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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 127654 times)
Swamprat
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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3735 on: Apr 23rd, 2011, 10:18am »

Hey! I LIKE "How I Met Your Mother"!! grin
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« Reply #3736 on: Apr 23rd, 2011, 10:20am »

World's Largest Atom Smasher May Have Detected 'God Particle'

Published April 22, 2011

LiveScience


A rumor is floating around the physics community that the world's largest atom smasher may have detected a long-sought subatomic particle called the Higgs boson, also known as the "God particle."

The controversial rumor is based on what appears to be a leaked internal note from physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 17-mile-long particle accelerator near Geneva, Switzerland. It's not entirely clear at this point if the memo is authentic, or what the data it refers to might mean — but the note already has researchers talking.

The buzz started when an anonymous commenter recently posted an abstract of the note on Columbia University mathematician Peter Woit's blog, "Not Even Wrong".

Some physicists say the note may be a hoax, while others believe the "detection" is likely a statistical anomaly that will disappear upon further study. But the find would be a huge particle-physics breakthrough, if it holds up.

"If it were to be real, it would be really exciting," said physicist Sheldon Stone of Syracuse University.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/04/22/worlds-largest-atom-smasher-detected-god-particle/#ixzz1KMHK6QXe

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« Reply #3737 on: Apr 23rd, 2011, 6:21pm »

Happy easter everyone grin!

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3738 on: Apr 23rd, 2011, 6:51pm »

on Apr 23rd, 2011, 10:18am, Swamprat wrote:
Hey! I LIKE "How I Met Your Mother"!! grin


Hey Swamp!

I was just being a snot! grin I take it back. May "How I Met Your Mother" last a LONG time.

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« Reply #3739 on: Apr 23rd, 2011, 6:55pm »

on Apr 23rd, 2011, 6:21pm, CA519705950 wrote:
Happy easter everyone grin!



Happy Easter CA5!




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« Reply #3740 on: Apr 23rd, 2011, 8:47pm »

on Apr 23rd, 2011, 10:20am, Swamprat wrote:
World's Largest Atom Smasher May Have Detected 'God Particle'

Published April 22, 2011

LiveScience


A rumor is floating around the physics community that the world's largest atom smasher may have detected a long-sought subatomic particle called the Higgs boson, also known as the "God particle."

The controversial rumor is based on what appears to be a leaked internal note from physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 17-mile-long particle accelerator near Geneva, Switzerland. It's not entirely clear at this point if the memo is authentic, or what the data it refers to might mean — but the note already has researchers talking.

The buzz started when an anonymous commenter recently posted an abstract of the note on Columbia University mathematician Peter Woit's blog, "Not Even Wrong".

Some physicists say the note may be a hoax, while others believe the "detection" is likely a statistical anomaly that will disappear upon further study. But the find would be a huge particle-physics breakthrough, if it holds up.

"If it were to be real, it would be really exciting," said physicist Sheldon Stone of Syracuse University.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/04/22/worlds-largest-atom-smasher-detected-god-particle/#ixzz1KMHK6QXe



Is this wild or what! Dr. Sheldon Cooper must be hysterical. We agree on "Big Bang Theory" huh Swamp.


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« Reply #3741 on: Apr 23rd, 2011, 9:53pm »

"We agree on "Big Bang Theory" huh Swamp."

Absolutely! Never miss an episode!!
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« Reply #3742 on: Apr 24th, 2011, 07:55am »

on Apr 23rd, 2011, 9:53pm, Swamprat wrote:
"We agree on "Big Bang Theory" huh Swamp."

Absolutely! Never miss an episode!!


Happy Easter!

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« Reply #3743 on: Apr 24th, 2011, 08:00am »

Washington Post

Yemen’s president agrees to resign in tentative deal
By Jeb Boone and Sudarsan Raghavan
Saturday, April 23, 8:48 PM

SANAA, Yemen — President Ali Abdullah Saleh on Saturday agreed to step down in exchange for immunity from criminal prosecution for himself and his family, the strongest indication yet that the embattled leader was willing to give up his 32-year grip on power if the opposition accepted his terms of exit.

Under a proposal by neighboring Arab states, Saleh would resign from office 30 days after a formal agreement has been signed. If Saleh, a vital U.S. counterterrorism ally, keeps his pledge, it would mark a rare negotiated transfer of power in a region where autocrats are increasingly resisting calls for their ouster by using violence and repression to suppress populist rebellions that are transforming the Middle East and North Africa.

Yemen’s political opposition said that while it had officially accepted the deal with reservations, it was negotiating conditions that could still derail a final agreement. It is also unlikely that youth and human rights activists who spearheaded Yemen’s uprising in late January would accept any agreement that allowed Saleh and his family to escape prosecution for crimes committed by the regime.

The activists particularly hold Saleh responsible for the deaths of 52 protesters in the capital, Sanaa, killed last month by snipers loyal to the regime.

“Not one person will accept that Saleh will be granted immunity,” said Adel al-Sarabi, a youth organizer. “He’s killed us. He’s killed hundreds of us. He must pay for his crimes.”

Saleh’s offer comes as former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak waits in detention facing possible prosecution for his role in the deaths of protesters this year and, along with his two sons, for alleged corruption during his rule. Saleh’s advisers and ruling party officials have said that what he fears most is sharing Mubarak’s fate and darkening his historical legacy.

Saleh is a shrewd political tactician, and it was unclear whether his offer was a genuine effort to stop this impoverished Middle East nation’s slide toward chaos or a calculated move to remain in power or blame the opposition for the political turmoil.

The state news agency Saba News reported Saleh as saying he had accepted the proposal only to prevent the opposition from forcing the country into a bloody and protracted civil war.

Yemen is gripped by multiple emergencies, including a rebellion in the north, a secessionist movement in the south and rapidly depleting resources such as oil and water. U.S. officials fear that al-Qaeda’s Yemen branch could take advantage of the political turmoil and deepen its presence here. The branch was behind two attempted attacks on U.S. soil: a failed plot to blow up a Detroit-bound airliner in December 2009 and last year’s attempt to send parcel bombs to Chicago.

The Obama administration has been quietly pushing for a peaceful transfer of power but has not publicly called for Saleh to step down.

Saleh’s offer comes amid pressure to relinquish power from Yemen’s neighbors, especially Saudi Arabia, who have long feared that Yemen’s instability could spill into their territories. He had apparently accepted a power transfer plan put forth by the Gulf Cooperation Council, which comprises Saudi Arabia and neighboring states, said Muhammed al Basha, a spokesman in the Yemeni Embassy in Washington.

According to the proposal, seven days after it is formally accepted, a transitional government comprising ruling party and opposition groups would be formed to oversee election preparations. The current parliament would adopt a law that grants Saleh, his family and aides immunity from prosecution for acts committed during his rule. Within 30 days, and after his immunity is assured, Saleh would hand over authority to his vice president, Abd al-Rab Mansur al-Hadi and resign; Hadi would become acting president. Then, within 60 days, elections would be held. The new president would oversee the drafting of a new constitution.

The Obama administration reacted cautiously to reports of Saleh’s acceptance of the Arab proposal. State Department spokesman Mark Toner said the United States welcomed the attempt by the Gulf Cooperation Council to resolve Yemen’s political crisis but added that the ultimate solution must enjoy broad support.

“There must be genuine participation by all sides, including youth, in an open and transparent process that addresses the legitimate concerns of the Yemeni people, including their political and economic aspirations and their calls to quickly bring all perpetrators of violence against protesters to justice,” Toner said in a statement released in Washington.

“We will not speculate about the choices the Yemeni people will make, or the results of their political dialogue,” he continued. “It is ultimately for the people of Yemen to decide how their country is governed.”

Mohammad Qahtan, a spokesman for Yemen’s main coalition of opposition of groups, said the leaders of all the parties have “officially accepted the plan.” But he said the interim government must be formed only after Saleh resigns and leaves office. The opposition is also against giving the country’s parliament — dominated by the ruling party — the power to approve or reject Saleh’s resignation. That, activists fear, would allow Saleh to politically maneuver and extend his rule.

The coalition was planning to make a counterproposal late Saturday or Sunday.

The question of giving Saleh immunity could prove to be a deal breaker. For decades, Saleh has run Yemen as a family enterprise, greased by rampant corruption. He gave his sons, nephews and tribesmen key positions in the security forces, and they, in turn, ruthlessly kept him in power. Through a system of patronage, Saleh bought loyalties and used a divide-and-rule strategy to pit tribes against one another.

If Yemen’s political opposition agrees to give Saleh and his family immunity from prosecution, it is likely to create a significant rift between the parties and the activists who have taken to the streets, camping out 24 hours a day in several cities.

Shatha al-Harazi, one of five protesters who have spoken with Saleh on behalf of the youth movement, said demonstrations would only continue with greater fervor.

“Of course we don’t accept this,” she said. “There will be an escalation, there will be more marches. Expect to see something big.”


Boone is a special correspondent. Raghavan reported from Nairobi. Staff writer Joby Warrick in Washington contributed to this report.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/yemens-president-saleh-agrees-to-step-down-in-return-for-immunity/2011/04/23/AFu59SWE_story.html?hpid=z1

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« Reply #3744 on: Apr 24th, 2011, 08:10am »

LA Times

Attempt to freeze Moammar Kadafi's assets hits resistance

Some countries have done little to cut off tens of billions that Libya's Kadafi family has spread around the globe, officials say, allowing the leader access to an enormous amount of cash.

By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
April 24, 2011
Reporting from Washington

The international drive to freeze the Libyan regime's foreign assets is running into stiff resistance in many parts of the world, allowing Moammar Kadafi to dig into a vast hoard of cash that has helped him cling to power as he battles rebel forces.

Although the United States and the European Union have blocked access to more than $60 billion in Libya's overseas bank accounts and investments, other nations have done little or nothing to freeze tens of billions more that Kadafi and his family spread around the globe over the last decade, according to U.S., European and U.N. officials involved in the search for Libyan assets.

Kadafi has moved billions of dollars back to Tripoli since the rebellion began in mid-February, the officials said. The totals are not clear, in part because investigators believe the Libyan ruler made significant investments in companies and financial institutions that shield his identity.

Kadafi's ability to skirt sanctions has undermined the Obama administration's attempts to force his ouster after four decades in power. And his access to ready cash has hampered efforts to persuade his top aides and military commanders to defect as the conflict drags on, officials acknowledged.

The case is a cautionary tale about the limits of sanctions as a tool of foreign policy. It recalls former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein's successful efforts to circumvent international sanctions, as well as Iran's apparent ability to defy United Nations resolutions by leveraging trade ties to Third World allies.

Several countries that have developed strong economic ties to Libya, including Turkey and Kenya, along with several other African nations, have balked at carrying out the freeze, which was mandated by U.N. Security Council resolutions in February and March, the officials said.

Three of the world's largest economies — India, China and Russia — have resisted U.S. and European efforts to expand the sanctions. They cite concerns that such action could halt payment to their own industries, suppliers or citizens who had worked in Libya.

Other countries with no apparent political or economic ties to Tripoli have made no attempt to identify or block access to Libyan assets, the officials said. In some cases, the governments may lack the technical capability to trace hidden assets.

So far, "only a handful" of governments have reported back to the Security Council enforcement committee, which oversees the sanctions, that they have blocked access to Libyan assets, according to a Security Council diplomat who spoke on condition he not be identified because of the sensitivity of the issue.

"We've done pretty well," the diplomat said. "But when you're dealing with somebody as sophisticated as Kadafi, with such sprawling commercial interests, this has been an uphill struggle.... It's been hard."

Under U.N. rules, governments don't have to report their efforts to comply with sanctions for 120 days, which will mean late June. A panel of experts, now being organized, then will start "naming and shaming" countries that have failed to comply.

The four-month delay "is a major weak flank in the system," the diplomat said. "And Kadafi, once bitten by [sanctions], understands the system."

A White House spokesman declined to comment Saturday. But it's clear that the lack of uniform action has hampered a global effort that initially seemed destined for success.

Shortly after the anti-Kadafi uprising erupted, U.S. officials found $34 billion in Libyan deposits, most of it in a single U.S. bank. President Obama quickly signed an executive order to freeze the funds, citing a "serious risk" that Kadafi, members of his family or senior government officials would misappropriate the money. EU officials soon found and froze as much as $30 billion more.

But then the trail apparently went cold.

"The fact of the matter is that Libya will still be able to draw on funds from banks that are simply outside the reach of the United States, the European Union and certain other countries that have blocked funds," said Victor Comras, a top sanctions enforcement official at the State Department until 2001 and then at the U.N. until 2004.

Kadafi was a global pariah for decades because of his involvement in terrorist attacks. U.N. sanctions were dropped only in 2003, and U.S. sanctions a year later, after he scrapped a nascent nuclear weapons program.

Afterward, the Libyan strongman still took special care to hoard reserves of cash and gold in Libya. The International Monetary Fund reported in February that Libya has foreign reserves of $104.5 billion, enough to pay for imports for three years.

After the uprising began, Kadafi shifted money in national accounts so rebels based in eastern Libya couldn't draw from bank branches there. It is one reason the Transitional National Council, ostensibly in control of the opposition-held zone, has pushed the West to make the frozen funds available to it.

In recent years, Kadafi also structured investments abroad in ways that enable him to quickly reclaim them, officials and analysts say. Investigators searching for his assets are still struggling to unravel the complex web of investments he built around the world.

Some were relatively easy to find. The country's sovereign wealth fund, the Libyan Investment Authority, had invested in major European banks and businesses, including the Dutch-Belgian bank Fortis, Italy's UniCredit banking giant, Britain's Pearson media empire, Italian defense firm Finmeccanica and an oil-production agreement with BP. It even owned a stake in an Italian soccer team, Juventus.

Other lucrative investments turned up in Southeast Asia and the Persian Gulf, where Libya controls 60% of Bahrain's Arab Banking Corp.

Other investments have proved harder to track, or to freeze.

Investigators say Kadafi has invested at least $5 billion since 2006 in African oil companies, pipelines, telecommunications firms, hotels, refineries and real estate.

The investments were motivated, in part, by "a desire to promote specific Libyan foreign policy objectives, or by the personal interests, desires and whims of the Kadafi family," said Ronald Bruce St. John, a veteran Libya analyst based in New Mexico.

In Kenya, the government has yet to freeze Libyan assets. They include Libya Oil Kenya Ltd., a major oil and gas distributor, and Nairobi's posh Laico Regency Hotel.

Zimbabwe, led by Kadafi's longtime ally Robert Mugabe, is not expected to comply with the freeze, a European diplomat said. Kadafi has a stake in the Commercial Bank of Zimbabwe, and investments in tourism and real estate, and has helped prop up Mugabe's brutal regime for years, analysts say.

Turkey has supported the international coalition arrayed against Kadafi, including deploying warships and planes to enforce the arms embargo and providing humanitarian aid. Yet Turkey has $17 billion worth of private investment in Libya's economy, and Libya has had sizeable investments in Turkey as well.

Turkey "wants to preserve those economic interests," said Bulent Aliriza, a specialist on Turkey at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a nonpartisan think tank in Washington.

Russia and China have frozen some Libyan assets. But they and India balked at Western proposals at the Security Council to add more Libyan individuals and organizations to the list of those whose assets must be frozen. The proposals would seize the assets of some Libyan-owned oil companies with links to the three.

Diplomats say the resistance in New Delhi, Moscow and Beijing stems partly from economic concerns, but also from political doubts about the viability of the rebellion and the NATO-led military efforts against Kadafi. All three nations abstained on the Security Council's votes to sanction Libya.


http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-fg-kadafi-money-20110424,0,6743350.story

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« Reply #3745 on: Apr 24th, 2011, 08:21am »

Wired

The Empire Strikes Back Retold in Glorious Iconoscope
By GeekDad Rewind
April 24, 2011 | 7:30 am
Categories: The Internet


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Back in February, British designer & illustrator Wayne Dorrington released his own special retelling of our most beloved of stories, Star Wars Episode IV – A New Hope: http://waynedorrington.blogspot.com/2011/02/star-wars-episode-iv-retold-in.html

He took the basic plot points of the movie and condensed them down into 32 panels of icons, with key bits of dialogue represented by more icons. He named this technique “Iconoscope” and invented a kind of modern day hieroglyphics along the way. Not surprising, it went mega viral around the interwebs, ate up all his bandwidth allowance and killed his regular web hosting package.

Two months, and a nice new blog, later he’s moved on to the second act, The Empire Strikes Back: http://waynedorrington.blogspot.com/2011/04/star-wars-episode-v-retold-in.html
keeping the same style, but this time ending up with twice as many panels. As Wayne writes on the post:

In doing this one, you realise how much more complex and in-depth the story was compared to first movie. The narrative is split into several sub-stories and keeps jumping between them – plus, in the first movie there were virtually no costume changes for the main characters – but in this one, each had several, all of which are iconic.

The two-parter is jam packed with more great little touches, like the way he’s dealt with the classic “I love you”/”I know” shown above or the clever way he’s illustrated IG-88. There are signs that he likes to “use the fork” maybe a bit too much with the icons for the insides of a Taun-Taun or Han being tortured in Bespin, but I’ll leave you to spot them all for yourself from the full size images over on his blog: http://waynedorrington.blogspot.com/2011/04/star-wars-episode-v-retold-in.html

I’m already looking forward to Jedi…


http://www.wired.com/geekdad/2011/04/the-empire-strikes-back-retold-in-glorious-iconoscope-geekdad-weekly-rewind/

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« Reply #3746 on: Apr 24th, 2011, 08:22am »

on Apr 23rd, 2011, 6:55pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Happy Easter CA5!




Crystal

Indeed, enjoy your guiltless chocolate consumption wink.
Paha, I like that song...never before seen the video but it's surprisingly provocative shocked...bah, I have no complaints.
I sometimes wonder why I can't ever just stick to one message board. I hang around for brief time periods and then vanish huh.
WoC, do you remember the name of the Myers-Briggs book written by your neighbour posted many pages back?
I have some money to kill and I need to read more smiley.
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« Reply #3747 on: Apr 24th, 2011, 08:28am »

Science Daily

Brown Recluse Spider: Range Could Expand in N. America With Changing Climate

ScienceDaily (Apr. 23, 2011)

— One of the most feared spiders in North America is the subject a new study that aims to predict its distribution and how that distribution may be affected by climate changes.


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Brown recluse spider.
(Credit: iStockphoto/William Howe)



When provoked, the spider, commonly known as the brown recluse (Loxosceles reclusa), injects powerful venom that can kill the tissues at the site of the bite. This can lead to a painful deep sore and occasional scarring.

But the wounds are not always easy to diagnose. Medical practitioners can confuse the bite with other serious conditions, including Lyme disease and various cancers. The distribution of the spider is poorly understood as well, and medical professionals routinely diagnose brown recluse bites outside of the areas where it is known to exist.

By better characterizing its distribution, and by examining potential new areas of distribution with future climate change scenarios, the medical community and the public can be more informed about this species, said study author Erin Saupe. Saupe is a graduate student in Geology and a Biodiversity Institute student.

To address the issue of brown recluse distribution, Saupe and other researchers used a predictive mapping technique called ecological niche modeling. They applied future climate change scenarios to the spider's known distribution in the Midwest and southern United States. The researchers concluded that the range may expand northward, potentially invading previously unaffected regions. Newly influenced areas may include parts of Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, South Dakota, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.

"These results illustrate a potential negative consequence of climate change on humans and will aid medical professionals in proper bite identification and treatment, potentially reducing bite misdiagnoses," Saupe said.

The paper is published in the March 25 edition of the journal PLoS ONE. The research team included Saupe; Monica Papes, a Biodiversity Institute and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology alumna; Paul Selden, Director of the Paleontological Institute and Gulf-Hedberg Distinguished Professor of Invertebrate Paleontology, Department of Geology; and Richard S. Vetter, University of California-Riverside.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110421212230.htm

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« Reply #3748 on: Apr 24th, 2011, 08:34am »

Screen Rant

23 April 2011
by Rob Keyes

Super 8 interactive trailer

The “trailer” lets players play through the events of the first Super 8 teaser trailer from the perspective of someone on the train that’s about to crash and leads up to the film’s most memorable moment thus far, of the crashed train car opening from the inside as the monster attempts to break out.

Watch and see as someone plays through the trailer and take note of the little hints revealed within:





http://screenrant.com/super-8-interactive-trailer-stills-rob-112077/

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« Reply #3749 on: Apr 24th, 2011, 08:43am »

on Apr 24th, 2011, 08:22am, CA519705950 wrote:
Indeed, enjoy your guiltless chocolate consumption wink.
Paha, I like that song...never before seen the video but it's surprisingly provocative shocked...bah, I have no complaints.
I sometimes wonder why I can't ever just stick to one message board. I hang around for brief time periods and then vanish huh.
WoC, do you remember the name of the Myers-Briggs book written by your neighbour posted many pages back?
I have some money to kill and I need to read more smiley.


Happy Easter CA5,

http://www.amazon.com/WINE-TYPES-Discover-Inner-Grape/dp/1424318149/ref=sr_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1303652205&sr=1-7

It's a fun read. For a serious chunk of reading get Richard Dolan's UFO's and the National Security State. That will keep you busy! It's a treasure trove of information. No I don't own stock in Dolan. grin


Volume one
http://www.amazon.com/UFOs-National-Security-State-Chronology/dp/1571743170/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1303652478&sr=1-1

Volume two
http://www.amazon.com/Cover-Up-Exposed-1973-1991-National-Security/dp/0967799511/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1303652478&sr=1-2

Crystal

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