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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 76436 times)
WingsofCrystal
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3330 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 2:10pm »

Karyn Dolan


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Through The Keyhole
with host Karyn Dolan

www.paranormalradionetwork.com

Fridays, 8-10 pm EST
Online or on UPRN 105.5 FM in New Orleans (7-9 pm CST)

Access past episodes of Through the Keyhole

on the Paltalk instant message board during the show,
or call toll-free at 1-877-786-0562

E-mail me at kdolan@rochester.rr.com

Follow me on Twitter!
www.twitter.com/karyndolan

~

She is married to Richard Dolan.

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3331 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 2:20pm »

on Mar 15th, 2011, 1:44pm, philliman wrote:
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3332 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 2:57pm »

Thanks, Jon. Never saw that movie.

on Mar 15th, 2011, 2:10pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Karyn Dolan


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Through The Keyhole
with host Karyn Dolan

www.paranormalradionetwork.com

Fridays, 8-10 pm EST
Online or on UPRN 105.5 FM in New Orleans (7-9 pm CST)

Access past episodes of Through the Keyhole

on the Paltalk instant message board during the show,
or call toll-free at 1-877-786-0562

E-mail me at kdolan@rochester.rr.com

Follow me on Twitter!
www.twitter.com/karyndolan

~

She is married to Richard Dolan.

Crystal

Oh, of course! Through the Keyhole! It's been a while since I've listened to her show. Thanks, Crystal! smiley
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« Reply #3333 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 2:59pm »

Los Angeles' six canine disaster teams arrive in Japan

Search Dog Foundation’s Los Angeles-based six canine disaster search teams finally arrived in Japan around 10:30 PT Sunday at Misawa Air Base. This base is located in Northern Japan. The teams made a stopover in Alaska on their way to Japan.

The dogs did well on their flight to Japan. Unlike most of us who fly our dogs, these dogs got to ride with their handlers in the cabin. Upon arrival they were rested with their handlers.

They are currently awaiting more details on their search assignment to travel to those areas with the highest probability of survivors.

As of the most recent report, the teams of dogs and handlers are working out transportation to Ofunato City, an area on the Northeast coast of Japan. Half of the team will be working in the area of Ofunato City to conduct reconnaissance and primary searches, while the other half will be assisting with logistics and equipment prep at the Misawa Air Base.

The canine task force will be divided into two teams. The red team will consist of Jasmine Segura and Cadillac, Eric Gray and Riley, and Gary Durian and Baxter. The blue team is Bill Monahan and Hunter, Linda Tacconelli and Joe, and Ron Horetski and Pearl.

The canines are trained to find people trapped in the rubble. All rescue personnel will be anxiously awaiting the “bark alert” from the dogs, letting them know there is someone alive, and possibly unconscious, in need of rescue.

...

Continue reading on Examiner.com: Los Angeles' six canine disaster teams arrive in Japan - Los Angeles Pets | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/pets-in-los-angeles/los-angeles-six-canine-disaster-teams-arrive-japan#ixzz1GhTKayk6
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3334 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 3:40pm »

on Mar 15th, 2011, 2:59pm, philliman wrote:
Los Angeles' six canine disaster teams arrive in Japan

Search Dog Foundation’s Los Angeles-based six canine disaster search teams finally arrived in Japan around 10:30 PT Sunday at Misawa Air Base. This base is located in Northern Japan. The teams made a stopover in Alaska on their way to Japan.

The dogs did well on their flight to Japan. Unlike most of us who fly our dogs, these dogs got to ride with their handlers in the cabin. Upon arrival they were rested with their handlers.

They are currently awaiting more details on their search assignment to travel to those areas with the highest probability of survivors.

As of the most recent report, the teams of dogs and handlers are working out transportation to Ofunato City, an area on the Northeast coast of Japan. Half of the team will be working in the area of Ofunato City to conduct reconnaissance and primary searches, while the other half will be assisting with logistics and equipment prep at the Misawa Air Base.

The canine task force will be divided into two teams. The red team will consist of Jasmine Segura and Cadillac, Eric Gray and Riley, and Gary Durian and Baxter. The blue team is Bill Monahan and Hunter, Linda Tacconelli and Joe, and Ron Horetski and Pearl.

The canines are trained to find people trapped in the rubble. All rescue personnel will be anxiously awaiting the “bark alert” from the dogs, letting them know there is someone alive, and possibly unconscious, in need of rescue.

...

Continue reading on Examiner.com: Los Angeles' six canine disaster teams arrive in Japan - Los Angeles Pets | Examiner.com http://www.examiner.com/pets-in-los-angeles/los-angeles-six-canine-disaster-teams-arrive-japan#ixzz1GhTKayk6


Thanks Phil.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3335 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 3:56pm »

Hank goes to the bait shop....... grin


http://www.wimp.com/verysmart/
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3336 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 5:20pm »

on Mar 15th, 2011, 3:56pm, Swamprat wrote:
Hank goes to the bait shop....... grin


http://www.wimp.com/verysmart/


Wow! Go Hank! He reasoned that out. Tell me they aren't smart!
Thanks Swamp.
Crystal
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« Reply #3337 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 6:40pm »

Regardless of the truth, this British spokesperson Clarke sounds like a real dill-weed.....

The Sarasota Herald Tribune

Devoid


March 15th, 2011 09:43am

While trying to do some ‘real’ research…

by Billy Cox

There was an actual bona fide headliner in the otherwise lusterless batch of UFO documents released by the British Ministry of Defence through its National Archives a couple of weeks ago: The files on the controversial 1980 Rendlesham Forest incident had been destroyed. Even the BBC couldn’t ignore it.

This well-documented UFO drama unfolded over several nights in late December of that year at an American NATO base housing nuclear weapons. One could assume there were national security issues in play, and several retired USAF veterans shared their eyewitness accounts of it at a press conference last year in Washington.

The researcher who organized that event, UFOs and Nukes author Robert Hastings, wasn’t surprised by the latest news. “The Brits are playing the same game the Pentagon did with the old Blue Book files,” he says from his home in New Mexico. “They’re trying to misdirect everybody by releasing a lot of low-level crap.”

The release reignited a l0ng-running battle between Hastings and David Clarke, the British journo professor who works in concert with the National Archives and introduces each bundled release with a foreword. In his blog, Clarke defended the lapse in transparency. “The conspiracy theorists,” he wrote, “have been making hay with the revelation that some MoD files covering the period of their cause celebre, the Rendlesham UFO incident, have been destroyed.”

Clarke explained the Rendlesham files weren’t specificly targeted for destruction; rather, they were part of a routine purge involving numerous documents. “It’s unlikely that the lost … files from 1980-81 contained anything substantially different to what has survived in the famous ‘Rendlesham File’ itself, released at [the Archives] last August as DEFE 24/1948/1. Indeed, this file actually contains papers and minutes from what … officers copied from the ‘lost’ files.”

Included in Clarke’s sanguine conclusion was a double-dog dare-ya: “So in actual fact nothing of substance has in fact been lost at all! A big fuss about nothing. If anyone out there wants to make a big deal about the loss of these files, they first need to do some real research and get their facts right.”

De Void tried to do some real research and get the facts right by checking out DEFE 24/1948/1 online. But ruh-roh! The Archives says the link is “not currently available,” and that “This document is closed and cannot be viewed or reproduced as a digital or printed copy.” Furthermore, according to the Archives’ access status, DEFE /24/1948/1 won’t be available to the public until Jan. 1, 2033.

We’ll give Hastings the last word:

“Some folks are calling [Clarke] a government-affiliated shill. I won’t go that far. He is just an arrogant, biased academic posturing as an expert in a field about which he knows very little. In short, he is the perfect dupe for the boys at the MoD.”

The good news: Only 22 years to wait before we find out there’s nothing to hide!

Share and Enjoy:

http://devoid.blogs.heraldtribune.com/

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« Reply #3338 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 7:30pm »

dill weed...I like that.
Thanks Swamp.
Crystal
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« Reply #3339 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 7:31pm »

This just arrived in my email.


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« Reply #3340 on: Mar 15th, 2011, 7:38pm »




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« Reply #3341 on: Mar 16th, 2011, 09:08am »

New York Times

March 16, 2011
Japan Says 2nd Reactor May Have Ruptured With Radioactive Release
By HIROKO TABUCHI and KEITH BRADSHER

TOKYO — Japan’s nuclear crisis intensified on Wednesday after the authorities announced that a second reactor unit at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant in northeastern Japan may have ruptured and appeared to be releasing radioactive steam.

The break, at the No. 3 reactor unit, worsened the already perilous conditions at the plant, a day after officials said the containment vessel in the No. 2 reactor had also cracked.

Such were the radiation levels above the plant, moreover, that the Japanese military put off a highly unusual plan to dump water from helicopters — a tactic normally used to combat forest fires — to lower temperatures in a pool containing spent fuel rods that was overheating dangerously. The operation would have meant flying a helicopter into steam rising from the plant with potentially high radiation levels.

However, in one of a series of rapid and at times confusing pronouncements on the crisis, the authorities insisted that damage to the containment vessel at the No. 3 reactor — the main focus of concern earlier on Wednesday — was unlikely to be severe.

Yukio Edano, the chief cabinet secretary, said the possibility that the No. 3 reactor had “suffered severe damage to its containment vessel is low.” Earlier, he had said only that the vessel may have been damaged and columns of steam were seen rising from it in live television coverage.

Mr. Edano’s assessment came as the reactor’s operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company, said it had been able to double the number of workers at the plant to 100 from 50. It was not immediately clear when the additional workers returned to the plant after the evacuation of 750 workers on Tuesday, leaving a skeleton crew of 50 struggling to reduce temperatures in the damaged facility.

Tokyo Electric said on Wednesday, however, that workers took cover for 45 minutes on site, and left water pumps running at reactors No. 1, 2 and 3. There was no suspension of cooling operations, said Kazuo Yamanaka, an official of Tokyo Electric, a Fukushima-based company. The vessel that possibly ruptured on Wednesday had been seen as the last fully intact line of defense against large-scale releases of radioactive material from the stricken reactor, but it was not clear how serious the possible breach might be.

The revised official assessment of the severity of the damage may have been designed to reduce some concerns about the containment vessel, which encloses the core, but the implications of overheating in the fuel rod pool — which is also at the No. 3 reactor — seemed potentially dire.

The developments were the latest in Japan’s swirling tragedy since an earthquake and tsunami struck the country with unbridled ferocity last Friday. Emperor Akihito made his first ever televised appearance on Wednesday to tell the nation he was “deeply worried” about the nuclear crisis.

Such is the growing international alarm about the nuclear crisis that France announced it was urging its citizens living in Tokyo to head to safer areas or to leave the country — apparently the most urgent instruction offered by foreign countries that so far had largely limited their advisories to simply avoid nonessential travel. Germany urged its citizens to move to areas farther away from the stricken nuclear plant.

Earlier on Wednesday, Mr. Edano, the chief cabinet secretary, said the government believed the steam was coming from the No. 3 reactor, where an explosion on Monday blew out part of the building surrounding the containment vessel.

The reactor has three layers of protection: that building; the containment vessel; and the metal cladding around fuel rods, which are inside the reactor. The government has said that those rods at the No. 3 reactor were most likely already damaged.

A spike in radiation levels at the plant as the steam was rising forced some of the relatively few workers left at the plant to retreat indoors, suspending some critical efforts to pump water into several reactors to keep them cool.

Earlier in the morning, the company that runs the plant reported that a fire was burning at a different reactor, just hours after officials said flames that erupted Tuesday had been doused.

A government official at Japan’s nuclear regulatory agency soon after said that flames and smoke were no longer visible, but he cautioned that it was unclear if the fire, at the Reactor No. 4 building, had died out. He also was not clear if it was a new fire or if the fire Tuesday had never gone out.

There are a total of six reactors at the plant.

The developments are troubling reminders of the difficulties the company is having in bringing the plant, which has suffered multiple explosions since Saturday, under control.

Tokyo Electric Power says it cannot know for sure what is happening in many cases because it is too dangerous for workers to get close to some reactors.

The situation became especially dire on Tuesday, when releases of radiation led the company to pull most of its workers from the plant.

Among the authorities’ main concerns are pools for spent fuel rods at several reactors at the plant, including Reactor No. 4, where the pool has lost some of the water needed to keep the fuel rods stable. The rods are still radioactive and potentially as hot and dangerous as the fuel rods inside the reactors.

The explosion on Tuesday was caused by hydrogen gas bubbling up from chemical reactions set off by the fuel rods in the pool, Japanese officials said. Inspectors from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission said they had been told by Japanese authorities that what was burning was lubricating oil from machinery near the pool.

Concern remained high about the storage pools at two other reactors, Nos. 5 and 6. None of those three reactors at the plant, 140 miles northeast of Tokyo, were operating on Friday afternoon when an offshore earthquake with a magnitude now estimated at 9.0 shook the site. A tsunami rolled into the northeast Japanese coastline minutes later, swamping the plant.

At least 750 workers were evacuated on Tuesday morning after a separate explosion ruptured the inner containment building at Reactor No. 2 at the Daiichi plant, which was crippled by Friday’s earthquake and tsunami. The closely spaced but apparently coincidental explosions at Reactors Nos. 2 and 4 together released a surge of radiation 800 times as intense as the recommended hourly exposure limit in Japan.

But 50 workers stayed behind, a crew no larger than would be stationed at the plant on a quiet spring day. Taking shelter when possible in the reactor’s control room, which is heavily shielded from radiation, they struggled through the morning and afternoon to keep hundreds of gallons of seawater a minute flowing through temporary fire pumps into the three stricken reactors, Nos. 1, 2 and 3, where overheated fuel rods continued to boil away the water at a brisk pace.

By early afternoon radiation levels had plunged, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency. Workers have released surges of radiation each time they bleed radioactive steam from the troubled reactors in an attempt to manage the pressure inside them, but the reactors are not yet releasing high levels of radiation on a sustained basis, Japanese officials said.

The United States military revised its plans as radiation from the plant worsened. Some American warships that had been expected to arrive at the tsunami-shattered northeast coast of Honshu Island were diverted to the west coast instead because of concerns about radiation, the Navy said.

The Navy also promised to continue relief missions even though several more helicopter crews were testing positive for low-level exposure to radiation, and even as American military personnel and their families at the Yokosuka and Atsugi bases were encouraged to take precautions against radiation exposure.

Late Tuesday morning, Prime Minister Naoto Kan warned in a nationally televised address of rising radiation.

Mr. Edano, the chief cabinet secretary, urged people who live within about 18 miles of the plant to take precautions. “Please do not go outside, please stay indoors, please close windows and make your homes airtight,” he said. Yukiya Amano, the director general of the International Atomic Energy Agency, said at the organization’s Vienna headquarters that there was a “possibility of core damage” at reactor No. 2, but that the damage “is estimated to be less than 5 percent of the fuel.”

The sudden turn of events, after an explosion on Monday at one reactor and then an early-morning explosion on Tuesday at yet another — the third in four days at the plant — had already made the crisis at the plant the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl reactor disaster a quarter-century ago.

It had become impossible for workers to remain at many areas within the plant for extended periods, the agency said. In Tokyo, the metropolitan government said Tuesday that it had detected radiation levels 20 times above normal over the city, though it stressed that such levels posed no immediate health threat and that readings had dropped since then.

The explosion in Reactor No. 2, a little after 6 a.m. on Tuesday, particularly alarmed Japanese officials and nuclear power experts around the world because it was the first detonation at the plant that appeared to occur inside one of the primary containment vessels.

Those buildings are fortresslike structures of steel and reinforced concrete, designed to absorb the impact of a plane crash and minimize radiation leaks.

more after the jump
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/17/world/asia/17nuclear.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #3342 on: Mar 16th, 2011, 09:13am »

New York Times

March 15, 2011, 10:00 pm
Freddie Mac’s Former Chief May Face S.E.C. Action
By BEN PROTESS and AZAM AHMED

The former chief executive of Freddie Mac may face a civil action as the government ramps up an investigation of disclosure practices at the mortgage finance giant and its sister company, Fannie Mae, people briefed on the investigation said.

The executive, Richard F. Syron, a former president of the American Stock Exchange and now an adjunct professor and trustee at Boston College, has received a so-called Wells notice from the Securities and Exchange Commission, an indication the agency is considering an enforcement action against him.

Mr. Syron, who has not been accused of any wrongdoing, is the latest executive mentioned in the government’s sweeping examination of the two government-controlled companies. Three others have already been sent Wells notices, and at least two others are thought to have received them, the people briefed on the investigation said.

Last week, Daniel H. Mudd, the former chief executive of Fannie Mae, received a Wells notice, and another former Fannie executive is expected to receive one as well, these people said.

The S.E.C.’s long-running investigation is now zeroing in on how Freddie and Fannie publicly disclosed their exposure to risky loans and whether those depictions were too rosy, according to the people briefed on the investigation who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the inquiry was still under way.

Although the companies offered detailed snapshots of their mortgage portfolios, the S.E.C. is exploring whether they underreported their ownership of subprime loans and mortgages that required few documents from borrowers.

The government continues to examine the potential culpability of people and agencies involved in the mortgage mess and the subsequent financial crisis.

The Justice Department has investigated Fannie and Freddie but no charges have been brought.

The S.E.C., which has faced intense criticism for bringing few prominent cases stemming from the crisis, has now spent two years interviewing former and current employees at the two companies. If the case against Fannie and Freddie officials proceeds, it may shape up to be one of the most significant actions brought by the agency in recent years.

The S.E.C., however, could decline to file suit against any of those who received Wells notices. Recipients of such a notice can choose to challenge the allegations against them in hopes of heading off any civil action. After receiving his notice in mid-January, Mr. Syron offered a rebuttal to the possible accusations on Feb. 22, according to his lawyer, Mark D. Hopson.

“We have made a submission to the commission which demonstrates that Mr. Syron, as C.E.O., oversaw a very rigorous and fulsome disclosure process and that the company’s disclosures were in fact wholly accurate and complete,” Mr. Hopson, a partner at Sidley Austin, said in a statement. “Any proposed charges against our client are completely without merit.”

Mr. Mudd, now the chief executive at the publicly traded hedge fund Fortress Investment Group, is also planning to contest any allegations against him. So far, Mr. Mudd has the support of Fortress.

Donald J. Bisenius, an executive vice president at Freddie Mac, and Anthony S. Piszel, the former chief financial officer at Freddie, both received notices as well and are also challenging them. Mr. Bisenius plans to leave Freddie Mac, while Mr. Piszel has resigned as chief financial officer of CoreLogic.

The S.E.C. investigation centers on Fannie’s and Freddie’s disclosures from 2006 to 2008. Regulators are focusing on the way both companies reported their subprime mortgage portfolios and concentrations of loans extended to borrowers who offered little documentation, also known as Alt-A loans.

The issues relate to how the two companies defined subprime. While there is no universal definition, it is often identified with characteristics that include borrowers with low credit scores and poor payment histories. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, however, categorized loans as prime or subprime based on the lender rather than on the loan itself. At Fannie, the company adopted lenders’ differing definitions of what constituted Alt-A loans, causing the company to underreport its exposure.

During that period, however, both companies did disclose to investors breakdowns of their loan portfolios by slicing data according to borrowers’ credit scores and how much equity they had in their homes, among other information, filings show.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were public companies that operated with a Congressional mandate to foster homeownership. They do not offer loans, but instead buy up thousands of mortgages from lenders, package them and sell them as securities to investors. The lenders, for their part, use the money to offer new loans to consumers.

By 2005, lawmakers and lenders began to push the companies to delve deeper into the risky subprime markets, to enhance business and offer the chance of homeownership to a segment of the population often ignored by lenders. The companies, meanwhile, sought to regain market share that they had ceded to Wall Street.

But the billions of dollars in risky mortgages acquired at the height of the real estate bubble ultimately sank the once-mighty mortgage financiers. The Bush administration rescued Fannie and Freddie from the brink of collapse in September 2008, effectively making them wards of the federal government.

The companies have since tapped more than $100 billion from their government lifelines. Fannie recently requested an additional $2.6 billion from the Treasury Department while Freddie requested $500 million.

Last month, Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner said the two companies should be slowly wound down.

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/ex-chief-of-freddie-mac-may-face-civil-action/?ref=business

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« Reply #3343 on: Mar 16th, 2011, 09:16am »

LA Times

Moammar Kadafi's forces bomb Benghazi

Warplanes attack a military airport in the Libyan rebel stronghold. It's the first assault on the city since the uprising began a month ago. Meanwhile, intense fighting occurs in Ajdabiya as Kadafi moves to crush the rebellion.

By Jeffrey Fleishman and David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
6:14 AM PDT, March 16, 2011
Reporting from Sultan, Libya —


Moammar Kadafi's warplanes bombed a military airport in Benghazi on Wednesday, the first assault on the eastern rebel stronghold since a revolt by inexperienced fighters with outdated weapons began one month ago to topple the Libyan dictator.

The airport attack came as government troops attempted to tighten their grip on Ajdabiya, 95 miles southwest of Benghazi, while rebels armed with rocket-propelled grenades and traveling in speedboats fired on Libyan ships off the Mediterranean coast.

The day spun into a succession of pitched battles and fleeing refugees as government soldiers pushed to crush the uprising and Kadafi scoffed at international criticism and the threat of a Western-backed no-fly zone over the country. The Libyan leader has gained momentum in recent days against an often erratic and confused insurgent force.

A siege of Benghazi would test the nerves, firepower and tenacity of a rebel force that has many times fled under heavy bombardments by better-armed government troops.

Guards at the military airport said two bombs struck outside the base and three exploded inside shortly after dawn. There were no reports of casualties. A crater along the complex's outside wall was quickly filled in by rebels, who have been loath to acknowledge their setbacks. One insurgent raised his rifle to force journalists from the airport's entrance.

The most intense fighting unfolded in Ajdabiya, the last rebel bastion before Benghazi and a key weapons depot.

Government troops attacked the city on Tuesday, holding it for hours before withdrawing to the outskirts as rebels launched a counteroffensive. By Wednesday morning, with war planes circling high overhead and rebel pickups racing down desert highways, Kadafi's forces surged on the city again as smoke plumes rose on the horizon and civilians gathered their belongings and fled.

"The shelling went on until 3 a.m.," said Mari Atiya, who was escaping in a truck with his wife, two children, five sheep and cartons of diapers. "When it stopped, we saw people dead in the street and cars destroyed. There were snipers on rooftops with red lasers on their guns and they show teenage boys who raised their arms."

A rebel helicopter skimmed low from Benghazi and flew toward Ajdabiya. Bursts of gunfire were heard closer to the coast, and it appeared that Kadafi's army was attempting to ring perimeters and gradually squeeze in opposition fighters. The rebels claimed to have captured from 300 to 700 Libyan solders and eight tanks.

Insurgents said their forces had at least two warplanes that had attacked key targets, including the city of Surt, Kadafi's hometown, and commercial ships the government has armed to indiscriminately shell cities. Those reports could not be independently confirmed, but the battle has spread to the air and along the coast.

The government's strategy has been to wage intense bombardments during the day and retreat at night while rebels counter-attack. But each day, Kadafi's forces have edged closer to Benghazi, where many of the city's residents were defiant but also seemingly oblivious to an impending onslaught.

Hundreds of men, women and children marched along the city's Martyrs' Square, chanting anti-Kadafi slogans, firing guns into the air and berating the international community for not imposing a no-fly zone to keep Kadafi's air force grounded. Thumping revolutionary anthems blared from a loudspeaker just hours after the airport was bombed.

"Nobody is afraid,'' said Ramadan Budarra, 28, a construction company safety officer. "Look, even the women are out demonstrating. Kadafi can't even take Ajdabiya, so how can he even come close to Benghazi?''

Rebels at a checkpoint in Sultan, about 20 miles north of Ajdabiya, said younger, inexperienced fighters had been replaced at the front by about 1,000 professionally trained soldiers who had defected from Kadafi's army. The fighters refused to let journalists drive closer to Ajdabiya.

The rebels claimed other victories too. They said they added special commandos and several armored personnel carriers to the fight in Ajdabiya.

Mustafa Gheriani, a spokesman for the opposition national council, said a rebel frigate intercepted an oil tanker late Tuesday carrying 25,000 tons of fuel bound for government use in Tripoli. He said rebels escorted the tanker, from Greece, to the rebel-held port in Tobruk and captured 30 government sailors. The opposition says it has deployed three Russian-made frigates — outdated military ships that have limited firepower but are relatively nimble and swift.

Gheriani also said he believed it was a ground-launched rebel missile, not an airstrike, that hit the Kadafi stronghold at Surt.

Mafta Mousa, a retired navy officer attending the opposition rally, said, "Nobody fears this madman. He tries to intimidate the people, but no one is afraid of him.''


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-benghazi-bombed-20110317,0,5729330.story

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3344 on: Mar 16th, 2011, 09:24am »

Wired

March 16, 1926: Goddard Launches Rocketry
By Tony Long
March 16, 2011 | 7:00 am
Categories: 20th century, Engineering, Space Exploration


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Goddard 8 March 1926 in Massachusetts.
photo taken by his wife.



1926: Robert Goddard’s folly becomes fact with the first successful launch of a liquid-fueled rocket, performed at his Aunt Effie’s farm in Connecticut.

Goddard has long been considered the father of modern rocketry, but it wasn’t always that way. His ideas of sustainable rocket-powered flight were ridiculed by some colleagues early on, and laughed at in the press.

But he was appreciated abroad, especially in Germany, where the rocket’s potential as a weapon was accepted and eventually realized. Wernher von Braun, who helped develop the V-2 rocket used against England during World War II (and which, ironically, had its first test flight 16 years to the day after the launch at Effie’s farm), described Goddard as an early influence.

Goddard’s great technical achievement was to devise a method that radically increased the fuel efficiency of the rocket engine, to the point where a heavy mass could be propelled upward with minimum fuel expenditure. This, more than any other factor, is what made Goddard’s vision of interplanetary travel feasible.

The press, especially The New York Times had been very hard on Goddard and openly mocked his belief of reaching the moon in a 1920 editorial. But the Times eventually came around. On July 17, 1969, the day after Apollo 11 left for the moon, it got around to running this belated retraction:

“Further investigation and experimentation have confirmed the findings of Isaac Newton in the 17th century, and it is now definitely established that a rocket can function in a vacuum as well as in an atmosphere. The Times regrets the error.”


Video: Excerpt from the “‘Moonwalk Series: Episode 1: The Day Before,” a four-part documentary series made in the 1970’s about the Apollo 11 mission. (Courtesy NASA)

video after the jump
http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2011/03/0316rocket-man-robert-goddard/

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