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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 49060 times)
WingsofCrystal
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« Reply #3840 on: May 1st, 2011, 3:29pm »

on May 1st, 2011, 2:52pm, Swamprat wrote:
So sad...
Be thankful for each day! Life is precious!

This picture was found in a camera during cleanup.
This is a fantastic photo!! Amazing that the film was still good - or memory stick. Either one, this really tells the story. Look at how high that wall of water is!!

This picture was taken on the banks of Sumatra Island (the height of waves was of approx. 32 m = 105 ft).
It was found saved in a digital camera, after the disaster.
We cannot know for sure, but very likely the one who took the picture is not alive any more (it was just a matter of seconds).

Today we can see the last image he/she saw before ending life on Earth!


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Holy Cow!
The cliff around the corner overlooking Birch Bay is about 100 feet.
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« Reply #3841 on: May 1st, 2011, 3:32pm »

Happy May Day!





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« Reply #3842 on: May 1st, 2011, 10:05pm »

Reuters

1 May 2011

Al Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden dead: U.S. officials

10:55pm EDT

WASHINGTON (Reuters)

- Osama bin Laden is dead and his body has been recovered by U.S. authorities, U.S. officials said on Sunday night.

President Barack Obama was to make the announcement shortly that after searching in vain for bin Laden since he disappeared in Afghanistan in late 2001, the Saudi-born extremist is dead.

It is a major accomplishment for Obama and his national security team, having fulfilled the goal once voiced by Obama's predecessor, George W. Bush, to bring to justice the mastermind of the September 11, 2001, attacks.

(Reporting by Steve Holland, editing by Philip Barbara)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/02/us-obama-statement-idUSTRE74107920110502

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« Reply #3843 on: May 1st, 2011, 10:11pm »



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« Reply #3844 on: May 1st, 2011, 10:22pm »

AMEN!
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« Reply #3845 on: May 2nd, 2011, 07:33am »

Although I won't miss him at all I would have preferred if they would have caught him alive.

on May 1st, 2011, 3:29pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Holy Cow!
The cliff around the corner overlooking Birch Bay is about 100 feet.
Crystal

Indeed. Shocking! shocked
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« Reply #3846 on: May 2nd, 2011, 07:40am »

on May 1st, 2011, 10:22pm, Swamprat wrote:
AMEN!



grin grin grin grin grin grin grin
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« Reply #3847 on: May 2nd, 2011, 07:41am »

Good morning Phil!

At least we don't have to pay for a huge trial for Osama Bin Dead!

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« Reply #3848 on: May 2nd, 2011, 07:43am »

Washington Post

Pakistan stresses that raid was a U.S. mission

By Karin Brulliard, Monday, May 2, 7:35 AM

ISLAMABAD–Osama bin Laden was killed in a Pakistani city known for its military bases -- but the Pakistani government stressed on Monday that U.S. forces carried out the mission, not Pakistani soldiers.

President Asif Ali Zardari learned of bin Laden’s death in a phone call from President Obama, a government statement said. The mission was carried out “in accordance with declared U.S. policy that Osama bin Laden will be eliminated in a direct action by the U.S. forces, wherever found in the world.”

The statement by Pakistan’s foreign ministry pointedly did not cite any Pakistani involvement in the operation, even though President Obama, in an announcement from the White House, cited Pakistani assistance.

The omission fueled speculation about Pakistan’s knowledge of bin Laden’s whereabouts, and appeared to reflect concern within the government here about a possible backlash from Islamist insurgents or Pakistan’s strongly anti-American public.

Depending on the role Pakistan played in identifying bin Laden’s location, the killing could ease tensions between U.S. and Pakistani military and intelligence officials, who have sparred recently over America’s presence in Pakistan, CIA drone strikes, Pakistani reluctance to strike terror hubs and U.S. assertions that Pakistani intelligence operatives protect or assist Islamist insurgents.

But the killing could also intensify suspicions in Washington that Pakistan is either uncommitted to the U.S.-backed fight against Islamist militancy or is playing a double game by sheltering terrorists.

Pakistan had long maintained that bin Laden and other wanted terrorists were not hiding on Pakistani soil. But bin Laden has now joined a list of high-value terror suspects captured or killed in populous mainland Pakistan, far from the wild borderlands where U.S. officials say the Taliban and al-Qaeda are based.

American troops in four helicopters swept into Abbottabad--a city 65 miles from the capital that is home to two Pakistani army regiments--early Monday morning in Pakistan (late Sunday afternoon in Washington). Bin Laden and four associates were killed inside a sprawling and heavily fortified mansion located within walking distance from a premiere military academy.

In its statement, released hours later, Pakistan’s foreign ministry hailed the killing as “a major setback to terrorist organizations around the world.”

Earlier, Pakistani intelligence officials, speaking anonymously, had said bin Laden was killed in a joint operation. One official called the mission “primarily ISI,” a reference to Pakistan’s top spy agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence directorate.

But senior U.S. officials said no other government was informed of the raid ahead of time — including Pakistan’s.

“It is a bit embarrassing, that even if he was hiding there, [the Pakistani army] would not know,” said Rahimullah Yusufzai, a Pakistani journalist who is an expert on militancy in the country’s northwest. “It means your intelligence is not good.”

A Pakistani intelligence official said bin Laden’s high-walled refuge not far from Islamabad had escaped the agency’s notice. “If we knew that he was hanging out there, we would have caught him earlier.”

On Monday, the Pakistani army cordoned off the neighborhood surrounding the house where bin Laden was killed. The newly developed area is within military residential property where many officers live, but most houses in the immediate vicinity were occupied by civilians, residents gathered at the scene said.

Even by the standards of the relatively posh neighborhood, the three-story house where bin Laden was killed stood out, senior U.S. officials said. The structure was roughly eight times larger than those nearby, and was surrounded by 12- to 18-foot walls topped with barbed wire. Its occupants burned their trash, unlike their neighbors. Though the six-year-old house was valued at $1 million, it had no connected phone or internet service, the official said--apparently an attempt to avoid surveillance.

A U.S. official said the Obama administration was “very concerned” that bin Laden was located in an easily accessible, well-populated part of Pakistan. “This is something that we’re going to continue to work with the Pakistani government on,” the official said.

Abbottabad, which is also known for its high-quality schools and medical facilities, has become a melting pot of sorts following Pakistani military operations in the tribal areas and the nearby Swat Valley, said Gohar Ayub, a former Pakistani foreign minister who is from the city. Refugees from those conflicts, as well as from Afghanistan, have made it a city where few people know their neighbors, he said.

“That’s one reason why he possibly went there,” Ayub said of bin Laden.

Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, Pakistan’s military chief, visited the military academy in Abbottabad just over a week ago and, in a speech, said his troops had “broken the backs” of militants. His comment followed a White House report that criticized the Pakistani military for lacking a clear strategy to defeat insurgents.

Pakistan’s cooperation with the U.S. war on terror is extremely unpopular among the public, and its powerful army has long been sensitive about U.S. military presence inside its borders. While it has allowed U.S. Special Forces to offer training, it publicly denies that it permits U.S. ground operations or CIA drone strikes, calling both a violation of national sovereignty.

Following the arrest in January of a CIA contractor who fatally shot two Pakistanis, bilateral military and intelligence relations dropped to what some officials in both countries called an all-time low. Pakistan recently demanded that the United States scale back its military presence and the number of drone strikes, and a Pakistani intelligence official said not long ago that joint intelligence operations had been halted.

On Monday, that official said the bin Laden killing symbolized that “sanity had prevailed and we continue to work together.”

Earlier this year, Pakistani officials said they arrested Umar Patek, an Indonesian militant with ties to al-Qaeda. Last year, a joint CIA-ISI operation netted Abdul Ghani Baradar, a senior Afghan Taliban leader. In 2002, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, an architect of the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, was arrested in Rawalpindi, home to Pakistan’s army.

Yusufzai, the journalist, said it was unlikely Pakistan had not assisted or approved of the bin Laden operation.

“Americans would be hard-pressed and face difficulties operating in a place like Abbotabad without the army’s help,” he said.

Special correspondents Shaiq Hussain in Islamabad and Haq Nawaz Khan in Abbottabad contributed to this report.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/pakistan-stresses-that-raid-was-a-us-mission/2011/05/02/AFd0eeXF_story.html?hpid=z3

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« Reply #3849 on: May 2nd, 2011, 07:47am »

FBI Most Wanted List

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« Reply #3850 on: May 2nd, 2011, 07:51am »

Wired Danger Room

Latest on the Osama Raid: Tricked-Out Choppers, Live Tweets, Possible Pakistani Casualties
By David Axe and Noah Shachtman
May 2, 2011 | 1:59 am
Categories: Af/Pak


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No U.S. operatives were hurt or killed in the dramatic, early-morning raid that killed al-Qaida leader Osama Bin Laden in his northern Pakistan hideout. At least, none that we know about here at 1:50 in the morning, eastern time. But there may have been casualties among the Americans’ allies, according to fragmentary press reports in the hours after the attack. That would mean U.S. troops had some friends along during the raid, despite some sources insisting it was an Americans-only show.

Let’s be clear: in these heady hours, information is flying in all directions, and a lot of it is bound to be wrong. But several early reports, if true, offer a very murky window into possible direct Pakistani assistance in the killing of Bin Laden. The reports also underscore the scale and ferocity of the raid — and into the aerial weaponry the Americans used to pull off arguably the most important military operation of the decade.

Under the cover of darkness, two or three helicopters infiltrated U.S. operators — maybe Special Operations Forces, maybe CIA agents, maybe both. They were brought into the vicinity of a compound where Bin Laden was thought to be hiding, near the city of Abbottabad around 35 miles from the Pakistani capital.

“The physical security measures of the compound are extraordinary. It has 12- to 18-foot walls topped with barbed wire. Internal wall sections — internal walls sectioned off different portions of the compound to provide extra privacy. Access to the compound is restricted by two security gates,” a senior administration official told reporters tonight. “The main structure, a three-story building, has few windows facing the outside of the compound. A terrace on the third floor has a seven-foot wall privacy — has a seven-foot privacy wall.”

One or two American choppers arrived safely near the compound. A third bird — allegedly a Pakistani bird — was struck by ground fire, some local news outlets claimed.

“According to eyewitnesses, a low-flying helicopter crashed in a populated area and as a result two houses were engulfed in flames,” a Pakistani news service reported, an hour before the world knew Bin Laden was dead. “Three people including two women were injured in the attack and were taken to the CMH Hospital.”

“A huge window shaking bang here in Abbottabad,” tweeted Sohaib Athar, a local IT consultant. “I hope its not the start of something nasty :-S”

The crash occurred near the Pakistani Military Academy in Abbottabad, according to the report, highlighting Bin Laden’s long-term proximity to Pakistan government forces — and thus the great extent of his local protection. The two injured women were almost certainly bystanders on the ground. It’s not clear if the injured man was a member of the helicopter crew or another civilian.

The apparent details surrounding the helicopter shoot-down fill in some of the (perhaps intentional) gaps left by U.S. President Barack Obama when he announced late Sunday night that Bin Laden was dead and his body was in American custody.

The operation itself was the culmination of years of careful and highly advanced intelligence work. Officers from the CIA, the NGA, the NSA all worked very hard as a team to analyze and pinpoint this compound.

The President and, later, a pair of senior administration officials, hinted at a brief, intense battle at Bin Laden’s compound — a 40 minute-raid that killed Bin Laden, one of his sons, and two of his couriers. But Obama made no mention of a hot landing zone — one of the most dangerous scenarios in modern military operations. It appears, as of this moment, that the raid that killed Bin Laden was no mere nighttime snatch-and-grab. It was a battle.

The scale of the resistance implies an equivalent U.S. force. It’s unlikely the CIA and Joint Special Operations Command would risk sending in a lightly-protected team to face terrorists capable of shooting down helicopters. That means air cover — most likely armed drones or Air Force gunships flying from one of America’s secretive Pakistani bases.

As for the infiltrating U.S. choppers themselves, the terrain offers clues about their identity. Abbottabad starts out at around 5,000 feet above sea level and only gets higher. The commando-transporting 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment possesses modified versions of the regular Army’s UH-60 Blackhawk and CH-47 Chinook helicopters.

The Blackhawk is the less powerful of the two, and in Afghanistan the Army tends to assign it to missions under 6,000 feet. The Chinook handles the higher altitudes that are common across eastern Afghanistan and northern Pakistan. For that reason, the American choppers over Abbottabad may have been tricked-out MH-47Gs, armed with up to four door guns. (Pictured above.) Those helos are noisy, however. So another candidate might be the quieter, ultra-light, single-engine Little Bird copter often favored by special operations forces.

Obama also only hinted at the level of Pakistani involvement in the raid. “It’s important to note that our counter-terrorism cooperation with Pakistan helped lead us to Bin Laden,” the president said. Senior administration officials on a conference call shortly after Obama’s announcement made a somewhat contradictory point. They said that the U.S. didn’t share intelligence with Pakistan immediately prior to the raid.

That would seem to run counter to the initial local news reports clearly stating that at least one Pakistani chopper was involved in the assault. A later report insists there were just two choppers, they were both American, and one was damaged flying in and subsequently destroyed by U.S. forces to avoid it falling into enemy hands.

“Since taliban (probably) don’t have helicopters, and since they’re saying it was not ‘ours’, so must be a complicated situation,” Athar tweeted.

Depending on which version is true, Pakistan either had a direct role in the risky, bloody raid … or no role at all. You get the sense that this will all get cleared up soon, as more info emerges about the long-awaited killing of the 9/11 mastermind.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/05/latest-on-the-osama-raid-tricked-out-choppers-live-tweets-possible-pakistani-casualties/#more-45710

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« Reply #3851 on: May 2nd, 2011, 08:04am »

LA Times

The 34th Occasional Pasadena Doo Dah Parade


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Dale Smith, 70, of Costa Mesa and other "Coneheads" take part in the 34th Occasional Pasadena Doo Dah Parade,
whose offbeat and zany pageantry proceeded down Colorado Boulevard.

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« Reply #3852 on: May 2nd, 2011, 08:09am »

Science Daily

Measuring the Distant Universe in 3-D Using Light from 14,000 Quasars

ScienceDaily (May 1, 2011)

— The biggest 3-D map of the distant universe ever made, using light from 14,000 quasars -- supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies billions of light years away -- has been constructed by scientists with the third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III).


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Zooming in on a slice of the BOSS map shows areas with more (red) and less (blue) intergalactic gas,
as revealed by correlations of the Lyman-alpha forest data from the spectra of thousands of quasars.
A distance of one billion light years is indicated by the scale bar.
(Credit: Anže Slosar and BOSS Lyman-alpha cosmology working group)



The map is the first major result from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), SDSS-III's largest survey, whose principal investigator is David Schlegel of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The huge new map was presented at the April meeting of the American Physical Society in Anaheim, CA, by Anže Slosar of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

BOSS is the first attempt to use baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) as a precision tool to measure dark energy. Baryon oscillation refers to how matter clumps in a regular way throughout the universe, a physical manifestation of the expansion of the universe. Until now, 3-D maps showing this oscillation have been based on the distribution of visible galaxies. BOSS is the first survey to map intergalactic hydrogen gas as well, using distant quasars whose light is produced by supermassive black holes at the centers of active galaxies.

"Quasars are the brightest objects in the universe, which we use as convenient backlights to illuminate the intervening hydrogen gas that fills the universe between us and them," Slosar says. "We can see their shadows, and the details in their shadows" -- specifically, the absorption features in their spectra known as the Lyman-alpha forest -- "allowing us to see how the gas is clumped along our line of sight. The amazing thing is that this allows us to see the universe so very far away, where measuring positions of individual galaxies in large numbers is impractical."

"BOSS is the first attempt to use the Lyman-alpha forest to measure dark energy," says principal investigator Schlegel. "Because the Sloan Telescope has such a wide field of view, and because these quasars are so faint, there was no one who wasn't nervous about whether we could really bring it off."

By using 14,000 of the quasars collected by the Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico during the first year of BOSS's planned five-year run, the new map demonstrates that indeed it is possible to determine variations in the density of intergalactic hydrogen gas at cosmological distances and thus to measure the effects of dark energy at those distances.

Slosar, who leads BOSS's Lyman-alpha cosmology working group, says that while similar measurements have been made with individual quasars or small groups of quasars in the past, "These have given only one-dimensional information about fluctuations in density along the line of sight. Before now there has never been enough density of quasars for a 3-D view."

The distance scale of the new map corresponds to an early time in the history of the universe, when the distribution of matter was nearly uniform. Any effects of dark energy detected so early would settle basic questions about its nature.

Measuring the expansion history of the universe

Baryon acoustic oscillation is cosmologists' shorthand for the periodic clustering (oscillation) of matter (baryons), which originated as pressure (acoustic) waves moving through the hot, opaque, liquid-like early universe. The pressure differences resulted in differences in density and left their signature as small variations in the temperature of the cosmic microwave background. Later -- because the denser regions formed by the pressure waves seeded galaxy formation and the accumulation of other matter -- the original acoustic waves were echoed in the net-like filaments and voids of the clustering of galaxies and in variations in the density of intergalactic hydrogen gas.

The oscillations repeat at about 500-million-light-year intervals, and because this scale is firmly anchored in the cosmic microwave background it provides a ruler -- a very big one -- to measure the history of the expanding universe. With this cosmic yardstick it will be possible to determine just how fast the universe was expanding at the redshift of the objects in the BOSS survey -- in other words, how the expansion rate has changed over time. (Redshift is the degree to which the light from an object speeding away from the viewer is shifted toward the red end of the spectrum.) Knowing whether expansion has accelerated at a constant rate or has varied over time will help decide among the major theories of dark energy.

Over its five-year extent, BOSS is using two distinct methods to calibrate the markings on the cosmic yardstick. The first method, well tested, will precisely measure 1.5 million luminous red galaxies at "low" redshifts around z = 0.7 (z stands for redshift). The second method will eventually measure the Lyman-alpha forest of 160,000 quasars with high redshifts around z = 2.5. These redshifts correspond to galaxies at distances of 2 to 6 billion light years and quasars at 10 to 11 billion light years.

Lyman-alpha is the name given to a line in the spectrum of hydrogen, marking the wavelength of light emitted when an excited hydrogen electron falls back to its ground state; it's a strong signal in the light from quasars. As the quasar's light passes through intervening clouds of hydrogen gas, additional lines accumulate where the gas clouds absorb the signal, echoing it but shifting by different degrees according to factors including the redshift of the gas cloud and its density. The spectrum of a distant quasar may have hundreds of lines, clumped and blended into a messy, wiggly structure in the spectrum: this is what astronomers call the Lyman-alpha forest.

"In theory, you can turn any of these absorption lines directly into redshifts and locate the gas cloud precisely," says Bill Carithers of Berkeley Lab's Physics Division, who concentrates on extracting relevant information from the noisy data that comes straight from the telescope. "But in practice only the spectra of the very brightest quasars are clean enough to make things that simple."

Carithers says that "while a very long exposure could improve the signal-to-noise ratio, that comes at a price. We need lots and lots of quasars to make a map. We can only afford to spend so much telescope time on each."

Since the heart of BAO is the correlation distance among density oscillations, the trick turns out to be not overconcentrating on individual spectra but instead measuring the correlations among them. "For any correlation distance, many quasars will contribute," says Carithers, "so the noise will average and the signal will get stronger. We can say, 'I'll use my data, noise and all.'"

If the attempt to measure density variations in the intergalactic gas is indeed successful, what will the BAO correlation signal from the Lyman-alpha forest look like? Shirley Ho of Berkeley Lab's Physics Division, working with Slosar and Berkeley Lab's Martin White, developed simulations to find out.

""We modeled what you would see when you have a BOSS-like data set, and through the simulations we understand the possible sources of systematics when we try with real data to detect the acoustic peak from the Lyman-alpha forest, the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations," Ho says. Comparing the real data to the simulation confirms whether the search is working as hoped.

With Peter Nugent, who heads the Computational Cosmology Center at Berkeley Lab's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), Ho established a 30-terabyte BOSS Project Directory to store the Lyman-alpha simulations, plus the entire Lyman-alpha raw data set as it arrives. The directory also contains a subset of galaxy data and is available to all BOSS collaborators and to the public. The total BOSS data set is stored in a dedicated cluster of computers nicknamed Riemann.

Targeting the search

The wide-field Sloan Telescope covers a wide expanse of sky at moderate magnification. To measure both galaxies and quasars, a thousand targets for each BOSS exposure are selected in advance from existing surveys. At the telescope's focal plane, "plug plates" are precision-machine-drilled with tiny holes at positions of known galaxies and quasars. These holes are plugged with optical fibers that channel the light from each chosen galaxy or quasar to a spectrograph, which isolates the spectrum of each individual object. Schlegel credits Berkeley Lab's Nicholas Ross for doing much of the "incredibly hard work" involved in this targeting.

Slosar says, "Our exploratory paper includes less than a tenth of the 160,000 quasars that BOSS will study, but already that's enough to establish a proof of the concept. This is a potentially revolutionary technique for mapping the very distant universe. We're paving the way for future BAO experiments like BigBOSS to follow suit." BigBOSS is a proposed survey that will find precise locations for 20 million galaxies and quasars and go beyond BOSS to encompass 10 times the volume of the finished BOSS map.

more after the jump
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110501183827.htm

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« Reply #3853 on: May 2nd, 2011, 08:14am »

Deadline Hollywood

Pair Of Hunt For Bin Laden Projects Could Be Timeliest Movies In Hollywood Now

By MIKE FLEMING
Sunday May 1, 2011 @ 9:37pm PDT

EXCLUSIVE: I've learned that Oscar-winning director Kathryn Bigelow in recent weeks has been preparing and starting to cast an indie movie with the working title Kill Bin Laden, while another movie project about the hunt for the Al Queda terrorist leader at a major Hollywood studio stalled back in 2006. Given tonight's startling news, it's clear that these may be the timeliest film projects in recent Hollywood history. And judging from tonight's showbiz phone calls coming into Deadline about Osama bin Laden's death, I wouldn't be surprised if the movie studios are anxious to bring these projects to the big screen as soon as possible, updated with the details behind tonight's successful military mission. Have you seen those spontaneous cheering crowds that formed tonight outside Washington DC's White House and in NYC's Times Square as well as around major American cities and small towns? If a patriotic film about this story can tap into these feelings of first helpless horror and then widespread frustration and then successful closure, it could be a real winner at the box office.

Bigelow and Mark Boal, her collaborator on The Hurt Locker, have been mobilizing their film to go into production as their follow-up to that Best Picture Academy Award winner. Their movie as planned was based on an earlier unsuccessful mission to try to kill the Al Qaeda leader responsible for the 9/11 terrorist attack on America as he hid in the border region between Pakistan and Afghanistan. But now they've certainly got a celebratory ending to that dramatic story with tonight's announcement that the U.S. conducted a military operation that killed Bin Laden. Mind you, reps for Bigelow have told me previously that this movie isn't specifically about the Al Qaeda leader. A lot of details about this film are stilll sketchy and secret, but I've heard that Megan Ellison, daughter of Oracle chief Larry Ellison, is ready to fund it. I heard as recently as Friday that Bigelow and Boal were courting Joel Edgerton for the lead actor. Edgerton had been on the short list for two Universal Pictures movie projects in the works, The Bourne Legacy and Snow White And The Huntsman.

Meanwhile, back in 2006, Paramount Pictures optioned Jawbreaker, a book by U.S. intelligence operative Gary Berntsen about the December 2001 American-led military mission to hunt and kill Bin Laden right during the opening stages of the 9/11-prompted invasion of Afghanistan that the author as the CIA pointman had helped coordinate with Special Operations Forces. The heavily vetted book detailed how close those forces came to finding and executing Bin Laden in the rugged mountains of Tora Bora until they were pulled back after a decision was made to let Pakistan tribal leaders lead the search -- a decision experts felt helped Bin Laden get away. The studio hired The Path To 9/11 scribe Cyrus Nowrasteh to rewrite a first draft by Berntsen's co-author Ralph Pezzullo, and Oliver Stone had eyed it as a follow-up to his film World Trade Center. But the project stalled. I've learned that, when Stone's movie version of the book didn't work out, Paramount discussed using the hunt for Bin Laden subject matter for a relaunch of Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan character made famous in books and movies like The Hunt For Red October, Patriot Games, Clear And Present Danger, and The Sum Of All Fears. But that plan stalled as well.

http://www.deadline.com/2011/05/pair-of-hunt-for-bin-laden-projects-could-be-timeliest-movies-now/

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« Reply #3854 on: May 2nd, 2011, 11:46am »




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