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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 91828 times)
Swamprat
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3615 on: Apr 11th, 2011, 6:26pm »

I know there are other threads on the release of FBI UFO files, but here is a Fox interview with Lynn Kitei relative to the FBI's Utah reports:

http://video.foxnews.com/v/4638527/fbi-investigation-of-ufos-/
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3616 on: Apr 11th, 2011, 7:12pm »

on Apr 11th, 2011, 2:21pm, realitybeyond wrote:
You have been very tired of the OMF
and here you are maybe craving
for the elusive shift of the minds.


Hello realitybeyond.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3617 on: Apr 11th, 2011, 7:13pm »

on Apr 11th, 2011, 6:26pm, Swamprat wrote:
I know there are other threads on the release of FBI UFO files, but here is a Fox interview with Lynn Kitei relative to the FBI's Utah reports:

http://video.foxnews.com/v/4638527/fbi-investigation-of-ufos-/


This should be interesting. Thanks Swamp.
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« Reply #3618 on: Apr 11th, 2011, 7:43pm »


Police on Bainbridge Island (Washington state) are being equipped with these video devices:


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VIEVU body worn video cameras are easy to wear and use. Holding a video camera does not always make sense. Use VIEVU to record hands-free video & audio of important or critical incidents from the perspective of the wearer.

http://www.vievu.com/

~

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3619 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 03:33am »

on Apr 11th, 2011, 7:12pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Hello realitybeyond.
Crystal


Hello, what happened so many monkeys from OMF
to be here!?

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« Last Edit: Apr 12th, 2011, 03:37am by realitybeyond » User IP Logged

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3620 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 07:28am »

Hello realitybeyond. Your writing style somehow strikes me to be familiar. Who were you over at OMF if you don't mind me asking?

I don't consider us to be monkeys. We possibly stranded here because of the much better atmosphere you can find around here and because we were in search for truth and honesty. No manipulative staff members here who censor or delete our posts simply because they don't like them. Also nobody here who wants to force his view upon us nor anybody who is an active hoax-supporter. Does this answer your question?
« Last Edit: Apr 12th, 2011, 07:29am by philliman » User IP Logged

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« Reply #3621 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 07:47am »

New York Times

April 11, 2011
Pakistan Tells U.S. It Must Sharply Cut C.I.A. Activities
By JANE PERLEZ and ISMAIL KHAN

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Pakistan has demanded that the United States steeply reduce the number of Central Intelligence Agency operatives and Special Operations forces working in Pakistan, and that it halt C.I.A. drone strikes aimed at militants in northwest Pakistan. The request was a sign of the near collapse of cooperation between the two testy allies.

Pakistani and American officials said in interviews that the demand that the United States scale back its presence was the immediate fallout from the arrest in Pakistan of Raymond A. Davis, a C.I.A. security officer who killed two men in January during what he said was an attempt to rob him.

In all, about 335 American personnel — C.I.A. officers and contractors and Special Operations forces — were being asked to leave the country, said a Pakistani official closely involved in the decision.

It was not clear how many C.I.A. personnel that would leave behind; the total number in Pakistan has not been disclosed. But the cuts demanded by the Pakistanis amounted to 25 to 40 percent of United States Special Operations forces in the country, the officials said. The number also included the removal of all the American contractors used by the C.I.A. in Pakistan.

The demands appeared severe enough to badly hamper American efforts — either through drone strikes or Pakistani military training — to combat militants who use Pakistan as a base to fight American forces in Afghanistan and plot terrorist attacks abroad.

The reductions were personally demanded by the chief of the Pakistani Army, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, said Pakistani and American officials, who requested anonymity while discussing the delicate issue.

The scale of the Pakistani demands emerged as Lt. Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha, the head of Pakistan’s chief spy agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate, or the ISI, arrived in Washington on Monday for nearly four hours of meetings with the C.I.A. director, Leon E. Panetta, and Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Two senior American officials said afterward that General Pasha did not make any specific requests for reductions of C.I.A. officers, contractors or American military personnel in Pakistan at the meetings.

“There were no ultimatums, no demands to withdraw tens or hundreds of Americans from Pakistan,” said one of the officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the tensions between the two spy services.

A C.I.A. spokesman, George Little, called the meetings “productive” and said the relationship between the two services “remains on solid footing.”

The meetings were part of an effort to repair the already tentative and distrustful relations between the spy agencies. Those ties plunged to a new low as a result of the Davis episode, which has further exposed the divergence in Pakistani and American interests as the endgame in Afghanistan draws closer.

The Pakistani Army firmly believes that Washington’s real aim in Pakistan is to strip the nation of its prized nuclear arsenal, which is now on a path to becoming the world’s fifth largest, said the Pakistani official closely involved in the decision on reducing the American presence.

On the American side, frustration has built over the Pakistani Army’s seeming inability to defeat a host of militant groups, including the Taliban and Al Qaeda, which have thrived in Pakistan’s tribal areas despite more than $1 billion in American assistance a year to the Pakistani military.

In a rare public rebuke, a White House report to Congress last week described the Pakistani efforts against the militants as disappointing.

At the time of his arrest, Mr. Davis was involved in a covert C.I.A. effort to penetrate one militant group, Lashkar-e-Taiba, which has ties to Pakistan’s military and intelligence establishment, has made deepening inroads in Afghanistan, and is perceived as a global threat.

The C.I.A. had demanded that Mr. Davis be freed immediately, on the grounds that he had diplomatic immunity. Instead, he was held for 47 days of detention and, the officials said, questioned for 14 days by ISI agents during his imprisonment in Lahore, infuriating American officials. He was finally freed after his victims’ families agreed to take some $2.3 million in compensation.

Another price, however, apparently is the list of reductions in American personnel demanded by General Kayani, according to the Pakistani and American officials. American officials said last year that the Pakistanis had allowed a maximum of 120 Special Operations troops in the country, most of them involved in training the paramilitary Frontier Corps in northwest Pakistan. The Americans had reached that quota, the Pakistani official said.

In addition to the withdrawal of all C.I.A. contractors, Pakistan is demanding the removal of C.I.A. operatives involved in “unilateral” assignments like Mr. Davis’s that the Pakistani intelligence agency did not know about, the Pakistani official said.

An American official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said without elaborating that the Pakistanis had asked “for more visibility into some things” — presumably the nature of C.I.A. covert operations in the country — “and that request is being talked about.”

General Kayani has also told the Obama administration that its expanded drone campaign has gotten out of control, a Pakistani official said. Given the reluctance or inability of the Pakistani military to root out Qaeda and Taliban militants from the tribal areas, American officials have turned more and more to drone strikes, drastically increasing the number of attacks last year.

The drone campaign, which is immensely unpopular among the Pakistani public, had become the sole preserve of the United States, the Pakistani official said, since the Americans were no longer sharing intelligence on how they were choosing targets. The Americans have also extended the strikes to new parts of the tribal region, like the Khyber area near the city of Peshawar.

“Kayani would like the drones stopped,” said another Pakistani official who met with the military chief recently. “He believes they are used too frequently as a weapon of choice, rather than as a strategic weapon.” Short of that, General Kayani was demanding that the campaign return to its original, more limited, scope and remain focused narrowly on North Waziristan, the prime militant stronghold.

A drone attack last month, one day after Mr. Davis was released, hit Taliban fighters in North Waziristan, but also killed tribal leaders allied with the Pakistani military, infuriating General Kayani, who issued an unusually strong statement of condemnation afterward.

American officials defended the drone attack, saying it had achieved its goal of killing militants. But there have been no drone attacks since then.

General Kayani’s request to reduce the number of Special Operations troops by up to 40 percent would result in the closing of the training program begun last year at Warsak, close to Peshawar, an American official said.

Informed by American officials that the Special Operations training would end even with the partial reduction of 40 percent, General Kayani remained unmoved, the American official said.

American officials believed the training program was essential to improve the capacity of the nearly 150,000 Pakistani soldiers deployed to fight the Taliban in the tribal region.

The C.I.A. quietly withdrew all contractors after Mr. Davis’s arrest, the Pakistani official said.

Another category of American intelligence agents, declared operatives whose purpose was not clear, were also being asked to leave, the Pakistani official said.

In a sign of the severity of the breach between the C.I.A. and the ISI, the official said: “We’re telling the Americans: ‘You have to trust the ISI or you don’t. There is nothing in between.’ ”

Eric Schmitt contributed reporting from Washington.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/12/world/asia/12pakistan.html?_r=1&hp

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« Reply #3622 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 07:49am »

Telegraph

Jesus crucifixion nails 'found'

Two of the nails used to crucify Jesus have been dsicovered in a 2,000-year-old tomb, according to a new film.

12:22PM BST 12 Apr 2011

The film, 'The Nails of the Cross' by Simcha Jacobovici, follows three years of research during which he presents his assertions - some based on empirical data, others requiring much imagination and a leap of faith.

He hails the find as historic, but most experts and scholars dismissed his case as far-fetched, some calling it a publicity stunt.

Many ancient relics, including other nails supposedly traced back to the crucifixion, have been presented over the centuries as having a connection to Jesus. Many were deemed phony, while others were embraced as holy.

Mr Jacobovici, who sparked debate with a previous film that claimed to reveal the lost tomb of Jesus, says this find differs from others because of its historical and archaeological context.

"What we are bringing to the world is the best archaeological argument ever made that two of the nails from the crucifixion of Jesus have been found," he said.

"Do I know 100 per cent yes, these are them? I don't."

The film begins by revisiting an ancient Jerusalem grave discovered in 1990 which was hailed by many at the time as the burial place of the Jewish high priest Caiaphas, who in the New Testament presides over the trial of Jesus.

The grave, along with a number of ossuaries, or bone boxes, was uncovered during construction work on a hillside a few miles south of the Old City. It has since been resealed.

Caiaphas is a major figure in the Gospels, having sent Jesus to the Romans and on to his death, and one of Jacobovici's assertions is that the high priest was not such a bad guy.

Two iron nails were found in the tomb, one on the ground and one actually inside an ossuary, and, according to the film, mysteriously disappeared shortly after. Mr Jacobovici says he tracked them down to a laboratory in Tel Aviv of an anthropologist who is an expert on ancient bones.

Either way, Mr Jacobovici shows why those nails could have been used in a crucifixion, which was a common practice two thousand years ago. He then offers his theory about why they may have been used in the most famous crucifixion in history.

"If you look at the whole story, historical, textual, archaeological, they all seem to point at these two nails being involved in a crucifixion," he said. "And since Caiaphas is only associated with Jesus's crucifixion, you put two and two together and they seem to imply that these are the nails."

The Israel Antiquities Authority, which oversaw the Jerusalem excavation, said in reaction to the film's release that it had never been proven beyond doubt that the tomb was the burial place of Caiaphas. It also said that nails are commonly found in tombs.

"There is no doubt that the talented director Simcha Jacobovici created an interesting film with a real archaeological find at its centre, but the interpretation presented in it has no basis in archaeological findings or research," it said.

video after the jump
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/israel/8445464/Jesus-crucifixion-nails-found.html

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« Reply #3623 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 07:54am »

LA Times

Nicolas Cage's national treasure recovered

A rare Superman comic book stolen from the actor in 2000 resurfaces and detectives are taking action.


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By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
April 12, 2011

Maybe the Man of Steel should step in and help police unravel the mystery of the Man of Steal.

An original copy of the first Superman comic book that was stolen a decade ago from actor Nicolas Cage has been recovered, and Los Angeles authorities are searching for the thief. Action Comics No. 1 — a 1938 comic book now worth as much as $1.5 million — was taken from Cage's West Los Angeles home in 2000 and discovered last month in a San Fernando Valley storage locker.

The highly sought-after first edition is now in an LAPD evidence safe as the department's art detail detectives try to bring the thieves to justice. "We have it protected in a safe and it isn't going anywhere until we finish our investigation," Det. Donald Hrycyk said Monday.

The Superman comic book, which cost 10 cents new, was part of a collection of vintage comics stolen from Cage.

The first edition depicted Superman hoisting a green sedan in the air as he breaks up the kidnapping of his Daily Planet newspaper co-worker, Lois Lane. The storyline explains how the infant Superman, known as Kal-El, was sent by his parents from a dying planet to grow up on Earth.

Hrycyk did not identify the man who claims to have discovered the rare comic book after buying the contents of an abandoned storage container at auction. The veteran art detail detective said he's still checking out the story of the man, who has been unable to identify the exact place from where the comic came.

"He claims he doesn't know the exact storage locker," Hrycyk said.

Another newspaper — the Ventura County Star, not the Daily Planet — reported that a Simi Valley liquidation company owner set up a meeting last week with New York comic book expert Stephen Fishler, who operates Metropolis Collectibles. Fishler had sold Cage the copy of Action Comics No. 1 in 1995 and said it was authentic. Aware of the theft, he alerted authorities.

Cage said Monday that he can't wait to get Superman back. "It is divine providence that the comic was found and I am hopeful that the heirloom will be returned to my family," the actor said in a statement.

The comic book was insured, but Hrycyk said that in such thefts the insurer will usually allow the original owner the right to buy back the item before auctioning it off publicly to recover the payout.

Cage has indicated in the past that he has a soft spot in his heart for the Man of Steel and comic books in general. In the 2000 theft, he also lost a 1937 Detective Comics No. 1 and a 1939 Detective Comics No. 27.

Clark Kent hasn't been heard from in the unfolding mystery. But he might be out checking the whereabouts of Lex Luthor. And maybe he should enlist the aid of Batman.

The still-missing Detective Comics No. 27 featured the first appearance of the Batman character.

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-superman-20110412-1,0,1343906.story

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« Reply #3624 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 07:59am »

Wired Danger Room

‘Stun Ray’ Will Blind You Into Submission
By Madhumita Venkataramanan
April 12, 2011 | 7:20 am
Categories: Lasers and Ray Guns


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Imagine this: A uniformed policeman is pursuing a fleeing criminal through the streets and while he huffs and puffs, the prey is speeding out of sight. The inspector whips out a mean-looking gun and zap! A flash of blinding white-light shoots out and the running man freezes, as if struck by lightning.

I’m not talking about those classic Nintendo video games with the Star Wars-inspired beam guns. I’m talking about today, with a newly patented technology created by Genesis Illumination.

Genesis has created the latest in a line of dazzle-weapons: a StunRay that can cause “temporary incapacitation…when illuminated by the [light] beam.” That’s right. It’s a high-intensity superbeam that blinds you into submission.

Let’s break this thing down and take a look inside.

The StunRay emits a controlled swath of white light, which claims to be about 10 times more intense than an aircraft landing light. (The company’s website says it is bright enough to read a newspaper a mile away).

Using bright light to incapacitate your foes is an old military idea — weaponeers have been trying it out since World War II, at least. Newer models tend to be laser-based, like the “dazzlers” being used by U.S. troops in Afghanistan, as well as the Neodymium Yttrium Aluminium Garnet laser envisioned by BAE Systems to blind pesky pirates at sea.

The StunRay is a little different; it uses bright light, not a laser. Apparently, the ray works by sending the optical nerves into overdrive because of surplus stimulus to the retina. Todd Eisenberg, the laser’s inventor, told Scientific American it was the “inverse of blindness.”

Physically, the gun is small and light, weighing about as much as a bag of flour. The width of the beam itself is adjustable so the weapon wielder can change its severity based on the threat level. It’s also got an infrared illumination tool for covert surveillance operations at night.

According to the patent claim, incapacitation occurs due to “disorientation, reduced cognitive abilities or temporarily loss of fine and gross motor skills.” Although that sounds pretty medically debilitating (doesn’t “reduced cognitive abilities” sound suspiciously like impaired brain function?), Todd Eisenberg says the victim will not suffer any lasting injury.

The StunRay is part of a legacy of non-lethal weapons developed by imaginative engineers. Compared to the Anti-Pirate Puke Spray— a high-pressure hose system that squirts an unknown barf-inducing chemical onto pirates—and the gruesome heat-shooting pain gun that was briefly deployed in Afghanistan as well as a Los Angeles prison, the StunRay is relatively mundane, technically. But the feeling when it hits you? Anything but.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/04/stun-ray-will-blind-you-into-submission/

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« Reply #3625 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 08:05am »

Hollywood Reporter

James Cameron to Make 'Avatar' Sequels in Manhattan Beach (Exclusive)
7:38 PM 4/11/2011
by Daniel Miller, Alex Ben Block


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Studio: FPI/Alamy; James Cameron: Courtesy Everett Collection


The blue people are on the move.

Director James Cameron and 20th Century Fox have signed a lease for studio and office space at MBS Media Campus in Manhattan Beach and will use the facility for the motion capture photography and high-tech production on two highly-anticipated sequels to Avatar, the biggest blockbuster of all time.

Cameron confirmed to THR the deal for space at the 1600 Rosecrans Ave. property, formerly known as Manhattan Beach Studios, in a brief interview at the National Association of Broadcasters show in Las Vegas on Monday. The length and dollar value of the lease are not known.

The 580,000-square-foot studio and office facility, which houses 15 soundstages, also is likely to become the new home of Cameron’s company, Lightstorm Entertainment. Sources said Cameron has been in the market for as much as 90,000 square feet of production and office space.

Production of the original Avatar was centered in Playa Vista at a property now known as the Hercules Campus, named for the Spruce Goose, the mammoth airplane built there by Howard Hughes in the 1940s. During the film’s four years of production, Lightstorm remained headquartered at a three-story, 26,277-square-foot office building Santa Monica, but Cameron spent most of his time in Playa Vista.

If things go as planned, Cameron would consolidate his offices and studio into one location -- down the coast from his Malibu home. His Santa Monica office building is listed for sale for $11.85 million by brokerage CB Richard Ellis Group. Entertainment office specialist Jim Jacobsen of Industry Partners, who is not involved in selling the building, said there have been several offers made for the Santa Monica Boulevard property but a deal has not been struck. In a brief interview with THR on Monday following his keynote address at NAB, Cameron did not provide details on whether Lightstorm would also be relocated.

Completion of the Manhattan Beach deal with Raleigh Studios, which operates the property for its owner, private equity firm Carlyle Group, ends a long search for Avatar’s new home. Cameron considered returning to the Hercules site, now owned by the Ratkovich Co., which purchased the property last year for $32.4 million, but the timing was a problem because the aging facility is undergoing renovations throughout this year. Ratkovich Co. told THR: “Lightstorm Entertainment expressed interest…however we are not currently in negotiations.”

Cameron’s search also took him to an office park in Agoura Hills, where owner Realty Bancorp Equities earlier this year gained preliminary approvals to construct a building for Lightstorm. The Toronto Sun in March reported that Cameron had settled on that property because it was close to the home of his mother. However, Doug Hooper, Agoura’s assistant director of community development, said the city hasn’t heard from the developer in several months, and the project would still require final approval from the city’s planning commission.

“Given the two different requirements -- needing soundstages like he had before and office space, and the fact that the Hercules Campus has started demolition, it’d make sense he’d be interested in a studio operation like Manhattan Beach Studios,” said Jacobsen. “90,000 square feet of space on the Westside is very difficult to put together.”

The complex Avatar production also must adhere to a schedule, and would be helped by using existing buildings. Avatar 2 is scheduled for release in December 2014 and Avatar 3 the following December. While MBS Media Campus will now be the location for the films’ extensive motion capture shooting, in which actors are filmed by a special computer camera and then transformed by special effects artists, it is unclear if any of the live action portions of the movies will be shot there as well.

For the original Avatar, the live action scenes were shot in New Zealand, where Cameron employed the special effects company WETA, partly owned by filmmaker Peter Jackson. WETA is expected to be involved in the two sequels (although that has not been confirmed), and Cameron said Monday he is still unsure if he will shoot the sequels’ live action scenes in New Zealand.

One current tenant at MBS Media Campus is Marvel Studios, owned by Disney, which filmed Iron Man 2 and Thor there. It has also been home to various TV shows including Ally McBeal, CSI: Miami, Medium, and America’s Funniest Home Videos.

Commercial real estate broker Matthew May says that MBS Media Campus’ location makes sense for Cameron. “With Playa Vista, when all that stuff is built up, trying to get onto the freeway at Jefferson at 5:30 -- that’s not going to be pretty,” says May, who is not involved in the Manhattan Beach lease.

Also on Monday, Cameron and Vince Pace, who co-developed the Fusion 3D camera system used to film Avatar, announced during their NAB Show keynote the formation of the Cameron-Pace Group to facilitate 3D broadcasting with the development of new technology. As part of the venture, the company has already expanded the existing Burbank offices of PACE, located off of West Empire Avenue.

Fox and Steve Wiseman, the broker who has the Santa Monica listing, both declined comment. MBS Media Campus, and Doug Jacobsen of Realty Bancorp, could not be reached for comment.

Carolyn Giardina contributed to this report.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/james-cameron-make-avatar-sequels-176992

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« Reply #3626 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 08:08am »

on Apr 12th, 2011, 03:33am, realitybeyond wrote:
Hello, what happened so many monkeys from OMF
to be here!?

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Good morning realitybeyond,

UFO Casebook is the best so I think this batch of monkeys, myself included, have very good taste. grin
No worries about the animation. Maybe it needed more coffee. wink

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« Reply #3627 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 08:52am »

Wired

April 12, 1961: Soviets Orbit Gagarin, First Human in Space
By Tony Long
April 12, 2011 | 7:00 am
Categories: 20th century, Politics, Space Exploration


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Photo courtesy Russian Institute of Radionavigation and Time.


1961: Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin becomes the first human to enter space and the first to orbit the Earth, helping boost the Soviet space program and intensify the space race with the United States.

The diminutive Gagarin, who stood a mere 5-foot-2, appeared ready to pursue a career as an industrial worker but found his passion for flying while attending technical school. He entered military flight training and earned his pilot’s wings at the controls of a MiG-15.

Gagarin was selected as one of the Soviet Union’s first class of 20 cosmonauts in 1960. He excelled in the training and so was chosen to be the first man to enter space — and perhaps partly because the Vostok-1 capsule was so cramped.

Space flight being very much a crapshoot at the time, Soviet authorities figured Gagarin was just as likely to die upon re-entering the atmosphere as he was to return safely. But return he did, and Premier Nikita Khrushchev — who hoped to use Gagarin’s success to strengthen the Soviet Union’s ballistic-missile program — rushed to his side to bask in a little reflected glory.

Twenty-three days later, on May 5, Alan Shepard became the first American to enter suborbital space, but it took nearly a year before a U.S. astronaut — John Glenn aboard Friendship 7 — successfully orbited the Earth.

Gagarin returned to flying jet aircraft and was killed in a training accident in 1968.

His pioneering 1961 spaceflight was nearly as close to the Wright brothers’ first flight — just 58 years earlier — as it is to today.

http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2011/04/0412soviet-cosmonaut-yuri-gagarin-orbits/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3628 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 09:24am »

The details around the death of Gagarin have been
recently declassified, he has died on his own fault
making a too sharp turn to avoid a cloud or a
meteorological baloon.
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3629 on: Apr 12th, 2011, 10:57am »

on Apr 12th, 2011, 09:24am, realitybeyond wrote:
The details around the death of Gagarin have been
recently declassified, he has died on his own fault
making a too sharp turn to avoid a cloud or a
meteorological baloon.


Well that's close but not quite correct. If you saw the movie 'Top Gun' and the scene were Goose looses his life. then you will know how Gagarins crash happened! He flew through the turbulent wash of another M-15 that was in the wrong place (other planes fault) and went into an unrecoverable flat spin at low altitude. He and his Flight Instructor died in the crash!

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De Opresso Libre! I Have Been many Men, In Many Times, I Shall Be Again!
\"The real destroyer of the liberties of the people is he who spreads among them bounties, donations and benefits.\"
Plutarch



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