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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 147191 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #3780 on: Apr 27th, 2011, 07:38am »

rolleyes

Telegraph

Pub singer's 'racism' arrest over Kung Fu Fighting performance

A pub singer has been arrested on suspicion of racial harassment after singing King Fu Fighting in front of two Chinese people.

By John Bingham
9:18AM BST 27 Apr 2011

Simon Ledger says he fears he will end up with a criminal record for performing the 1974 disco classic at a seafront bar on the Isle of Wight on Sunday after two people walking past apparently took offence.

The 34-year-old, from the island, regularly features Carl Douglas’s 1974 number one hit in his set when he performs at the Driftwood Beach Bar in Sandown.

But after striking up the melody in front of customers at the weekend he noticed a man of Chinese origin walking past with his mother, making gestures at him and taking a picture on his mobile phone.

He said that he later received a telephone call from police - while he was dining in a Chinese restaurant - asking him to meet officers about the incident.

He was then arrested and questioned before being bailed.

Hampshire Police said that it had been following up a complaint of racially aggravated harassment.

“We were performing Kung Fu Fighting, as we do during all our sets,” Mr Ledger, 34, told The Sun.

“People of all races were loving it, Chinese people have never been offended before.”

A police spokesman said: “Police are investigating an allegation of racially-aggravated harassment. A man from Shanklin was arrested.”


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/8475965/Pub-singers-racism-arrest-over-Kung-Fu-Fighting-performance.html

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« Reply #3781 on: Apr 27th, 2011, 07:46am »

Wired Danger Room

First Look: Inside the Army’s App Store for War
By Spencer Ackerman
April 27, 2011 | 7:00 am
Categories: Army and Marines


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If all of the bureaucratic and security hurdles can be overcome, the Army will soon launch its version of an app store, where soldiers can download Army-relevant software to their work computers and — with a little luck — mobile phones. This is what its homepage will look like.

Called Army Marketplace, it’ll start off featuring the few dozen applications that soldiers created last year during the Apps for the Army contest. Those early efforts ran the gamut from workout guides to digitized manuals for standard Army tasks. So far, there are 17 apps for Android phones and another 16 for iPhones.

But the Army Marketplace will do more than sell existing apps. It’ll help generate ideas for new ones, says Lt. Col. Gregory Motes, chief of the Army’s new Mobile Applications Branch. Imagine that a soldier wants an app instructing how to call for artillery fire, and the app doesn’t exist yet. The soldier would post a description of what she needs on a Marketplace forum, attracting discussion from fellow soldiers and potential designers.

If other troops can’t home-brew a solution, the Army would open a bidding or contracting process from would-be vendors who’ve expressed interest on the thread. Ideally, the app would be available on Marketplace not long thereafter, with a nominal purchase price, a la the App Store or Android Market.

“It’d use an agile software-development process, to close with the vendor and try to quickly turn these apps around,” Motes tells Danger Room. “The current process of software creation [in the Army] is a very long and arduous process. That’s how we do things. But app development needs to be done quickly.”

You’ll have to be a member of the Department of Defense community to see the store and access its wares. It’ll be hosted on a secure DOD server and require a username and password from intranets like Army Knowledge Online. Eventually, Marketplace will become an app of its own, loadable onto the forthcoming Army-issued smartphone so users aren’t tied to a website. Marketplace isn’t meant for the general public — which creates problems for how it interacts with smartphones. (More on that in a moment.)


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Army Marketplace’s designers are also working on personalized user pages to facilitate the app exchange. On them, customers announce their needed apps, propose new ones, and exchange criticism. On the right hand side of that inside page are auto-generated lists of “Top Ideas” and “Top Projects” that others have generated. (That’s a screenshot of a personalized page, above.)

Army brass like Gen. Peter Chiarelli, the vice chief of staff often seen thumbing like mad on his iPhone 4, view apps as a game-changing approach to pushing information down to the lowest ranks and exponentially increasing the Army’s ability to learn and adapt. So the service has set up new shops — like Motes’ parent organization, called Connecting Soldiers to Digital Applications — inside the Army’s Training and Doctrine Command, to help generate an ecosystem of military-friendly applications.

Eventually, the Army will host apps that track the location of friendly forces or map out wartime terrain or translate foreign languages. Software writers and defense companies have already created all of those. On top of that, the Army will launch its second Apps for the Army contest later this year as a way to generate both more apps and a constituency for them inside the service.

There’s just one small problem. The government hasn’t certified any single mobile device as secure enough to receive data from its networks. If all goes according to plan, the Army will unveil Marketplace in August, at the LandWarNet convention. That’ll mean whatever applications are currently available could be easily sent to a soldier’s work computer — which doesn’t really help, given the whole idea is to allow mobile access to the corpus of Army information.

The Army’s now testing Google’s Android OS to power its first smartphone prototype. That’s made by MITRE, the federally funded defense consultancy. Other defense companies use Android’s open architecture as the backbone of their own mobile devices that they’d like to sell the Army, such as Raytheon’s RATS and General Dynamics’ GD300. But the Army isn’t near close to settling on an operating system or a mobile device for its ultimate goal of requiring soldiers to carry a smartphone just as they carry a rifle.

And no Android phone has so much as started going through the process of having the National Institute of Standards and Technology certify it as secure-enough to host government data. The iPhone has started the process, Motes says, but is still months away from finishing it.

That’s why government BlackBerries can process someone’s official mail and do practically nothing else a civilian smartphone does. As of now, “we don’t have a solution for authenticating applications or secure websites,” Motes says.

How long until a phone receives certification? “An optimist might say 12 months,” Motes assesses, but being pragmatic, it’s further down the road.”

Until then, Marketplace will be a good place to download web apps and dream up apps of the future. It won’t be useful for loading up your phone with Army apps.

But it’s possible, Motes says, that “commanders can take risks” if they can convince the Army there’s a pressing need in a “tactical environment” for skipping certification. Welcome to the laborious process of getting the Army prepared for the day when every soldier is required to carry a secured smartphone.

That’s not the only challenge. Congress’ inability to pass a budget for months set back the apps program. A LandWarNet debut for Marketplace remains the goal, Motes says, and “if they don’t announce at LandWarNet, then it’s just a big sigh.” Another headache is securing the apps themselves, a process of going through code “line by line” looking for potential security flaws, which “is gonna drive us crazy.”

But at least Motes is convinced that at the end of this process is an agile website and mobile portal that will connect soldiers to apps that will let them do their jobs better. It’s a lot more functional and intuitive than the laughable attempt at a placeholder homepage for the Apps for the Army results, called Storefront, currently hosted at storefront.mil/army:


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Motes sums up Storefront in one word: “Busted.” Now to see if Marketplace will fix it.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/

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« Reply #3782 on: Apr 27th, 2011, 07:57am »

Hollywood Reporter

Arnold Schwarzenegger Ready to Play Terminator Again
10:23 PM 4/26/2011
by Gregg Kilday

CAA is shopping a package for a new sequel that includes the action star and "Fast Five" director Justin Lin.
Now that Arnold Schwarzenegger is no longer the Governator, he's ready to return to his signature role as the Terminator.

The star's agency, CAA, has put together a package that it's currently shopping to the studios that includes rights to produce a new Terminator sequel, which would be directed by Justin Lin, hot off Fast Five, which opens domestically Friday, and produced by Robert Cort. No screenwriter has come on board yet.

There has definitely been interest in reviving the Terminator franchise, which has resulted in four films to date, ranging from the original James Cameron-directed 1984 movie The Terminator and its sequel, 1991's Terminator 2: Judgment Day, to the last film in the series, 2009's Terminator Salvation, the only one in which Schwarzenegger didn't appear.

When the movie's rights holder the Halcyon Group went through bankruptcy in 2010, Lionsgate and Sony joined together in an unsuccessful bid to claim the franchise for themselves. More recently, Universal has been talking to CAA about tackling the project.

But winning the package could be pricey. In last year's bankruptcy proceedings, Pacificor, a Santa Barbara-based hedge fund, won the rights to the property for $29.5 million plus a promise to pay Halcyon $5 million for each sequel that is produced. Pacificor would be part of any new production.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/arnold-schwarzenegger-ready-play-terminator-182345

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3783 on: Apr 27th, 2011, 09:00am »

on Apr 27th, 2011, 07:57am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Hollywood Reporter

Arnold Schwarzenegger Ready to Play Terminator Again
10:23 PM 4/26/2011
by Gregg Kilday

CAA is shopping a package for a new sequel that includes the action star and "Fast Five" director Justin Lin.
Now that Arnold Schwarzenegger is no longer the Governator, he's ready to return to his signature role as the Terminator.

The star's agency, CAA, has put together a package that it's currently shopping to the studios that includes rights to produce a new Terminator sequel, which would be directed by Justin Lin, hot off Fast Five, which opens domestically Friday, and produced by Robert Cort. No screenwriter has come on board yet.

There has definitely been interest in reviving the Terminator franchise, which has resulted in four films to date, ranging from the original James Cameron-directed 1984 movie The Terminator and its sequel, 1991's Terminator 2: Judgment Day, to the last film in the series, 2009's Terminator Salvation, the only one in which Schwarzenegger didn't appear.

When the movie's rights holder the Halcyon Group went through bankruptcy in 2010, Lionsgate and Sony joined together in an unsuccessful bid to claim the franchise for themselves. More recently, Universal has been talking to CAA about tackling the project.

But winning the package could be pricey. In last year's bankruptcy proceedings, Pacificor, a Santa Barbara-based hedge fund, won the rights to the property for $29.5 million plus a promise to pay Halcyon $5 million for each sequel that is produced. Pacificor would be part of any new production.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/arnold-schwarzenegger-ready-play-terminator-182345

Crystal



Even a pound of chinese hgh couldn't save him now.
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« Reply #3784 on: Apr 27th, 2011, 11:47am »

on Apr 27th, 2011, 09:00am, Gort wrote:
Even a pound of chinese hgh couldn't save him now.



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« Reply #3785 on: Apr 27th, 2011, 11:50am »

Wired

April 27, 1981: Say Hello to the First Personal Computer Mouse
By Tony Long
April 27, 2011 | 7:00 am
Categories: 20th century, Computers and IT, Gadgets

1981: The first integrated mouse intended for use with a personal computer makes its appearance with the Xerox Star workstation.

The name “mouse” derived from the device’s rounded shape and tail-like cord extending from it, suggesting the diminutive rodent.

The first mouse, an experimental pointing device, was invented in 1964 by Douglas Englebart, who was then working at the Stanford Research Institute in Palo Alto, California. Other methods of direction were being tried at the time — a head-mounted device, for example — before Englebart’s hand-operated mouse won out.

Englebart’s original design underwent a number of changes before emerging as part of the Star workstation, a commercial system which was notable for a few other firsts as well: the graphical user interface, and the use of folders, file servers and e-mail.

The modern mouse is available in a number of variations, each designed to be integrated with a specific operating system or to fulfill a specific function.

http://www.wired.com/thisdayintech/2011/04/0427first-computer-mouse/

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« Reply #3786 on: Apr 27th, 2011, 4:12pm »

Apollo 16 "UFO" Identified

http://ufobriefcase.net/2011/04/25/nasa-identifies-apollo-16-ufo/
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« Reply #3787 on: Apr 27th, 2011, 6:46pm »

on Apr 27th, 2011, 4:12pm, Swamprat wrote:
Apollo 16 "UFO" Identified

http://ufobriefcase.net/2011/04/25/nasa-identifies-apollo-16-ufo/


Hey Swamp!

"EVA floodlight/boom from the perspective of a Command/Service Module window"

Looks like they solved it.

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« Reply #3788 on: Apr 27th, 2011, 6:47pm »

Project Preserve and Honor

Honoring America's heroes buried in Arlington Cemetery who served their country in support of the Global War on Terror

http://www.preserveandhonor.com/

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« Reply #3789 on: Apr 27th, 2011, 7:54pm »

Orlando Sentinel

Wildfire burning near Kennedy Space Center


By Walter Pacheco, Orlando Sentinel
2:11 p.m. EDT, April 27, 2011

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The countdown clock at the press site is seen, as the wildfire burns, near Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral. (JOE SKIPPER, REUTERS / April 27, 2011)

Officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said there is a wildfire burning at the Merritt Island National Refuge south of the Kennedy Space Center.

Refuge spokesman Dorn Whitmore said fire crews and three fire engines are at the 50-acre wildfire which is located about 1.5 miles south of the vehicle assembly building.

Whitmore said the fire is quickly moving north and producing heavy smoke as it burns in an oak brush area of the preserve.

He could not confirm how long it will take to knock down the blaze.

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« Reply #3790 on: Apr 28th, 2011, 07:42am »

Thanks Swamprat and good morning to you.
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« Reply #3791 on: Apr 28th, 2011, 07:45am »

Washington Post

Death toll jumps to 193 people in 5 states from killer tornadoes, storms across the South

By Associated Press, Thursday, April 28, 8:35 AM

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — The death toll from severe storms that punished five Southern U.S. states jumped to a staggering 193 Thursday after Alabama canvassed its hard-hit counties for a new tally of lives lost.

Alabama’s state emergency management agency said it had confirmed 128 deaths, up from at least 61 earlier.

“We expect that toll, unfortunately, to rise,” Gov. Robert Bentley told ABC’s “Good Morning America.”

Mississippi officials reported 32 dead in that state and Tennessee raised its report to 14. Another 11 have been killed in Georgia and eight in Virginia.

The fierce storms Wednesday spawned tornadoes and winds that wiped out homes and businesses, forced a nuclear power plant to use backup generators and prompted the evacuation of a National Weather Service office.

The National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., said it received 137 tornado reports around the regions, including 66 in Alabama and 38 in Mississippi.

One of the hardest-hit areas was Tuscaloosa, a city of more than 83,000 and home to the University of Alabama. The city’s police and other emergency services were devastated, the mayor said, and at least 15 people were killed and about 100 were in a single hospital.

A massive tornado, caught on video by a news camera on a tower, barreled through the city late Wednesday afternoon, leveling it.

By nightfall, the city was dark. Roads were impassable. Signs were blown down in front of restaurants, businesses were unrecognizable and sirens wailed off and on. Debris littered the streets and sidewalks.

College students in a commercial district near campus used flashlights to check out the damage.

At Stephanie’s Flowers, owner Bronson Englebert used the headlights from two delivery vans to see what valuables he could remove. He had closed early, which was a good thing. The storm blew out the front of his store, pulled down the ceiling and shattered the windows, leaving only the curtains flapping in the breeze.

“It even blew out the back wall, and I’ve got bricks on top of two delivery vans now,” Englebert said.

A group of students stopped to help Englebert, carrying out items like computers and printers and putting them in his van.

“They’ve been awfully good to me so far,” Englebert said.

The storm system spread destruction from Texas to New York, where dozens of roads were flooded or washed out.

The governors in Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia each issued emergency declarations for parts of their states.

President Barack Obama said he had spoken with Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley and approved his request for emergency federal assistance, including search and rescue assets. About 1,400 National Guard soldiers were being deployed around the state.

“Our hearts go out to all those who have been affected by this devastation, and we commend the heroic efforts of those who have been working tirelessly to respond to this disaster,” Obama said in a statement.

Around Tuscaloosa, traffic was snarled by downed trees and power lines, and some drivers abandoned their cars in medians.

“What we faced today was massive damage on a scale we have not seen in Tuscaloosa in quite some time,” Mayor Walter Maddox said.

University officials said there didn’t appear to be significant damage on campus, and dozens of students and locals were staying at a 125-bed shelter in the campus recreation center.

Volunteers and staff were providing food and water to people like 29-year-old civil engineering graduate student Kenyona Pierce.

“I really don’t know if I have a home to go to,” she said.

Storms also struck Birmingham, felling numerous trees that impeded emergency responders and those trying to leave hard-hit areas.

The Browns Ferry nuclear power plant about 30 miles west of Huntsville lost offsite power. The Tennessee Valley Authority-owned plant had to use seven diesel generators to power the plant’s three units. The safety systems operated as needed and the emergency event was classified as the lowest of four levels, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission said.

In Huntsville, meteorologists found themselves in the path of severe storms and had to take shelter in a reinforced steel room, turning over monitoring duties to a sister office in Jackson, Miss. Meteorologists saw multiple wall clouds, which sometimes spawn tornadoes, and decided to take cover, but the building wasn’t damaged.

“We have to take shelter just like the rest of the people,” said meteorologist Chelly Amin, who wasn’t at the office at the time but spoke with colleagues about the situation.

In Kemper County, Miss., in the east-central part of the state, sisters Florrie Green and Maxine McDonald, and their sister-in-law Johnnie Green, all died in a mobile home that was destroyed by a storm.

“It’s hard. It’s been very difficult,” said Mary Green, Johnnie Green’s daughter-in-law. “They were thrown into those pines over there,” she said, pointing to a wooded area. “They had to go look for their bodies.”

In Choctaw County, Miss., a Louisiana police officer was killed Wednesday morning when a towering sweetgum tree fell onto his tent as he shielded his young daughter with his body, said Kim Korthuis, a supervisory ranger with the National Park Service. The girl wasn’t hurt.

The 9-year-old girl was brought to a motor home about 100 feet away where campsite volunteer Greg Maier was staying with his wife. He went back to check on the father and found him dead.

“She wasn’t hurt, just scared and soaking wet,” Maier said.

Her father, Lt. Wade Sharp, had been with the Covington Police Department for 19 years.

“He was a hell of an investigator,” said Capt. Jack West, his colleague in Louisiana.

In a neighborhood south of Birmingham, Austin Ransdell and a friend had to hike out after the house where he was living was crushed by four trees. No one was hurt.

As he walked away from the wreckage, trees and power lines crisscrossed residential streets, and police cars and utility trucks blocked a main highway.

“The house was destroyed. We couldn’t stay in it. Water pipes broke; it was flooding the basement,” he said. “We had people coming in telling us another storm was coming in about four or five hours, so we just packed up.”

Not far away, Craig Branch was stunned by the damage.

“Every street to get into our general subdivision was blocked off. Power lines are down; trees are all over the road. I’ve never seen anything like that before,” he said.

In eastern Tennessee, a woman was killed by falling trees in her trailer in Chattanooga. Just outside the city in Tiftonia, what appeared to be a tornado also struck at the base of the tourist peak Lookout Mountain.

Tops were snapped off trees and insulation and metal roof panels littered the ground. Police officers walked down the street, spray-painting symbols on houses they had checked for people who might be inside.

Mary Ann Bowman, 42, stood watching from her driveway as huge tractors moved downed trees in the street. She had rushed home from work to find windows shattered at her house, and her grandmother’s house next door shredded. The 91-year-old woman wasn’t home at the time.

“When I pulled up I just started crying,” Bowman said.

___

Mohr reported from Choctaw County, Miss. Associated Press writers Jamie Stengle in Edom, Texas, Andrew DeMillo and Nomaan Merchant in Vilonia, Ark., Jack Elliott Jr. in Jackson, Miss., Anna McFall and John Zenor in Montgomery; Bill Fuller and Alan Sayre in New Orleans, Dorie Turner in Atlanta, Bill Poovey in Chattanooga, Tenn., and Terry Wallace in Dallas contributed to this report.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/emergency-agencies-alabama-death-toll-jumps-to-128-after-storms-miss-up-to-32/2011/04/28/AFvWZY4E_story.html

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« Reply #3792 on: Apr 28th, 2011, 07:48am »

Telegraph

Calling animals 'pets' is insulting, academics claim

Animal lovers should stop calling their furry or feathered friends “pets” because the term is insulting, leading academics claim.

By John Bingham
8:30AM BST 28 Apr 2011

Domestic dogs, cats, hamsters or budgerigars should be rebranded as “companion animals” while owners should be known as “human carers”, they insist.

Even terms such as wildlife are dismissed as insulting to the animals concerned – who should instead be known as “free-living”, the academics including an Oxford professor suggest.

The call comes from the editors of then Journal of Animal Ethics, a new academic publication devoted to the issue.

It is edited by the Revd Professor Andrew Linzey, a theologian and director of the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics, who once received an honorary degree from the Archbishop of Canterbury for his work promoting the rights of “God’s sentient creatures”.

In its first editorial, the journal – jointly published by Prof Linzey’s centre and the University of Illinois in the US – condemns the use of terms such as ”critters” and “beasts”.

It argues that “derogatory” language about animals can affect the way that they are treated.

“Despite its prevalence, ‘pets’ is surely a derogatory term both of the animals concerned and their human carers,” the editorial claims.

“Again the word ‘owners’, whilst technically correct in law, harks back to a previous age when animals were regarded as just that: property, machines or things to use without moral constraint.”

It goes on: “We invite authors to use the words ‘free-living’, ‘free-ranging’ or ‘free-roaming’ rather than ‘wild animals’

“For most, ‘wildness’ is synonymous with uncivilised, unrestrained, barbarous existence.

“There is an obvious prejudgment here that should be avoided.”

Prof Linzey and his co-editor Professor Priscilla Cohn, of Penn State University in the US, also hope to see some of the more colourful terms in the English language stamped out.

Phrases such as “sly as a fox, “eat like a pig” or “drunk as a skunk” are all unfair to animals, they claim.

“We shall not be able to think clearly unless we discipline ourselves to use less than partial adjectives in our exploration of animals and our moral relations with them," they say.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/8479391/Calling-animals-pets-is-insulting-academics-claim.html

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« Reply #3793 on: Apr 28th, 2011, 07:53am »

Wired Science

Budget Cuts Shutter SETI’s Search for Aliens
By Wired UK
April 27, 2011 | 1:45 pm
Categories: Space


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Part of SETI’s Allen Telescope Array.
(brewbooks/Flickr)



A collection of radio telescopes dedicated solely to listening out for extraterrestrial life has been put into “hibernation” because of a lack of funds.

The Allen Telescope Array in Northern California has a combined collecting area of one hectare, and was funded by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. However, just three and a half years after the array began its hunt for extraterrestrial life, the money has dried up.

ATA is a joint project between the SETI Institute — a not-for-profit organization dedicated to establishing the possibility of life beyond Earth, or astrobiology — and the Radio Astronomy Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. Like SETI, ATA is funded by a mixture of private foundations and organizations such as NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey.

The ATA is located in the Hat Creek Radio Observatory, so it also gets cash from the National Science Foundation and the state of California, but both of these monetary sources have shrunk considerably over recent months. Annual costs for ATA operations are $1.5 million and the SETI campaign at the array are another $1 million.

According to Scientific American, on April 22 ATA’s donors received a letter from SETI’s CEO, Tom Pierson, stating: “Starting this week, the equipment is unavailable for normal observations and is being maintained in a safe state by a significantly reduced staff.”

The ATA was conceived in a series of SETI Institute workshops in 1997, which established that an LSND array (“Large Number of Small Dishes”, all working together) was more effective than one big antenna for collecting data. The ATA was proposed as a result.

The project was planned to be built in four phases, during which the number of telescopes would increase over time, eventually reaching 350. After securing $25 million of funding from Allen in 2001, the first phase was completed in 2007, when 42 dishes began operation at the cost of $50 million.

Although the ATA isn’t the only radio telescope facility which is capable of searching for alien life, it’s the only one dedicated almost wholly to the task. The SETI Institute had plans to use the ATA to listen out for radio emissions from the extrasolar planets discovered by NASA’s Kepler spacecraft.

The project is attempting to source new funds, along with new uses for the array. SETI has offered up the ATA’s abilities to help the U.S. Air Force track orbiting debris that could be harmful to defense satellites. Pierson says that he’s hopeful that these other uses “will help provide future operating funds”.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/04/seti-telescope-shutdown/

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xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3794 on: Apr 28th, 2011, 07:53am »

"Phrases such as “sly as a fox, “eat like a pig” or “drunk as a skunk” are all unfair to animals, they claim."

Gosh! Wait 'till they form a political bloc and start voting!! shocked
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"Let's see what's over there."
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