 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 12:09pm »

The Atlantic

Apollo 14's Lunar Module Reflects the Sun



User Image


The Apollo 14 mission is often eclipsed by Apollo 11's achievement of President Kennedy's goal of landing the first humans on the Moon and returning them to Earth safely, but it, too, accomplished important goals. The third to land on the Moon, the astronauts of Apollo 14, led by commander Alan Shepard, collected 93 pounds of Moon rocks and conducted several surface experiments during their nine-day mission.

Shepard was only able to famously smash two golf balls from the Moon with a club he brought with him from Earth because of the successful landing on the lunar surface of Antares, the module seen in the photograph above. Antares spent 33 hours on the Moon's surface after lunar module pilot Edgar Mitchell guided it there. Here, Antares reflects a brilliant flare from the sun, described by the astronauts as having a jewel-like appearance, according to NASA.

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/02/picture-of-the-day-apollo-14s-lunar-module-reflects-the-sun/70571/

Crystal


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
CA519705950
Senior Member
ImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 587
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2769 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 4:16pm »

on Jan 31st, 2011, 6:39pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Hey CA5!

I saw your Myers-Briggs thread. Interesting thread. My neighbor wrote two books re: Myers-Briggs. Wine types and Pet types Myers-Briggs style. They are really fun takes on the tests.

Crystal

Hiya Crystal smiley.
Now they sound pretty amusing! Have they been published by any chance?
User IP Logged

"Death does not concern us, because as long as we exist, death is not here. And when it does come, we no longer exist."
Epicurus.
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2770 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 5:15pm »

on Feb 1st, 2011, 4:16pm, CA519705950 wrote:
Hiya Crystal smiley.
Now they sound pretty amusing! Have they been published by any chance?


Hi CA5, cheesy
Yep.............

http://www.amazon.com/WINE-TYPES-Discover-Inner-Grape/dp/1424318149/ref=sr_1_8?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1296601854&sr=1-8

As much about your inner self as about the world of wine, the enjoyable book Wine Types gives a unique perspective on both. --Michael Bishop, Wine Manager, Green's Beverages
--Green's Beverages - Atlanta, Georgia

Intelligent, fun and eductional. Great for both the novice and the experienced wine drinker. A great addition for teambuilding, social or wine education events. - Jocelyn Whitton, Wine Consultant, E.J. Gallo, Canada

--E.J.Gallo Canada

How entertaining...as a woman in the wine industry for many years this is a fresh perspective on not only wine and its history but your own personality.
Diane Easterday Andrews, Samson Estates Winery, Everson, Washington
--Samson Estates Winery, Everson, WA

~

http://www.amazon.com/Pet-Types-Communing-Heart/dp/1615843604/ref=sr_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1296601924&sr=1-10

Do you and your pet have a lot in common? 'Pet Types - Communing Heart to Heart' offers a look at how well we know each other and what we can learn from one another. It includes an assessment you can take on yourself and your pet, as well as stories illustrating different personality traits. The 'Dog Walk Talk' section is a collection of philosophical conversations that have been shared with my dogs on our daily jaunts. Sharing and appreciating the qualities that make us unique can lead to the discovery of what is truly relevant in life. Portions of proceeds go to animal welfare organizations.

About the Author
Maureen Kelly, author of 'Wine Types: Discover Your Inner Grape' has been passionate about animals since the day she went looking for dinosaurs in the S.F. Bay at 2 years of age. She has been conducting seminars on interpersonal communication for 20 years and now wishes to spread that understanding to the animal companions we have the privilege to share our lives with.

~

Maureen taught Myers-Briggs for years. She is one of the kindest most gentle human beings you could ever meet.

Crystal

« Last Edit: Feb 1st, 2011, 5:17pm by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2771 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 5:23pm »

New York Times

February 1, 2011
New Service Allows Egyptian Voices to Be Heard
By CHRISTINE HAUSER

With the unruly sounds of protests in the background, the Egyptian man declared there were 50,000 demonstrators in the streets of Cairo.

“And the number is growing,” he said, raising his voice to be heard on the recording.

Unedited, raw, anonymous and emotional, Egyptian voices are trickling out through a new service that evades attempts by the authorities to suppress them by cutting Internet services.

There is still some cellphone service, so a new social-media link that marries Google, Twitter and SayNow, a voice-based social media platform, gives Egyptians three phone numbers to call and leave a message, which is then posted on the Internet as a recorded Twitter message. The messages are at twitter.com/speak2tweet: http://twitter.com/speak2tweet
and can also be heard by telephone.

The result is a story of a revolution unfolding in short bursts. Sometimes speaking for just several seconds, other times for more than a minute, the disembodied voices convey highly charged moments of excitement or calm declarations of what life is like in Egypt, the Arab world’s most populous country, as it seeks to overturn the rule of its leader.

The messages rolled out as Egyptians seemed to be approaching a crucial point, with hundreds of thousands of people crammed into central Cairo on Tuesday, as protests continued to demand the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak.

Protesters have sought to use social media like Facebook and Twitter to muster momentum for attendance at demonstrations, even as the Egyptian authorities have shut off Internet access.

“Urgent news,” one caller to speak2tweet said. “The police have changed to serve the people. We are very happy.”

As of Tuesday afternoon, the account had more than 8,000 followers.

Not all of the callers were inside Egypt. On Tuesday, the service started to identify the country from which each recorded message came. While most were from Egypt, they included calls from Germany and the United States in Arabic and English, as well as messages from Arabic speakers in the Netherlands and Turkey.

It was clear that support for the uprising in Egypt had crossed borders.

“I live in Jordan,” said one man, urging on the demonstrators in a crackly recording. “I want to congratulate Egyptians on their popular revolution.”

One man calling from the United States criticized what appeared to him to be the double standard of democracies that support a “dictator who ruled for 30 years.”

“If you don’t stand with the people who are looking for freedom, they are not going to believe any more of everything you say about democracy and freedom,” the man said.

Another man, speaking for several seconds, introduced himself simply as an Egyptian engineer named Wael. Without a trace of irony in a message that could potentially be heard by millions, he voiced dismay over cuts to the Internet.

But no Internet connection is needed for speak2tweet, and in Egypt there was some phone service. Vodafone was working for text and voice on Tuesday, while AT&T BlackBerry users said MobiNil was working. Callers in Egypt had three numbers to leave recorded messages, based in the United States (1-650-419-4196), in Italy at (39-06) 6220-7294 and in Bahrain at (973) 1619-9855.

Then the service will instantly send the recorded call as a Twitter message using the hashtag #egypt. They are subject to international calling charges, but Google and SayNow, which announced last month that it had been acquired by Google, are also exploring the possibility of setting up a local phone number in Egypt, a person close to the project said Tuesday.

“Like many people, we’ve been glued to the news unfolding in Egypt and thinking of what we could do to help people on the ground,” said a joint statement posted Monday by Ujjwal Singh, the co-founder of SayNow, and AbdelKarim Mardini, Google’s product manager for the Middle East and North Africa.

“Over the weekend, we came up with the idea of a speak-to-tweet service — the ability for anyone to tweet using just a voice connection,” the statement said.

“We hope that this will go some way to helping people in Egypt stay connected at this very difficult time. Our thoughts are with everyone there.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/02/world/middleeast/02twitter.html?_r=1&ref=world

Crystal
edit to add speak2tweet link
« Last Edit: Feb 1st, 2011, 5:25pm by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4284
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2772 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 8:22pm »

Fox News

Hunting for Earth-like Alien Planets: Q & A with Astronomer Geoff Marcy


Published February 01, 2011
Space.com

Since astronomers discovered the first planet beyond our own solar system back in 1992, they've been on somewhat of a roll — the tally now tops 500.

And the finds are about to ramp up dramatically. Today (Feb. 1), NASA's planet-hunting Kepler mission will make much of its data public. A press conference will follow tomorrow, during which researchers are expected to announce intriguing new information about many more possible alien planets.
One man leading the charge is Geoff Marcy, an astronomer at the University of California, Berkeley, and a Kepler co-investigator.

Marcy has had a hand in finding more alien planets than anyone else. He helped spot 70 of the first 100. He also found the first multi-planet system around a sun-like star, and he discovered the first planet that transits — or passes in front of — its star from our perspective on Earth.
SPACE.com caught up with Marcy last month in Seattle, at the winter meeting of the American Astronomical Society, to chat about the accelerating pace of planet discovery, what we still don't know about alien worlds and whether there might be intelligent life elsewhere in the universe.

SPACE.com: What has led to the recent explosion in alien planet discoveries? Is it primarily better instrumentation, or better techniques?

Marcy: Well, let me give you a different vantage point. There is a bunch of astronomers who've been working really hard, and they're really innovative, pushing on the frontier technically, pushing on the frontier in terms of the science. And basically burning the midnight oil, essentially literally. I'm giving you the human component of all of this, because sometimes you don't get to see it.

SPACE.com: So if we were to have this conversation in 20 years, where do you think the total exoplanet count would stand?

Marcy: Honestly, Kepler's so good that it's hard to beat it. It gets the numbers. Kepler's going to find thousands. There's going to be another follow-up to Kepler, either from Europe or the U.S. or both. They'll find thousands.

I bet by 2020, there'll be 10,000 planets, and by 2030 there might be another 20,000 or 30,000 more planets.

SPACE.com: Will this discovery arc we're on now continue to go up exponentially, or will it plateau?

Marcy: It'll plateau, because you can't do much better than Kepler. But let's be fair here. It's not the number of planets we care about; it's the quality. We want the Earth-size. We want planets in the habitable zone, and ultimately planets that are sending little radio signals to us for some reason or another.

SPACE.com: You've said that, with exoplanets, theory has really struck out. What are some of the things that we thought we knew, but it turns out were totally wrong about?

Marcy: Well, the first thing — I go back to 1996. No one wants to talk about this, because it's so embarrassing. The reason that as a community we struggled to find the first hot Jupiters isn't because we didn't have the technology. It's because the theorists led us astray. I'm speaking slightly jokingly, but not really.

There were theorists who said, "Look at our solar system. Of course the small, rocky planets are close in. The host star burned off the gases, so you're left with rocky planets. And look at the giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn — they had to form farther out, because it's colder, and the gases can gravitationally stick to the planets. Therefore, all planetary systems will have the following architecture: There will be an inner planet. The second planet out will be named Venus. The third planet out will have great lattes." I mean, it was just silly.

SPACE.com: And that's based on a sample size of one.

Marcy: It would be like trying to characterize human psychology by going to one distant Indonesian island and interviewing one person, and thinking that that gave you the full range of human psychology. And in 1996, there were papers where they said, Jupiter-sized planets, Saturn-sized planets, will all orbit far from their host star. Well, that of course tells you what to look for. If you write a proposal to try to find anything else, you're flying in the face of wisdom.

SPACE.com: So do you think we are starting to get a handle on exoplanets now?

Marcy: I think so. We're always a little too confident, so I would hate to say, "Go home, we're all done." We do have these planets we're finding with Doppler work, and now with Kepler, that are five times the size of Earth, three times the size of Earth, 1.4 times the size of the Earth. And I don't think we really know how they formed.

SPACE.com: What are some of the biggest mysteries that are left?

Marcy: There's one huge one that nobody really wants to talk about. It's the age-old question: Are Earth-like planets common? We know they're out there for sure. I mean, there's too many stars. But there's two parts to the question. What do you mean by "Earth-like?" And then, how common are they?

SPACE.com: Your research suggests that smaller planets may be pretty common — that nearly one in four nearby sun-like stars could host a roughly Earth-size planet.

Marcy: Yeah. But here's the sleeper idea that no one wants to talk about: Because Earth-size planets are so much smaller than the Jupiters, Saturns, Uranuses and Neptunes, and we now know that planets often get thrust into eccentric and misaligned orbits, the Earths are like the Volkswagens on a highway full of 18-wheelers.

SPACE.com: It's one thing to say they can form. But to say that they'll actually stick around long enough — that's a totally different question.

Marcy: Yeah. And I think they'll form. It's hard to imagine they wouldn't. If you make Jupiters, why wouldn't you make Earth-size planets? But the Earths — and maybe the Volkswagen is giving it too much credit. It's an 18-wheeler and a tricycle. Earth is a tricycle on Highway 5 running up and down the Pacific Coast.

And you don't even have to hit the tricycle. You just have to come close enough that gravity slingshots the poor tricycle right out of the system. So it's possible that Earth-like planets form, they get thrown out into the cold darkness of the galaxy and they have no chance of starting — never mind sustaining — life, because it's too cold out there.

And that's possible. We might be rare.

And by the way: Where are the SETI [search for extraterrestrial intelligence] signals? There is a non-detection that's like the elephant in the room. Forty years of Frank Drake and Carl Sagan looking for SETI signals, and we have precisely zero to show for it. So there's an indication — not definitive — that maybe the Earth is more precious than we had thought.

Copyright © 2010 Space.com. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/02/01/hunting-earth-like-alien-planets-q-astronomer-geoff-marcy/#ixzz1ClMipSY5
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2773 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 8:31pm »

Thanks for that article Swamp!
Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12235
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #2774 on: Feb 1st, 2011, 8:34pm »

Ancient Egypt Online

Dr. Hawass provides an update regarding the state of Egyptian Antiquities - Feb. 1

"Yesterday, Dr. Zahi Hawass was appointed as the Minister of Antiquities, a newly created department that will be charged with the care and protection of all Egyptian monuments and museums. This department will absorb the Supreme Council of Antiquities, and Dr. Zahi will continue excavating, writing books, and representing his country.

The following statement was made by Dr. Hawass this morning:

I would like to tell the people, all over the world, the good news: the storage magazine that was looted in Qantara, in the Sinai, has had 288 objects returned! I cannot say exactly how many objects were lost, but it seems that the majority of what was stolen has been returned.

I would like to say that we were afraid that sites around Alexandria were robbed, but the military is now protecting them all. Also, the site of San el-Hagar in the Delta, where important 21st and 22nd Dynasty tombs are located, is being protected by the local Egyptians. More good news comes from Saqqara, where a committee reported that, although outlaws did open the padlocks of tombs there, they did not enter the tombs or cause any damage; everything is safe. The Egyptian Museum, Cairo, is fine, too. A total of seventy objects have been broken, but the museum was dark and the nine robbers did not recognise the value of what was in the vitrines. They opened thirteen cases, threw the seventy objects on the ground and broke them, including one Tutankhamun case, from which they broke the statue of the king on a panther. However, the broken objects can all be restored, and we will begin the restoration process this week.

The commanders of the army are now protecting the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, and all of the major sites of Egypt (Luxor, Aswan, Saqqara, and the pyramids of Giza) are safe. The twenty-four museums in Egypt, including the Coptic and Islamic museums in Cairo, are all safe, as well. I would like to say that I am very happy to see that the Egyptian people, young and old, stood as one person against the escaped prisoners to protect monuments all over the country. The monuments are safe because of both the army and the ordinary people."

Quoted Text from:
Dr. Hawass' blog: http://www.drhawass.com/blog/state-egyptian-antiquities-today-update?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+DrhawasscomWritings+%28DrHawass.com+-+Writings+by+Dr.+Zahi+Hawass+Feed%29

Additional Source(s):
Washington Post: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/01/AR2011020102755.html

New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/02/world/middleeast/02antiquities.html


http://ancientegyptonline.org/egyptnews/p/dr-hawass-provides-an-update-regarding-the-state-of-egyptian-antiquities-feb-1

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 183 184 185 186 187  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 19,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls