Board Logo
« Stuff & Nonsense »

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
May 22nd, 2017, 2:23pm


Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

*Totally FREE 24/7 Access *Your Nickname and Avatar *Private Messages

*Join today and be a part of one of the largest UFO sites on the Net.


« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 ... 278 279 280 281 282  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Stuff & Nonsense  (Read 43051 times)
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4185 on: Jun 6th, 2011, 07:58am »

An $8,000 Segway Will Revolutionize Your Golf Game

I hope so! grin

Good morning Swamprat,

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4186 on: Jun 6th, 2011, 08:00am »

New York Times

June 6, 2011
5 American Soldiers Are Killed in Iraq
By JACK HEALY

BAGHDAD – Five American soldiers were killed in an attack in central Iraq on Monday, marking one of the deadliest days for the American military since the combat mission ended nine months ago.

United States officials provided no additional details on the attacks, but an Iraqi security official said the soldiers were killed after multiple rockets struck an American base in southeast Baghdad. American military officials would not confirm those events.

Militants have continued to attack American bases and convoys with mortars, rockets and improvised roadside bombs in the waning months of the United States military’s time here, although American casualties have dropped sharply in the last few years. Two American troops died last month, and 11 died in April, according to a tally kept by icasualties.org.

All of the 46,000 American forces still in Iraq are scheduled to withdraw by the end of the year, but Iraqi leaders are debating whether to ask some troops to stay behind to help train Iraqi soldiers and help Iraq secure its borders and airspace.

The attacks against the Americans were part of a bloody day across Iraq.

Elsewhere, gunmen and suicide bombers struck at Iraqi security forces and militias in three heavily Sunni Muslim areas, killing at least 21 people in attacks that challenged the government’s attempts to demonstrate gains in security.

In the worst of the attacks, a suicide bomber detonated a car filled with explosives at the main gates of the governmental headquarters in Tikrit, the hometown of Saddam Hussein. Security officials said 12 people were killed, nine of them Iraqi soldiers.

It was the second major attack in Tikrit in just three days. On Friday, a suicide bomber detonated an explosive device in the center of a mosque filled with worshippers, and hours later, a second suicide bomber attacked the hospital treating the wounded. Nineteen people were killed, including several local officials.

The head of national security in the province, Brig. Gen. Jasim al-Jabara, resigned after Monday’s attack, saying that security in his section of central Iraq had deteriorated sharply. He blamed other security agencies for failing to act on intelligence.

“We are giving some good information to the security forces in the province, but they are doing nothing,” General Jabara said.

In western Iraq, several miles west of Fallujah, militants aiming to kill a local police chief set off four improvised bombs at his home, killing his father, mother, sister and one of his children. The police chief survived.

Duraid Adnan contributed reporting from Baghdad. Iraqi employees of the New York Times contributed reporting from Anbar and Salahuddin provinces.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/07/world/middleeast/07iraq.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4187 on: Jun 6th, 2011, 08:04am »

Telegraph

Titanic II sinks on maiden voyage

When Mark Wilkinson took ownership of a cabin cruiser called Titanic II, perhaps he should have realised the omens were not good.

9:48AM BST 06 Jun 2011

When he took his new 16ft boat out for its maiden voyage, it lived up to its namesake, and sank.

Mr Wilkinson was left floundering as the vessel sprang a leak and began taking on water before disappearing beneath the waves.


User Image
Mark Wilkinson with his Titanic II sinking at West Bay in Dorset
Photo: BNPS



Holidaymakers looked on while Mr Wilkinson, from Birmingham, was pulled out of the sea by the local harbour master.

Titanic II was was later towed out of West Bay harbour in Dorset.

Mr Wilkinson, aged in his 40s, said afterwards: "If it wasn't for the harbour master I would have gone down with the Titanic.

"It's all a bit embarrassing and I got pretty fed up with people asking me if I had hit an iceberg."

He had recently taken ownership of the second hand boat and towed it from his home to the south coast for its first outing.

He enjoyed a successful fishing trip in Lyme Bay but as the boat entered the harbour a large hole opened up in the fibre-glass hull.

He tried to pump the water out but was forced to abandoned ship when the boat sunk stern first.

Margaret O'Callaghan, 63, was one of dozens of tourists on the quayside who witnessed the sinking.

She said: "The guy was in a small cruiser on his own. Someone said to me, 'that boat is sinking.'

"There was a big guy desperately holding on to the wheel and the back of the boat was going down.

"I shouted at him to jump as the back of the boat went right down and the bow was sticking out of the water.

"He clung on to the nose and the tide took the boat in. Someone threw a rope and tied it up to the side.

"The harbourmaster came out in a RIB and managed to secure it and get it on to the slipway.

"The funny thing about it was that the name of the boat was Titanic II.

"The guy seemed fine. He got out and was standing on the side dripping wet."

One eye-witness said: "It wasn't a very big boat - I think an ice-cube could have sunk it!"

Harbour master James Radcliffe said: "The owner had put his bilge pumps on when he started taking on water but there was just too of it.

"The stern of the boat was fully submerged in the water but there was an air pocket in the cabin which kept the front end afloat.

"The guy hadn't had the boat for very long. It was an old repair job. The hole in the hull was about six inches square."

It is thought the boat is worth about £1,000.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/8559138/Titanic-II-sinks-on-maiden-voyage.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4188 on: Jun 6th, 2011, 08:12am »

Geeky Gadgets

By Roland Hutchinson on Monday 6th June 2011 2:07 pm in Tablets, Technology News

Pixel QI has shown off a new solar panel that is designed to be used in tablets, and the new panel is capable of powering a specially designed tablet that uses just 1w of power.

According to Pixel QI the solar panel can be designed into virtually any shape, for example it could be used around the actual tablet display, so you wouldn’t actually notice that the solar panel is there.


[youtube]http://youtu.be/EbL3-1vB73c[/youtube]


ggggggggrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!!!!!! For some reason I can't get the youtube link to work this morning.
Video after the jump

http://www.geeky-gadgets.com/pixel-qi-demos-solar-panel-that-could-power-future-tablets-video-06-06-2011/#more-83155

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4189 on: Jun 6th, 2011, 08:15am »

Wired Danger Room

The Secret History of Boeing’s Killer Drone
By David Axe
June 6, 2011 | 7:00 am
Categories: Drones

When the pilotless, wing-shaped warplane lifted off a runway at California’s Edwards Air Force Base for the first time on the morning of April 27, it was like the resurrection of the dead. The Boeing Phantom Ray — one of the most advanced drones ever built — came close to never flying at all.

In late 2007, according to company insiders, U.S. military officials ordered Boeing to destroy an earlier version of the Phantom Ray, the X-45C. Exactly why the feds wanted the robotic aircraft dismantled has never been fully explained.

Boeing had just lost out to rival aerospace firm Northrop Grumman in a contest to develop an so-called “Unmanned Combat Air System” for the Navy, capable of taking off from and landing on aircraft carriers. That contest, known by its acronym N-UCAS — “N” for “Navy” — was actually the third time in five years Boeing had gone toe-to-toe with Northrop over a government contract to build killer drones, and the second time it had lost.

With each round of competition, Boeing had made enemies.

Even so, the kill order came as a shock to the Chicago-based company. Rare if not unprecedented in the world of military contracting, the command represented the climax of a nearly decade-long drama pitting a rotating field of corporations and government agencies against each other and, bizarrely, even against themselves — all in an effort to develop a controversial, but potentially revolutionary, pilotless jet fighter.

The UCAS development story has all the trappings of a paperback techno-thriller: secret technology, a brilliant military scientist, scheming businessmen, and the unseen-but-decisive hand of the military’s top brass.

And the story’s not over. The X-45C barely survived the government’s alleged assassination attempt. And after three years of clandestine development, a modified version of the flying-wing ‘bot leaped into the air that day in late April, an event depicted in the video above. The Boeing drone’s first flight opened a new chapter in the ongoing struggle to build a combat-ready, jet-powered robot warplane — and to convince the military to give the new unmanned aircraft a place on the front lines of aerial warfare.

What follows is the Phantom Ray’s secret history, reconstructed from news reports, interviews with government and corporate officials, leaked documents, and a treasure trove of information from Boeing insiders who spoke to Danger Room on condition of anonymity. Officials at Northrop largely declined to answer in-depth questions about their unmanned aircraft’s development.

This isn’t a complete retelling of the competition to build the combat drone. By virtue of its subject and sources, this portrays largely Boeing’s point of view over those of its rivals and customers. And Boeing played just one role, however prominent, in the continuing drama.

With traditional, manned fighters growing more expensive, and consequently rarer, by the day, unmanned warplanes are rising to take their place. Boeing isn’t alone in testing pilotless jet fighters. Northrop Grumman, Lockheed, General Atomics, European firm EADS, British BAE Systems and Swedish plane-maker Saab are also working on killer drones. Each company’s UCAS surely has its own secret history.

The future of aerial warfare is more robotic than ever. Boeing’s decade-long struggle to launch the Phantom Ray, and the drone’s ultimate takeoff, is one reason why.

Video and more after the jump
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/06/killer-drone-secret-history/all/1

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4190 on: Jun 6th, 2011, 08:18am »

LA Times

Libya rebels want U.S. recognition to help pay bills

The rebel ambassador seeks diplomatic recognition for the Transitional National Council to bolster its standing and
possibly allow it to use frozen Libyan assets. Until then, the council is broke.

By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
June 6, 2011
Reporting from Washington

As fellow rebels back in Libya plot fresh attacks against embattled leader Moammar Kadafi, the chief of the Libyan insurgency's American outpost sits in a tiny, borrowed Washington office and faces a more immediate question: Who will pay the bills?

Ali Aujali, the soft-spoken representative from the rebels' ruling body, the Transitional National Council, has spent three months in a forlorn effort to persuade the Obama administration to extend diplomatic recognition to his group, a move that would bolster its international standing and could provide access to $34 billion in frozen Libyan assets.

But the White House has shut the door on formal recognition, imperiling the interim council's ability to pay for its rebellion as well as Aujali's capacity to keep the lights on in his lonely mission.

The military stalemate in Libya has turned Aujali, who served as Kadafi's envoy in Washington before switching sides in February, into a Rodney Dangerfield of diplomats. He waters his front lawn, worries about storm damage to his roof, and takes walks with his grandchildren when he's not escorting visiting rebels to inconclusive meetings at the White House and on Capitol Hill.

His hopes have been raised time and again, only to be dashed. When he asks American officials why the Obama administration won't recognize the opposition council even though the U.S. insists Kadafi step down and is supporting the NATO alliance that is bombing Kadafi's military, diplomacy kicks in.

"I am only told, 'It is a legal issue,' and no more," sighs Aujali, a compact man in his early 60s with a shaved head and a close-cropped goatee. "We are desperate."

Administration officials, for their part, say the council isn't the only Libyan opposition group, and it may not control enough territory or population to qualify as sovereign. The officials also worry that the makeshift council may not be able to observe treaties and international obligations, as would be required if it was Libya's official government.

It's an odd life. Aujali was given the honor of a front-row seat when President Obama hailed the "Arab Spring" uprisings in a major speech at the State Department last month. Aujali briefly cheered up when Obama said Libya's opposition had "organized a legitimate and credible" interim council, but the president left it at that.

The Obama administration has granted the council permission to open a Washington office, a gesture aimed at enhancing its stature. But Aujali and his six aides are jammed two to a room in a suite of small offices that he says a friend, whom he declined to identify, has provided for free.

"I have no budget," he explains.

U.S. authorities have allowed Aujali and his family to remain in Libya's ambassadorial residence, a refurbished 1890s mansion in a leafy Washington neighborhood. The residence is still technically owned by the regime he is trying to overthrow, although Kadafi's government has not tried to evict him. The U.S. is holding the property in custodianship for the post-Kadafi government.

The grand entrance hall displays the kind of photographs often seen in senior diplomats' homes. They show Aujali and his wife smiling with the Obamas, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and former President George W. Bush.

Kadafi's official portrait has been whisked away, as have been copies of the infamous Green Book, Kadafi's rambling political manifesto, which once held an honored place on a nearby table. To make it clear that he has split with the autocratic ruler whom he served for more than 40 years, Aujali jokes that he should just scrawl graffiti on the wall: "Kadafi was here."

Aujali joined the Libyan diplomatic service shortly before Kadafi seized power in a 1969 coup. Now his face appears like a mug shot, along with those of other former diplomats and officials who defected, in angry television broadcasts in Tripoli in which Kadafi reviles the "traitors" who he says have sold out his revolution.

Aujali knows that Kadafi has used terrorist plots and assassinations to eliminate opponents in the past. "I believe that if I am meant to live to 90, it will be," he says with a shrug.

Aujali grew up near Ajdabiya in what is now rebel-controlled eastern Libya. He has a degree in business administration from the University of Benghazi, the city that is the rebels' de facto capital, and served in Malaysia, Brazil, Argentina, Canada and other diplomatic posts before he arrived in Washington as Libyan ambassador in 2004.

He first met Kadafi at a reception in Tripoli in 2008, when then-Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice flew to Libya to mark the resumption of U.S. diplomatic relations after Kadafi surrendered his nascent nuclear weapons program. As Aujali recalls the meeting, Kadafi appeared surprised to meet his envoy to Washington and said, "I thought you were an American."

Aujali says he held out hope after relations were normalized that Kadafi would allow political reforms. But he was soon disillusioned, and when Kadafi's forces opened fire on peaceful protesters in February, Aujali was one of the first senior officials to switch sides.

On Feb. 25, the usually quiet diplomat defiantly lowered Kadafi's flag in a public ceremony at his residence, and instead raised the national flag from the pre-Kadafi era. For the next few days, Washington hosted two rival embassies — Aujali's, and the regime's official mission in the Watergate complex.

The State Department received a cable signed by Musa Kusa, then Kadafi's foreign minister and one of his closest aides, urging the Obama administration to ignore Aujali. U.S. officials ignored the cable instead, and Kusa defected a month later to Britain. By then, the Libyan Embassy in the Watergate had shut down and 10 diplomats still loyal to Kadafi had left the United States.

But the rebel advances in Libya soon stalled, and more than two months of North Atlantic Treaty Organization airstrikes to protect civilians have not broken the logjam. France and Italy have recognized the rebel council, but the U.S. and British governments have not.

Aujali was heartened when the White House agreed to receive him and Mahmoud Jibril, deputy leader of the council, last month. After a friendly meeting with Thomas Donilon, Obama's national security advisor, the White House put out a statement praising the group as a "legitimate and credible interlocutor."

Aujali stumbles pronouncing the word "interlocutor," apparently unsure of its meaning, as well as the White House's motive in using it. "They didn't say, 'The council is the sole legitimate representative of Libya,'" he points out.

He says the council is struggling to pay for weapons, ammunition, food, medical care and salaries. In an oil-rich land, the rebels are also running out of fuel. Efforts to secure U.S. loans backed by the frozen Libyan assets have gone nowhere. Another worry is the 1,700 Libyan students in the U.S. Many are stranded without money and are looking to him for help.

Jeffrey Feltman, the State Department's top official for the Middle East, told reporters in Benghazi last month that the Obama administration intends to withhold recognition until Kadafi leaves office and Libya has a permanent government.

With Libya's internal politics murky and legal complexities to worry about, "the administration wants to keep their options open," says Brian Katulis, an analyst at the Center for American Progress, a Washington think tank with ties to the administration.

Aujali also was buoyed two weeks ago when Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.), chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, announced plans to draft legislation to make available to the rebels the cash portion of the $34 billion in frozen assets held by U.S. institutions.

But it turned out only $180 million is in cash, much less than Aujali had hoped for and far too little, he says, to run a government. It's unclear whether Congress will free up even that sum, however.

That leaves Aujali pondering how to pay his bills. "From the U.S.," he says, "people expect something more."

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-libya-ambassador-20110606,0,3201045.story

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4191 on: Jun 6th, 2011, 1:54pm »

Guardian

One in four US hackers 'is an FBI informer'

The FBI and US secret service have used the threat of prison to create an army of informers among online criminals.

Ed Pilkington in New York, guardian.co.uk
Monday 6 June 2011 16.12 BST


The underground world of computer hackers has been so thoroughly infiltrated in the US by the FBI and secret service that it is now riddled with paranoia and mistrust, with an estimated one in four hackers secretly informing on their peers, a Guardian investigation has established.

Cyber policing units have had such success in forcing online criminals to co-operate with their investigations through the threat of long prison sentences that they have managed to create an army of informants deep inside the hacking community.

In some cases, popular illegal forums used by cyber criminals as marketplaces for stolen identities and credit card numbers have been run by hacker turncoats acting as FBI moles. In others, undercover FBI agents posing as "carders" – hackers specialising in ID theft – have themselves taken over the management of crime forums, using the intelligence gathered to put dozens of people behind bars.

So ubiquitous has the FBI informant network become that Eric Corley, who publishes the hacker quarterly, 2600, has estimated that 25% of hackers in the US may have been recruited by the federal authorities to be their eyes and ears. "Owing to the harsh penalties involved and the relative inexperience with the law that many hackers have, they are rather susceptible to intimidation," Corley told the Guardian.

"It makes for very tense relationships," said John Young, who runs Cryptome, a website depository for secret documents along the lines of WikiLeaks. "There are dozens and dozens of hackers who have been shopped by people they thought they trusted."

The best-known example of the phenomenon is Adrian Lamo, a convicted hacker who turned informant on Bradley Manning, who is suspected of passing secret documents to WikiLeaks. Manning had entered into a prolonged instant messaging conversation with Lamo, whom he trusted and asked for advice. Lamo repaid that trust by promptly handing over the 23-year-old intelligence specialist to the military authorities. Manning has now been in custody for more than a year.

For acting as he did, Lamo has earned himself the sobriquet of Judas and the "world's most hated hacker", though he has insisted that he acted out of concern for those he believed could be harmed or even killed by the WikiLeaks publication of thousands of US diplomatic cables.

"Obviously it's been much worse for him but it's certainly been no picnic for me," Lamo has said. "He followed his conscience, and I followed mine."

The latest challenge for the FBI in terms of domestic US breaches are the anarchistic co-operatives of "hacktivists" that have launched several high-profile cyber-attacks in recent months designed to make a statement. In the most recent case a group calling itself Lulz Security launched an audacious raid on the FBI's own linked organisation InfraGard. The raid, which was a blatant two fingers up at the agency, was said to have been a response to news that the Pentagon was poised to declare foreign cyber-attacks an act of war.

Lulz Security shares qualities with the hacktivist group Anonymous that has launched attacks against companies including Visa and MasterCard as a protest against their decision to block donations to WikiLeaks. While Lulz Security is so recent a phenomenon that the FBI has yet to get a handle on it, Anonymous is already under pressure from the agency. There were raids on 40 addresses in the US and five in the UK in January, and a grand jury has been hearing evidence against the group in California at the start of a possible federal prosecution.

Kevin Poulsen, senior editor at Wired magazine, believes the collective is classically vulnerable to infiltration and disruption. "We have already begun to see Anonymous members attack each other and out each other's IP addresses. That's the first step towards being susceptible to the FBI."

Barrett Brown, who has acted as a spokesman for the otherwise secretive Anonymous, says it is fully aware of the FBI's interest. "The FBI are always there. They are always watching, always in the chatrooms. You don't know who is an informant and who isn't, and to that extent you are vulnerable."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/jun/06/us-hackers-fbi-informer

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Swamprat
Gold Member
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 3720
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4192 on: Jun 6th, 2011, 3:45pm »

Australian Files “Lost”

The Sydney Morning Herald

Alien abduction? Defence's X-Files are lost in space


Linton Besser
June 7, 2011

COULD there be any better fodder for Australia's conspiracy theorists? The Department of Defence has ''lost'' its X-Files.

For decades, Defence officials dutifully investigated an unknown number of UFO sightings being reported all over the country. Intelligence officers attached to the Royal Australian Air Force checked the known movement of aircraft against reported sightings, and politely responded by mail to everyone who claimed they saw floating lights or flat saucers or streaking vapour trails. Some of the files were marked as classified.

Last year, the British government released a large part of its dossier on unidentified flying objects after significant pressure from freedom- of-information applicants. More than 4000 pages of Defence Ministry documents, detailing 800 reported encounters during the 1980s and 1990s were posted online.

The Herald sought access to the Australian version. But the response was more surprising than what the files might have contained - the material has largely gone missing.

The department spent two months searching its offices for files that would be captured by the Herald's FOI application, which sought a ''schedule of records held by the Department of Defence … which relate to unidentified flying objects''.

But in late May, the department's FOI assistant director, Natalie Carpenter, delivered a reply that seemed almost designed to set online chat rooms alight with conspiracy chatter.

The only file Defence was able to locate was titled ''Report on UFOs/Strange Occurrences and Phenomena in Woomera''; the others had been destroyed.

''We also discovered one [other] file, which had not been destroyed but could not be located,'' Ms Carpenter wrote.

''In an effort to retrieve this file our office conducted searches of the Defence Record Management System, National Archives Australia [Canberra], National Archives Australia [Chester Hill], Defence Archives Queanbeyan and Headquarters Air Command, RAAF Base Glenbrook.

''Despite searching these locations, the files could not be located and Headquarters Air Command formally advised that this file is deemed lost.''

What is left is sketchy at best - a handful of ancient press clippings and scattered pieces of formal government correspondence. The papers show that about six years ago, the Australian UFO Research Association was able to locate some files, now missing. The organisation's summary of the material is one of the few complete items left in the remaining dossier.

It shows there were a series of sightings from around the country and overseas, including people living in towns near Woomera, a weapons range.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/alien-abduction-defences-xfiles-are-lost-in-space-20110606-1fpea.html#ixzz1OWwOvtKb
User IP Logged

"Let's see what's over there."
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4193 on: Jun 6th, 2011, 5:22pm »

"Australian Files “Lost”

The Sydney Morning Herald

Alien abduction? Defence's X-Files are lost in space

Linton Besser
June 7, 2011

COULD there be any better fodder for Australia's conspiracy theorists? The Department of Defence has ''lost'' its X-Files."



Come on! The dog ate my homework. rolleyes

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4194 on: Jun 6th, 2011, 5:24pm »

.





Uploaded by DNRGaming: http://www.youtube.com/user/DNRGaming
on Jun 6, 2011

One of the new Star Wars The Old Republic Trailer from Bioware and EA
All rights reserved to Electronic Arts.

Category:
Gaming

~

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4195 on: Jun 7th, 2011, 06:57am »

New York Times

June 6, 2011
Elusive Explanations for an E. Coli Outbreak
By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL

The hit-and-miss struggle of German health authorities to identify the contaminated food behind one of the deadliest E. coli outbreaks in recent years underscores the difficulties of following a pathogen through the complex food supply chain, as well as deficiencies in even the most modern health systems in diagnosing this deadly illness.

After mistakenly suggesting that Spanish cucumbers were the likely culprit several days ago, German authorities focused Sunday on bean sprouts from a German farm, only to report on Monday that the first 23 of 40 samples from that farm had tested negative for E. coli. The results from the remaining samples had yet to come back. That does not entirely eliminate the farm as the outbreak’s origin, since even one positive test is sufficient to make the connection.

But determining the origins of an outbreak that has killed 22 and left 600 people in intensive care presents a difficult mystery to unravel, with vital clues disappearing day by day as contaminated food is thrown away and farm and factory equipment is cleaned. Patients — whose illnesses first alerted health authorities to the outbreak — may have only cloudy memories of the meal that landed them in the hospital. Did the sandwich last month in Hamburg contain sprouts, tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers — or all four?

After E. coli infection, diarrhea can take a week or more to emerge and it takes another week before the most serious complications, like kidney failure and anemia, occur.

That means that as German investigators interview patients and visit farms to hunt for traces of the germ, the smoking gun may be long gone. Finding the offending food “is sometimes going to be easy and sometimes going to be difficult and I think this is one of those,” said Dr. Robert Tauxe, deputy director of the division that handles food-borne diseases for the United States Centers for Disease Control.

“What did you eat four weeks ago?” Dr. Tauxe said. “You’re dealing with memory here — so it’s hard to pull apart.”

He said that even if hundreds of patient stories pointed investigators to a particular food — say, bean sprouts — it might be impossible to prove conclusively that they are to blame. To do so, scientists must visit the restaurant, farm or food processing plant and find the germ in water, or on food or other material.

“Even if all the samples are negative, maybe you just missed it,” Dr. Tauxe said. “You can go to a place reeking of chlorine, and find nothing.”

Indeed the largest serious outbreak of E. coli, which sickened more than 8,000 people in Japan in 1996 has been widely attributed to eating contaminated radish sprouts, but scientists were never able to prove contamination in the laboratory.

To identify suspected sources, scientists painstakingly question victims about what they have eaten, searching for statistically significant patterns.

Some scientists complain that health systems in the United States and Europe are not using all available tools to better diagnose toxic E. coli; earlier detection would allow for more effective treatment and limit the scope of outbreaks, they say. Routine tests for patients with bloody diarrhea look for other germs — shigella, salmonella and campylobacter — but not E. coli. Such tests are readily available but more expensive.

“This suffered from a lack of primary diagnosis, and that’s crucial because no one is looking for it,” said Dr. Flemming Scheutz, the Copenhagen-based head of a World Health Organization collaborating center that specializes in E. coli. “The first alert didn’t go out until people were hospitalized.”

Likewise, Dr. Scheutz expressed concern that the decentralized German health system had made doctors initially unaware of the scope of the outbreak, familiar only with the cases in their region. A nationwide reporting system collects such information in the United States.

Dr. Lothar H. Wieler, a professor of veterinary medicine at the Free University of Berlin, said he was reluctant to criticize health officials. But he said German vets had a faster warning system for infectious disease than doctors who treated humans did. Germany has strict laws on sharing patient data.

“It would certainly be good to have a reporting system where officials get data very fast,” he said. “That is technically possible but must be implemented.”

But over all, said Frederic Vincent, a European Commission spokesman for health and consumer policy, German officials had acted logically in confronting “one of the worst E. coli outbreaks ever.”

Mr. Vincent defended their decision to publicly blame Spanish cucumbers, even though it proved unfounded and has decimated Spain’s farm economy. He said that 80 percent of the ill Germans had recalled eating the vegetable, that many of Europe’s cucumbers were grown in Spain and that initial tests had revealed the presence of E. coli on Spanish cucumbers — though it later proved to be a different strain.

E. coli strains range from benign to highly toxic. Accordingly, infections range from mild disease to a potentially deadly illness. The toxin-producing strains can result in severe bloody diarrhea and, in some cases, a syndrome characterized by kidney failure and anemia.

There were about 3,500 confirmed cases involving those strains in the European Union last year, Mr. Vincent said, and nearly 1,000 in Germany in 2008, according to the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control. But many if not most cases probably go undetected. A few countries, like Ireland and Denmark, test aggressively for the disease, so their numbers appear high, Dr. Scheutz said.

The outbreak in Germany was caused by a relatively rare strain of E. coli, O104, which possesses 2 potentially deadly qualities encoded into its genes: it produces the so-called shiga toxin and it also sticks to intestinal walls.

Dr. Alfredo Caprioli, who runs the European Union reference laboratory for E. coli in Rome, said the strain had previously been identified as the culprit in a few cases, including two in Germany in 2001; in those no food source was ever implicated.

Because the strain is rare, scientists remain uncertain of just how much toxin it produces or even where it hides in nature, which make tracing and combating outbreaks more difficult. The high number of severe illnesses in the current outbreak could be because the strain is extraordinarily virulent, because the food that caused the outbreak was highly contaminated or because a huge number of people were exposed to it, Dr. Tauxe of the American disease centers said.

But the outbreak does have some classic features. Women have been infected far more frequently than men have, which is common when the contaminated food involves raw vegetables, rather than meat — the other common source of E. coli. “In the past, when we see the majority of patients are women, we think salad,” said Dr. Scheutz.

Two weeks into the outbreak, German health officials have a lot to sort out. “These can take a very long time — we may never find it,” said Mr. Vincent of the European Commission, noting that a 2006 E. coli outbreak that resulted from contaminated spinach originating in California took over a month to work out.

“But hopefully we can get very lucky,” he said.

Jack Ewing contributed reporting from Frankfurt.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/07/science/earth/07ecoli.html?_r=1&hp

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4196 on: Jun 7th, 2011, 06:59am »

LA Times

Environmental coalition wants to save whales by reducing ships' speed in marine sanctuaries

A 10-knot limit off the West Coast could prevent deaths, advocates tells the U.S. Department of Commerce. Shippers oppose the limits.

By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
June 7, 2011

A coalition of environmental groups is asking the federal government to require ships traveling through California's marine sanctuaries to slow down to avoid fatal collisions with whales, a problem they say has climbed to "unsustainable levels."

Four groups filed a petition Monday asking the U.S. Department of Commerce to establish a 10-knot limit for large commercial vessels traveling through California's four National Marine Sanctuaries in the Channel Islands, Monterey Bay, Gulf of the Farallones and Cordell Bank. Some freighters travel through those waters at more than twice that speed.

Nearly 50 whales have been hit by ships off the California coast in the last decade, according to experts, who believe the number is probably much higher because many accidents go unreported.

Shipping groups say a speed limit would greatly delay cargo reaching port and more than double the time it takes the fastest vessels to travel through the sanctuaries.

The petition from the environmental groups is meant to prod the federal government to take steps to deal with the growing concern. Some of the most heavily used shipping lanes in and out of ports in Los Angeles, Long Beach and San Francisco Bay run through the migratory paths and feeding areas of endangered whales.

In the 61-page document, the Environmental Defense Center, Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of the Earth and Pacific Environment say a speed limit would help protect endangered blue, humpback and fin whales from being run over by big ships.

"The overlap of these shipping lanes with California's national marine sanctuaries puts sanctuary wildlife at great risk," the petition reads. "While we cannot likely change the behavior of whales and other species so as to avoid ship strikes, we can and must regulate vessel practices to minimize this risk."

Slower speeds would give whales more time to detect approaching ships and would lower the chances that injuries would become fatal if they are hit, the groups argue. A speed limit also would cut back on air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions and underwater noise, which can harm whales.

In a statement, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a branch of the Department of Commerce that oversees national marine sanctuaries and endangered marine species, said it is also concerned with ship strikes to whales and would review the petition.

Shipping groups said a speed limit may not make it any safer for whales and has suggested realigning shipping routes as an alternative.

"It's just premature to assume that slowing vessel speed is the solution to the ship-whale interaction issue," said T.L. Garrett, vice president of the Pacific Merchant Shipping Assn., a trade group representing ocean carriers that dock at West Coast ports. Where possible, vessels would probably navigate around the sanctuaries to avoid the restrictions, he said.

Four blue whales were struck and killed by vessels in 2007 near the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, prompting NOAA to designate shipping lanes from Point Conception to Point Dume a "whale advisory zone."

Since then, the agency has conducted aerial surveys of the area and broadcast seasonal advisories to ship captains traveling through the channel, suggesting that they limit their speed to 10 knots — roughly 11.5 mph — to avoid hitting whales when they're in the Santa Barbara Channel in high concentrations, usually from May to December.

Because the advisories are voluntary, environmental groups say, they have gone largely unheeded. Shipping groups said most vessels have not lowered their speeds.

A mandatory speed limit would not be the first. A seasonal 10-knot speed limit is already in place on large ships traveling through key areas off the U.S. East Coast to protect endangered North Atlantic right whales.

Environmentalists cite more recent fatalities, including at least five documented in 2010 alone. A fin whale was wedged on the bow of a cargo ship when it arrived at the Port of Oakland last year and a humpback whale washed ashore last month in San Pedro with apparent injuries from a large ship's propeller.

NOAA officials said they are still studying whether the collisions significantly threaten West Coast populations of endangered species like the blue whale.

"We just don't know yet," said Chris Mobley, superintendent Supt. of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. "Even though they're large animals, it's a big ocean out there."


http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-whale-ships-20110607,0,5700416.story

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4197 on: Jun 7th, 2011, 07:03am »

Der Spiegel


German Intelligence Report
Increase in Left-Wing Extremism Sparks Concern

06/06/2011

Germany's domestic intelligence agency has warned that a militant left-wing movement is on the rise in the country. An arson attack on cables that caused severe disruption to the Berlin rail network last month has thrown a spotlight on left-wing extremism, and official figures reveal a steep rise in violence this year.

"The security situation has markedly worsened," says a confidential report on the radical left-wing scene compiled by regional and national intelligence agencies. The number of left-wing activists deemed prone to violence increased by more than 20 percent from 2005 to 2010, reaching an all-time high of 6,800, the report says.

The number of offenses committed by extremists in the first quarter of 2011 was significantly higher than in same period last year, it adds.

Authorities are pointing to the protests against the G-8 summit in Heiligendamm, Germany in 2007 as the start of an escalation in left-wing violence. The anti-globalization demonstrations, joined by tens of thousands of people, were a "turning point in the development of German left-wing extremism," the report says.

Authorities are worried that the militant left is attracting support from young people who had hitherto been outside the core left-wing scene. It has started to appeal to a violent, thrill-seeking and less ideological youth culture.

But despite the increase in offenses, German intelligence officials do not see a "terrorist dimension" in the trend. This indirectly contradicts an assessment by the German Federal Prosecutor's Office, which has launched a number of investigations into left-wing acts of violence.

Currently, the domestic intelligence agency classifies 767 people as "violent left-wing extremists." Most of them are younger than 26 years old and 84 percent of them are men.

In recent months the authorities have sharply increased their surveillance of the far-left scene, for example by recruiting informants. The aim is to get an overview of their targets and of the addresses of suspects.

SPIEGEL Staff

http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/0,1518,766865,00.html

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4198 on: Jun 7th, 2011, 07:11am »

Wired Science

Waste Slime Turns Jellyfish Into Ecological Vampires
By Brandon Keim
June 6, 2011 | 5:09 pm
Categories: Animals, Biology


User Image
Image: Sea nettles at the Monterey Bay Aquarium


That waste is useful is one of the animal kingdom’s cardinal principles. One creature’s discards are another’s dinner, and so continues the circle of life. But jellyfish, it would seem, bend the rule.

Their waste is generally inedible, food mostly for a few odd species of bacteria that live just long enough to emit a whiff of CO2, then sink. All that nutrition and energy vanishes with barely a trace.

During a jellyfish bloom, food webs may thus be plucked and rearranged, configured to feed jellies that in turn feed almost nothing. Whether this represents the future of Earth’s oceans depends on whom you ask, but it’s an interesting phenomenon in itself.

“Jellyfish are consuming more or less everything that’s present in the food web,” said Robert Condon, a Virginia Institute of Marine Science and co-author of a jellyfish-impact study published June 7 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “They’re eating a lot of the food web, and turning it into gelatinous biomass. They’re essentially stealing a lot of the energy, then putting it away.”

Condon and his co-authors are part of a research community whose attention has been recently transfixed by jellyfish, which evolved more than 500 million years ago and once dominated Earth’s oceans, but until the late 20th century were of largely esoteric scientific interest.

In the 1990s, however, jellyfish populations exploded in the Bering Sea, rising by a factor of 40 in less than a decade. Fishermen nicknamed one region the “Slime Bank.”

By the time those blooms subsided, fishermen in the Sea of Japan were accustomed to 500-million-strong swarms of refrigerator-sized, ship-sinking Nomura jellyfish, their numbers unprecedented in recent memory. In the Mediterranean, once-seasonal jellies became a year-round fact of life, again wreaking fisheries havoc.

The blooms became a matter of popular and scientific fascination. Some researchers talked of a “rise of slime,” interpreting the blooms as portents of a “gelatinous future” in which overfished, overpolluted and rapidly overheating marine ecosystems are overrun by algae and jellies.

Such grim assessments may prove correct, though Condon thinks it’s too soon to know. Long-term datasets are few (see sidebar), and these seemingly apocalyptic blooms may represent a mix of local disturbance and natural cycling, not a global tipping point into ooze. But whatever the case may be, studying jellyfish is a sensible thing to do.

“They’re a big unknown,” said Condon, and one of the biggest unknowns is this: At an ecological level, exactly what happens during a jellyfish bloom, anyway?

In what may be the most comprehensive jellyfish study to date, Condon’s group spent nearly four years gathering data from Chesapeake Bay on Mnemiopsis leidyi and Chrysaora quinquecirrha, two species that have caused trouble elsewhere and are considered representative of jellyfish habits worldwide.

The researchers counted them at sea, measured the nutrients in surrounding water, and calculated the composition of nearby bacterial communities. In the lab, they observed how bacteria in seawater reacted to jellyfish, and tracked chemicals flowing through their aquariums.

They found that jellyfish, like many other marine species, excrete organic compounds as bodily wastes and as slime that covers their bodies. But whereas the excretions of other species are consumed by bacteria that form important parts of oceanic food webs, jellyfish excretions nourish gammaproteobacteria, a class of microbes that little else in the ocean likes to eat, and that produces little of further biological use.

“Lots of marine creatures make this dissolved organic matter that bacteria use to live. But the point of this paper is that the organic matter produced by jellies doesn’t make it back up the food web,” said study co-author Deborah Steinberg, also a Virginia Institute of Marine Science biologist. “When jellies are around, they’re shunting this energy into a form that’s just not very usable. They’re just shunting energy away from the rest of the food web.”


User Image
Model of the water-column food web before and after jellyfish blooms.
Courtesy PNAS



Under normal conditions, gammaproteobacteria are rare. During jellyfish blooms, they may become ubiquitous. And though many questions remain unanswered — perhaps jellyfish and gammaproteobacteria end up as food in the open ocean, beyond the confines of this study — the implications are stark. Given time and numbers, jellyfish might be able to suck an ecosystem dry, converting its bounty to short-lived bacteria.

Even if it’s too soon to say that all Earth’s oceans are returning to some ancient, jellyfish-dominated state, it’s clear that in some areas people have made it easier for jellies, said Steinberg. Overfishing and pollution leave gaps that jellies have spent half a billion years evolving to exploit.

“We’re a long ways from jellyfish taking over the world, but humans are changing food webs in the ocean by our activities,” Steinberg said. “It’s an experiment, a big experiment, and we don’t know yet what the outcome is going to be. We need to be careful.”

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/06/jellyfish-shunt/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
WingsofCrystal
Global Moderator
ImageImageImageImageImage


member is offline

Avatar




PM

Gender: Female
Posts: 11621
xx Re: Stuff & Nonsense
« Reply #4199 on: Jun 7th, 2011, 07:14am »

Wired Threat Level

LulzSec Claims Another Sony Hack
By David Kravets
June 6, 2011 | 6:09 pm
Categories: Breaches, Hacks and Cracks


User Image


The anonymous group LulzSec, which hacked into Sony last week and posted the stolen e-mail addresses and passwords of about 50,000 consumers, said it hacked the Japanese media giant again Monday.

This time, the group announced it had swiped 54 megabytes of “Sony Developer source code.”

A LulzSec member, meanwhile, was allegedly taken into custody by the FBI, according to a report that could not be independently verified.

LulzSec is the same group that claimed it cracked PBS last month to protest Frontline’s hour-long documentary on WikiLeaks. In that hack, the group stole and posted thousands of stolen passwords.

The group has also claimed responsibility for hacking Sony’s Japanese website and Fox.com, where the group stole and posted 363 employee passwords and the names, phone numbers and e-mail addresses of 73,000 people who had signed up for audition information for the upcoming Fox talent show The X-Factor.

The latest Sony hack adds to a seemingly endless series of intrusions at the company. They began with massive breaches in April that compromised account information on 77 million users of Sony’s PlayStation Network, and another 25 million at Sony Online Entertainment, the company’s game-development arm.

Nobody has claimed credit for those large attacks, but the hacking group Anonymous had recently declared Sony a target to protest the company’s lawsuit against PlayStation 3 tinkerer George Hotz. Sony claimed an Anonymous calling card was found on one of the servers compromised at SOE.

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/

Crystal
User IP Logged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VkrUG3OrPc
Pages: 1 ... 278 279 280 281 282  ...  1070 Notify Send Topic Print
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Become a member of the UFO Casebook Forum today and join our more than 18,000 members.

Visit the UFO Casebook Web Site

Donate $6.99 for 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

| |

This forum powered for FREE by Conforums ©
Sign up for your own Free Message Board today!
Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Conforums Support | Parental Controls