Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Oct 23rd, 2017, 10:23am


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 273 274 275 276 277  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 153450 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4110 on: May 28th, 2011, 08:12am »

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Heist: How a Burglary May Impact the Future Of 'Superman' (Analysis)

Did Warner Bros.' arch-nemesis make a legal error? And why superagent Ari Emanuel has been deposed in the billion-dollar battle for the Man of Steel

4:47 PM 5/27/2011
by Eriq Gardner

The billion-dollar battle over who controls the future of the Superman franchise is now in its second decade. But one story that hasn't been fully told is the heist of documents from Marc Toberoff, the legal adversary and arch nemesis of Warner Bros., who has been fighting the studio over rights to the Man of Steel for years.

The story might make a good John Grisham novel. After sensitive documents were taken from Toberoff a couple years ago and sent anonymously to Warner Bros., the heist became the subject of a probe by federal prosecutors, leading to a rather extraordinary decision Wednesday by a United States magistrate judge.

First, some background.

Toberoff represents the estates of Superman co-creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, who for the past decade have been attempting to terminate copyright grants over their early work, which includes some of Superman’s defining characteristics, such as his costume, Clark Kent and his origin story. They've been very successful. For example, In March, a federal judge handed the Siegel estate partial summary judgment affirming Siegel's termination. The dispute may now be headed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Once that happens, if things go well for the Siegels and Shusters, they might be able to effectively control the Superman franchise (or at least a significant part of it) as early as 2013. Warner Bros. would arguably no longer be able to make new Superman movies, which would be unfortunate considering the studio is spending hundreds of millions of dollars on a Superman "reboot" from director Zack Snyder and producer Christopher Nolan.

Last year, Warner Bros. sued Toberoff for tortiously interfering with its rights, claiming he engineered an improper arrangement between the Siegels and Shusters not to make any deal with the studio.

At the time the lawsuit was announced, Toberoff put out a statement that hinted at some shenanigans: "Warner oddly attached to their complaint an anonymous, inadmissible letter spewing unsubstantiated and unattributed accusations against Mr. Toberoff," he wrote in the third person. "The anonymous letter was supposedly included with a large pile of privileged documents that were brazenly stolen from Mr. Toberoff's law offices and mysteriously arrived at Warner Bros.' doorstep in the midst of this billion-dollar litigation."

All of that is true. We've confirmed it.

A declaration Toberoff later gave identified a perpetrator. The theft of those documents came from "a disgruntled attorney" employed by his own firm. That lawyer (whose name we've decided to withhold) allegedly called all of Toberoff's clients in an attempt to win their business with reduced fees. It didn't work, so the alleged culprit gave Warner Bros. some ammunition to destroy Toberoff.

After the documents were taken, what did Toberoff do?

He called law enforcement, which launched a criminal investigation.

Federal prosecutors, buttressed by grand jury subpoena powers, then asked Toberoff to identify the precise nature of the documents stolen from him. Toberoff talked. (Legal scholars can debate the wisdom of such a move. More on that in a bit.)

And after the documents were delivered, what did Warner Bros. do?

The studio returned the cache of documents, although a judge let it keep the aforementioned letter, which included a key timeline of Toberoff's dealings over the years. Did anybody at the studio peak at the documents? Were copies made? That's hard to know for sure. But Warner Bros. knows some of Toberoff's secrets, which likely influenced the decision last year to sue Toberoff for tortious interference.

One of those documents is a letter dated May 13, 2003, from Michael Siegel, son of Jerry, to his half-sister, Laura Siegel Larson, who now is in charge of the estate after her mother's death. According to sources, Michael Siegel was never close with his father, but as a member of the family was due a certain share of the proceeds from the outcome in the Superman case. Toberoff is said to have tried to bring Michael Siegel on board, but instead was rebuffed.

Instead, Michael warned Laura about getting involved with Toberoff.

In his letter to his half-sister, he describes Toberoff as a "mysterious billionaire" who was teaming with super-agent Ari Emanuel at WME on a secret agenda to control Superman for themselves. The letter contains some details about Toberoff's dealings and many disparaging characterizations of Toberoff. Interestingly, the letter's language seemed to become the basis for the cover document that Toberoff's ex-associate sent Warner Bros. with those heisted documents.

Ever since Warner filed the lawsuit against Toberoff last year, the studio and its ligitator Daniel Petrocelli have been trying to obtain all of the previously-stolen documents. The studio also tried to attain documents containing a "consent agreement" between the Siegel and Shuster estates not to independently do business with Warners, plus a formula for how the two estates will share proceeds on Superman were they to successfully terminate Warners' rights to the lucrative franchise.

Warners' first attempt to attain those documents through legitimate channels failed.

United States Magistrate Judge Ralph Zaresky ruled that the documents were protected by attorney-client privilege. But then, Warners got its hands on Michael's letter -- legitimately, this time -- which it waived around to the judge as a smoking gun that Toberoff was up to bad stuff. Plus, there was that little matter of what Toberoff had told federal prosecutors.

On Wednesday, Judge Zarefsky ruled that Warners should have access to those previously stolen documents.

He based the decision on the fact that Toberoff had already disclosed the nature of those documents to law enforcement authorities who were investigating the theft. In other words, Toberoff became victimized twice by the burglary of those documents. Judge Zarefsky found that Toberoff "could have responded to the subpoena by standing on [attorney-client] privilege," but didn't.

In making the ruling, Zarefsky noted that the Ninth Circuit has never addressed the issue of whether stolen documents in a criminal investigation could be used in a civil matter.

Contacted for comment, Toberoff says he's considering appealing the decision to federal judge Otis Wright, who oversees the case.

Assuming Warners gets the go-ahead, it believes it will now have documents that purportedly show what it has suspected all along -- that Toberoff persuaded the Siegels and Shusters to act in concert and deprive the studio of Superman rights.

This doesn't necessarily mean that Toberoff did anything wrong. It's more than possible that a judge will see Toberoff's work as garden-variety client solicitation rather than a shady business arrangement, and it's also reasonable that a judge will see the Siegels and Shusters teaming together as nothing more than some form of collective bargaining unit.

We'll see.

In the meantime, though, Warners gets access to evidence to help support its arguments against Toberoff. Plus, the studio continues to make life difficult for him.

But the studio isn't getting everything it wants. For example, Petrocelli wanted to explore the full nature of the relationship between Toberoff and Emanuel (and indeed has deposed Emanuel in this case, we've learned). But the judge is only making Toberoff produce documents pertaining to Superman, Superboy, the Siegels and the Shusters.

As they say in the comics business, to be continued...

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/hollywood-heist-how-a-burglary-192768

Crystal

edit to add:

Ari Emanuel is the brother of Rahm Emanuel, Mayor of Chicago and former Obama enforcer
« Last Edit: May 28th, 2011, 08:26am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
philliman
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




Homepage PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 1298
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4111 on: May 28th, 2011, 1:22pm »

on May 26th, 2011, 7:29pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:

Just classic! Love it! grin

on May 26th, 2011, 7:29pm, WingsofCrystal wrote:
Popeater.com

Report: Jeff Conaway to Be Taken Off Life Support
By PopEater Staff
Posted May 26th 2011 03:50PM

Jeff Conaway will be taken off life support machines after doctors told the 'Grease' actor's family that he has had no brain activity since being admitted to a hospital May 11.

They already did it. R.I.P. sad

on May 27th, 2011, 11:43am, WingsofCrystal wrote:
AAAAAAAGHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!! UFO!!!!!!!!
Thanks Swamp. Great photo.
Crystal

Indeed. I wonder how long it will take until it emerges on Michael Cohen's website. grin rolleyes
User IP Logged

Stellar Thoughts
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4112 on: May 28th, 2011, 1:55pm »

Hello Phil!

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4113 on: May 28th, 2011, 1:58pm »



User Image


Intersecting the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, International Space Station solar array wings are featured in this image
photographed by an STS-134 crew member while space shuttle Endeavour remains docked with the station.

Photo credit: NASA S134-E-007756 (20 May 2011) --- high res (1.4 M) low res (72 K)

http://www.onorbit.com/node/3427

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4114 on: May 29th, 2011, 08:02am »

LA Times

Executive pay is zooming skyward again after pausing a few years for the recession

But corporate watchdogs are hopeful that the most egregious pay practices can be reined in as new 'say-on-pay' votes and other investor-friendly rules take effect.

Kathy M. Kristof
Personal Finance
May 29, 2011

The $6.4 million that Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. paid Chief Executive Craig Martin last year normally wouldn't have raised many eyebrows.

Sure, the amount was a lot more than most of us could ever hope to make for a mere 12 months' work. But it also was well below the average CEO compensation at California's 100 biggest public companies — and less than one-tenth the remuneration of the executives at the top of that ladder.

Still, Martin's pay gained uncomfortable attention when a majority of the Pasadena company's shareholders voted not to approve it at the firm's annual meeting in January — marking the first "no" vote in the country in newly required "say-on-pay" ballots.

Since then, shareholders of more than 20 other companies nationwide have rejected their top managers' pay packages, and more such rebuffs are expected in the months ahead.

Although the "no" votes account for a small fraction of the hundreds of say-on-pay ballots held so far — and they aren't binding — investor advocates say this new exercise in corporate democracy, mandated by last summer's financial reform legislation, is already having an effect.

Opponents of fat executive paychecks say they're getting more attention from boards of directors. Some firms took small steps to change their ways before their shareholders voted. Along with other investor-friendly rules in the regulatory pipeline, the referendums are giving corporate watchdogs some hope that the most egregious pay practices can be reined in.

"I think boards have actually gotten the message," said Patrick McGurn, executive director of Institutional Shareholder Services in Rockville, Md., which advises big investors on say-on-pay ballots and other issues.

For now, however, executive pay once again is zooming skyward after pausing for a couple of years for the recession.

At California's 100 biggest public companies as measured by revenue, the total pay bestowed on CEOs surged 23% last year to an average of $10.4 million, according to data compiled for The Times by compensation research firm Equilar Inc. The sharp increase was consistent with the national trend in executive pay, surveys show.

The jump followed declines the previous two years in response to the deepest economic downturn in decades. But many of the pay packages in those lean years had an unusually large proportion of equity, or company shares and stock options. As the stock market has recovered — the Standard & Poor's 500 index has almost doubled since March 2009 — the equity awards have shot up in value. And those increases aren't counted as part of total pay.

The Golden State's highest-paid CEO was Ray Irani of Occidental Petroleum Corp., who earned $76 million in 2010, more than double his 2009 pay. But even Irani, whose pay has been a longtime target of critics, is an example of progress.

A year ago, under pressure from angry shareholders, Occidental held an early say-on-pay vote, which management lost. That triggered a series of conversations with Oxy's biggest investors, after which the Westwood company said Irani would give up the CEO post, which he did this month (though he remains executive chairman). Oxy also promised significant executive pay cuts to be phased in over three years. Shareholders overwhelmingly approved the revamped compensation program this month.

No. 2 on the state's CEO pay chart was Larry Ellison of Oracle Corp., whose fiscal 2010 compensation totaled $70.1 million, which was down 17% from the year before. The biggest chunk of that treasure: stock options valued at $61.9 million. For years Oracle has been widely criticized for giving Ellison generous option grants. That sentiment could make for an interesting say-on-pay vote at the software giant's annual meeting in the fall. By then the Redwood City firm will have reported Ellison's pay for fiscal 2011, which ends Tuesday.

There also could be fireworks at McKesson Corp.'s annual meeting this summer. John Hammergren, the pharmaceutical distributor's chief executive and chairman, was the third-highest-paid CEO in California, collecting $54.6 million for the year that ended March 31, 2010. (The San Francisco company hasn't yet reported its fiscal 2011 compensation.) The main complaint heard about Hammergren's pay focuses on its biggest component: a $21-million contribution by McKesson to his supplemental retirement plan — a form of pay that's completely divorced from measures of company performance.

"These pensions are one of the elements of 'stealth compensation' that grew in an environment when these things didn't have to be disclosed," McGurn said, predicting that such massive supplemental pensions would draw increasing attention from shareholder activists.

The battle against extreme pay could gain more momentum next year, when another provision of the Dodd-Frank financial regulatory overhaul is scheduled to kick in. That rule, still being written by regulators, would require every public company to disclose the disparity between how much the firm pays its CEO and how much the average worker makes.

Those numbers, which won't look pretty by any stretch of the imagination, could shame companies into pulling back on executive pay, said Brandon Rees, deputy director of the AFL-CIO's office of investment.

Business groups are lobbying Congress to block the rule, though that isn't considered likely.

"When you look at how hard companies are fighting" the disclosure requirement, Rees said, "it tells me that this might be enough to burst the CEO pay bubble."

Shareholders could get additional leverage on compensation under a rule adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission that would make it easier for big investors to put up their own candidates in board elections. The rule, however, is on hold pending a court challenge.

But some warn that any downward pressure on pay as a result of these changes may be limited largely to the companies now granting truly eye-popping packages. In other words, don't expect a typical CEO's compensation to drop into the mere six figures.

One possible reason is that many shareholders, especially institutional investors, aren't averse to high pay per se. But they get ticked off when compensation is inflated so much that it's divorced from the company's financial performance, said Paul Hodgson, senior research associate at GovernanceMetrics International, a research firm in New York.

That's because a disconnect between results and rewards, he said, can be a sign of a weak corporate board that provides ineffective oversight of management for shareholders.

"Most of our clients are convinced that pay is the window to the board's soul," Hodgson said. "It gives a good picture as to how the board functions and whether it's independent."

Concern that compensation was out of sync with performance was an issue in the failed say-on-pay vote at Jacobs Engineering. The CEO's pay jumped 38% from the year before although the firm's profit slumped 28% and its revenue tumbled 14%. The company didn't return phone calls seeking comment.

Generally, however, more companies are responding to concerns about inappropriate levels of pay.

"Compensation committees are more focused than ever on this link between pay and performance," said attorney Claudia Allen, head of the corporate governance practice at Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg in Chicago.

Still, the generous level of executive pay in general may be hard to change. In setting compensation, it's not unusual for company directors to survey how much CEOs make at other firms in the same industry. Because directors tend to view their CEO as an above-average leader, they often opt for above-average pay. That self-reinforcing process is what has shot executive pay into the stratosphere.

"The problem is that pay levels are just so high, and it's very hard to ratchet them back," said Amy Borrus, deputy director of the Council of Institutional Investors. "Progress is being made, but the battle is not over."


http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-executive-pay-20110529,0,915351,full.column

Crystal
« Last Edit: May 29th, 2011, 08:04am by WingsofCrystal » User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4115 on: May 29th, 2011, 08:09am »

Washington Post

Back from Europe, Obama turns to the rubble and heartache of tornado-ravaged Missouri

By Associated Press
Updated: Sunday, May 29, 3:32 AM


WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is pivoting from diplomacy on the world stage to the intimate and delicate domestic task of acting as healer-in-chief to a devastated community.

The president travels to tornado-wrecked Joplin, Mo., on Sunday, a day after returning from a six-day European tour of Ireland, England, France and Poland.

After days of focusing on the U.S. relationship with the rest of the world, he’ll turn to an even more critical connection: his own, with the American people.

The president will visit with survivors and family members of the worst tornado in decades, a monster storm that tore through Joplin a week ago leaving more than 120 dead and hundreds more injured. A hundred more are unaccounted for, and the damage is massive.

The president will tour destroyed neighborhoods in the city of 50,000 in southwestern Missouri, and speak at a memorial service being held by local clergy and Gov. Jay Nixon for those who lost their lives. He’ll offer federal assistance, and his own condolences.

It’s a role Obama has had to assume with increasing frequency of late, after the mass shooting in Arizona in January in which Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was injured, when tornadoes struck Tuscaloosa, Ala., last month and more recently when flooding from the Mississippi inundated parts of Memphis, Tenn.

Such moments can help define a president, but habitually even-tempered Obama is more apt to offer handshakes and hugs than tears and deep emotion.

Though times of trouble can erase politics and unite people, a phenomenon Obama has commented on, his task as healer Sunday will be carried out on unfriendly political ground as his re-election campaign approaches. Obama narrowly lost Missouri to Republican John McCain in 2008, but in Jasper County, where Joplin is located, McCain won by a large margin: 66 percent to 33 percent.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/obama-heads-to-missouri-to-view-aftermath-of-tornadoes-meet-with-victims-of-deadly-storms/2011/05/29/AGIzw0DH_story.html?hpid=z2

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4116 on: May 29th, 2011, 08:17am »

Wired

Lego Fan Creates 250,000-Brick ‘Garrison of Moriah’
By Alice Vincent
May 28, 2011 | 9:00 am
Categories: Art, Design and Fashion


User Image
Gerry Burrows stands with his massive Lego creation, the Garrison of Moriah.
Photo courtesy Gerry Burrows



Usually, the only constraint on building a Lego creation is your imagination. Unless, that is, you build a giant structure that demands its own “Lego room.”

One Lego fan has done just that: Say hello to the “Garrison of Moriah,” and the 540-square-foot room it inhabits. Inspired by the fantastic buildings featured in the likes of Star Wars and The Lord of the Rings, Garrison creator Gerry Burrows has built a detailed (and huge) sculpture to the scale of the tiny Lego people who have the honor of inhabiting it.

Burrows has wanted to build big ever since his Lego fandom began as a child. However, it was the freedom of maturity that allowed him to realize his construction dreams. He tells Wired.co.uk: “I entered what Lego fans call ‘The Dark Ages’ — where I didn’t do anything with Lego — but when I graduated college and bought my first house, I unpacked a box of my old Lego bricks. I started thinking how I now have the money and space to actually build the things I wanted to build — without a little sister to rampage through my Lego creations.”

A combination of discovering BrickLink (“the holy grail of Lego buying”), adapting a basement for building purposes (“I told our realtor that I needed a ‘Lego room.’ He thought I was joking at first.”) and a week off work resulted in the first Lego bricks being laid on what was to become the Garrison of Moriah.

Making preparations for building, however, was just the first step. Amazingly, Burrows’ building strategy took little planning, he tells Wired.co.uk: “Nothing ever touched paper or computer. But as I would start to build and focus on individual structures, I would spend time thinking of the specific structures’ design. As I built I would get inspiration on cool directions to take.”

Burrows never suffered any disasters during construction. That’s not to say, however, there weren’t a few precautions taken in building such a megastructure: “I learned to not jump or even flinch when stepping on a Lego piece in my bare feet,” he says.

Currently, the Garrison of Moriah stands at 28 feet long, wrapping around one-third of the room. It has a depth ranging between 24 inches and 59 inches and runs from 6.5 feet to 12 feet tall — and that’s after shortening two structures to fit in the Lego room. Burrows estimates he’s used between 200,000 and 250,000 Lego bricks.

However, the Garrison is set to expand further: “It’s still growing. The bridge isn’t complete, nor is the other end of the bridge. And I’m building a fleet of custom ships,” Burrows says.

We’re holding our breaths. Until then, check out the awesome Garrison of Moriah up close, in the Wired UK gallery: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2011-05/25/giant-lego-construction/viewgallery

http://www.wired.com/underwire/2011/05/lego-garrison-of-moriah/

Crystal

User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4117 on: May 29th, 2011, 08:19am »

Reuters

Lockheed says thwarted "tenacious" cyber attack

By Jim Wolf
WASHINGTON
Sun May 29, 2011 1:49am EDT

(Reuters) - Lockheed Martin Corp., the U.S. government's top information technology provider, said on Saturday it had thwarted "a significant and tenacious attack" on its information systems network a week ago but was still working to restore employee access.

No customer, program or employee personal data was compromised thanks to "almost immediate" protective action taken after the attack was detected May 21, Jennifer Whitlow, a company spokeswoman, said in an emailed statement.

She said the company, the world's biggest aerospace company and the Pentagon's No. 1 supplier by sales, was working around the clock to restore employee access to the targeted network while maintaining the highest security level.

The U.S. Defense Department said in statement late Saturday night that it was working with Lockheed to determine the scope of the attack.

The incident's impact on the department is "minimal and we don't expect any adverse effect," Air Force Lieutenant Colonel April Cunningham said by email.

She declined to specify the nature of the impact, saying that as a matter of policy, the department does not not comment on operational matters.

The Department of Homeland Security, or DHS, said that it and the Defense Department had offered to help curb the risk from the incident.

Lockheed is the maker of the F-16, F-22 and F-35 fighter jets as well as warships and other multibillion-dollar arms systems sold worldwide.

There was no word on where the attack may have originated. Military contractors' systems contain technical specifications on weapons under development as well as those currently in use.

The U.S. government has offered to help Lockheed analyze "available data in order to provide recommendations to mitigate further risk," Chris Ortman, a DHS official, said in an e-mailed reply to a query from Reuters.

A person with direct knowledge told Reuters on Friday that unknown attackers had broken into sensitive networks of Lockheed and several other U.S. military contractors.

Boeing Co and Northrop Grumman, the Pentagon's No. 2 and No. 3 suppliers respectively, declined to discuss matters involving corporate security.

CYBER ESPIONAGE

U.S. officials may investigate a cyber breach at a company's request. DHS, the lead agency for securing federal civilian networks, can deploy a team to analyze infected systems, develop mitigation strategies, advise on efforts to restore service and make recommendations for improving overall network security.

Several top cybersecurity experts with extensive government dealings said they were in the dark about the origin of the attack.

"I think it tells us that DHS doesn't know much about what's going on either," said Anup Ghosh, a former senior scientist at the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency who worked on securing military networks.

Ghosh, who now runs Invincea, a software security company, said there had been a string of intrusions against defense contractors, security companies and U.S. government labs, including the U.S. Energy Department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, since the start of this year.

These attacks typically were carried out through so-called "spear-phish" inducements to click on a certain link to web sites or through emailed attachments carrying malicious code.

Once so compromised, a computer can surreptitiously download other code that can log a victim's key strokes, giving an attacker a path to potentially wide network access.

"Defense industrials is where our military technology secrets are," Ghosh said in an email interview. "What's happening here is nothing short of theft of a nation."

The person with direct knowledge told Reuters on Friday that an intrusion at Lockheed was related to a recent breach of "SecurID" token authentication technology from EMC Corp's EMC.N RSA security division.

Cyber intruders were reported in 2009 to have broken into computers holding data on Lockheed's projected $380 billion-plus F-35 fighter program, the Pentagon's costliest arms purchase.

A series of once-secret U.S. diplomatic cables released by the WikiLeaks website suggests that China has jumped ahead of the United States when it comes to cyber espionage.

More than 100 foreign intelligence organizations are trying to break into U.S. networks, Deputy U.S. Secretary of Defense William Lynn wrote in the journal Foreign Affairs last fall. Some already have the capacity to disrupt U.S. information infrastructure, he wrote.

(Additional reporting by Andrea Shalal-Esa and Jim Finkle; Editing by Paul Simao)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/29/us-usa-defense-hackers-idUSTRE74Q6VY20110529

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4118 on: May 29th, 2011, 08:23am »

Screen Rant

SR Pick: Famous Corporate Logos Get Star Wars-Themed

May 28, 2011
by Mike Eisenberg

The latest addition to the plethora of ‘Star Wars’ fan art includes a handful of cool alterations to famous corporate logos – using Jedi and Dark Side themes.


User Image


gallery after the jump
http://screenrant.com/star-wars-corporate-logos-fan-art-mikee-117550/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4154
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4119 on: May 29th, 2011, 10:05am »

Anyone want to send good ol' Seth Shostak a check??


The Record Searchlight

redding.com

SETI scours Earth for cash; donations sought to restart deep space search


• By Dylan Darling
• Posted May 27, 2011 at 10:27 p.m.

The search for intelligent life among the cosmos has turned into a quest for cash on Earth.

Since mid-April, the Allen Telescope Array, a collection of radio dishes about 75 miles east of Redding, has been in hibernation after the state and federal government steeply cut funding. To bring the array back online, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Institute is trying to find $2.5 million a year in support, said Tom Pierson, CEO for the nonprofit organization in Mountain View.

"We are basically trying to tap our donor base," he said.

So far SETI has about $100,000 for the array, but it's about to launch a new fundraising program called SETI Stars in the next two weeks to a month, Pierson said. While he was tight with details, Pierson said the new program will feature social networking designed by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs.

He said the idea is to have donors have a sense of personal participation and feedback.

SETI already has "tens of thousands" of supporters and more than 110,000 followers on Twitter, Pierson said.
While the $50 million array is named after Paul Allen, co-founder of Microsoft Corp. and one of the richest men in the world, Pierson said he didn't expect the billionaire to donate any more to the cause.

Allen — who said during a 2007 visit to the north state that he's had a curiosity about space since he was a teenager — gave $30 million to help build the array. When the array went into hibernation, a spokesman for the Paul G. Allen Foundation said there were no immediate plans to provide more money for the project.

"At the moment we need to look elsewhere for ongoing support," Pierson said.

Read more: http://www.redding.com/news/2011/may/27/seti-scours-earth-for-cash/
tongue
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4120 on: May 30th, 2011, 07:31am »

on May 29th, 2011, 10:05am, Swamprat wrote:
Anyone want to send good ol' Seth Shostak a check??


The Record Searchlight

redding.com

SETI scours Earth for cash; donations sought to restart deep space search


• By Dylan Darling
• Posted May 27, 2011 at 10:27 p.m.

The search for intelligent life among the cosmos has turned into a quest for cash on Earth.

Since mid-April, the Allen Telescope Array, a collection of radio dishes about 75 miles east of Redding, has been in hibernation after the state and federal government steeply cut funding. To bring the array back online, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Institute is trying to find $2.5 million a year in support, said Tom Pierson, CEO for the nonprofit organization in Mountain View.

"We are basically trying to tap our donor base," he said.

So far SETI has about $100,000 for the array, but it's about to launch a new fundraising program called SETI Stars in the next two weeks to a month, Pierson said. While he was tight with details, Pierson said the new program will feature social networking designed by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs.

He said the idea is to have donors have a sense of personal participation and feedback.

SETI already has "tens of thousands" of supporters and more than 110,000 followers on Twitter, Pierson said.
While the $50 million array is named after Paul Allen, co-founder of Microsoft Corp. and one of the richest men in the world, Pierson said he didn't expect the billionaire to donate any more to the cause.

Allen — who said during a 2007 visit to the north state that he's had a curiosity about space since he was a teenager — gave $30 million to help build the array. When the array went into hibernation, a spokesman for the Paul G. Allen Foundation said there were no immediate plans to provide more money for the project.

"At the moment we need to look elsewhere for ongoing support," Pierson said.

Read more: http://www.redding.com/news/2011/may/27/seti-scours-earth-for-cash/
tongue


Good morning Swamprat,
I hope you are having a good weekend.
Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4121 on: May 30th, 2011, 07:37am »



User Image


Thank you


User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4122 on: May 30th, 2011, 07:40am »

Washington Post

Haqqani insurgent group proves resilient foe in Afghan war

By Joshua Partlow, Published: May 29

KHOST, Afghanistan — The United States knows where to find the most feared insurgent family in the Afghanistan war.

Troops can point to the downtown Khost mansion owned by its patriarch, Jalaluddin Haqqani; the million-dollar blue-tile mosque he built for the city’s residents; and his base of operations 20 miles away in Pakistan. They are aware of his trucking and warehouse businesses, his sons who command about 3,000 fighters, and their sophisticated training camps that conduct courses in withstanding interrogation and firing rockets across borders.

Defeating the Haqqanis is another matter.

“Haqqani is the most resilient enemy network out there,” said Col. Christopher Toner, commander of the U.S. military brigade in this eastern Afghan province.

Outnumbered by the Taliban and less famous than al-Qaeda, the Haqqani network nevertheless poses an intractable problem for U.S. troops, particularly as the focus of the war shifts toward the Pakistani border.

After an intensive focus on fighting Mohammad Omar’s Taliban in southern Afghanistan in 2010, the Obama administration is in talks, mediated by Germany and Qatar, with an Omar deputy. But a political deal with the Taliban — still a distant prospect — would not necessarily end the war in the east: the Haqqani network is seen as the least reconcilable of the Afghanistan war’s motley crew of insurgent factions.

The Haqqani family, protected from all threats save for the occasional U.S. drone strike in its Pakistani sanctuary of North Waziristan, has carved out a lucrative niche by exploiting the porous border with smuggling rings and bribery.

The Haqqanis rely on their Pash­tun tribal connections and their patrons in Pakistan’s intelligence service, according to U.S. military officials.

The Haqqanis hew to the relatively narrow goal of ruling a three-province swath of eastern Afghanistan that was once their exclusive domain but is now shared with thousands of American troops.

“They want power, wealth, money and a seat at the table when this thing is over,” Toner said.

The Haqqani fighters cooperate with the Taliban but are “not fully subordinate” to Omar and sometimes extract tolls from Taliban fighters who transit their territory, said a U.S. military intelligence official, who, like others, spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter for the record.

Resourceful network

Haqqani’s fighters slip into Afghanistan along mountain passes and historic trade routes, including several illegal border crossings used by hundreds of cargo trucks each day. The men generally fight in Afghanistan for many weeks before returning to Pakistan for a break of several months, U.S. officials say.

When in Afghanistan, the fighters move from village to village, never spending more than one night in the same house. They rarely use cellphones or radios, because the communications can be picked up by U.S. surveillance technology, and know to exploit the “red zone” — the one-kilometer-wide buffer zone near the border that U.S. troops do not enter without clearance from their commanders.

Even as U.S. troops work to deplete the ranks of Haqqani fighters — about 150 of them are killed or captured every month in Khost — the group regenerates. The Haqqanis dip into a seemingly endless supply of Afghan refugees and young men and boys schooled at conservative Islamic madrassas in Pakistan’s tribal areas. U.S. soldiers recently arrested a 15-year-old who they suspect is an insurgent cell leader.

To avoid detection, Haqqani fighters sometimes take elaborate precautions. U.S. troops noted how several people will convene at an Afghan safe house, each with a different bomb component — batteries, wire, clothespins and homemade explosives.

The fighters report to leaders in Pakistan and often do not know their comrades. Even if one is arrested, “he can’t give you the other six dudes,” said Capt. Daniel Leard, the company commander in the border district of Terezayi. “Even if you take out one arm, you can’t take out the whole network.”

‘The shadow government’

The titular head of the organization, Jalaluddin Haqqani, has been a militia leader for three decades, and he received money and weapons from the United States during the war against the Soviets. Then-U.S. Rep. Charlie Wilson (D-Tex.), who championed the rebel cause, famously described Haqqani as “goodness personified.” Haqqani exacted a heavy toll on Soviet troops by besieging his home town of Khost. His status as a war hero gave him a credibility among Afghans that lasts to this day.

Now in failing health, Haqqani plays more of a symbolic role in the organization, which has been run for the past few years by his son Sirajuddin and, to a lesser extent, a second son, Badruddin. Sirajuddin is known for his business savvy, earning money from trucking, extortion and racketeering. The fighters conduct kidnappings, collect illegal taxes and shake down Afghan shopkeepers for protection fees.

“They’re trying to position themselves as the shadow government that will take over as the official government if they can win the war,” said Lt. Col. Jesse Pearson, a battalion commander in Khost. “That’s what their motivation is. I do not see them as ideologically based.”

Haqqani fighters receive extensive training in Pakistan, U.S. troops said. They have “live fire training that is every bit as realistic and funded and supported as anything we do in the States,” Leard said.

Two U.S. soldiers were killed last month on Forward Operating Base Salerno in Khost in separate rocket attacks; at least one is suspected to have been staged from Pakistan.

The level of expertise in the Haqqani network has helped the group strike targets far from its base, including in the Afghan capital, Kabul. A suicide bombing this month inside an Afghan military hospital, as well as several other assaults on hotels, embassies and shopping malls, have been attributed to Haqqani fighters.

Last month, Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, openly accused Pakistan’s main intelligence agency of supporting the Haqqani network. To Afghan officials, there has long been little doubt of ties between the group and Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence agency. “They are an element of the ISI. The whole world knows that,” said Lt. Col. Atiqullah Torzan, an Afghan border police commander in Khost. “They get 100 percent support.”

Pakistan denies the allegation. Pakistani officials have long pledged a military operation in North Waziristan to target the insurgents hiding there but have not delivered.

Weak links along border

To combat the Haqqani network, the United States has sent more troops to eastern Afghanistan: A 5,000-man brigade operates in Khost and in part of neighboring Paktia province. The Haqqanis are also a leading target of U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan.

The military pressure has taken its toll not only in the number of killed and captured insurgents, but also in less tangible ways. U.S. military officials said the greater presence of troops at border checkpoints has slowed illegal truck traffic and diverted it to other parts of the border, increasing the costs of bringing weapons into battle. Insurgents have complained in intercepted communications of wanting to attack but not having the money, bombs or people to do it. Pearson, the battalion commander, says he thinks Haqqani’s men are in “full defense mode” and are “hiding and trying to stay alive.”

“Frankly, we’re bringing terror to the terrorists,” he said.

But the Afghan security forces along the border remain a weak link in the fight. In Terezayi district, along the Pakistan border, there are just seven policemen on any given shift to patrol an area with a population of more than 100,000.

The border police have more men on the payroll, about 300, but only a third are present for duty at any one time. Those who serve are notoriously susceptible to bribes, which helps the Haqqani fighters slip through. The price the policemen charge, about $4 per vehicle, rises to about $40 for more important insurgent cargo, U.S. military officials said.

“We’re talking illegal imports of up to 200 trucks a day, semitrailers,” Leard said. “That’s enough to feed the insurgency in all of Khost.”


http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia-pacific/haqqani-insurgent-group-proves-resilient-foe-in-afghan-war/2011/05/27/AG0wfKEH_story.html?hpid=z2

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4123 on: May 30th, 2011, 07:44am »

LA Times

Yemeni forces storm protest camp, killing 20

A medical volunteer says troops fired indiscriminately into a crowd. Elsewhere, troops move into a city reportedly seized by an Al Qaeda affiliate.

By Iona Craig
Special to The Times
4:07 AM PDT, May 30, 2011
Reporting from Sana, Yemen

Yemeni security forces stormed a protest camp in a southern city early Monday morning, shooting indiscriminately, setting fire to the camp and killing at least 20 people, a medical volunteer said.

The city of Taiz has seen large anti-government protests calling for President Ali Abdullah Saleh's ouster since early February.

Sadek Shugaa, a volunteer medic at the field hospital at the protest camp in Taiz, said he watched as snipers took up positions around the camp while other Yemeni forces used water cannons to clear the area early Monday.

The violence came a day after the beleaguered government claimed that Zinjibar, the capital of Abyan province in the south, had been overrun by the country's Al Qaeda affiliate, while the political opposition and dissident generals blamed the president for losing control of the city.

Government reinforcements were sent there overnight, and a local resident reported heavy fighting and explosions throughout Monday morning as troops took on the militants.

Government officials said four soldiers were killed in an ambush as they approached the city, but there was no other word on casualties.

Clashes were also reported Sunday night in Arhab, north of Sana. Artillery explosions could be heard as tribesmen fought Republican Guard troops into the early hours of Monday morning.

Craig is a special correspondent.

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fgw-yemen-shooting-20110530,0,365778.story

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 12093
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4124 on: May 30th, 2011, 07:48am »

Telegraph

Al Capone gun could sell for £70k at auction

A revolver belonging to Al Capone, the Chicago mobster, could fetch as as much as £70,000 when it is auctioned next month, experts say.


User Image
The Colt .38 owned by notorious American gangster Al Capone
Photo: PA



7:00AM BST 30 May 2011

The Colt .38 was made in May 1929, just months after the gangster ordered the murder of seven of his rivals in the St Valentine's Day Massacre.

It is being sold by a private collector and comes with a letter signed by Capone's sister-in-law confirming its authenticity.

The New York-born mobster, who was known as Scarface, dominated the Chicago underworld during prohibition until his 1931 arrest for tax evasion. He died in 1947.

Also included in the June 22 sale is a gun belonging to American outlaw Thomas Coleman ''Cole'' Younger who was a member of the James gang with brothers Frank and Jesse James.

It is expected to sell for as much as £85,000.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturenews/8545418/Al-Capone-gun-could-sell-for-70k-at-auction.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 273 274 275 276 277  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 19,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls