Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Nov 24th, 2017, 10:49am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 262 263 264 265 266  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 15732 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3945 on: May 9th, 2011, 3:58pm »

"An asteroid the size of an aircraft carrier will come closer to Earth this autumn than our own moon does, causing scientists to hold their breath as it zooms by. But they'll be nervous with excitement, not with worry about a possible disaster."

YIKES! shocked

Hi Swamprat,

Thanks for that article. I had nothing in mind for a nightmare tonight. grin

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3946 on: May 9th, 2011, 6:52pm »


User Image
"The Situation Room"
by Josh Rogin



Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3947 on: May 10th, 2011, 07:38am »

Washington Post

Arnold Schwarzenegger and wife of 25 years, Maria Shriver, say they’re separating

By Associated Press
Published: May 9

LOS ANGELES — Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and his wife of 25 years, Maria Shriver, announced Monday that they are separating.

The statement, issued by a spokesman for Schwarzenegger, said the two were working on the future of their relationship while living apart and would continue to parent their four children together.

“This has been a time of great personal and professional transition for each of us,” the two said in a prepared statement. “After a great deal of thought, reflection, discussion, and prayer, we came to this decision together.”

It was not clear from the statement if either remained at their estate in Brentwood, or who the children were with. Schwarzenegger’s spokesman, Daniel Ketchell, said he wouldn’t answer questions beyond what was said in Monday’s statement.

Schwarzenegger, a Republican, finished his seven-year run as governor in January and has been traveling to deliver speeches and pursuing entertainment projects. He tweeted frequently during his travels to such faraway places as Brazil, Nigeria and France.

Shriver was not mentioned in his Twitter updates from the road.

Shriver, also active on social networks, posted three updates on her Twitter page on the day of their 25th wedding anniversary on April 26, but did not mention the milestone.

About a month before the wedding anniversary, Shriver wrote on her Facebook page that she was going through a transition in her life.

“As you know, transitions are not easy. I’d love to get your advice on how you’ve handled transitions in your own life,” she said in a video posted on YouTube.

“It’s so stressful to not know what you’re doing next. People ask you what are you doing and then they can’t believe that you don’t know what you’re doing,” she said.

Schwarzenegger has said that Shriver, who is keenly attuned to the risks of a life in politics, initially was very upset about his plan to run for governor. But when Schwarzenegger announced his decision on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” in August 2003, he said his wife stood by his decision.

During Schwarzenegger’s time as governor, Shriver and the couple’s children never moved to Sacramento, preferring their secluded canyon estate a few miles from the Pacific Ocean. Schwarzenegger never settled in Sacramento, choosing instead to commute by private jet between his home and the state capitol.

Shriver, a member of the Kennedy political dynasty and the daughter of the late Eunice Kennedy Shriver, left her job as an NBC News correspondent after Schwarzenegger took office.

In a May 2009 commencement speech at the University of Southern California, Schwarzenegger alluded to the powerful influence Shriver had on his life. He said when people ask him the secret to success, “I say, number one, come to America. Number two, work your butt off. And number three, marry a Kennedy.”

As the state’s first lady, Shriver ran an annual women’s conference that attracted a long list of business, political and entertainment luminaries, along with an audience of thousands. She also was credited with overhauling the California Museum in downtown Sacramento and, with Schwarzenegger, starting the California Hall of Fame.

The separation announcement comes months after the death of Shriver’s father, Peace Corps founder and former vice presidential candidate Sargent Shriver, in January.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/arnold-schwarzenegger-and-wife-of-25-years-maria-shriver-say-theyre-separating/2011/05/10/AF16qwdG_story.html?hpid=z3

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3948 on: May 10th, 2011, 07:41am »

Defense News

Taiwan to Deploy Supersonic Missile on Warships

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Published: 8 May 2011 13:37

TAIPEI - Taiwan has deployed a new supersonic missile on its warships in the latest response to China's rapid naval expansion, a lawmaker said May 8.

Military authorities are also mulling deploying the Hsiung Feng III - the first locally developed supersonic anti-ship missile - on mobile launchers, Lin Yu-fang of the Kuomintang party said in a statement quoting Vice Adm. Lee Hao.

"Several types of warships have been armed with Hsiung Feng IIIs [Brave Wind]," the statement said.

It was not clear how many missiles will be produced, but according to Lin, eight Perry-class frigates and seven patrol boats will be fitted with the weapon in the Tw$11.89 billion ($413 million) project.

Analysts say Hsiung Feng III, designed to cruise at a maximum speed of mach 2.0, with a range of up to 80 miles, are difficult to defend against.

Taiwan's defense ministry has expressed alarm at China's naval buildup, although experts say it may still take time for the People's Liberation Army to operate its first carrier group complete with fighter jets.

Tsai Teh-sheng, head of Taiwan's National Security Bureau, confirmed last month that Varyag, a half-completed Soviet era aircraft carrier Beijing obtained in 1998, is expected to make its maiden voyage before the end of the year.

Tsai said the warship will have "certain combat capability" and will serve as a base for China's home-grown fighter jets that are modeled on Russian-made Su-33s.

Taiwan plans to build a new stealth warship armed with guided-missiles next year in response, military officers have said.

http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=6447237&c=ASI&s=SEA

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3949 on: May 10th, 2011, 07:47am »

Hollywood Reporter

How Japan's NHK Public Broadcaster Adapted to Cover the Earthquake and Tsunami

5:26 AM 5/10/2011
by Gavin J. Blair

TOKYO -- Japan’s public broadcaster, NHK, and its English-language global channel, NHK World, came into their own during the triple disasters of the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis that began March 11, although it is yet to commercialize its strengths in the way as the British Broadcasting Corp.

When Japan’s Meteorological Agency issued a warning for a major earthquake at 2:46 pm on Friday, March 11, NHK had the message on viewers' screens in two seconds.

“NHK holds disaster drills after midnight every evening across eight locations; the training and experience that people acquire is put to use at times like this,” says Atsushi Matsumoto, director at the Disaster and Safety Information Center of NHK’s news department. “Our strength is not just in broadcasting, but the fact that we have an extensive national network that is in place and prepared for natural disasters.”

Within a minute and 30 seconds of the earthquake, NHK had cut from a live broadcast of a Japanese parliamentary debate to rolling coverage of the unfolding catastrophe. NHK, however, would never use a word as evocative as "catastrophe" in its matter-of-fact reporting style, which won plaudits from many who preferred it to the breathless hysteria that permeated much of the global media’s coverage.

“An element of our duty as a public broadcaster is to present the news with impartiality, independence and to have a complete separation of fact and opinion,” explains Matsumoto.

The public broadcaster has 460 robot cameras set up along the coast and at key locations such as airports, harbors and nuclear power stations, which are able to provide live feeds during disasters. It was some of these, along with three of its 13 helicopters that it deployed, that provided some of the most dramatic footage that was beamed around the globe, as the resulting tsunami laid huge swathes of the northeast coast to waste.

The footage, which also came from 13 satellite broadcast trucks, was provided free to broadcasters around the globe, some of which simply switched over to live feeds from NHK. Offering unrestricted access for the first 48 hours, NHK is not sure exactly how many outlets took advantage, although footage was taken by the BBC, CNN, Al Jazeera, Associated Press Television, Reuters, European Broadcasting Union and Asian Broadcasting Union.

“We had so many international broadcasters using our footage that we added the English ‘Live’ caption to the Japanese characters on-screen,” explains Matsumoto. “It’s not just a question of covering the story as a mass media outlet, NHK has a duty under its public charter regarding disaster reporting.”

Under that mandate, all its domestic broadcast channels – four TV and three radio stations – switched to disaster coverage, which continued 24 hours per day for the first week after the earthquake. “This being the era of three screens, as well as TV, we also broadcast on One-seg [Japan’s free digital TV system for mobile phones] and the Internet, through our own website and streaming on sites Nico Nico Live and Ustream. NHK also collaborated with Google to provide access to the missing person finder that the company had set up," he says.

Following the experience of the Hanshin (Kobe) Earthquake in 1995, policies for covering disasters were established. “But the scale of this was so much larger and the difficulty of actually getting in on the ground was very different,” according to Matsumoto.

Matsumoto says that in the past, NHK’s aim was to report on the damage and victims in the event of a natural disaster, “but now our focus is also on how to prevent damage and people becoming victims.”

As the situation at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant deteriorated, much of the foreign broadcast media pulled its crews out to Tokyo and even Osaka – another 250 miles away – to report on the supposed impending apocalypse. NHK meanwhile, was sending more crews into the disaster zone.

The broadcaster had 400 people already on the ground in local bureaus (Morioka, Sendai and Fukushima) in the worst-affected prefectures, plus another 700 that were sent in from outside.

“The problem of supplies was a major issue in this disaster, not just for the victims, but also for the news crews that were covering it,” says Matsumoto. “In the case of the Kobe earthquake, there was a major city nearby, Osaka, from which things could be sent quickly.”

“The situation was very different this time, and of course without food and gasoline, the news crews couldn’t work,” explains Matsumoto. “We had to send these from Tokyo but there were shortages of gasoline, so we used diesel trucks when we could.”

The public broadcaster re-launched its global channel, NHK World, in 2009 as a 24-hour, all-English service split 50-50 between news and programs about Japan. With a total staff of about 300, including around 50 native English-speaking rewriters and announcers, the channel also found its global profile raised by the disaster.

As well as its core overseas target audience, it became a vital source of information during the disaster for foreigners living in Japan. With the channel not usually available on television in Japan, NHK World’s website – which offers live streaming -- attracted 5.4 million unique users in the first 15 days of the disaster. The channel was also offered through some cable stations to six million households in Japan.

“It was different to our usual broadcasts of 30 minutes of news and then regular programming. We were suddenly doing 24-hour rolling news with a huge amount of information coming in: the earthquake, the tsunamis, the massive numbers of evacuees, and then the nuclear plant story broke in the middle of that,” recalls Makoto Harada, the head of the international planning and broadcasting department.

“Because of a lot our people come from NHK, the style – the lack of sensationalism - is very similar, they have that ingrained in them,” says Harada. “As a basic rule, we don’t use adjectives, just stick to the facts.”

“Our feeds were being taken live by channels such as BBC, CNN and Al Jazeera. There was a lot of pressure to be accurate," according to Satoshi Kubo, head of the news and production division, who says NHK World doesn’t usually do much simultaneous translation, which it was suddenly undertaking with limited manpower for complicated and crucial press conferences about the crisis at the nuclear plant.

“And with the worries about radiation leaks in the early days, some of our own native English-speaking staff went back to their own countries, although most have now returned,” says Kubo.

NHK World has a current potential worldwide audience of approximately 130 million, set to rise to 137 million by the end of the year.

“We hope to see that increase from now on, but we don’t yet have the brand name of a BBC. So it’s been a kind of promotion to give our footage away this time,” says Harada. “We can’t have commercials now, but it’s possible in the future we could form a separate company and go in that direction.”

For now, NHK is planning to learn from the experience of covering the disaster.

“When things calm down again, we will be able to look at everything we did, and find out what we can improve on. For example, the power outages putting some of our robot cameras out of commission after the earthquake, and helicopter pads becoming unusable due to the tsunami,” says the Disaster and Safety Information Center’s Matsumoto.

“If the ‘big one’ hits Tokyo, it will help us in being able to respond better.”

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/how-japans-nhk-public-broadcaster-187019

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3950 on: May 10th, 2011, 07:49am »

Guardian

Microsoft's $8bn Skype deal shocks analysts

Business experts question whether internet phone service Skype could be worth price after recording losses last year

by Charles Arthur, technology editor guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 10 May 2011 07.38 BST


Microsoft is reported to have closed a $8.5bn (£5bn) deal for the internet phone service Skype, in a deal that has shocked analysts who think it would be a substantial overpayment for the company.

The acquisition, which is expected to be announced on Tuesday, would be Microsoft's biggest, ahead the $6bn it paid for online advertising company aQuantive in 2007, and would bring it 660 million users worldwide while giving it a foothold in voice and video communications. Analysts suggested the service could be integrated into existing Microsoft products such as its Xbox 360 games console and Kinect gaming systems, or even into its flagship Office product to let users collaborate more effectively.

Speculation has been rife in Silicon Valley for months about Skype's future. Rumours last week suggested Facebook, Google or Cisco Systems were interested in acquiring it to fold into their own services. Tony Bates, the chief executive hired from Cisco last year, has reportedly been exploring the idea of joint ventures or a sale to Google and Facebook.

News of the deal and Microsoft's interest in Skype was first reported by the Wall Street Journal online and the technology site GigaOM.

Analysts have broadly favoured the idea of the deal, but questioned whether it could ever be worth the price. Skype was bought by eBay for $2.6bn in 2005: at the time people suggested its services could be incorporated into auctions so that bidders or sellers could call each other ahead of their close. But the synergistic ideas never materialised, and eBay wrote down Skype's value by $1.4bn, before selling off a 70% stake at the end of 2007. Ironically, the suggested price would make its 30% stake worth $2.4bn – effectively making money on the deal long-term.

Skype has debt of $686m, which Microsoft would assume in the purchase.

Microsoft's online efforts have been staggering loss-makers over the past few years. Its online service division, which includes its Bing search engine, has lost $8bn over the past six years, and has not been profitable since the end of 2005.

Google previously looked at purchasing Skype in 2005, but decided against it because of questions over patent ownership – essential patents for the service are owned by a company linked to Skype's founders – and doubts about integration into its own offerings.

Microsoft already has a voice-over-internet offering, called Lync, which combines email, instant messaging and voice communications into a single program. That is run by its huge Office division, one of Microsoft's two biggest profit centres along with the Windows division.

While Skype has a name among consumers, it has barely bumped along on profitability. With 663 million registered users, most of its services are free, using internet connections for make calls between computers or in some cases internet-enabled phones. It makes revenues on voicemail services and calls to physical landlines or mobile numbers.

In 2010 it recorded a loss of $7m on revenues of $859.8m, and there has been little sign that it will gain traction there.

Mobile carriers tend to see Skype as a threat to their own services, because it allows people to make calls for free via data links rather than over voice connections, and have been reluctant to route its traffic. Though Microsoft is keen to push its Windows Phone mobile operating system, it is not clear whether it could keep carriers sweet while incorporating that.

Microsoft rarely makes large purchases, preferring to buy smaller startups. It made an ill-fated $48bn bid for Yahoo in January 2008, which was opposed and fell apart. Since then Yahoo's value has halved and Microsoft has taken over its search business, but in their latest quarterly results the companies revealed that integration had been more difficult than they expected. In 2004 it also explored a takeover of the corporate integration software company SAP for $50bn, but that too stalled.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/may/10/microsoft-skype-deal-shocks-analysts

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3951 on: May 10th, 2011, 07:58am »

Phantoms and Monsters

Monday, May 09, 2011
The 1945 New Mexico UFO Crash Encounter

Preamble: On August 16, 1945, 20 mile southeast of San Antonio, New Mexico, Reme Baca and Jose Padilla literally stumbled across the remains of what they believe to have been an alien spacecraft. Their personal account of the case displays many of the key ingredients of crashed UFO lore.

Incident: In August of 1945 Jose Padilla and Reme Baca said they were sent out on horseback from the Padilla Ranch in San Antonio New Mexico tasked to check on Jose’s father’s herd of new cows.

What they were sent to do and what they claimed to have experienced was nothing short of what actually occurred to them that frightening afternoon.

With their horses tethered as they hid behind a rock in the distant reaches of the New Mexico desert – Jose 9 and Reme 7 years of age at the time – were awe-struck by the sound of thunder and the grinding thud of something strange that came to earth on the Padilla Ranch in San Antonio New Mexico.

With trepidation tendered by child-like watchfulness they approached the crash site to within 200 yards to witness a craft stuck in rock and sand; its charred 30 foot hull shrouded in dust and burned ash had skidded to rest at the end of a wide plough-like furrow the length of a football field.

Using binoculars they saw strewn wreckage, strange creatures and military activity that would haunt them for days to come and – for the rest of their lives.

All of this occurring two full years before the archetype of all UFO crashes on the Foster Ranch outside the small town of Corona New Mexico a mere 67 miles from Roswell.

These astonishing claims, made by Jose Padilla and Reme Baca, have been researched and recorded by Denver author/researcher Paola Harris who – in conversation with ZlandCommunications – detailed how these two young Hispanic children: saw at least three creatures in the unusual oval shaped craft, had, some days later, climbed into the craft itself to retrieve pieces of the wreckage after guards had vacated the area and, how they were told by State Police to be quiet about what they had seen. - news.exopoliticsinstitute.org

Born on the edge of Ground Zero, living in the shadow of Area 51, two little Hispanic children experienced an extraordinary event occurred in August of 1945.

Jose Padilla, age 9 and Reme Baca, age 7 witnessed a saucer crash on Padilla land in the town San Antonio, New Mexico. They were witness to one of the most spectacular events in UFO history.

This new book entitled the same “Born the Edge of Ground Zero, Living in the Shadow of Area 51", was released February 2011 and is Jose Padilla’s and Reme Baca’s detailed account of what happened in their childhood. They explain what they saw the actual crash, the creature’s appearances, the pieces they took, the military clean up and an in-depth analysis of the significance of this case.

First printed in The Mountain Mail, Soccorro, New Mexico on November 2, 2003 by journalist Ben Moffet, the case was passed to me, journalist/researcher, Paola Harris in May 4, 2009. The desire to finally disclose the details and the kind invitation of Reme Baca, led me to fly to Gig Harbor in Washington State in the Northern part of the United States to interview witness Reme Baca and his wife, Virginia in July 2010. Consequently because he now lives in California, I interviewed Jose Padilla by telephone from the Baca house. During my two day stay, I was able to see and photograph the piece that Jose extracted from the craft and study the detailed analysis of its composition done in Europe.



more after the jump
http://naturalplane.blogspot.com/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3952 on: May 10th, 2011, 08:33am »

New Scientist

Talk with a dolphin via underwater translation machine

09 May 2011
by MacGregor Campbell


A DIVER carrying a computer that tries to recognise dolphin sounds and generate responses in real time will soon attempt to communicate with wild dolphins off the coast of Florida. If the bid is successful, it will be a big step towards two-way communication between humans and dolphins.

Since the 1960s, captive dolphins have been communicating via pictures and sounds. In the 1990s, Louis Herman of the Kewalo Basin Marine Mammal Laboratory in Honolulu, Hawaii, found that bottlenose dolphins can keep track of over 100 different words. They can also respond appropriately to commands in which the same words appear in a different order, understanding the difference between "bring the surfboard to the man" and "bring the man to the surfboard", for example.

But communication in most of these early experiments was one-way, says Denise Herzing, founder of the Wild Dolphin Project in Jupiter, Florida. "They create a system and expect the dolphins to learn it, and they do, but the dolphins are not empowered to use the system to request things from the humans," she says.

Since 1998, Herzing and colleagues have been attempting two-way communication with dolphins, first using rudimentary artificial sounds, then by getting them to associate the sounds with four large icons on an underwater "keyboard".

By pointing their bodies at the different symbols, the dolphins could make requests - to play with a piece of seaweed or ride the bow wave of the divers' boat, for example. The system managed to get the dolphins' attention, Herzing says, but wasn't "dolphin-friendly" enough to be successful.

Herzing is now collaborating with Thad Starner, an artificial intelligence researcher at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, on a project named Cetacean Hearing and Telemetry (CHAT). They want to work with dolphins to "co-create" a language that uses features of sounds that wild dolphins communicate with naturally.

Knowing what to listen for is a huge challenge. Dolphins can produce sound at frequencies up to 200 kilohertz - around 10 times as high as the highest pitch we can hear - and can also shift a signal's pitch or stretch it out over a long period of time.

The animals can also project sound in different directions without turning their heads, making it difficult to use visual cues alone to identify which dolphin in a pod "said" what and to guess what a sound might mean.

To record, interpret and respond to dolphin sounds, Starner and his students are building a prototype device featuring a smartphone-sized computer and two hydrophones capable of detecting the full range of dolphin sounds.

A diver will carry the computer in a waterproof case worn across the chest, and LEDs embedded around the diver's mask will light up to show where a sound picked up by the hydrophones originates from. The diver will also have a Twiddler - a handheld device that acts as a combination of mouse and keyboard - for selecting what kind of sound to make in response.

Herzing and Starner will start testing the system on wild Atlantic spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis) in the middle of this year. At first, divers will play back one of eight "words" coined by the team to mean "seaweed" or "bow wave ride", for example. The software will listen to see if the dolphins mimic them. Once the system can recognise these mimicked words, the idea is to use it to crack a much harder problem: listening to natural dolphin sounds and pulling out salient features that may be the "fundamental units" of dolphin communication.

The researchers don't know what these units might be. But the algorithms they are using are designed to sift through any unfamiliar data set and pick out interesting features (see "Pattern detector"). The software does this by assuming an average state for the data and labelling features that deviate from it. It then groups similar types of deviations - distinct sets of clicks or whistles, say - and continues to do so until it has extracted all potentially interesting patterns.

Once these units are identified, Herzing hopes to combine them to make dolphin-like signals that the animals find more interesting than human-coined "words". By associating behaviours and objects with these sounds, she may be the first to decode the rudiments of dolphins' natural language.

Justin Gregg of the Dolphin Communication Project, a non-profit organisation in Old Mystic, Connecticut, thinks that getting wild dolphins to adopt and use artificial "words" could work, but is sceptical that the team will find "fundamental units" of natural dolphin communication.

Even if they do, deciphering their meanings and using them in the correct context poses a daunting challenge. "Imagine if an alien species landed on Earth wearing elaborate spacesuits and walked through Manhattan speaking random lines from The Godfather to passers-by," he says.

"We don't even know if dolphins have words," Herzing admits. But she adds, "We could use their signals, if we knew them. We just don't."

The software that Thad Starner is using to make sense of dolphin sounds was originally designed by him and a former student, David Minnen, to "discover" interesting features in any data set. After analysing a sign-language video, the software labelled 23 of 40 signs used. It also identified when the person started and stopped signing, or scratched their head.

The software has also identified gym routines - dumb-bell curls, for example - by analysing readings from accelerometers worn by the person exercising, even though the software had not previously encountered such data. However, Starner cautions that if meaning must be ascribed to the patterns picked out by the software, then this will require human input.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21028115.400-talk-with-a-dolphin-via-underwater-translation-machine.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4240
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3953 on: May 10th, 2011, 3:15pm »

Wow! Stolen Valor-----by a CLERGYMAN! shocked tongue


Pastor: My tale of being a Navy SEAL was just 'an ego-builder'

NBC News and msnbc.com

updated 5/10/2011

A pastor who regaled family and parishioners with tales from his time in the Navy SEALs is backtracking after his story turned out to be nothing more than a self-described "ego-builder," according to reports.

Rev. Jim Moats, a 59-year-old pastor at the Christian Bible Fellowship Church in Newville, Pa., was exposed after The Patriot-News interviewed him for a story about life in the elite force.

Don Shipley, a retired SEAL who says he has access to the database containing the names of all SEALs, told The Patriot-News that the pastor was never part of the team and had never served in Vietnam, another claim by Moats.

Shipley called Moats on Sunday evening to confront him on the issue, and shortly after, Moats came clean, explaining that he had served in the Navy, but not in Vietnam, as he had previously stated.

“We deal with these guys all the time, especially the clergy. It’s amazing how many of the clergy are involved in those lies to build that flock up,” Shipley told The Patriot-News.

Read More: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42975023/ns/us_news-life/t/pastor-my-tale-being-navy-seal-was-just-ego-builder/from/toolbar
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3954 on: May 10th, 2011, 6:21pm »

on May 10th, 2011, 3:15pm, Swamprat wrote:
Wow! Stolen Valor-----by a CLERGYMAN! shocked tongue


Pastor: My tale of being a Navy SEAL was just 'an ego-builder'

NBC News and msnbc.com

updated 5/10/2011

A pastor who regaled family and parishioners with tales from his time in the Navy SEALs is backtracking after his story turned out to be nothing more than a self-described "ego-builder," according to reports.

Rev. Jim Moats, a 59-year-old pastor at the Christian Bible Fellowship Church in Newville, Pa., was exposed after The Patriot-News interviewed him for a story about life in the elite force.

Don Shipley, a retired SEAL who says he has access to the database containing the names of all SEALs, told The Patriot-News that the pastor was never part of the team and had never served in Vietnam, another claim by Moats.

Shipley called Moats on Sunday evening to confront him on the issue, and shortly after, Moats came clean, explaining that he had served in the Navy, but not in Vietnam, as he had previously stated.

“We deal with these guys all the time, especially the clergy. It’s amazing how many of the clergy are involved in those lies to build that flock up,” Shipley told The Patriot-News.

Read More: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42975023/ns/us_news-life/t/pastor-my-tale-being-navy-seal-was-just-ego-builder/from/toolbar


Geez! You would think they would know that they would get rumbled eventually.

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3955 on: May 11th, 2011, 07:38am »

New York Times

May 11, 2011
Arrest of Mets Clubhouse Manager to Be Announced
By WILLIAM K. RASHBAUM

New York City police and prosecutors are expected to announce the arrest of former Mets clubhouse manager Charlie Samuels on Wednesday in a case that saw a gambling investigation mushroom into an inquiry centered on sports memorabilia, including a full set of autographed 1986 World Series uniforms, according to people briefed on the case.

The specific charges were not immediately clear, but the investigation by New York police detectives and prosecutors in the Queens district attorney’s office has focused on what the people have said appeared to be a pattern of theft over several decades, from autographed bats and balls and other equipment to hundreds of uniforms. The people all spoke on the condition of anonymity because the charges have yet to be announced.

Michael F. Bachner, Mr. Samuels’ lawyer, said his client was expected to surrender to the authorities Wednesday morning.

“We don’t know what the charges are and I’ll reserve comment until such time as I’ve had a chance to review them,” he said.

A spokesman for the Mets could not immediately be reached for comment.

The investigation, which was first disclosed in November and resulted in the firing of Samuels a little more than a week later, was initially centered on allegations he had been gambling with a ring that had some links to organized crime.

But the inquiry, by police detectives assigned to the department’s Organized Crime Investigation Division and prosecutors in the Queens district attorney’s office Organized Crime and Rackets Bureau, soon began to focus on the team’s equipment and sports memorabilia, the people said. Earlier this year, investigators were examining whether Samuel had stolen a full set of 40 autographed uniforms worn during the 1986 World Series, as well as a full set of autographed uniforms worn during the commemorative 9/11 game played just days after the 2001 attacks.

A news advisory issued Tuesday night by the office of the Queens district attorney, Richard A. Browne, said he and senior police officials would announce the results of an investigation centered on baseball and sports memorabilia at a news conference at his office Wednesday morning.

Samuels, who had served as the clubhouse manager for 27 seasons, was suspended without pay after the gambling allegations were revealed. In addition to the post of clubhouse manager, he also held the positions of equipment manager and travelling secretary.

On most teams, the three jobs are held by two or three different people. Because he held all three, Samuels had unfettered access to everything at the club and he operated, several of the people said, with almost no oversight. He had control of the team’s road account, tickets, equipment purchases and other matters.

As a result, where most teams would purchase 10 jerseys for each player every year, Samuels would buy many times more, one of the people said.

It was routine for team members to sign bats and balls and jerseys, which were used by the team for legitimate purposes, such as marketing and auctions and for the use of people in the team’s front office, one of the people said. As a result, it was not out of the ordinary for Samuels to regularly ask players to sign equipment or uniforms.

A great deal of equipment and jerseys that came under scrutiny in the inquiry were signed by Mike Piazza, Tom Glavine and Roberto Alomar, two of the people said.

Detectives investigating the case recovered a large amount of memorabilia from a storage locker Samuels maintained, the people said.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/12/sports/baseball/arrest-of-mets-clubhouse-manager-to-be-announced.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3956 on: May 11th, 2011, 07:41am »

Washington Post

After cresting in Memphis, flooded Mississippi River takes aim at poverty-stricken Delta

By Associated Press
Updated: Wednesday, May 11, 3:55 AM

VICKSBURG, Miss. — William Jefferson paddles slowly down his street in a small boat, past his house and around his church, both flooded from the bulging Mississippi River that has rolled into the Delta.

“Half my life is still in there,” he said, pointing to the small white house swamped by several feet of water. “I hate to see it when I go back in.”

The river was taking aim at one of the most poverty-stricken parts of the country after cresting Tuesday at Memphis, Tenn., just inches short of the record set in 1937. Some low-lying Memphis neighborhoods were inundated, but the city’s high levees protected much of the rest of Memphis.

Jefferson’s neighborhood in Vicksburg, a historic Mississippi city and the site of a pivotal Civil War battle, has been one of the hardest hit. Jefferson refuses to leave, so he spends his days in the sweltering sun watching the water rise and sleeping in a camper at an intersection that’s likely to flood soon, too.

“If you don’t stay with your stuff, you won’t have it,” he said. “This is what I do every day. Just watch the water.”

Over the past week or so in the Delta, floodwaters along the rain-swollen river and its backed-up tributaries have already washed away crops, forced many to seek higher ground and closed some of the dockside casinos that are vital to the state’s economy.

The state gambling industry is taking a hit: All 19 casinos along the river will be shut down by the end of the week, costing governments $12 million to $13 million in taxes per month, authorities said. That will put some 13,000 employees temporarily out of work.

But the worst is yet to come, with the crest expected over the next few days. The damage in Memphis was estimated at more than $320 million as the serious flooding began, and an official tally won’t be available until the waters recede.

To the south, there were no early figures on the devastation, but with hundreds of homes already damaged, “we’re going to have a lot more when the water gets to where it’s never been before,” said Greg Flynn, a spokesman for the Mississippi emergency management agency.

Across the region, federal officials anxiously checked and reinforced the levees, some of which could be put to their sternest test ever.

In northwestern Mississippi, crews have been using dirt and sand to make a levee higher at the Bolivar-Coahoma county line in the north Delta, said Charlie Tindall, attorney for the Mississippi Levee Board. Inmates also put sandbags in a part of the levee where a “sand boil” was discovered Monday night, he said Tuesday. A “sand boil” occurs when water moves under the structure of a levee, sending bubbles up on the other side that make it appear as though the sand is boiling.

About 10 miles north of Vicksburg, contractors lined one side of what is known as a backwater levee with big sheets of plastic to keep it from eroding if floodwaters flow over it as feared — something that has never happened to the levee since it was built in the 1970s.

In Vicksburg, which is at the southern tip of the rich alluvial soil in the central part of the state, the river was projected to peak Saturday just above the record set during the cataclysmic Great Flood of 1927. The town is home to thousands of soldier graves.

Jimmy Mitchell, 46, and his wife and two children have been living in a loaned camper for more than week at a civic arena in Tunica.

“There’s no sewage hookup. You go in a barn to take a shower,” said Mitchell, who is from the small community of Cutoff. “We have no time frame on how long we can stay.”

As Mitchell and friends sat outside chatting in the breeze, children rode bikes nearby.

“Cutoff is a community where everybody lives from paycheck to paycheck. It’s also a community where everybody sticks together,” Mitchell said.

Widespread flooding was expected along the Yazoo River, a tributary that is backed up because of the bloated Mississippi. Rolling Fork, home of the bluesman Muddy Waters, was also in danger of getting inundated.

Farmers built homemade levees to protect their corn, cotton, wheat and soybean crops, but many believed the crops would be lost entirely.

More than 1,500 square miles of farmland in Arkansas, which produces about half of the nation’s rice, have been swamped over the past few weeks, and the economic impact will be more than $500 million, according to the state’s Farm Bureau.

Vicksburg National Military Park, where thousands of Civil War soldiers who died in an 1863 battle are buried, was expected to remain dry. The park is the site where Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s troops entrapped a Confederate army under Lt. Gen. John Pemberton, forcing its surrender. The victory effectively split the Confederacy in half.

Vicksburg was forecast to see its highest river level ever, slightly above the 56.2-feet mark set in 1927. Farther south in Natchez, forecasters said the 1937 record could be shattered by 4 feet on Saturday.

The Mississippi crested in Memphis at nearly 48 feet, just short of its all-time record of 48.7.

Some homes had polluted floodwaters near their first-floor ceilings, while others were completely submerged. Snakes and other creatures slithered in the foul water, and officials warned of bacteria. Nearly 500 people in Memphis were in shelters.

President Barack Obama declared Memphis’ Shelby County and surrounding counties disaster areas, making them eligible for federal aid.

The passing of the crest was of little consolation for many.

“It doesn’t matter. We’ve already lost everything,” said Rocio Rodriguez, 24, who has been at a shelter for 12 days with her husband and two young children since their trailer park flooded.

On the downtown Memphis riverfront, people came out to gawk at the river. High-water marks were visible on concrete posts, indicating that the level was dropping slowly.

“It could have been a lot worse. Levees could have broke,” said Memphis resident Janice Harbin, 32. “I’m very fortunate to stand out here and see it — and not be a victim of the flood.”

Downstream in Louisiana, jail inmates filled sandbags for residents to use to protect their property in St. Martin Parish.

“Everybody is just scared. They don’t know what to do,” said Deputy Sheriff Ginny Higgins, who was overseeing a crew of prisoners.

Sharonda Buck, an unemployed 18-year-old mother, lives in a house with 12 relatives in Vicksburg. The water has been creeping into their yard and the power company said electricity will be cut off Wednesday morning. They spent Tuesday walking the railroad tracks through their neighborhood, kids throwing rocks in flooded yards.

“I really don’t know what we’re going to do. We’re trying to find somewhere to stay, that’s all I know,” she said.


Mohr reported from Vicksburg, Miss. Associated Press writers Alan Sayre in New Orleans; Randall Dickerson in Nashville, Tenn., and Adrian Sainz in Memphis, Tenn., contributed to this report. AP video journalist Jason Bronis contributed from Memphis.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/after-cresting-in-memphis-flooded-mississippi-river-takes-aim-at-poverty-stricken-delta/2011/05/11/AFY2XwnG_story.html?hpid=z2

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3957 on: May 11th, 2011, 07:49am »

Wired Danger Room

New Nanosensor Sniffs Bombs, One Molecule at a Time
By Spencer Ackerman
May 10, 2011 | 5:51 pm
Categories: Crime and Homeland Security


User Image
Photo: Los Alamos National Laboratory


Imagine a piece of metal 30,000 times thinner than one of the hairs on your head. Mixed with a little protein from bee venom, that microscopic filament becomes the most powerful explosives-detection system in history, able to detect a single molecule of dangerous chemicals.

Now imagine having that in an airport. No need for taking a pornographic photograph or having your genitals massaged by the Transportation Security Agency. And a nanotechnology specialist may have hastened that happy day for homeland security.

Michael Strano, an associate professor of chemical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, spent the past two years testing out the boundaries of nanotech in explosives detection. For less than $200,000, he took it practically to the atomic limit. “There’s no further improvement in the sensor part you can get,” Strano tells Danger Room. “It’s the last word in sensors.”

Some of his colleagues aren’t quite so sure. Strano’s system is promising, they say. But they have questions about bringing Strano’s sensor into the field.

The science behind the Strano’s sensor is complex. But here’s the simplest way of breaking it down. Put bee venom on a carbon rod and you’ve got yourself a sensor.

Believe it or not, bees are powerful bomb sleuths. That’s why Darpa wanted to enlist them to find explosives, landmines and “odors of interest” in the early 2000s. As it turns out, inside of every bee sting is a small fragment of a protein called a peptide that has an uncanny property.

“When it wraps around a small wire, that allows it to recognize ‘nitro-aromatics’,” Strano explains, the chemical class of explosives like TNT. That wire is a carbon nanotube, a mere one atom thick.

Put that against a nitro-aromatic treated with the bee peptide, and take a look through a near-infrared microscope. “The light from the carbon nanotube will fluoresce — so red that your eye can’t see it,” Strano says. “What you’d see in the microscope is: The nanotube would flicker off and on.” A single molecule of the explosive material would set off the sensor.

Strano and his team published their work Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The ion-mobility spectrometers currently used to spot bombs in U.S. airports are “poor machines,” says Ray von Wandruszka, chairman of the chemistry department at the University of Idaho, who’s worked on atmospheric explosive detection since 1989. The spectrometers typically detect chemicals in the “low parts per billion” range. Strano’s sensor would be vastly more sensitive.

If it works, that is.

Neither von Wandruszka nor his colleague at the university, Patrick Jerzy Hrdlicka, have read Strano’s paper. But Hrdlicka is intrigued.

“Single-molecule detection is clearly interesting and something people are striving for these days,” Hrdlicka says. “Surely that’s going to be a very interesting result, provided their sensor technology is reproducible, easy to commercialize, easy to use, and so on.”

Indeed, if so, there’s a market for it that extends far beyond the airports. The threat from homemade bombs to troops at war has prompted billions in spending over the last decade.

But the state of the art technology is still a dog’s nose, according to the Pentagon’s anti-bomb squad — which is why the Navy SEALs took a canine companion along when raiding Osama bin Laden’s house.

Explosives-detection tech modeled on a dog’s nose is also the claim to fame of the director of the Pentagon’s blue-sky research agency, Regina Dugan. (It’s also what her family firm, RedXDefense has controversial contracts with Darpa to study.)

Nanoscience isn’t even the most baroque method of explosives detection around. A biologist at Colorado State University is breeding plants that change color in the presence of bomb materials.

There are limits, though. Von Wandruszka thinks a sensor that sniffs down to a single molecule would be subject to false positives. And while the sensor doesn’t have a “clear distance after which it can’t be used,” Strano says, it’s meant more for “looking for contaminated surfaces” — not remote detection.

At the same time, while Strano’s sensor isn’t designed for detecting explosive compounds at a distance, there’s a simple engineering solution: Make the device mobile.

It’s an engineering and finance problem to get the sensor mobile, Strano figures, a matter of shrinking down an infrared microscope that can see the sensor’s flickering signal. Because his work has been funded by the Army’s Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies at MIT, he might be able to find some deep-pocket sponsors who’d be interested in taking it mobile.

“If you walked through the airport after a shower, you’d be dripping wet,” he explains. “Anyone you touch or brushed up against would get a little bit wet. That can help me follow everyone you’ve touched. But if I get closer to where you are, I’ll find a lot of wetness.” Beats having your junk touched.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/05/new-nano-sensor-sniffs-bombs-one-molecule-at-a-time/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3958 on: May 11th, 2011, 08:01am »

Guardian

Police buy software to map suspects' digital movements

Geotime software, bought by the Met, collates data from social networking sites, satnavs, mobiles and financial transactions

by Ryan Gallagher and Rajeev Syal
guardian.co.uk
Wednesday 11 May 2011 12.00 BST


Britain's largest police force is using software that can map nearly every move suspects and their associates make in the digital world, prompting an outcry from civil liberties groups.

The Metropolitan police has bought Geotime, a security programme used by the US military, which shows an individual's movements and communications with other people on a three-dimensional graphic. It can be used to collate information gathered from social networking sites, satellite navigation equipment, mobile phones, financial transactions and IP network logs.

Police have confirmed its purchase and declined to rule out its use in investigating public order disturbances.

Campaigners and lawyers have expressed concern at how the software could be used to monitor innocent parties such as protesters in breach of data protection legislation.

Alex Hanff, the campaigns manager at Privacy International, called on the police to explain who will decide how this software will be used in future.

"Once millions and millions of pieces of microdata are aggregated, you end up with this very high-resolution picture of somebody, and this is effectively what they are doing here.

"We shouldn't be tracked and traced and have pictures built by our own government and police for the benefit of commercial gain," he said.

Sarah McSherry, a partner at Christian Khan Solicitors, which represents several protesters in cases against the Metropolitan police, said: "We have already seen the utilisation of a number of tactics which infringe the right to peaceful protest, privacy and freedom of expression, assembly and movement. All of these have a chilling effect on participation in peaceful protest. This latest tool could also be used in a wholly invasive way and could fly in the face of the role of the police to facilitate rather than impede the activities of democratic protesters."

Hugh Tomlinson QC, a specialist in privacy, said a public body such as the police must be able to justify the lawfulness of how it uses the information it collects and retains.

"Storing data because it's potentially interesting or potentially useful is not good enough. There has got to be some specific justification," he said.

According to Geotime's website, the programme displays data from a variety of sources, allowing the user to navigate the data with a timeline and animated display. The website claims it can also throw up previously unseen connections between individuals.

"Links between entities can represent communications, relationships, transactions, message logs, etc and are visualised over time to reveal temporal patterns and behaviours," it reads.

The software was displayed in Britain earlier this month at the defence industry Counter Terror exhibition in Olympia, west London. Curtis Garton, product management director for Oculus, the company that markets the programme, said the Metropolitan police was the only UK police force to have purchased the software. "[There are] a few countries that we don't sell to, but in terms of commercial sales pretty much anybody can buy," he said.

The issue of data retention and how it is used has become a major political and judicial issue. The European justice commissioner, Viviane Reding, said in March that data protection rules also applied to data retention. "Individuals must be informed about which data is collected and for what purposes," she said. "To be effective, data protection rights need to actually be enforced."

The Guardian disclosed last week that an 86-year-old man had been granted permission to take legal action against police chiefs who kept a detailed record of his political activities on a clandestine database.

John Catt, who has no criminal record, is bringing the high court action against a secretive police unit that systematically logged his presence at more than 55 peace and human rights protests over a four-year period.

Some academics have praised the software as a positive move for the police in their fight against terrorist groups and organised crime.

Professor Anthony Glees, director of the University of Buckingham's Centre for Security and Intelligence Studies, said he was aware of tracking software such as Geotime, the use of which he described as "absolutely right".

"There are these dangerous people out there and we need to stay ahead of the game in order to deal with the threat that they pose," he said. "My feeling is: if it can be done, and if its purpose is the protection of the ordinary citizen that wants to go about their lawful business ... then it's absolutely fine."

A spokesman for the Met confirmed that Geotime had been paid for, and said several possible uses for it were being assessed, including as a tool in "telephone investigations".

He declined to clarify what a telephone investigation might be or how much the software cost. Neither could he comment on whether the software might be used during investigations into public order offences in the future.

"We are in the process of evaluating the Geotime software to explore how it could possibly be used to assist us in understanding patterns in data relating to both space and time. A decision has yet to be made as to whether we will adopt the technology [permanently]. We have used dummy data to look at how the software works and have explored how we could use it to examine police vehicle movements, crime patterns and telephone investigations," he wrote in an email.

Alongside the Met, the Ministry of Defence is also examining Geotime. A spokesman said: "The MoD is assessing Geotime as part of its research programme but it is not currently being used on operations."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/may/11/police-software-maps-digital-movements

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12182
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #3959 on: May 11th, 2011, 08:08am »

Geeky Gadgets

By Julian Horsey
Wednesday 11th May 2011 1:16 pm
in Design, Gadgets, Geeky

Extraordinary watch makers MB&F who are well know for their very unique style of watch designs have this week launched a new addition to their range the HM3 Frog Zr Watch pictured below. But if you like the look of this very distinctive watch design you had better hurry and place your order as only 18 pieces are being made in total and will be available for a retail price of $92,000.


User Image


The MB&F watches movement is a three-dimensional horological engine designed by Jean-Marc Wiederrecht/Agenhor, Powered by a Girard-Perregaux base, with a balance oscillating at 28,800 bph. Its fitted with a Purple 22K rose gold battle-axe shaped ‘mystery’ automatic winding rotor and the hour and minutes information is transmitted via ceramic ball bearings to rotating domes.


User Image


http://www.geeky-gadgets.com/hm3-frog-zr-watch-created-by-mbf-11-05-2011/#more-80985

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 262 263 264 265 266  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 19,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls