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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 114182 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #300 on: Jul 27th, 2010, 6:35pm »

I don't agree with the one reviewer, "Kean presents the most accurate, most credible reports on UFO's you will ever find. She has fought long and hard to discover the facts...."

Richard Dolan is SUPERMAN with his "UFO's and the National Security State", two volumes.

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« Reply #301 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 07:54am »

LA Times

Epic legal battle over oil spill is about to begin
A panel of federal judges will decide who will oversee lawsuits against BP, Transocean and others. Plaintiffs and defendants say location is key.
By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer

July 28, 2010

The largest oil spill in U.S. history has unleashed a gusher of at least 250 class-action lawsuits that could eventually encompass millions of victims in a legal battle expected to stretch on for decades.

The first step in what many experts predict will be among the most complex environmental cases to hit the U.S. courts begins Thursday when an army of attorneys converges on Boise, Idaho, where a federal panel will start to decide what judge or judges will oversee the cases and where they will be heard initially.

"The stakes here are tremendous," said Georgene Vairo, a Loyola Law School professor of civil procedure and expert in complex litigation. "For a single-event type of incident, this is the biggest we've ever seen, just in the range of claims, the government and private-party actions, the cost of claims, the insurance aspects. It's just the whole nine yards. It's huge."

Since the April 20 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig, hundreds of trial attorneys have descended on Gulf of Mexico states, some garnering clients by advertising on billboards and holding town hall meetings. They have filed scores of lawsuits seeking damages expected to reach into the double-digit billions from BP, Transocean Ltd. and other companies.

The vast majority of the suits have been filed by fishermen, charter operators, restaurants and property owners claiming financial losses after the disaster shut down fisheries and pummeled coastal tourism. One suit seeks payouts for the diminished property values of every land, home and business owner within five blocks of the gulf shore.

Families of the 11 men killed in the explosion have filed wrongful-death suits. Seafood processors and marinas have sued over their dwindling revenues.

Complaints have flooded in from afar as well. An Ohio-based investment fund hit by falling oil industry share values is seeking damages. And a group of South Carolina beach hoteliers has filed suit, saying they are suffering from a spate of cancellations because tourists fear the oil will reach around to the East Coast.

Environmental defense groups have sued on behalf of dead and injured wildlife. Veteran litigators have gone so far as to target BP with civil RICO actions, accusing the company of negligence so willful that it should be subjected to the steep penalties of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act.

"This spill has caused tremendous fallout in the legal arena," said New Orleans environmental attorney Allan Kanner, noting that the scope of the accident already far eclipses that of the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska, which led to more than 20 years of courtroom wrangling.

The panel of seven federal judges, known formally as the U.S. Judicial Panel for Multidistrict Litigation, is responsible for sorting through the mountain of legal actions and will hear the parties' arguments about where all pretrial proceedings should be consolidated. The assignments are expected to be decided within a few weeks.

The panel often consolidates litigation from mass-casualty accidents like plane crashes and train wrecks, or victims alleging a common cause of their problems, such as those suffering from asbestos exposure. The panel recently assigned more than 200 lawsuits brought against Toyota alleging sudden acceleration and other defects to a judge in Southern California.

Location is key, the plaintiffs and defendants agree.

Those with seafood industry and marine services businesses devastated by the spill want their cases merged in New Orleans or Mobile, Ala., close to where they live and work.

BP, the majority owner of the leaking oil well, has asked the panel to send the entire docket to Houston, the corporate heart of the oil industry, and specifically to U.S. District Judge Lynn N. Hughes. Like many judges in the gulf, Hughes has long-standing ties to and investments in energy industries.

Anticipating the surge of litigation, Transocean, which operated the drilling rig, quickly filed a petition in a Houston courtroom, seeking to limit its liability. Because Judge Keith Ellison has begun work on that case in Houston, legal analysts expect the panel to send all defendant challenges to liability to his bench.

The judge or judges selected to handle the spill cases will have tremendous power. The judges will appoint a steering committee of plaintiffs' lawyers from among all who have filed suit. A defense lawyers' panel will also be named.

The appointed jurists will decide important fact-finding and discovery issues, determine whether the cases can even move forward, vet the parties' expert witnesses and rule on the admissibility of evidence. A key objective will be to press the parties to settle rather than go to trial.

The companies targeted by lawsuits are also under federal investigation by the U.S. Coast Guard and the Justice Department, which could expose them to fines and recovery costs in addition to court-ordered compensation.

Many legal analysts expect the judicial panel to split up the huge caseload. Under this scenario, one judge might be assigned all the economic loss complaints, and others would oversee environmental claims, securities actions, RICO charges and the liability limitation efforts.

Still, professor Vairo said, it wouldn't be surprising for a single judge to be put in charge of all the litigation.

"The facts here are going to be relevant to every single claim. What did they do when they built that pipeline and well? Who did what in terms of maintaining the well over time? Did they do the required inspections?" Vairo said. Once those questions are answered in one case, they can be applied to the rest, she said.

Most of the lawsuits have been filed under the post-Valdez Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Although that statute caps a company's liability at a total of $75 million, it holds the firm responsible for paying unlimited cleanup and environmental restoration costs. However, if victims' attorneys can prove that BP and the others were willfully negligent, the liability cap comes off and the companies have to pay what the court orders.

Charlie Tebbutt, an Oregon attorney representing the Center for Biological Diversity in its suit alleging violations of the Clean Water Act, said he was pursuing the maximum penalties against BP and Transocean of $4,300 per barrel of oil spilled into the gulf. He estimates the bill could be $20 billion, "if we can prove gross negligence or willful misconduct, which we expect should be relatively easy to prove in this case."

Attorney Kanner, who represents the state of Louisiana, said, "We are witnessing nothing short of a collapse of an ecosystem that took tens of thousands of years to create." He added that it would have a domino effect on the region's economy.

Filing of lawsuits has tapered off since last month's announcement of an out-of-court program for settling claims from a $20-billion fund established by BP. But if claimants despair of that process, they could abandon it and turn to the courts.

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-oil-spill-lawsuits-20100728,0,563444.story

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« Reply #302 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 07:57am »

LA Times

Australia's marsupials originated in what is now South America, study says
The research in PLoS Biology suggests that Australian kangaroos, wallabies and more evolved from a common South American ancestor millions of years ago.
By Jessie Schiewe, Los Angeles Times

July 28, 2010

The kangaroo, a beloved national symbol of Australia, may in fact be an ancient interloper.

A study published Tuesday in the online journal PLoS Biology suggests that Australian marsupials — kangaroos, wallabies, Tasmanian devils and more — evolved from a common South American marsupial ancestor millions of years ago. The finding, by researchers at the University of Munster in Germany, indicates that the theory that marsupials originated in Australia is incorrect.

Marsupials are characterized by distinctive frontal pouches in which they carry their young. There are seven existing orders, three from the Americas and four from Australia.

One prominent theory, now validated by the new study, suggested that ancient South American marsupials migrated across Antarctica to Australia more than 80 million years ago when the continents were connected in a supercontinent known as Gondwana. But scientists had also theorized that the first marsupials migrated from South America to Australia and then back again.

A third theory was that marsupials originated in Australia and then traveled to South America.

Up till now, it had been hard to verify any of the theories, said Matt Phillips, a biologist at the Australian National University in Canberra, who was not involved in the study.

"Ancient fossil records for marsupials are very poor, particularly in Australia," Phillips said. "This has made it hard to understand early migration patterns and relationships amongst the species."

Previous studies had tried to tackle the question by comparing small bits of DNA or physical differences between marsupials, such as ankle joint characteristics, Phillips said. The new study, in contrast, examines large chunks of marsupial genomes for evolutionary clues.

The team started by analyzing the genome sequences for the South American opossum and the Australian tammar wallaby. They specifically looked at DNA features called retroposons, types of "jumping genes" that pass virtually unchanged from mother to offspring. When two species share retroposons with very similar genetic sequences it is likely that they are derived from the same ancestor. The scientists found 53 similar retroposons in the opossum and wallaby, verifying their common ancestry.

The team then compared the wallaby and opossum data to the DNA of 20 other marsupial species, including the wallaroo, the common wombat, and the marsupial mole, to find out which marsupial lineages are more closely related and which split off first.

They found that all of the species had common retroposons, and thus a common ancestor. Closer analysis revealed that the South American opossum order, Didelphimorphia, was the oldest living marsupial order, indicating that all marsupials originated in South America.

"Scientists had always suspected there was a common ancestor between South American and Australasian marsupials but now we finally understand where they may have originated and how they branched off from one another," said study lead author Maria Nilsson, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Munster.

The study also cleared up years of confusion about where to group a marsupial called the monito del monte (mountain monkey). Although this creature is native to South America, it has more characteristics in common with Australian marsupials, and so scientists had debated its closest relatives for many years, Phillips said.

The DNA comparisons clearly showed that the mountain monkey belongs to the South American group on the marsupial evolutionary tree.

http://www.latimes.com/news/science/la-sci-marsupial-20100728,0,5549873.story

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« Reply #303 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 08:02am »

Telegraph

FBI arrests 'mastermind' of Mariposa botnet computer code
International authorities have arrested a computer hacker believed responsible for creating the malicious computer code that infected as many as 12 million computers, invading major banks and corporations around the world, FBI officials have said.

Published: 7:00AM BST 28 Jul 2010

A 23-year-old Slovenian known as Iserdo was picked up in Maribor, Slovenia, after a lengthy investigation by Slovenian Criminal Police there along with FBI and Spanish authorities.

His arrest comes about five months after Spanish police broke up the massive cyber scam, arresting three of the alleged ringleaders who operated the so-called Mariposa botnet, stealing credit cards and online banking credentials. The botnet - a network of infected computers - appeared in December 2008 and infected more than half of the Fortune 1,000 companies and at least 40 major banks.

Botnets are networks of infected PCs that have been hijacked from their owners, often without their knowledge, and put into the control of criminals.

Jeffrey Troy, the FBI's deputy assistant director for the cyber division, said that Iserdo's arrest was a major break in the investigation. He said it will take the alleged cyber mastermind off the street and prevent him from updating the malicious software code or somehow regaining control of computers that are still infected.

Officials declined to release Iserdo's real name and the exact charges filed against him, but said the arrest took place about 10 days ago and the man has been released on bond.

"To use an analogy here," said Mr Troy, "as opposed to arresting the guy who broke into your home, we've arrested the guy that gave him the crowbar, the map and the best houses in the neighborhood. And that is a huge break in the investigation of cyber crimes."

Mr Troy said more arrests are expected and are likely to extend beyond Spain and Slovenia and include additional operators who allegedly bought the malware from Iserdo. Authorities would not say how much Iserdo supposedly charged, but said hackers could buy the software package for a certain amount, or pay more to have it customized or get additional features. Internet reports suggest the fees ranged from as much as $500 for basic packages to more than $1,300 for more advanced versions.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/7913767/FBI-arrests-mastermind-of-Mariposa-botnet-computer-code.html

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« Reply #304 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 08:05am »

Telegraph

Tarantulas on the loose in Britain
Britain could be facing a tarantula invasion after a number of the spiders were discovered in gardens in some parts of the country, wildlife experts have warned.

By Andrew Hough
Published: 7:00AM BST 28 Jul 2010

The RSPCA has issued an alert urging people to be on their guard amid fears a large batch of the spider has escaped in the north of the country.

The alert came after two separate incidents involving 10cm-wide Chilean Rose tarantulas in Bolton, Greater Manchester.

The rare arachnids, capable of blinding people by spitting hairs in their eyes, were both found in back gardens within two miles of each other.

Both spiders are the same age, breed and gender.

Experts said it suggested they could be part of a larger batch. The slow-moving large spiders from South America are a popular breed among collectors.

Lisa Broad, 20, found the first spider in her garden on the Oldhams Estate in Sharples.

She called the RSPCA, who re-homed the creature, named Fang, at Smithills Open Farm.

Three-and-a-half weeks later another woman from Lostock discovered another tarantula, which was sitting on her garden wall.

The woman, who did not want to be named, eventually trapped it under a plant pot on her path and alerted the RSPCA.

Derek Hampson, an inspector for the animal welfare charity, said: "We advised her to keep it under the plant pot until we arrived. They can quite happily go a week without food, so it was quite content.

"It got a bit aggressive when I picked it up. I wore safety goggles as these creatures can spit hairs which can blind you.

"It is possible there could be more out there, but unfortunately we havent got the resources to search for them."

He added: "It is up to members of the public to call us if they spot any."

Mr Hampson took the female, which is known to kill the male after mating, to Bugworld in Liverpool.

Jenny Dobson, the Bugworld curator, said: "It is rare for one of these to come in and we saw... there had been another with the same characteristics found outdoors.

"It is likely they came from the same place.

"It would be too much of a coincidence otherwise for two breakouts and they cant survive in the wild for long with the UK climate.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/7913369/Britain-facing-tarantula-invasion-RSPCA-warns.html

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« Reply #305 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 08:08am »

Wired

Build Us a Better Ray Gun, Pentagon Pleads
By Olivia Koski July 27, 2010 | 4:41 pm |

The Department of Defense continues its quest for the ultimate (or at least a working) ray gun, asking small businesses last week to submit ideas for lasers that sense, communicate, illuminate targets and shoot missiles out of the air.

No surprises here — the military wants ‘em small, light, efficient and devastatingly powerful. To date, real-life ray guns are still too big, bulky and complicated for the battlefield, even when they’re powerful enough to blow things up.

Take the lethal-yet-unwieldy Airborne Laser, which shot down a ballistic missile in midair last February. The laser weapon took up every last corner of a tricked-out Boeing 747, but according to the Missile Defense Agency the megawatt-class chemical laser is “too large and expensive to field in large numbers on many operational airborne platforms.” (Pictured above is the jet the Airborne Laser uses as a target in practice blasts.)

One way to lighten the payload is with a chemical laser that uses gas instead of liquid to store energy. The all-gas-phase-iodine-laser (AGIL) could be as powerful as the Airborne Laser’s chemical-oxygen-iodine-laser (COIL), but lighter and easier to manage, the Missile Defense Agency hopes.

Of course solid-state, or “electric” lasers are much more compact than liquid or gas lasers, and with an energy supply that “is rechargeable and clean,” according to the Air Force. But they’re typically 100 to 1,000 times less powerful.

Still, they are considered “the laser of choice in the long term,” especially the fiber-optic laser, “which integrates well with other sensors and electro-optical elements in the aerospace environment,” according to the proposal solicitation. It asks for companies to come up with novel ways to combine fiber lasers up to the kilowatt-class level — far short of the 100-kilowatt power level considered entry-level dangerous.

Eventually, a 100-kW fiber laser system could be compact enough for shorter-range tactical missions on something like a fighter jet. The Air Force is “exploring and developing several aircraft mounted high energy laser (HEL) systems for precision strike and self-defense missions.”

Any aircraft-mounted laser system also needs a laser-beam stabilization system to help compensate for aircraft vibrations, which is the focus of one Air Force program. A separate effort calls for development of a system to account for atmospheric distortions. These have been around for a while, so make sure your idea is 10 times better than anything else out there. According to the description, the program seeks to “extend the capabilities of adaptive optics by a factor of 10 over the current state-of-the-art for adaptive optics.”

Darpa also wants one of its programs to achieve a factor-of-10 improvement on existing systems, asking for a “fiber-coupled diode laser system with brightness that is at least 10 times higher than the current state-of-the-art.”

Other new ray-gun programs include a Navy one to use lasers to foil heat-seeking missiles, an Air Force call for a 100-kW “Magnetron” — a high-power microwave weapon to stop improvised bombs — as well as a program to harden its own weapons to “against electromagnetic threats, including HPMs, employed by adversaries.”

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/07/build-us-a-better-ray-gun-pentagon-pleads/

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« Reply #306 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 08:10am »

Wired Danger Room

Marines’ Stealth Jet Struggling to Lift Off
By Noah Shachtman July 28, 2010 | 6:29 am

90% of America’s combat aviation power is eventually supposed to come from F-35 Joint Strike Fighters. But the $388 billion program has busted its budget so badly, it’s on the verge of collapse. So a couple of weeks back, some two-bit defense pundit proposed overhauling the JSF effort by getting rid of its most expensive, most technically-complex model: the one for the Marines that takes off and lands vertically, helicopter-style. It’s a neat trick but its battlefield utility is debatable. “The Marines have talked themselves into believing they really need this capability,” one senior defense official told me. “But it’s one we’ve never counted on in any fight.”

Now, as if on cue, the Marines’ Joint Strike Fighter is once again proving itself to be the problem child of the F-35 program. Bob Cox with the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram reports that the Lockheed Martin-built F-35B has only completed 91 of its test flights this year — far short of the 125 scheduled. “Failure rates are higher than predicted,” Lockheed CEO Bob Stevens tells Cox. The cooling fans, lift fan doors, actuators, and other switches are the current headaches.

In contrast, Cox notes, test flights for the stealth jet’s two other models “are both well ahead of plan.” Looks like it’s time for those to be the only two models.

Of course, just when the JSF program needs to trim down, the House defense appropriations panels lards it up with $450 million for a second F-35 engine that the Pentagon says it doesn’t need. As if the program wasn’t expensive and complicated enough already.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/07/marines-stealth-jet-struggling-to-lift-off/

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« Reply #307 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 08:16am »

Wired

My war wikileaked. Why the public and the military can't count on those battle logs.

By Noah Shachtman
July 28, 2010 |
7:24 am |
Categories: Army and Marines

Echo company got into a gunfight last August 25th in Afghanistan’s Helmand province. You’ll learn that by reading the report found in WikiLeaks’ database. You’ll learn that, after a chase, the marines killed one insurgent. You’ll learn that the insurgents supposedly fled and that the troops – part of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Marines — decided to stay the night in the area in case the militants returned.

What you won’t learn is that a marine sniper team sparked the shoot-out with a surprise assault on the insurgents; that every member of that team was nearly killed in the battle; that the incident would kick off a three-day siege in which the Taliban nearly had the Echo company squad surrounded; that this spot eventually became an Echo company base; or that, while this extended gun fight was going on, British and Afghan troops were nearby, waging a more gentle form of counterinsurgency as they sat cross-legged under shady patches of farmland and talked with village elders.

I happen to know this because I was there with Echo company, reporting for WIRED magazine. And the wide difference between what actually happened at the Moba Khan compound and what the report says happened there should give caution to those who think they can discover the capital-T truth about the Afghanistan conflict solely through the WikiLeaks war logs. It should also give pause to those officers in military headquarters who count on these updates to learn about what’s happening on the front lines. The military has a problem in how it talks to itself. These reports — ultra-compressed, and focused solely on the bombs-and-bullets part of the war — are a symptom of that shaky reporting system. They have their utility, of course. But they’re not smart or broad enough for the complexities of a war like Afghanistan.

My article in today’s Wall Street Journal has more. (Go through Google News to read it, if you’re not a subscriber.)

After the jump: a week’s worth of WikiLeaked reports from Echo Company. For all the combat that’s recorded, it’s actually just a slice of the action those marines saw during that short time. Also, check out how this terse notice of a bomb dropped on Moba Khan differs from what actually went down.

Continue Reading “My War, WikiLeaked: Why the Public (and the Military) Can’t Count on Those Battle Logs” »

after the jump
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703977004575393523349648264.html


http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/07/my-war-wikileaked-why-the-public-and-the-military-cant-count-on-those-battle-logs/

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« Reply #308 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 08:20am »

i newswire

Most Haunted Dr. Ciaran O’Keeffe And Ex-MOD UFO Investigator Nick Pope In Wiltshire For Weird 10 UFO And Paranormal Conference

Weird 10 : 2010 Paranormal & UFO Conference, Warminster Keeping Wiltshire Weird This August, eleven TV Celebrities, Authors and world wide speakers will arrive in Wiltshire for the counties largest UFO & Paranormal event.

I-Newswire) July 27, 2010 - This August, eleven TV Celebrities, Authors and world wide speakers will arrive in Wiltshire for the counties largest UFO & Paranormal show.

Weird 10 will be held in the atmospheric Athenaeum Victorian theatre in Warminster for two days of talks, lectures, live music and sky watching in the Wiltshire market town. Hundreds of people are expected to descend on the town for the event.

The speakers for Saturday are Kevin Goodman, Wal Thornhill, Nick Pope, Dr. David Clarke and Andy Roberts. Sunday will see Dr. Ciaran O’Keeffe, Philip Mantle, Brian Allan, Ross Hemsworth and ASSAP presenting. The event is hosted by world wide known paranormal personality Malcolm Robinson.

With such a diverse guest list many different subjects and theories will be covered from the Supernatural in Warfare and Paranormal investigation to alternative theories of the cosmic standard model and the Rendlesham Forest Incident. There is something for everyone at the event regardless of your belief!

We also offer a daily coach service from Swindon which is ideally located with major rail and road links.
Free copies of Paranormal Magazine will be on offer and merchant stall areas will be stocked with all kinds of paranormal related items. The event will also launch books by authors Andy Roberts, Philip Mantle, Malcolm Robinson and Brian Allan.

An open question and answer session on Saturday is followed by Free live music in the evening by 'The Programme Initiative,' an innovated band that mixes stunning visuals with their music and celebrates a post-disclosure world. The evening ends with a chance to join the legendary UFO Warminster sky watch held at Cradle Hill on the outskirts of the town.

You can also save over 10% on the price of a weekend pass by purchasing your tickets in advance of the event.
Date 21st and 22nd August. Talks 9:15am – 5:30pm both days.

Ticket Prices: £35 for a weekend pass if bought in advance, £20 per day on the door.
The live band is FREE and are playing on the 21st from 7:30pm – 9:00pm

The Sky Watch is FREE and will take place at Cradle Hill from 9:00pm onwards.
Venue: Athenaeum Theatre, High Street, Warminster.

http://www.i-newswire.com/most-haunted-dr-ciaran-o-keeffe/50908

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« Reply #309 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 08:30am »

King5 News Seattle

Not many dogs would take on a black bear and survive. But a chihuahua did at a campground near Cle Elum on Sunday.

Video Report
http://www.king5.com/video?id=99442504&sec=549122

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« Reply #310 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 2:07pm »

Seattle Times
Please keep Petty Officer Newlove in your prayers.
Crystal

A sailor from West Seattle serving in Afghanistan is missing and the target of a massive search by Afghan and NATO forces.

The search for Petty Officer 3rd Class Jarod Newlove unfolds as the Taliban claim to have taken a U.S. serviceman captive. While not confirming that Newlove is the serviceman being held, NATO officials, in a statement released Tuesday, said the international coalition "holds the captors accountable for the safety and proper treatment of our missing service member."

Newlove, 25, and a second sailor, Petty Officer 2nd Class Justin McNeley, left their Kabul base Friday for a trip to the Charkh District of Logar province, where the Taliban have a strong presence.

Pentagon officials confirmed Tuesday that Newlove is missing and reported that McNeley, 30, died of wounds suffered Friday. International forces recovered his body after an extensive search. McNeley is from Wheatridge, Colo., and was assigned to the Navy's Assault Craft Unit One in San Diego.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2012459380_missingsailor28m.html
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« Reply #311 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 4:06pm »

Hello Wingsie. wink And welcome back, Swamprat. Hope you had a decent time and had a nice b-day party. smiley
on Jul 28th, 2010, 2:07pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Seattle Times
Please keep Petty Officer Newlove in your prayers.
Crystal

Will do. He looks like a nice guy. Hope he'll be found and alright.
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« Reply #312 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 7:16pm »

on Jul 28th, 2010, 4:06pm, philliman wrote:
Hello Wingsie. wink And welcome back, Swamprat. Hope you had a decent time and had a nice b-day party. smiley

Will do. He looks like a nice guy. Hope he'll be found and alright.


Hi Phil! cheesy
Yes, he does look like a nice guy. Thanks for the prayers. I do believe in prayer.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #313 on: Jul 28th, 2010, 7:22pm »

A Zedonk

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A Zedonk is the result of a donkey and a zebra cross breeding. One was recently born in a Georgia wildlife preserve. The baby's parents are a female donkey and a male zebra. The adorable little female looks like she is wearing striped soccer socks. The preserve's owner says the foal is already showing signs of zebra like instincts and will be allowed to roam freely with the other animals in about 2 weeks.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #314 on: Jul 29th, 2010, 07:09am »

Good morning all! smiley

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